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Lyrics and title of a war song - Alphabet

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A YOU'RE ADORABLE
SAILOR'S ALPHABET
THE LUMBERMAN'S ALPHABET


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rkehoe@marina.istar.ca 17 Mar 97 - 08:28 PM
Gene Graham 22 Mar 97 - 04:53 PM
Jim Dixon 04 Dec 07 - 10:01 PM
Joe Offer 04 Dec 07 - 10:09 PM
Jim Dixon 04 Dec 07 - 10:21 PM
Jim Dixon 04 Dec 07 - 10:48 PM
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Subject: Lyrics and title of a war song
From: rkehoe@marina.istar.ca
Date: 17 Mar 97 - 08:28 PM

The song uses the letters of the alphabet... A is for the alphabet..... B is for the boys ..... And so on, it was a song of war and I believe it is called "The Alphabet Song". Can anyone help, please??? I would like to know all the lyrics and the proper title. Thanks.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics and title of a war song
From: Gene Graham
Date: 22 Mar 97 - 04:53 PM

The following song is in the data base.

SAILOR'S ALPHABET


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Subject: Lyr Add: A SOLDIER'S ALPHABET (US Civil War era)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 04 Dec 07 - 10:01 PM

Copied from http://unionguard.cciu.org/history_pages/abc-johnston.htm
where it says this comes from the 10 September 1892 (Lancaster, Pennsylvania) Daily New Era:
^^
A SOLDIER'S ALPHABET
How the Rising Generation of the Early '60's Learned Their A, B, C's.

    This is the way the babies of the early sixties learned their "A, B, C's" in Lancaster. It is needless to add the rhyme was written shortly after Chickamauga; that its writer was a soldier of the Seventy-ninth, and that his devotion to the glorious Army of the Cumberland was part and parcel of his good will to fellow men and to his country.

    The "Alphabet" was written at Chattanooga, Tenn., in the fall of 1863. The author of the rhyme was J. M. Johnston, late First Lieutenant Company K, Seventy-ninth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers:

A is for Anderson, name ever dear;
B is for Butler, whom traitors all fear;
C is for Crittenden, brave as his sword;
D is for Dix, by true patriots adored;
E is for Ellsworth, the gallant zouave;
F is for Farragut, pride of the wave;
G is for Grant, who brought Vicksburg to grief;
H is for Halleck, commander-in-chief;
I is for Ironsides, queen of the sea;
J is for Johnson, right gallant is he;
K is for Kearney, so noted for dash;
L is for Logan, whom naught can abash;
M is for McClellan, so modest and great;
N is for Nelson, untimely his fate;
O is for Ord, battling rebel works down;
P is for Porter, of gun-boat renown;
Q is for Quimby, a soldier confess'd;
R is for Rosecrans, pride of the West;
S is for Scott, the great chief of three wars;
T is for Thomas, as dauntless as Mars;
U is for Union, enduring as time;
V is for Victory, o'er treason and crime;
W is for Warren, sagacious and bold;
X is for Xerxes, a warrior of old;
Y is for Yancey, a traitor now dead;
Z is for Zagoni, a great charge he lead.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics and title of a war song - Alphabet
From: Joe Offer
Date: 04 Dec 07 - 10:09 PM

Boy, a Cilvil War alphabet song is a real find. I'll betcha there's a more recent soldier's alphabet song, and I'll betcha that was the one tat was requested.
Sailors aren't the only ones who can spell.

-Joe, U.S. Army vet-


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Subject: Lyr Add: SOLDIER'S ALPHABET (British, WW1)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 04 Dec 07 - 10:21 PM

Copied from http://www.louthleader.co.uk/mr-19111920/Market-Rasen-19111920.1080049.jp?articlepage=2
where it says this poem was published in the Rasen Mail (Market Rasen, Lincolnshire, England) in 1916:
^^
A SOLDIER'S ALPHABET
Pte F. Vickers

A stands for Army, to which we all belong,
And if you like to wait a little while, I'll sing you this song.

B stands for Berlin, the place we want to get,
If the lads all come and help, we hope to get there yet.

C stands for Charges, which often make you shake,
But we keep on doing them, for good old England's sake.

D stands for Dug-outs, the place we take a rest,
But when we are in the trench, we think that place the best.

E stands for England, our good old native land,
And so we would much rather be in Market Rasen Band.

F stands for Fighting, the job we are doing now,
Many a lad is fighting now, who once walked behind the plough.

G stands for Gas, which the Germans often use,
But now we've found protection, they can use it if they choose.

H stands for Hand-grenades, things which we have to throw,
And when the Germans see them, they think it time to go.

I stands for Iron Cross, which the Kaiser gives his men,
But when we give them lumps of lead they're seldom seen again.

J stands for Jam, of which we have to eat,
When we get a change of it, oh, won't it be a treat.

K stands for Kaiser, the man who caused this strife,
If Tommy Queer gets hold of him, he's sure to take his life.

L stands for Letters, the things we love to get,
Then we know those left behind are thinking of us yet.

M stands for Mother, of her I often think,
She often writes and asks me if I am in the pink.

N stands for Nurses, who do their duty well,
They bind up all our wounds, received by shot or shell.

O stands for Officers, who guide us on our way,
We try to do our bit by them, with good hearts day by day.

P stands for Prussian Guards, who wear the helmet bright,
But when they meet the Lincolns they know they've got to fight.

Q stands for Queer, yes, good old Tommy Queer,
They cannot get him drunk though on this here sort of beer.

R stands for Rats, which torment us in bed,
I often feel as though I could give them a lump of lead.

S stands for Sniper, who has his work to do,
If you do not look after him, well, he'll look after you.

T stands for Trenches, where Tommy spends his time,
If he is not in support, he's in the firing line.

U stands for Union Jack, the dear old flag we love,
And we hope before too long to hoist it up above.

V stands for Vickers, which is my good old name,
And my mother has my photo in a good old wooden frame.

W stands for Wire, which we put between our lines,
And when the Huns come there to cut they got a lively time.

X stands for Xmas, which is a merry time,
We hope to be in England, then to hear the Church bells chime.

Y stands for Yesterday, the day I wrote this song,
If I do not sing it right forgive me where I'm wrong.

Z stands for Zeppelins, which fly up in the air,
They often go to England to do some damage there.

And now my song has ended, may this war soon be the same,
So when we get back to England we'll be welcomed home again.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SOLDIER'S ALPHABET (U.S. WW1 era)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 04 Dec 07 - 10:48 PM

Copied from a genealogical web page:
http://www.barnesfamilync.com/pdf%20files/POEM%20A%20Soldier's%20Alphabet.pdf
where it says this comes from the diary of Octavia Barnes, born 1890, of Wayne County, North Carolina, who kept a diary from 1916 to 1923.
^^
SOLDIER'S ALPHABET

A is for our Army Uncle Sam's best
B is for boys that can stand the test
C is for colors, Red, White, and Blue
D is for duty which we will all do
E is for enemy which we will crush
F is for fight and we are at it in a rush
G is for God, in his power we trust
H is for Huns we will capture or burst
I is for intention which we meant well
J is for Jesus at his mercy we dwell
K is for Kaiser, the big German hound
L is for liberty, in America it abounds
M is for money the amount has no ends
N is for Nature, which we will defend
O is for our boys with grit and nerve
P is for Pershing, the man we are eager to serve
Q is for quickness and we are like a cat
R is for Recruits, eager to be at the bat
S is for Sammie's'a very peculiar name
T is for troops training for the game
U is for Uncle [? barely legible] who is young and gay
V is for Victory we will bring home to stay
W is for war and that's what we are at
X mean xterminate the Huns like a rat
Y is for you to help and don't wait a minute
Z is for Zoo, so let's put Kaiser Bill in it


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