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Origins: Butter and cheese and all (Greasy Cook)

Paul D 09 Jun 99 - 08:04 PM
10 Jun 99 - 02:26 PM
Liz C. 10 Jun 99 - 08:37 PM
Jim Dixon 05 Feb 03 - 10:30 AM
Jim Dixon 05 Feb 03 - 10:49 AM
Joe Offer 11 Feb 11 - 07:16 PM
RTim 11 Feb 11 - 09:46 PM
MGM·Lion 11 Feb 11 - 11:08 PM
r.padgett 12 Feb 11 - 10:39 AM
MGM·Lion 12 Feb 11 - 02:33 PM
r.padgett 12 Feb 11 - 03:36 PM
Steve Gardham 13 Feb 11 - 01:05 PM
RTim 13 Feb 11 - 01:23 PM
Steve Gardham 13 Feb 11 - 02:54 PM
GUEST,Alan Whittle 13 Feb 11 - 03:43 PM
Herga Kitty 13 Feb 11 - 04:30 PM
Jim Dixon 18 Mar 13 - 03:44 PM
Jim Dixon 18 Mar 13 - 04:12 PM
Mo the caller 19 Mar 13 - 05:11 AM
Mo the caller 19 Mar 13 - 05:23 AM
Tradsinger 19 Mar 13 - 05:36 PM
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Subject: LYR REQ. Butter and cheese and all
From: Paul D
Date: 09 Jun 99 - 08:04 PM

Has anyone got a text for this which I think came from Harry Cox or Sam Larner. It starts:

Well since you've called on me to sing I'll see what I can do And when that I have finished it I'll call on one of you

which I always thought must be the start of hundreds of songs, although I can't find a single one like it in the database


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Subject: RE: LYR REQ. Buttr and cheese and all
From:
Date: 10 Jun 99 - 02:26 PM

Peter Kennedy gives Cox's version, "The Greasy Cook" in 'the Folksongs of Britain and Ireland', #129, and he lists severral other versions, printed and recorded, including 2 from Canada.


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Subject: Lyr Add: BUTTER AND CHEESE AND ALL
From: Liz C.
Date: 10 Jun 99 - 08:37 PM

The version I have is from the singing of Frank Shergold, who was the squire, I believe, of Bampton Morris in Oxfordshire for a long time until maybe a couple of years ago. It's on a cassette tracing their history, I've searched the house for it in the middle of writing this but can't find it so can't tell you more at the moment.


BUTTER AND CHEESE AND ALL
(from the singing of Frank Shergold)

I think it's very unkind of you to ask me for to sing
For it doesn't lie within me power to do any such a thing
But seeing as you've asked me, I'll see what I can do
But when it comes to the chorus, you all must help me too, you all must help me too.

I fell in love with a loverly cook, the truth I can't deny,
But why a cook should be my wife, I'll tell you the reason why
For she had plenty of mince pies, plum puddings and roast beef
And when my belly was empty, she gave to me relief, she gave to me relief.

I received an invitation some supper for to take,
And gladly did accept it all for my belly's sake.
And after supper was over, of the cupboard she took the keys,
One pocket she crammed with butter, the other she filled with cheese, the other she filled with cheese.

I hadn't been sitting there very long not half an hour or more,
When master of the house came home rat-tatting at the door
And I not knowing where to hide, up the chimney I did fly,
And there I sat on a catalogue like a sweep exalted high, like a sweep exalted high

Oh I hadn't been sitting there very long a taking of my ease
When the fire started to melt me butter, likewise to toast me cheese
And every drop that fell down below, it made the fire to flare
Master looked up the chimney and he swore the old devil was there, he swore the old devil was there.

They climbed up to the chimney top, and poured some water down
They swilled me out of the bottom and I ran up to town
As I did run, the dogs did bark, the children loudly squall
All the women cried 'oh well-a- day, there goes butter and cheese and all, there goes butter and cheese and all'.

Regards,
Liz


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE COOK'S CHOICE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 05 Feb 03 - 10:30 AM

Found at Garry Gillard's website:

THE COOK'S CHOICE

What a pity it is to tease me or try me for to sing
When it does not lay in my power for to do any such thing,
But since that you have teased me so, I'll try what I can do,
And when I come to the chorus, why you must bawl out too,
    Why you must bawl out too.

It's of a cook I fell in love and the truth I don't deny.
For why a cook should have her choice I'll tell you the reason why,
Because she has plenty of mince pies, plum pudding and roast beef
And when my belly was empty she gave to me relief,
    She gave to me relief.

She sent me an invitation some supper for to take,
I kindly did accept it all for my belly's sake;
And after supper was over, of the cupboard I got the keys,
One pocket I crammed with butter and the other I stuffed with cheese,
    And the other I stuffed with cheese.

And supper being over about a half an hour or more,
When the master smelling of my cheese came tapping at the door,
And I not knowing where to hide up the chimney I did hide
And there I sat quite at my ease like a sweep exalted high,
    Like a sweep exalted high.

I hadn't been long there sitting, sitting at my ease
When the fire began to melt my butter, likewise to toast my cheese,
And every drop that fell in the fire it caused the fire to flare
And the old man looked up the chimney and he swore that Satan was there,
    He swore that Satan was there.

Then up to the chimney top he got and down some water poured,
And I came tumbling after my butter and cheese and all;
But I'm safe down from the chimney now with a smut and a greasy face
And out of the street door I nimbly ran and down the street I was chased,
    And down the street I was chased.

The dogs did bark, the children screamed, up flew the windows all,
And every soul cried out 'Well done' as loud as they could bawl;
So to make an end to my ditty, boys, I hope I arn't kept you long,
So we'll wish success to the chorus and sing another good song,
    And sing another good song.

[Collected by Bob Copper in about 1954 from a book left by John Johnson..., 1865-1943, in Fittleworth, Sussex: see Chapter Nine, pp. 83-9, of "Songs and Southern Breezes" for the details; and the appendix for these words.]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Butter and cheese and all
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 05 Feb 03 - 10:49 AM

BUTTER AND CHEESE AND ALL was recorded by Sam Larner on "Now is the Time for Fishing"; by Peter Bellamy on two albums: "Mainly Norfolk" and "Won't You Go My Way?"; by Tom Brown on "I Wish They'd Do It Now;" and by Mrs. Dowrick on Folkways' "English Folk Music Anthology."

It's also in Peter Kennedy's "Folksongs of Britain and Ireland" where it's called "The Greasy Cook."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Butter and cheese and all
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Feb 11 - 07:16 PM

"Butter and Cheese and All" is the song for February 12 on Jon Boden's A Folk Song a Day project. It's also the title song of a venerable old record album by the inimitable Michael Grosvenor Myer.
-Joe-

Here's the Traditional Ballad Index entry on this song:

    Greasy Cook, The (Butter and Cheese and All, The Cook's Choice)

    DESCRIPTION: The singer keeps company with a cook. One day she is about to send him off with cheese and butter when the master comes in. He hides in the chimney; the fire melts cheese and butter and sets them afire. The master douses him; he flees to a chorus of jeers
    AUTHOR: unknown
    EARLIEST DATE: 1908 (GreigDuncan4)
    KEYWORDS: cook courting food humorous
    FOUND IN: Britain(England(South),Scotland(Aber)) Ireland Canada(Newf)
    REFERENCES (5 citations):
    Greenleaf/Mansfield 108, "Butter and Cheese and All" (1 text)
    Peacock, pp. 251-252, "Butter and Cheese" (1 text, 1 tune)
    GreigDuncan4 914, "A Cook I Went a-Courtin'" (1 fragment, 1 tune)
    Copper-SoBreeze, pp. 236-237, "The Cook's Choice" (1 text, 1 tune)
    Kennedy 129, "The Greasy Cook" (1 text, 1 tune)

    Roud #510
    RECORDINGS:
    Harry Cox, "The Greasy Cook" (on HCox01)
    Sam Larner, "Butter and Cheese" (on SLarner02)

    CROSS-REFERENCES:
    cf. "The Boatsman and the Chest" [Laws Q8] (plot) and references there
    NOTES: This and similar songs are sometimes traced back to a story in Boccaccio (seventh day, second story: Gianella, Peronella, and her husband). But the story is really one of the basic themes of folktale, and doubtless predates Boccaccio as well as these songs. - RBW
    Last updated in version 2.5
    File: CoSB236

    Go to the Ballad Search form
    Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
    Go to the Bibiography
    Go to the Discography

    The Ballad Index Copyright 2010 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


Roud Index Search


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Subject: ADD Version: Greasy Cook (as sung by Harry Cox)
From: RTim
Date: 11 Feb 11 - 09:46 PM

It was some time ago now - but someone asked for Harry Cox's version; here it is below, and I have been singing this for 40 years!!!

Tim Radford

=================================

THE GREASY COOK.
(as sung by Harry Cox)

I fell in love with a Greasy Cook And that I can't deny
I fell in love with a greasy cook
I'll tell you the reason why - Repeat.

Plum pudding, roast beef a plenty
Plum pudding, roast beef
Oh when my belly was empty
She gave to me relief - repeat

I kindly was invited some supper for to take
And kindly I did accept it
All for my stomach's sake - repeat

Now after supper was over
The cupboard she took some key
One pocket she crammed butter
And the other she crammed with cheese - Repeat

Her master smelling of the cheese
Came rat-tat at the door
I had no where to hide my face
But up the chimney crawl - repeat

I had not been there very long
A sitting at my ease
The fire melted my butter
And likewise touched my cheese - repeat

Every drop that fell on the fire
It caused the old fire to rear
The old woman looked up the chimney top
And she swore the old devil was there - repeat

Her master went to the chimney top
A bucket of water let fall
And I came following after
Me butter & cheese and all - repeat

The dogs did bark & the children screamed
Up flew the windows all
The old woman cried out well done, well done
There goes butter & cheese & all - repeat.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Butter and cheese and all (Greasy Cook)
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 11 Feb 11 - 11:08 PM

Thank you for kind words, Joe. Song is also on my youtube channel, www.youtube.com/user/mgmyer

♫♪Michael♬♩
Butter and Cheese and All


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Subject: RE: Origins: Butter and cheese and all (Greasy Cook)
From: r.padgett
Date: 12 Feb 11 - 10:39 AM

I sing the Sam Larner version!
Ray


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Subject: RE: Origins: Butter and cheese and all (Greasy Cook)
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 12 Feb 11 - 02:33 PM

OP: Well since you've called on me to sing I'll see what I can do And when that I have finished it I'll call on one of you

which I always thought must be the start of hundreds of songs, although I can't find a single one like it in the database ===

Out of interest, Tony Rose sang a song called "Compliments Returned" which started with these words also.

~Michael~


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Subject: RE: Origins: Butter and cheese and all (Greasy Cook)
From: r.padgett
Date: 12 Feb 11 - 03:36 PM

Yes Tony did sing Compliments Returned, starting as you say the same way

Ray


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Subject: RE: Origins: Butter and cheese and all (Greasy Cook)
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 13 Feb 11 - 01:05 PM

Both Catnach and Pitts of London printed it in the early 19th century, but it was printed on broadsides all over the country and even in America under a variety of titles, usually in 7 stanzas, corresponding to 'Cook's Choice' as given above.

The Catnach broadside is at Bodleian, Harding B11(1836) 'Cookey's Courtship or Cupboard Love'.

A later copy printed by Harkness of Preston is on the same website, Harding B20 (73) 'Beef and Treacle or Cook's Courtship.'

'Compliments Returned' has a similar history though not so common in oral tradition. On broadsides it is known as 'I don't think much of you'. This was also widely printed and like the previous ballad printed in New York. Both a Hodges of London and a De Marsan of New York broadsides are on the Bodleian website

Harding B18 (269)
Firth b25 (396)

Longer versions of both these songs were printed by the Glasgow Poet's Box in the 1850s.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Butter and cheese and all (Greasy Cook)
From: RTim
Date: 13 Feb 11 - 01:23 PM

Hey Steve,
I love the links to the "Complements Returned" songs. Thanks

I have been singing this song for years, and didn't know where it came from other than via Gardiner and/or Purslow.

Tim Radford


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Subject: RE: Origins: Butter and cheese and all (Greasy Cook)
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 13 Feb 11 - 02:54 PM

In that case, Tim, it's just a case of 'compliments returned'!

Cheers,
Steve


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Subject: RE: Origins: Butter and cheese and all (Greasy Cook)
From: GUEST,Alan Whittle
Date: 13 Feb 11 - 03:43 PM

heard Tim Laycock sing this one last week. he mentioned Sam Larner in association with it.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Butter and cheese and all (Greasy Cook)
From: Herga Kitty
Date: 13 Feb 11 - 04:30 PM

I think Johnny Collins sang the Sam Larner version.

Kitty


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Subject: Lyr Add: BUTTER AND CHEESE (Bodleian, 1957)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 18 Mar 13 - 03:44 PM

From the Bodleian broadside collection, Firth c.18(274):


BUTTER AND CHEESE
[1857]

I once did serve a gentleman who asked me to sing.
Right well I do assure you I can do no such thing,
But since you've asked me to sing, I'll try what I can do,
And when I come to the chorus, you're all to bawl out too.
You're all to bawl out too, &c.

I once did court a cook; I'll tell you the reason why:
When I did feel hungry, grub she did supply
With plenty of good mutton and a little of fine beef,
And when I felt hungry, she gave great relief.
She gave me great relief, &c.

One night she asked me to supper; I quickly gave consent,
And two or three nights after that, to her master's house I went.
Her master he being away from home, of the cupboard she had keys.
One of my pockets she stuffed with butter, the other with toast and cheese.
The other with toast and cheese, &c.

The supper it being over about half an hour or more,
To my surprise I heard a noise, and a foot came to the door,
And where to hide my shameful face I'm sure I did not know,
So up the chimney I did go, as black as any crow.
As black as any crow, &c.

The fire it being very hot, it began to burn my knees,
Likewise to melt my butter, and also to toast my cheese.
While every drop fell in the fire, it caused such a flare,
The master he being standing by, he swore the devil was there.
He swore the devil was there, &c.

The master then as quick as shot hastened to a rout
To pour some water down the chimney to chase the devil out,
While every drop came down the chimney on my poor skull did fall,
And by my soul, I suffered dearly for my butter and cheese and all.
My butter and cheese and all, &c.

Come all you men that wants a wife, a-courting cooks do go.
Eat your fill but pocket none for fear your overthrow.
For they bundled me out in the midst of the night, my shameful face to show,
Likewise my melted butter, and my face as black's a crow.
And my face as black's a crow, &c.

The dogs did bark and the children roar,
And round me they did squall,
And the ladies out of their windows peep, crying—
There goes butter and cheese and all.
Butter and cheese and all, &c.


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Subject: Lyr Add: COOKEY'S COURTSHIP, etc. (Bodleian)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 18 Mar 13 - 04:12 PM

From the Bodleian broadside collection, Harding B 11(692):


COOKEY'S COURTSHIP,
CUPBOARD LOVE, OR,
BUTTER, CHEESE, AND ALL.
[London, between 1819 and 1844]

'Tis a pity you should teaze me so, for to attempt to sing,
For it never was in my power to do any such a thing,
But since that you do plague me so, I'll try what I can do,
And when it comes to the chorus, why you must bawl out too.

'Tis of a cook who fell in love; the truth I don't deny,
And why a cook should be my choice, I'll tell you the reason why:
Because of plenty of pies, plum-pudding and roast beef,
And when my belly was empty, she gave to it relief.

T'other night I received an invitation, supper for to take,
And kindly did accept it, all for my belly's sake.
After supper was over, of the cupboard she got the key.
One pocket she stuffed with butter; the other she cramm'd with cheese.

Now the supper was over half an hour or more,
The master smelling of the cheese, came tapping at the door.
I not knowing where to hide, did up the chimney fly,
And there I sat quite at my ease, like a sweep exalted high.

I had not long been there a-sitting at my ease,
When the fire began to melt my butter, likewise to toast my cheese,
And every bit that fell in the fire, it made the fire to flare.
The master looked up the chimney and swore the devil was there.

Then he went to the chimney top, down let the water fall,
And I came tumbling after, butter and cheese and all.
Now safe down the chimney, with a smutt and greasy face,
Unto the street door I quickly run, and out of the street was chas'd.

The dogs did bark and children squall; up flew the windows all,
And all the old women cried out "well done" as loud as they could bawl.
Now to conclude my ditty, I hope I have not kept you long,
So we'll all proceed to harmony, if that gentleman will give us a song.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Butter and cheese and all (Greasy Cook)
From: Mo the caller
Date: 19 Mar 13 - 05:11 AM

OP: "Well since you've called on me to sing I'll see what I can do And when that I have finished it I'll call on one of you"

That's the way the version I've heard in Cheshire folk clubs starts. Or maybe "And after I have finished..."
Same story, slightly different words which I can't remember all of.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Butter and cheese and all (Greasy Cook)
From: Mo the caller
Date: 19 Mar 13 - 05:23 AM

Ah, I see that the version I know is the one sung in the 2 links above.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Butter and cheese and all (Greasy Cook)
From: Tradsinger
Date: 19 Mar 13 - 05:36 PM

It's much the same story as "Bill the Weaver". I sing the Buster Mustoe version from Worcestershire which some of us collected from Buster some years ago.

Tradsinger


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