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DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann

DigiTrad:
FARE THEE WELL MARIANNE


Related threads:
(origins) Origin: Mary Ann (17)
Lyr Req: Marianne (from Easy Riders) (14)


Joe Offer 15 Apr 08 - 02:34 PM
SINSULL 15 Apr 08 - 03:15 PM
Malcolm Douglas 15 Apr 08 - 03:35 PM
Joe Offer 15 Apr 08 - 04:05 PM
Joe Offer 15 Apr 08 - 04:42 PM
Joe Offer 15 Apr 08 - 04:58 PM
GUEST,TJ in San Diego 15 Apr 08 - 07:26 PM
Barry T 16 Apr 08 - 12:13 AM
Joe Offer 16 Apr 08 - 12:41 AM
GUEST,Bob Coltman 16 Apr 08 - 07:50 AM
GUEST,Bob Coltman 16 Apr 08 - 08:15 AM
GUEST,Bob Coltman 16 Apr 08 - 08:30 AM
Malcolm Douglas 16 Apr 08 - 03:34 PM
Q 16 Apr 08 - 04:29 PM
Barry T 16 Apr 08 - 11:08 PM
GUEST,Steve Gardham 17 Apr 08 - 05:40 PM
GEST 17 Apr 08 - 08:47 PM
Snuffy 31 Mar 10 - 05:37 PM
Q 31 Mar 10 - 11:30 PM
Snuffy 01 Apr 10 - 03:00 AM
Bryn Pugh 01 Apr 10 - 08:20 AM
Midchuck 01 Apr 10 - 10:32 AM
pavane 01 Apr 10 - 10:45 AM
GUEST 29 Jun 12 - 07:57 AM
GUEST 25 Jan 13 - 04:17 PM
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Subject: My Dear Mary Ann
From: Joe Offer
Date: 15 Apr 08 - 02:34 PM

This is an edited DTStudy thread, and all messages posted here are subject to editing and deletion.
This thread is intended to serve as a forum for corrections and annotations for the Digital Tradition song named in the title of this thread.

Search for other DTStudy threads



The only version of this song I find right off in the Digital Tradition is one recorded by Mike Cross, but it's not the one I remember. There are several versions scattered over the Forum, and I'd like to post copies in this thread to consolidate the information we have.
-Joe-
Here's the Mike Cross version from the Digital Tradition:

FARE THEE WELL MARIANNE

Fare thee well, my own true love
Fare thee well, my dear
The ship is sailin' and the wind blows free
And I am bound away to the sea, Marianne

Ten thousand miles away from home
Ten thousand miles or more
The sea may freeze or the Earth may burn
If I never more return to you, Marianne

The lobster boiling in the pot
The bluefish on the hook
Their sufferings long but it's nothing like
The ache I bear for you, Marianne

And if I had a flask of gin
Sugar here for two
And a great big bowl to mix them in
I'd pour a drink for you, Marianne

So fare thee well, my own true love
Fare thee well, my dear
The ship is sailing and the wind blows free
And I am bound away to the sea, Marianne

as sung by Mike Cross
@parting @sailor
filename[ FRWLMRNN
DS
Here's the entry from the Traditional Ballad Index:

Mary Anne

DESCRIPTION: "Oh fare thee well, my own true love, Oh fare thee well my dear, For the ship is waiting and the wind blows free, And I am bound away to the sea, Mary Ann." The singer compares his pain at parting to that of a mourning dove or a lobster in a pot
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: before 1860 (broadside, LOCSinging as110580)
KEYWORDS: sailor separation love sea floatingverses
FOUND IN: Canada(Que) US(Ap,MA,SE) Britain(England)
REFERENCES (6 citations):
BrownIII 300, "My Martha Ann" (1 text)
Fowke/Johnston, pp. 142-143, "Mary Ann" (1 text, 1 tune)
Fowke/MacMillan 48, "Mary Ann" (1 text, 1 tune)
Lomax-FSNA 75, "Mary Ann" (1 text, 1 tune)
Silber-FSWB, p. 147, "Mary Ann" (1 text)
DT MARYAN*

Roud #4438
BROADSIDES:
Bodleian, Johnson Ballads 1111, "My Mary Ann," A. Ryle and Co. (London), 1845-1859; also Firth c.12(366), Firth c.12(368), "My Mary Ann"
LOCSinging, as110580, "Our Mary Ann," J. Andrews (New York), 1853-1859; also sb30400b, "Our Mary Ann"; as109170, "My Mary Ann"; Harding B 15(288b), "My Mary Anne"

CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "Who Will Shoe Your Pretty Little Foot" (floating lyrics) and references there
cf. "Fare You Well, My Own True Love (The Storms Are on the Ocean, The False True Lover, The True Lover's Farewell, Red Rosy Bush, Turtle Dove)" (lyrics)
cf. "The Lass of Roch Royal" [Child 76] (lyrics)
ALTERNATE TITLES:
Ten Thousand Miles
Notes: Cazden et al report that the distinct subtext of "pretty little foot" group "...was written by stageman Barney Williams to a variant of the traditional tune, ascribed to M. Tyle. It was published as sheet music in Baltimore during 1856...."
Don Duncan reports of this version, "The melody is clearly related to the version re-popularized by Ian & Sylvia; Revels lists it in their songbook as having been collected by Marius Barbeau from a Canadian who had learned it from an Irish sailor "around 1850." I&S's "lobster/bluefish" verse is from the Williams version, which apparently was a bit of a spoof; the fourth verse is downright funky:
The pride of all the produce rare,
That in our garden grow'd
Was punkins, but none could compare
In angel form to my Mary Ann,
In angel form to my Mary Ann.
The Library of Congress has at least three song sheets (that is, I found three, one published in Baltimore and two in New York) in their American Memory 19th century song sheets collection... These have almost identical lyrics to the original, but rather than repeating the final line of each verse (as the original did) they use the first verse as a chorus. "Our Mary Ann," by de Marsan in New York... identifies it as a minstrel song."
It is likely that some badly worn down versions of this song are filed with "Fare You Well, My Own True Love (The Storms Are on the Ocean, The False True Lover, The True Lover's Farewell, Red Rosy Bush, Turtle Dove)"; the latter song is a catch-all for songs of this type that don't mention Mary Anne or have the Roch Royal plot. - RBW
Broadside LOCSinging as110580: J. Andrews dating per Studying Nineteenth-Century Popular Song by Paul Charosh in American Music, Winter 1997, Vol 15.4, Table 1, available at FindArticles site. - BS
File: FJ142

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Bibiography
Go to the Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2008 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


Let's be careful to keep this song separate from "Leaving of Liverpool" and a few others that share phrases with this song.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: SINSULL
Date: 15 Apr 08 - 03:15 PM

That is the version sung by Ian and Sylvia. Who was it at the recent Utah Phillips' benefit who went on and on about the "worst example of lovesick suffering" and then gave us Marianne and the lobster in the pot?


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 15 Apr 08 - 03:35 PM

There a several broadside editions at  Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads:

Fare you well my own Mary Ann

A mid-C19 burlesque of 'The True-Lovers Farewell', incorporating some of the older song unaltered: evidently put together by Barney Williams and M Tyte, and 'sung by Mrs Barney Williams in all the principal theatres in the U.S.' Three sets of sheet music can be seen at The Lester Levy Collection, as 'My Mary Ann. The Yankee Girl's Song'.

There is plenty of information to be found on Williams, but I don't know who 'M Tyte' was.


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Subject: ADD Version: My Dear Mary Ann
From: Joe Offer
Date: 15 Apr 08 - 04:05 PM

Here's a version posted by Sandy Paton in the Breast of Glass thread. Deckman added the "lobster" verse.
    Thread #38681   Message #632758
    Posted By: Sandy Paton
    22-Jan-02 - 01:37 AM
    Thread Name: Lyr Req: Breast of Glass
    Subject: Lyr Add: MARY ANN
    Song titled (I think) "Mary Ann." From Maud Karpeles (possibly Creighton?) Nova Scotia collection. Recorded years ago by Ian & Sylvia. I first heard it from Happy Traum at a party at Dave Van Ronk's place in New York back in the mid 50s. Words I can recall are:

    Fare you well, my own true love,
    Fare you well for awhile.
    My ship is a-waiting and the wind blows high (free?)
    And I am bound away to the sea, Mary Ann.
    And I am bound away to the sea, Mary Ann.

    Your company, your company,
    Your company unto me,
    It makes me feel, when we're apart,
    That every day is three, my dear Mary Ann.
    That every day is three, my dear Mary Ann.

    A lobster boiling in the pot
    A blue fish on the hook
    Their sufferings long, but it's nothing like
    The ache I bear for you, my dear, Mary Ann


    I wish my breast was made of glass,
    Wherein you might behold
    The secret of my own true love
    In letters writ in gold, my dear Mary Ann.
    In letters writ in gold, my dear Mary Ann.


    And there were probably other verses, including one about the lobster boiling in the pot, which I never sang. Any of you remember this? It has a lovely tune! I'm just too freakin' lazy to climb the stairs to check the source. Been a long and hard day!

    Sandy


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Subject: ADD Version: Mary Ann
From: Joe Offer
Date: 15 Apr 08 - 04:42 PM

I found this version in Folk Songs of Canada (1954), by Edith Fowke and Richard Johnston (pp. 142-143). The exact same version is in the Alan Lomax book, The Folk Songs of North America (pp. 145-146). Lomax says the song was published in Come a-Singing, edited by Marius Barbeau for the National Museum of Canada. And the very same version is #23 in Folk Songs of the Americas, edited by A.L. Lloyd and Isabel Aretz de Ramon y Rivera (Oak Publications, 1965), pp. 40-41.

Mary Ann

Oh, fare thee well, my own true love,
Oh, fare thee well, my dear!
For the ship is a-waiting, the wind blows high,
And I am bound away for the sea, Mary Ann.
And I am bound away for the sea, Mary Ann.

Oh, yonder don't you see the dove a-sitting on the stile?
She is mourning the loss of her own true love,
As I do now, for you, my dear Mary Ann.
As I do now, for you, my dear Mary Ann.

A lobster boiling in the pot,
A blue fish on the hook,
They are suffering long, but it's nothing like
The ache I bear for you, my dear, Mary Ann.
The ache I bear for you, my dear, Mary Ann.

Oh, had I but a flask of gin
With sugar here for two,
And a great big bowl for to mix it in,
I'd pour a drink for you, my dear, Mary Ann.
I'd pour a drink for you, my dear, Mary Ann.



Click to play



Here are the notes from Fowke/Johnston:
    Dr. Marius Barbeau heard this unusual sailor's song in 1920 at Tadoussac, Quebec. The singer, Edouard Hovington, who was then ninety, had been for many years a coureur-de-bois employed by the Hudson's Bay Company. He said he had learned "Mary Ann" from an Irish sailor some seventy years earlier, which would carry it back at least to 1850.
    "Mary Ann" is obviously descended from the old English song, "The True Lover's Farewell" (which is also the ancestor of "The Turtle Dove" and Burns' "My Luve's Like a Red, Red Rose"), but it is one of the most unusual of the many variants. The nautical references give it a salty flavour quite appropriate to the Tadoussac region, which abounds in tiny fishing villages.


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Subject: ADD Version: My Dear Mary Anne
From: Joe Offer
Date: 15 Apr 08 - 04:58 PM

This version is from the GEST Website of Newfoundland songs. I don't completely understand their explanation of where this particular variant came from.

My Dear Mary Anne

Oh, fare thee well, my dear Mary Anne,
Our days have all gone by;
Spring is coming, and soon I'll be gone,
But, I'll come back, don't you cry, my dear Mary Anne.

A lobster dies in the boiling pot,
Oh, pity the bluefish, too;
But, they're quickly gone and they suffer not,
The way I cry for you, my dear Mary Anne.

Oh, fare thee well, my dear Mary Anne,
Our days have all gone by;
Spring is coming, and soon I'll be gone,
But, I'll come back, don't you cry, my dear Mary Anne.

Oh, don't you see the pretty turtle dove,
That flies from pine to pine;
Crying for its own true love,
The way I cry for you, my dear Mary Anne.

Oh, fare thee well, my dear Mary Anne,
Our days have all gone by;
Spring is coming, and soon I'll be gone,
But, I'll come back, don't you cry, my dear Mary Anne.

####.... Author unknown. Variant of a 19th century British broadside ballad, My Mary Ann, published by W.S. Forley (London) sometime between 1858 and 1885, and archived at the Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads, shelfmark: Firth c.12(366) ....####
A variant was published as #48, Mary Ann, by Edith Fowke (editor) with Keith MacMillan (music consultant) in The Penguin Book of Canadian Folk Songs, (1973). A variant was also recorded by Ian and Sylvia as Mary Ann/Anne, on Ian & Sylvia, (Vanguard Records VSD 2113, LP, 1962, cut #A.06.

Source: http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/07/maryanne.htm


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: GUEST,TJ in San Diego
Date: 15 Apr 08 - 07:26 PM

I remember doing the version from the Lomax "Folk Songs of North America" book back in 1960 or so. I still have the book. It was given to me by a true love of the time, whose tender Christmas message on the inside cover was blotted out by a successor with no great regard for good penmanship.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: Barry T
Date: 16 Apr 08 - 12:13 AM

> This version is from the GEST Website of Newfoundland songs.

This was the interpretation by the New Christy Minstrels, though I do not know which of their several arrangers is to be credited with the adaptation. Perhaps Randy Sparks himself.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: Joe Offer
Date: 16 Apr 08 - 12:41 AM

Barry, it's nice to see you're around when you're needed. I'll bet you're the source of the MIDI on the GEST site - right?

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: GUEST,Bob Coltman
Date: 16 Apr 08 - 07:50 AM

In Joe Mitchell Chappell's perennial favorite "Heart Songs," originally published in 1909, the four-verse version of this is credited to one M. Tyte. The verses, briefly:

Fare you well, my own Mary Anne ...

Don't you see that turtle dove ...

A lobster in a lobster pot ...

I'll give the final verse as it's different from any above.

The pride of all the produce rare,
That in the kitchen garden grow'd,
Was pumpkins, but none could compare
In angel form to my Mary Anne!
Could compare with Mary Anne.

Some observations.

This final verse, and some touches in the others, make it clear the intent is comical. At a guess, Tyte might not be the original author, but rewrote "My Mary Ann" (his title) for concert performance as a comic song.

On the other hand, Tyte *could* be the name of the original author. "Heart Songs" is, as far as I have been able to tell, usually reliable in its assignment of authorship.

However, on evidence in this thread, that would mean Tyte would have had to write the song before 1850. Frankly it does not sound that old, and I question the earliest dates given above, particularly that of Marius Barbeau -- a sound scholar whose statements are always worthy of respect, but in this case I think his sailor stretched the years a little too thin.

Performance history among modern folkies seems to be rooted in Peggy Seeger's 1950s recorded version. It's my belief that she was the first to dig the song out and perform it widely in the US, and that hers is the one that became the standard, close to that sung by Mike Cross above, though not exact. I haven't Ian and Sylvia's lyrics to hand, but I bet they (and most everyone else) learned it from Peggy's recording or from someone else who covered it.

Anyone know who "M. Tyte" might be?

Bob


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: GUEST,Bob Coltman
Date: 16 Apr 08 - 08:15 AM

Re M. Tyte as possible composer of "My Mary Anne," at the following website:

http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/ThisLandIsOurLand/message/207

there is a reference to an Arthur M. Tyte, composer/conductor in residence at the 125-year-old Vail-Leavitt Music Hall on eastern Long Island near the Hamptons. His dates are not given, so whether he is our composer or not is an open question, but he is described as an "old-time local composer" whose family still live in the area, and who still have some of his music. He is credited with composing?? or at least performing two pieces, "Althea's Wedding March" and "Easter Hymn."

That most helpful and wonderful source of Public Domain music,

http://www.web-helper.net/PDMusic

has a two-verse online version, also credited to M. Tyte, from the Carl Fischer collection "Book of a Thousand Songs" (1918), but it is identical to, and perhaps a cop of, the "Heart Songs" version.

Bob


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: GUEST,Bob Coltman
Date: 16 Apr 08 - 08:30 AM

Belatedly I see I have duplicated your earlier information re M. Tyte, Malcolm. My apologies. I hope, however, I have added something to the mix.

The Vail-Leavitt Music Hall website makes it clear that Professor Arthur M. Tyte flourished in the 1880s. He had "previously lent his talents to the orchestra at New York's famed Fifth Avenue Theatre," presumably before the Vail-Leavitt opened in 1881. So it seems entirely possible that he was old enough and early enough to be our "M. Tyte."

But the addition of the name "Arthur" leaves that in some doubt, since one would expect he would be credited identically everywhere.

And it seems unlikely he can be credited as original composer, since broadside versions go back to previous decades. At most, perhaps, Tyte was concocter of a novelty version. But that seems to be the one that got into the songbooks.

The other possibility is that Tyte may have been the composer of the music only. Which may mean that he is the one who devised the tune to "My Mary Anne" that we now sing, and that the previous versions were sung to other tunes. But lacking further information, that's guesswork.

Bob


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 16 Apr 08 - 03:34 PM

I've already said that sheet music of [1856] names Tyte as composer and Williams as lyricist. I don't think this is in question, though as I've also said, much of the text is borrowed directly from the much older 'True-Lovers Farewell'.

Whether Tyte's music is original and whether the tune(s) found in oral currency derive from it I don't yet know, not being a sight reader.

Barney Williams (1823-1876, born Bernard Flaherty in Cork) was a very successful performer and promoter; he moved to America and appears to have started out as a dancer specialising in clog styles. He and his wife (née Maria Pray) also toured in Britain (late 1850s), hence the English broadside editions of 'My Mary Ann'. Quite a bit of detail can be found on the web, including photographs of the Williamses.

The British performer Sam Cowell took up the song; see Steve Gardham's article (which also provides a lot of good information on the song's antecedents) The Turtle Dove for the full text from Cowell's songbook. It is considerably longer than the 'official' version; whether the additional verses came from Williams or Cowell I have no idea.

There are problems in a number of indexes with the composer's name. Although in the music sheet which uses standard type it is rendered 'Tyte', other editions used a fanciful script which is ambiguous and has also been read as 'Tyle', 'Tyse' and 'Jyce,' so there may be some uncertainty there.

Arthur M Tyte is perhaps a bit late to be our man, but shouldn't be written off yet as a possibility.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: Q
Date: 16 Apr 08 - 04:29 PM

MARY ANN
Hovington, in Barbeau, Lismer and Bourinot

Oh, far...e...well, my own true love!
Far...e...well, my dear!
For the ship is waiting; the wind blows high,
And I am bound a...way for the sea, Mary Ann!
2
Oh, yonder don't you see the dove
Sitting on the stile?
She's mourning the loss of her own true love,
As I do now for you, my sweetheart,
Mary Ann! (bis)
3
A lobster boiling in the pot,
A bluefish in the brook,
They are suffering long, but it's nothing like
The ache I bear for you, my sweetheart,
Mary Ann!
4
Oh, had I but a flask of gin,
Sugar here for two,
And a great big bowl for to mix it in,
I'd pour a drink for you, my sweetheart,
Mary Ann!

With score, pp. 41-42, Marius Barbeau, Arthur Lismer and Arthur Bourinot, 1947, "Come A Singing!, Canadian Folk Songs," National Museum of Canada, Bull. 107, Anthropological Series No. 26, Ottawa.
Barbeau notes that, "It was not advisable, therefore, to reproduce the sources exactly, as we usually find them in a run down condition because of prolonged oral transmission."

Edith Fowke, 1973, "The Penguin Book of Canadian Folk Songs," pp. 116-117 used the same lyrics and musical score. She notes that Dr. Barbeau first heard it in 1920, from Mr. Hovington, formerly a Hudson's Bay trapper, who said he learned it about 1850 from an Irish sailor.

Barbeau, and Fowke in 1973, both have the line "A bluefish in the brook" in verse 3, line 2, but Fowke and Johnson, 1954, change the line to "A bluefish on the hook." This does seem better, but no reason is given for the change.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: Barry T
Date: 16 Apr 08 - 11:08 PM

Joe Offer> I'll bet you're the source of
Joe Offer> the MIDI on the GEST site - right?

Ahh, your sensors are working perfectly, Joe! ;-)


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: GUEST,Steve Gardham
Date: 17 Apr 08 - 05:40 PM

Malcolm,
Cowell and Williams though born in Britain both spent long periods in the States. c1860-1 Mrs Cowell appears to have been something of a theatre critic and occasionally reviewed The Williams's performances. On at least one occasion Williams wrote to Sam Cowell in disparaging terms. Reading between the lines they may have been rivals to some extent. It was common at that time to plagiarise the works of others and make additional verses to existing stage songs, Villikins for example, had several editions with 'extra verses'. Sam also had a tendency to take existing negro songs from the South where he grew up and claim them as his own work.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: GEST
Date: 17 Apr 08 - 08:47 PM

Joe Offer> I'll bet you're the source of the MIDI on the GEST site - right?

Barry T> Ahh, your sensors are working perfectly, Joe! ;-)

How many times do I have to tell you guys? Barry is the very best MIDI file sequencer - bar none. That's why you'll see his name credited all over the MIDI file listing pages at GEST Songs of Newfoundland and Labrador. We're always wishing he had more to add. :-) MIDI Files A-F

GEST Songs of Newfoundland and Labrador


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Subject: ADD Version: Mary Ann
From: Snuffy
Date: 31 Mar 10 - 05:37 PM

This version from c1854 proves that Mr. Hovington's recollection of dates might not have been faulty.

While this website would make it seem to date from the 1960s, not the 1850s, with Bob Dylan(!) as the performer and Charles and Ray as the writers !!!!!!

MARY ANN

Oh fare thee well my own true love,
Fare thee well but for a while
The ship is waitin' an' the wind blows high,
An' I am bound away for the sea, Mary Ann.
(I am bound away for the sea, Mary Ann)

Ten thousand miles away from home
Ten thousand miles or more
The sea may freeze an' the earth may burn
If I never no more return to you, Mary Ann
(Never no more return to you, Mary Ann)

Oh, don't you see that crow fly high
She'll surely turn to white
If ever I prove false to you
Let the day turn to night, my dear Mary Ann
(Day will turn to night, my dear Mary Ann)

Oh, if I had a flask of gin
An' sugar here for two,
An' a great big bowl to mix it in,
I'd pour a drink for you, my dear Mary Ann
(I'd pour a drink for you, my dear, Mary Ann)
Yes I'd pour a drink for you, my dear Mary Ann
(Mary Ann)
(Mary Ann)
(Mary Ann)

Writer CHARLES, RAY
Copyright:Lyrics @copy; Warner/Chappell Music. Inc.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: Q
Date: 31 Mar 10 - 11:30 PM

Would you try that Berkeley link again, Snuffy?


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: Snuffy
Date: 01 Apr 10 - 03:00 AM

Is this better? Seems to work for me.
https://sherlock.ischool.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/CSMPSearch2.tcl?CSMP@docid+1279


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: Bryn Pugh
Date: 01 Apr 10 - 08:20 AM

I learned this 'version' from the singing of a dear friend, at the time (best part of 50 years ago !) :

"Fare thee well, my own true love.
Fare thee well for a while -
For my ship lies waiting the next flowing tide,
And I am bound away for the sea, Mary Ann (bis).

The crow that is so black, my love
Will change her colour white :
If ever I prove false to thee,
The day will turn to night, my dear Mary Ann (bis)

Oh, but I had a flask of gin -
Sugar here for two
And a great big bowl for to mix them in -
I'd mix a drink for you, my dear Mary Ann (bis).

Repeat 1st verse.

Hope this helps.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: Midchuck
Date: 01 Apr 10 - 10:32 AM

And if I had a flask of gin
Sugar here for two
And a great big bowl to mix them in
I'd pour a drink for you, Marianne


Urk...arrgh...I think I'm going to...which way's the toilet?...glarrgh.

P.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: My Dear Mary Ann
From: pavane
Date: 01 Apr 10 - 10:45 AM

I am sure Nic Jones recorded a version - I will have to look it up and report back


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Subject: RE: sheet music and chords
From: GUEST
Date: 29 Jun 12 - 07:57 AM

Does any one know where I can find the sheet music and chords (preferrably for uke) for the Ian and sylvia version of Mary Anne? I would be forever grateful!

sjpcraig@comcast.net


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Subject: ADD Version: My Dear Mary Ann
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Jan 13 - 04:17 PM

Can anyone correct the lyrics to Hamish Imlach's version of Mary Anne?

MARY ANNE

So fare thee well, my own true love
Fare thee well, my dear
The ship is a-waiting and the wind blows high
And I am bound away to the sea, Mary Anne
And I am bound away to the sea, Mary Anne

Yonder don't you see the dove (it's sitting on) (xxx)?
(Lamenting) the loss of her own true love,         
As I do now, for (my) my love Mary Anne
As I do now, for you, my love Mary Anne

(xxx) (I suffer grief and pain)
(xxx) (little while)
(xxx) I go away, I return again
I go ten thousands mile, my love, Mary Anne
I go ten thousands mile, my love, Mary Anne

(The waves) (xxx)
The stars from the sky
(And) I love you more and more
Until the day I die, my love, Mary Anne
Until the day I die, my love, Mary Anne

So fare thee well, my own true love
Fare thee well, my dear
The ship is a-waiting and the wind blows high
And I am bound away to the sea, Mary Anne
And I am bound away to the sea, Mary Anne


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Mudcat time: 30 October 11:59 PM EDT

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