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Lyr Req: The Gallant Forty-Twa

DigiTrad:
THE GALLANT FORTY TWA
THE STOUTEST MAN IN THE FORTY TWA
WHA SAW THE COTTON SPINNERS


Related threads:
(origins) Origins:Jock McGraw/Stoutest Man in the Forty-Twa (55)
Req:More lyrics to 'Stoutest man in the Forty-Twa (3) (closed)
Lyr Req: Wha Hae the Forty-Twa (6)
Lyr Req: The Stoutest Cheil o' the Forty Twa (5)


BK 31 Jul 99 - 10:08 AM
Alice 31 Jul 99 - 10:16 AM
Sourdough 31 Jul 99 - 12:36 PM
BK 31 Jul 99 - 01:10 PM
jon a 31 Jul 99 - 07:06 PM
Sourdough 31 Jul 99 - 07:42 PM
Barry Taylor 31 Jul 99 - 09:19 PM
Sourdough 31 Jul 99 - 09:53 PM
BK 01 Aug 99 - 09:59 AM
j0_77 01 Aug 99 - 09:38 PM
Sourdough 02 Aug 99 - 03:38 AM
Taconicus 06 Aug 09 - 08:18 AM
Jim Dixon 07 Aug 09 - 08:36 PM
Jon Bartlett 07 Aug 09 - 11:12 PM
Joe Offer 08 Aug 09 - 04:00 PM
Reiver 2 01 Jun 10 - 05:33 PM
Tootler 01 Jun 10 - 06:04 PM
Jack Campin 01 Jun 10 - 06:09 PM
GUEST,Sheila L 03 Aug 15 - 12:20 AM
GUEST,Sheila L 03 Aug 15 - 12:20 AM
GUEST,Lighter 03 Aug 15 - 09:23 AM
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Subject: WORDS? gallant forty-twa?
From: BK
Date: 31 Jul 99 - 10:08 AM

Searched DT & threads several ways; wild cards, etc, etc, - apparently the words to this aren't there? (My skills are admittedly not sophisticated in this regard.) Surely many 'catter's must have these words..

thanx, BK


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Subject: RE: gallant forty-twa?
From: Alice
Date: 31 Jul 99 - 10:16 AM

BK, I typed in [I really was delighted] in square brackets in the search box, and the lyrics came up. They are here.


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Subject: RE: gallant forty-twa?
From: Sourdough
Date: 31 Jul 99 - 12:36 PM

I really like the spirit of this song but I have no idea of its background. I have assumed that there was (is) a 42nd Regiment but of what? What is their history? Anyone know?

Sourdough


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Subject: RE: gallant forty-twa?
From: BK
Date: 31 Jul 99 - 01:10 PM

Thanx, Alice - I really did type just that, including the brackets, (& several other varients of the name or lines in the chorus, w/wild cards...) honest injin... Couldn't believe the DT didn't have it. Guess I really am a klutz (as if that was news!)

Thanx, BK


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Subject: RE: gallant forty-twa?
From: jon a
Date: 31 Jul 99 - 07:06 PM

I believe it to be the 42nd regiment of foot, I have half a feeling that they became part of the Black Watch but will need a look through some books to find out for sure if I can't I know a man who proberably can!

Jon


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Subject: RE: gallant forty-twa?
From: Sourdough
Date: 31 Jul 99 - 07:42 PM

Jon a -

My friend, Rainmaker, hangs out in a New York City pub that is filled with Irish, mostly people who came here from Ireland within the past twenty years. I asked him to see if he could find the meaning of the "gallant forty-twa" but he said he had no luck. Of course, I can't be sure how hard he tried but when I sent him the lyrics of "The Ancient and Old Irish Condom", I know he got that around the bar quickly!

Sourdough


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Subject: RE: gallant forty-twa?
From: Barry Taylor
Date: 31 Jul 99 - 09:19 PM

You may read about the Regimental history here


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Subject: RE: gallant forty-twa?
From: Sourdough
Date: 31 Jul 99 - 09:53 PM

They sure do have something to be proud of!

That also explains why no one in the Irish pub in NYC was able to identify who the Gallant Forty-twa was.

Sourdough

It's astounding. In one day being able to learn about the regimental history of a two hundred and fifty year old military organization and the contributions to medicine of a great ventriliquist who also invented an artifical heart - all on Mudcat and all backed up by blue clickies leading to the appropriate websites.


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Subject: RE: gallant forty-twa?
From: BK
Date: 01 Aug 99 - 09:59 AM

Only on the 'Cat could you klutz around, get something wrong, be politely set straight by a helpful freindly phoakie, then learn stuff you've actually been wondering abt for years. Great link to the BW; will pass it on to freinds who might be interested. thanx.

Cheers, BK


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Subject: RE: gallant forty-twa?
From: j0_77
Date: 01 Aug 99 - 09:38 PM

The "Watch" The Highlanders were a broken society at the time the 'regiment' begun.


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Subject: RE: gallant forty-twa?
From: Sourdough
Date: 02 Aug 99 - 03:38 AM

Jo_77

What do you mean, "The "Watch" The Highlanders were a broken society at the time the 'regiment' begun."

Sourdough


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Gallant Forty-Twa
From: Taconicus
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 08:18 AM

This beautiful traditional song from Elizabeth's family repertoire. The 'forty-twa' is the 42nd Highland Regiment, more commonly known as the Black Watch. It was established in 'to be constant guard for securing the peace in the Highlands' and 'to watch upon the braes'. The name comes from the dark tartans it's members wear, which was originally to distinguish them from regular troops who wore red uniforms. Several other traditional songs include the broken token motif but few pack such feeling of loss as this.

Here's a different "Gallant Forty Twa" direct from the folk source (an elderly Scottish woman who still stings it from memory of the past), Elizabeth Stewart: Live from the Fife Traditional Singing Weekend May 2007. On Autumn Harvest ah006: Old Songs & Bothy Ballads: Nick-knack on the Waa. Go to this link to see the lyrics and hear the song itself (and the comments printed at the top of this post):

http://www.springthyme.co.uk/ah006/ah006_Pop4.html

___________________________________________________

Oh it's six weeks come Sunday since ma laddie's went awa,
He's awa tae join the regiment o the gallant Forty Twa.

Chorus:
Oh broken herted I may wander for the loss o ma true lover,
He's awa tae join the regiment o the gallant Forty Twa.

I haed only one sixpence and I broke it into twa,
An I gaed ma love the half o't afore he went awa.

(Chorus)

I will set at my windae and I'll spin at ma wheel,
An I'll I think aboot ma laddie and the times we haed sae weel.

(Chorus)
_____________________________________________________

There is, of course, a much better known and more recent song with the same title that was published by The Poet's Box in Dundee in the 1880s.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Gallant Forty-Twa
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Aug 09 - 08:36 PM

Here's another from The Greig-Duncan Folk Song Collection by Gavin Greig, James Bruce Duncan, Patrick N. Shuldham-Shaw, Emily B. Lyle (Aberdeen: Aberdeen University Press, 1981), page 171:

1. Noo I am a sodger. They ca' me Willie Broon.
I used to be a weaver lad and lived in Maxwelltoon,
But noo I am enlisted and to Perth I'm gaun awa
To join the gallant regiment ca'd the gallant Forty-twa.

2. First time I went oot to drill wi' a lot o' raw recruits,
The sergeant-major checked me for lookin' at my boots.
He tipped me on the shoulder and says, "Jock, ye'll come awa
For ye're sure to mak' an awfu' mess o' the gallant Forty-twa."

3. It's when the bugle sounded for the dinner-time,
I was the first man at the table and in my hand a speen.
The sergeant cam' to call the roll an officer and a'
And he pointed oot the billie o' the gallant Forty-twa.

4. It's when I gang on furlough to Dundee I will gang
And teach all my comrades the way to handle a gun,
I'll tak' them in and stand them a drink and then I'll start a blaw
And then they'll see I'm a corporal in the gallant Forty-twa.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Gallant Forty-Twa
From: Jon Bartlett
Date: 07 Aug 09 - 11:12 PM

Here's another set from Greig-Duncan, this one as sung by Andy Hunter and with a chorus, on the CD "Folk Songs of North-East Scotland: Songs from the Greig-Duncan Collection as performed at the Edinburgh International Festival":

O it's yinced I was a weaver, my name is Jeckie Broon,
It's yinced I was a weaver and I dwelt in Maxwellton,
But noo I've joined the sodgers and tae Perth I'm gaen awa
Tae join that heilan regiment, the gallant forty-twa.

Chorus
Ye can talk aboot your first royals, Scottish fusiliers,
Your Aiberdeen militia and your dandy volunteers,
Your Seaforths wi their streekit kilts, and your Gordons big and braw,
But gae bring tae me the tartan o the gallant forzy-twa.

O the verra first day an parade was wi a lot o young recruits
And the sergeant he got on tae me for aye lookin at my boots,
He tapped me on the shouder says ye'll hae tae come awa,
For you're gaen tae mak a hell o a mess o the gallant forty-twa.

O it's whan the bugle sounded and dinner time cam roon
They handed me a wooden bowl and a muckle wooden spoon;
Roon cam the orderly officer, but he turned his heid awa,
O ye are the biggest glutton in the gallant forty-twa.

It was ince o at manoeuvers the sergeant said tae me,
Yell moot aboot and scoot aboot and see what ye can see,
But if ye keep your heid aye bobbin up, man, ye'll gie us a awa
For ye have the biggest napper in the gallant forty-twa.

O it's noo I've got on furlough, tae Dundee I maun gang,
And I will learn my comrades hoo tae hanle a gun,
They'll tak me in an stan a treat, then it's I'll begin tae blaw
And they'll think that I'm fu colonel ower the gallant forty-twa.

streekit = stripped
moot = skulk
scoot = dart
napper = head

Jon Bartlett


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Gallant Forty-Twa
From: Joe Offer
Date: 08 Aug 09 - 04:00 PM

I'd like to call attention to The Gallant Twenty-Eighth which has no relation to the Forty-Twa, other than gallantry.
But hey, how many songs do you know of that mention Waukesha, Wisconsin?
Not many, you betcha!
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Gallant Forty-Twa
From: Reiver 2
Date: 01 Jun 10 - 05:33 PM

As The Reivers we sang this version we learned from a Clancy Bros. recording].

THE GALLANT FORTY-TWA

1] You may talk about your Lancers and your Irish Fusiliers,
   The Aberdeen Militia or The Queen's Own Volunteers;
   Or any other regiment that's lyin' far awa,
   But gie tae me the tartan of the gallant Forty-Twa

   CHO: And strollin' through the green fields on a summer day,
       Watchin' a' the country girls workin' a' the hay.
       I really was delighted and he stole ma heart awa'
       When I saw him in the tartan o' the gallant Forty-Twa.

2] I never will forget the day his regiment marched past
   The pipes they played a lively tune, but my heart was agast.
   He turned around and smiled farewell, and then from far awa',
   He waved to me the tartan o' the gallant Forty-Twa.

   CHO:

2] Once again I heard the music o' the pipers from a-far,
   They tramped and tramped, the weary men, returnin' from the war.
   And as they nearer drew, I brushed a woeful tear awa'
   Tae see ma bonnie laddie and the gallant Forty Twa.

   CHO: [repeating last two lines]

Either Reiver 1 or I commented once in rehearsal about visualizing the moment described in verse 2, as the soldier suddenly stripping off his kilt and waving it frantically in the air! Every time we sang the song after that, we had to struggle to keep from laughing every time we got to that line in the song. Perhaps it was due to that association that it remained one of our favorite songs for a long time. Maybe, we joked, the regiment was called the Black Watch, because everyone always watched for a soldier to suddenly turn and wave his tartan kilt in the air!

Reiver 2


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Gallant Forty-Twa
From: Tootler
Date: 01 Jun 10 - 06:04 PM

I remember a fragment of another song about the 42nd. It was on a Robin Hall and Jimmie McGregor LP. I only remember the chorus and a fragment of one verse. It went something like this.

Cho.
Wha saw the forty second?
Wha saw them gang awa?
Wha saw the forty second?
Marchin' doon the Broomielaw.

Verse fragment

Some were ......
Some were greetin' for their Ma
Some were ......
Marchin' doon the Broomielaw

At least that's what I can remember. I am pretty sure the LP concerned is still up in the loft, but I have nothing to play it on, so I can't check it just now.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Gallant Forty-Twa
From: Jack Campin
Date: 01 Jun 10 - 06:09 PM

We've had a thread about that one revived in the last day or so. There have been others.

http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16036


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Gallant Forty-Twa
From: GUEST,Sheila L
Date: 03 Aug 15 - 12:20 AM

Reiver2, If the soldier was wearing a full length of plaid, with part of it wrapped as a kilt and the remainder of it slung over his shoulder, he certainly could have waved the upper part to his sweetheart without "flashing" the lower part.

Mudcats, I came to this thread because I heard The Gallant Forty Twa performed this evening along with another set of lyrics called The American Land to the same tune. And I also recognized the tune as the one used for Sink the Bismarck! I was wondering to myself how many different song lyrics are set to this catchy tune, and thought I'd ask the Mudcats!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Gallant Forty-Twa
From: GUEST,Sheila L
Date: 03 Aug 15 - 12:20 AM

Reiver2, If the soldier was wearing a full length of plaid, with part of it wrapped as a kilt and the remainder of it slung over his shoulder, he certainly could have waved the upper part to his sweetheart without "flashing" the lower part.

Mudcats, I came to this thread because I heard The Gallant Forty Twa performed this evening along with another set of lyrics called The American Land to the same tune. And I also recognized the tune as the one used for Sink the Bismarck! I was wondering to myself how many different song lyrics are set to this catchy tune, and thought I'd ask the Mudcats!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Gallant Forty-Twa
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 03 Aug 15 - 09:23 AM

The tune (apparently) was first known as "The Son of a Gambolier."

It appeared in the United States during the Civil War. Parody words frequently appeared from before World War I till the 1950s or '60s.

Nowadays it's usually thought of as the Georgia Tech college "fight song" under the title "The Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech." These lyrics date back to at least 1908.


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