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ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^

DigiTrad:
SWEET KING WILLIAMS TOWN


In Mudcat MIDIs:
Sweet Kingwilliamstown


Sally Burnell 02 Aug 99 - 09:22 PM
John Moulden 03 Aug 99 - 05:38 AM
GUEST,Johanna V. Psalidas 22 Aug 08 - 12:56 PM
Jim Dixon 25 Aug 08 - 10:30 PM
Jim Dixon 26 Aug 08 - 08:23 AM
GUEST,kenny 26 Aug 08 - 08:46 AM
GUEST,Jerry O'Reilly 27 Aug 08 - 04:03 AM
Joe Offer 27 Aug 08 - 06:17 PM
Joe Offer 27 Aug 08 - 06:35 PM
Joe Offer 27 Aug 08 - 07:08 PM
GUEST,David Ingerson 27 Aug 08 - 08:56 PM
GUEST,Morrisbrendon 28 Aug 08 - 03:42 AM
Joe Offer 28 Aug 08 - 04:16 AM
Acorn4 28 Aug 08 - 05:36 AM
GUEST,morrisbrendon 29 Aug 08 - 04:42 AM
GUEST,Elizabeth 29 Aug 08 - 05:49 AM
Acorn4 29 Aug 08 - 06:06 AM
Acorn4 29 Aug 08 - 06:30 AM
GUEST,morrisbrendon 29 Aug 08 - 07:07 AM
GUEST,Christy Kearney 27 Jan 09 - 01:18 PM
MartinRyan 27 Jan 09 - 01:34 PM
David Ingerson 27 Jan 09 - 10:49 PM
David Ingerson 27 Jan 09 - 11:13 PM
GUEST,Jerry O'Reilly 28 Jan 09 - 06:55 AM
David Ingerson 29 Jan 09 - 01:38 AM
GUEST 15 Dec 10 - 09:05 PM
zozimus 16 Dec 10 - 05:37 AM
GUEST,schlimmerkerl 16 Dec 10 - 05:10 PM
GUEST,Senan Molony 01 Jan 12 - 01:46 PM
Rog Peek 02 Jan 12 - 01:27 PM
GUEST,me2u 09 Apr 12 - 05:03 PM
GUEST,kenny 10 Apr 12 - 04:30 AM
GUEST 11 Apr 12 - 11:37 AM
GUEST,Joe O'Connor Rechtaire CCE 31 Oct 12 - 08:07 PM
MartinRyan 25 May 13 - 11:31 AM
GUEST,Thady Quill 31 Dec 15 - 10:28 PM
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Subject: In Sweet Kingwilliamstown, by Daniel Buckley
From: Sally Burnell
Date: 02 Aug 99 - 09:22 PM

The subject of this message is the title of a song I heard sung at a concert recently. It has a very strange tale to it: The song was composed by a Daniel Buckley, who was a 3rd class passenger on board the Titanic who hailed from Kingwilliamstown (now Ballydesmond) in Ireland. He boarded at Queenstown (now Cobh) and traveled steerage. As the ship began to founder, Buckley was the one who smashed the gates separating the steerage passengers from rescue, allowing them to go up on deck to try to be saved. Buckley managed to get to a lifeboat and was rescued and made his way to the US. He enlisted in World War I, and tragically, was the last American soldier killed on the last day of World War I.

I would LOVE it if anyone has the words and music to this haunting emigration song and could somehow send them to me. It was a powerful and affecting song and I really want to learn it. Buckley's story as well is particularly haunting, and the fact that he left us this one amazing song has left a lasting effect on me. I would appreciate any help that anyone could give me in locating the words and music. Thanks!

Sally Burnell sburnell@raex.com


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Subject: RE: In Sweet Kingwilliamstown, by Daniel Buckley
From: John Moulden
Date: 03 Aug 99 - 05:38 AM

It's in the Digitrad Database. Search under "Kingwill"


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Subject: RE: In Sweet Kingwilliamstown, by Daniel Buckley
From: GUEST,Johanna V. Psalidas
Date: 22 Aug 08 - 12:56 PM

Thanks to John Moulden I found the words to this song.
Just two days ago I found out that Daniel Buckley was my great-grandmother's first cousin so this means I also have Irish roots which I never knew. I would also like the music or hear it being sung by someone. So if you know where I could find it please let me know.
Daniel Buckley has an amazing story. I am so fascinated and even more being a descendant of his.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 25 Aug 08 - 10:30 PM

United States, and William Alden Smith. "Titanic" Disaster: Hearing Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Commerce, United States Senate : Sixty-Second Congress, Second Session, Pursuant to S. Res. 283, Directing the Committee to Investigate the Causes Leading to the Wreck of the White Star Liner "Titanic" ... : [April 19-May 25, 1912]. Washington [D.C.]: G.P.O., 1912, page 1017ff:

TESTIMONY OF DANIEL BUCKLEY.

[Testimony taken separately before Senator William Alden Smith, chairman of the subcommittee.]

The witness was sworn by Senator Smith.

  Senator SMITH. Mr. Buckley, where do you live?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. 855 Trement Avenue, Bronx.
  Senator SMITH. How old are you?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Twenty-one years old.
  Senator SMITH. Where did you get aboard the Titanic?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. At Queenstown.
  Senator SMITH. Had you been living in Ireland?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes; I lived in King Williamstown, Town Court.
  Senator SMITH. How did you happen to come over to America?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. I wanted to come over here to make some money. I came in the Titanic because she was a new steamer.
  This night of the wreck I was sleeping in my room on the Titanic, in the steerage. There were three other boys from the same place sleeping in the same room with me.
  I heard some terrible noise and I jumped out on the floor, and the first thing I knew my feet were getting wet; the water was just coming in slightly. I told the other fellows to get up, that there was something wrong and that the water was coming in. They only laughed at me. One of them says: "Get back into bed. You are not in Ireland now."
  I got on my clothes as quick as I could, and the three other fellows got out. The room was very small, so I got out, to give them room to dress themselves.
  Two sailors came along, and they were shouting: "All up on deck! unless you want to get drowned."
  When I heard this, I went for the deck as quick as I could. When I got up on the deck I saw everyone having those life belts on only myself; so I got sorry, and said I would go back again where I was sleeping and get one of those life preservers; because there was one there for each person.
  I went back again, and just as I was going down the last flight of stairs the water was up four steps, and dashing up. I did not go back into the room, because I could not. When I went back toward the room the water was coming up three steps up the stairs, or four steps; so I did not go any farther. I got back on the deck again, and just as I got back there, I was looking around to see if I could get any of those life belts, and I met a first-class passenger, and he had two. He gave me one, and fixed it on me.
  Then the lifeboats were preparing. There were five lifeboats sent out. I was in the sixth. I was holding the ropes all the time, helping to let down the five lifeboats that went down first, as well as I could.
  When the sixth lifeboat was prepared, there was a big crowd of men standing on the deck. And they all jumped in. So I said I would take my chance with them.
  Senator SMITH. Who were they?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Passengers and sailors and firemen, mixed. There were no ladies there at the same time.
  When they jumped, I said I would go too. I went into the boat. Then two officers came along and said all of the men could come out. And they brought a lot of steerage passengers with them; and they were mixed, every way, ladies and gentlemen. And they said all the men could get out and let the ladies in. But six men were left in the boat. I think they were firemen and sailors.
  I was crying. There was a woman in the boat, and she had thrown her shawl over me, and she told me to stay in there. I believe she was Mrs. Astor. Then they did not see me, and the boat was lowered down into the water, and we rowed away out from the steamer.
  The men that were in the boat at first fought, and would not get out, but the officers drew their revolvers, and fired shots over our heads, and then the men got out. When the boat was ready, we were lowered down into the water and rowed away out from the steamer. We were only about 15 minutes out when she sank.
  Senator SMITH. What else happened?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. One of the firemen that was working on the Titanic told me, when I got on board the Carpathia and he was speaking to me, that he did not think it was any iceberg; that it was only that they wanted to make a record, and they ran too much steam and the boilers bursted. That is what he said.
  We sighted the lights of the big steamer, the Carpathia. All the women got into a terrible commotion and jumped around. They were hallooing and the sailors were trying to keep them sitting down, and they would not do it. They were standing up all the time.
  When we got into the Carpathia we were treated very good. We got all kinds of refreshments.
  Senator SMITH. Did you feel a shock from the collision when the ship struck?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes; I did.
  Senator SMITH. And did that wake you up?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. It did. I did not feel any shock in the steamer; only just heard a noise. I heard a kind of a grating noise.
  Senator SMITH. Did you get right out of bed?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes; I did.
  Senator SMITH. When you got out, you got into the water? There was water in your compartment in the steerage?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes; water was there slightly. There was not very much.
  Senator SMITH. How much?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. The floor was only just getting wet. It was only coming in under the door very slightly.
  Senator SMITH. You had two or three boys with you?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes; three boys that came from the same place in Ireland.
  Senator SMITH. What became of those other three boys?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. I can not say. I did not see them any more after leaving the room where I parted from them.
  Senator SMITH. They were lost?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes; they were lost.
  Senator SMITH. Was there any effort made on the part of the officers or crew to hold the steerage passengers in the steerage?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. I do not think so.
  Senator SMITH. Were you permitted to go on up to the top deck without any interference?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes, sir. They tried to keep us down at first on our steerage deck. They did not want us to go up to the first-class place at all.
  Senator SMITH. Who tried to do that?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. I can not say who they were. I think they were sailors.
  Senator SMITH. What happened then? Did the steerage passengers try to get out?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes; they did. There was one steerage passenger there, and he was getting up the steps, and just as he was going in a little gate a fellow came along and chucked him down; threw him down into the steerage place. This fellow got excited, and he ran after him, and he could not find him. He got up over the little gate. He did not find him.
  Senator SMITH. What gate do you mean?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. A little gate just at the top of the stairs going up into the first-class deck.
  Senator SMITH. There was a gate between the steerage and the first-class deck?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes. The first-class deck was higher up than the steerage deck, and there were some steps leading up to it; 9 or 10 steps, and a gate just at the top of the steps.
  Senator SMITH. Was the gate locked?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. It was not locked at the time we made the attempt to get up there, but the sailor, or whoever he was, locked it. So that this fellow that went up after him broke the lock on it, and he went after the fellow that threw him down. He said if he could get hold of him he would throw him into the ocean.
  Senator SMITH. Did these passengers in the steerage have any opportunity at all of getting out?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes; they had.
  Senator SMITH. What opportunity did they have?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. I think they had as much chance as the first and second class passengers.
  Senator SMITH. After this gate was broken?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes; because they were all mixed. All the steerage passengers went up on the first-class deck at this time, when the gate was broken. They all got up there. They could not keep them down.
  Senator SMITH. How much water was there in the steerage when you got out of the steerage?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. There was only just a little bit. Just like you would throw a bucket of water on the floor; just very little, like that.
  Senator SMITH. But it was coming in, was it?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes; it was only just commencing to come in. When I went down the second time, to get one of the life preservers, there was a terrible lot of water there, in a very short time.
  Senator SMITH. How much?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. It was just about three steps up the stairs, on the last flight of stairs that I got down.
  Senator SMITH. Did you find any people down in the steerage when you went back the second time?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. There were a number, but I can not say how many.
  All the boys and girls were coming up against me. They were all going for the deck.
  Senator SMITH. Were they excited?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes; they were. The girls were very excited, and they were crying; and all the boys were trying to console them and saying that it was nothing serious.
  Senator SMITH. Were you crying at the time?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Not at this time. There was a girl from my place, and just when she got down into the lifeboat she thought that the boat was sinking into the water. Her name was Bridget Bradley. She climbed one of the ropes us far as she could and tried to get back into the Titanic again, as she thought she would he safer in it than in the lifeboat. She was just getting up when one of the sailors went out to her and pulled her down again.
  Senator SMITH. How many people were there in the steerage when you got out of bed?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. I can not say.
  Senator SMITH. Could you see many people around?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes, sir; there was a great crowd of people. They were all terribly excited. They were all going for the decks as quick as they could. The people had no difficulty in stepping into the lifeboat. It was close to the ship.
  Senator SMITH. I want to ask you whether, from what you saw that night, you feel that the steerage passengers had an equal opportunity with other passengers and the crew in getting into the lifeboats?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes; I think they had as good a chance as the first and second class passengers.
  Senator SMITH. You think they did have?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes. But at the start they tried to keep them down on their own deck.
  Senator SMITH. But they broke down this gate to which you have referred?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes, sir.
  Senator SMITH. And then they went on up as others did, mingling all together?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes; they were all mixed up together.
  Senator SMITH. Have you told all you know, of your own knowledge, about that?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes.
  Senator SMITH. Were you where you could see the ship when she went down?
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes; I saw the lights just going out as she went down. It made a terrible noise, like thunder.
  Senator SMITH. I wish you would tell the committee in what part of the ship this steerage was located.
  Mr. BUCKLEY. Down, I think, in the lower part of the steamer, in the after part of the ship; at the back.
  Senator SMITH. That is all. Thank you.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 26 Aug 08 - 08:23 AM

Brewer's Dictionary Of Irish Phrase & Fable By Sean McMahon, Jo O'Donoghue, Maeve Binchy, has the following quote:

SWEET KINGWILLIAMSTOWN [excerpt]
Danny Buckley

My bonny barque bounced light and free
Across the surging foam,
Which bears me far from Innisfail,
To seek a foreign home.
A lonely exile driven neath
Misfortune's coldest frown,
From my loved home and cherished friends
In dear Kingwilliamstown.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)
From: GUEST,kenny
Date: 26 Aug 08 - 08:46 AM

The song "Sweet Kingwilliamstown" was recorded by Cara Dillon, [ at the age of around 16, I'd guess ], on a cassette-only release, when she was a member of the Northern Ireland group "Oige". It's one of the finest renditions of a traditional song I've ever heard.
I've a feeling it was also recorded by Andy M.Stewart on one of his CDs, although I've never heard his version.
The tune, as a slow-air, was recorded by Kerry fiddle-player Julia Clifford on a record she made with her flute-player brother Billy Clifford.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SWEET KINGWILLIAMSTOWN (Daniel Buckley)
From: GUEST,Jerry O'Reilly
Date: 27 Aug 08 - 04:03 AM

This is the song as I have it.


SWEET KINGWILLIAMSTOWN
(Daniel Buckley)

My bonnie barque floats light and free
Across the surging foam
It bears me far from Innisfail
To seek a foreign home
A lonely exile traveller
Driven neath misfortune's cruel frown
From my own home and cherished friends
In dear Kingwilliamstown

Whilst here upon the deck I stand
And watch the surging foam
Fresh thoughts arise within in my mind
Of friends I'll ne'er see more
Of moonlight deeds and happy hours
While fast the tears roll down
Still thinking of my friends so dear
In sweet Kingwilliamstown

Shall I no more gaze on your shore
Or roam your mountains high
Or stray along Black Water's banks
Where I roamed when just a boy
Or watch the sun over Knocknaboul
Light up the heather brown
Before she flings her farewell gleams
O'er sweet Kingwilliamstown

I know not yet but I fondly hope
Where e'er my footsteps roam
For cherished greatly in my mind
Are thoughts of love and home
Though fair is the land where I stand
As night falls gently down
May God be with you Motherland
Farewell Kingwilliamstown


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Subject: DT Corr: Sweet King Williams Town
From: Joe Offer
Date: 27 Aug 08 - 06:17 PM

Jerry, what's the source for your text?

The Digital Tradition lyrics are an exact transcription of the lyrics in the CD booklet from the 1994 Andy M. Stewart album, The Man In the Moon - except for one egregious error: in the third line of the song, the DT has "It bear's me far from Innisfail." I hate being pedantic about grammar, but it's in my nature as the son of an English teacher.
I'd like to propose the following corrected text for the DT, but I'm not completely sure the note I added at the bottom is completely justified. Can we document the attribution of the song to Daniel Buckley, and are we sure that the songwriter was the Titanic survivor and that he was also the last US soldier killed in WWI???
Any chance we could find a printed text of this song, as written by Buckley?
-Joe-

SWEET KING WILLIAMS TOWN
(Daniel Buckley)

My bonnie barque floats light and free
Across the surging foam
It bears me far from Innisfail
To seek a foreign home
A lonely exile traveller
'Neath misfortune's cruel frown
Away from home and the friends so dear
In sweet King Williams Town

While here upon the deck I stand
And watch the surging foam
Kind thoughts arise all in my mind
For friends I'll ne'er see more
For childhood days and all happy hours
As fast the tears roll down
For my old home and the friends so dear
In sweet King Williams Town

Shall I no more gaze on that shore
Or view those mountains high
Or gaze along Black Water's banks
Where I roamed as a boy
For to view the sun over Knockacummer*
Light up the heather brown
Before she flings
Her little farewell beams
Over sweet King Williams Town


I know not yet but I fondly hope
Where e'er my footsteps roam
For cherished greatly in my mind
Are thoughts of love and home
Though fair is the land where I stand
As night falls gently down
May God be with you Motherland
Farewell Kingwilliamstown


Source: CD booklet from the 1994 Andy M. Stewart album, The Man In the Moon. The final verse is from an unknown source, and is not in the Stewart recording.

*Knocknaboul??? - the CD booklet has Knockacummer, but it's hard to tell what Stewart actually sings. It sounds like "Knocknamour."

Stewart says he learned the song from the singing of Cara Dillon. Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase and Fable attributes the song to Danny Buckley. Other sources report that Daniel Buckley was a Titanic survivor who was reportedly the last American soldier to die on the last day of World War I.
Kingwilliamstown in County Cork is now called Ballydesmond.

@emigrate @Irish
filename[ KINGWILL
MR
oct97


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: Joe Offer
Date: 27 Aug 08 - 06:35 PM

Here are the notes for "Sweet King Williamstown" from the Mick Moloney recording Far from the Shamrock Shore:

    This song was written in the early 1900s by Daniel Buckley, a native of King Williamstown in the Sliabh Luachra area of County Cork, now known more by its original name of Ballydesmond. Buckley was a "character" with a precocious talent for singing and song writing, well known and liked in the locality. He decided to emigrate to the United states in 1912, at the age of 22, along with his 16 year old cousin Nora O'Leary who had received an offer to work as a domestic in New York. The ship they sailed on out of Queenstown Harbor was none other than the Titanic. When the ship struck the iceberg Danny Buckley was among those who led the charge from steerage to first class, breaking down the dividing doors in the process. He made it onto a lifeboat but, when officers with revolvers came to order all the men out of boats, Danny's nerve broke. As he lay cowering in the corner of a lifeboat, trying to hide, one of the female lifeboat passengers took pity on him and threw her shawl over him. Thus disguised as a woman, he managed to escape detection and was among those who made it safely to New York. The whole story came out during a U.S. Senate hearing on the tragedy when he was forced to appear and tell of his experiences.   

    Indeed there was hardly ever a more reluctant witness subpoenaed to appear before that august body! Afterwards he was known disparagingly among the New York Irish as "Danny Buckley the girl." Probably motivated by a desire to prove his manhood, he enlisted in the American army in World War I. He was transferred overseas in 1918 and in the last week of the war was the last American solder to be killed -- ironically while helping wounded fellow soldiers escape the battlefields of France. "Sweet King Williamstown," his most famous composition, is still sung to the day in his native Ballydesmond where he is buried in the local cemetery right beside his cousin Nora.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SWEET KINGWILLIAMSTOWN
From: Joe Offer
Date: 27 Aug 08 - 07:08 PM

Here's what I hear on the Mick Moloney recording. I'm still looking for a printed source.


SWEET KINGWILLIAMSTOWN
(Daniel Buckley - as sung by Mick Moloney)

My bonnie barque floats wild and free
Across the surging foam
It brings me far from Innisfail
To seek a foreign home
A lonely exile driven far
By misfortune's cruel frown
Far from my home and my friends so dear
In sweet Kingwilliamstown

While here upon this deck I stand
And I gaze upon the darkening shore
Kind thoughts arise all in my mind
Of the friends I'll ne'er see more
Of moonlit nights and happy hours
How fast the tears roll down
While I'm thinking on my friends so dear
In sweet Kingwilliamstown

Shall I no more gaze on that shore
Or view those mountains high
Or walk along Blackwaterside
Where I roamed once as a boy
Or watch the sun over Knocknaboul
Light up the heather brown
Before she flings
Her farewell beams
O'er sweet Kingwilliamstown

I know not but I fondly hope
That where e'er my footsteps roam
I will cherish deep within my heart
Kind thoughts and love of home
Fast fades the shore and on my soul
The night comes sadly down
So, fare thee well, old Ireland,
And sweet Kingwilliamstown


transcribed by ear from the 2002 Mick Moloney recording Far from the Shamrock Shore
I could use some help on this transcription. If anyone has the CD, please give it a listen. Moloney has a book titled Far from the Shamrock Shore, which accompanies the CD. If the CD or book have printed lyrics, please post them. I bought the album as an MP3 download.
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: GUEST,David Ingerson
Date: 27 Aug 08 - 08:56 PM

I was just talking about this song today with a fellow student here at the Daltai na Gaeilge's Irish immersion week in upstate New York. It's a beautiful air with somewhat affected words but it comes across powerfully when sung sensitively.

I don't have access to my library right now but I believe three verses of it are printed in "Songs of Cork" edited by Thomas O'Connain--and I'm sure that spelling is botched.

I can post that version when I get home in a week.

Cheers,

David


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: GUEST,Morrisbrendon
Date: 28 Aug 08 - 03:42 AM

Kingwilliamstown is now called Ballydesmond, but I still occasionally hear some of the older generation calling it "Williamstown". The placename mentioned is not "Knockacummer", I would guess somebody either misheard or just couldn't make out the word and took a shot. "Knocknaboul" is correct. Ballydesmond is in County Cork, very close to the Kerry border. It comes from the Irish "baile deasmumhan", the town of South Munster. I've heard variants referring to other parts of Ireland. It's a hard song to sing, it covers the full register (more than that in my case!). Andy M. Stewart does a fine version, referred to above.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Aug 08 - 04:16 AM

Hi, Morrisbrendon. I'll buy 'Knocknaboul' for the Mick Moloney version, and I changed my text above. As for the Andy M. Stewart version, what I hear is more like "Knocknamour," but the CD booklet says "Knockacummer" - I made changes to reflect the confusion.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: Acorn4
Date: 28 Aug 08 - 05:36 AM

I heard this lovely song on "Folkwaves" about two years ago sung by a band called "Sleevenotes". I don't know anything about them, but do still have the cassette. As it's a cassette I can't online it, but if you want to leave me your address in the messages area, I can do you a copy and send it.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: GUEST,morrisbrendon
Date: 29 Aug 08 - 04:42 AM

Hello Joe, yes you are correct, Andy M. sings "Knockacummer", or something like that, what I meant is that there is in reality no such place...which is not a criticism of his version, just a point of information. Mick Moloney has been to the area (he organises tours from the US) so he would have heard the local version...it's still a popular song around here, almost always sung unaccompanied.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: GUEST,Elizabeth
Date: 29 Aug 08 - 05:49 AM

Acorn4, the band is called Sliabh Notes, and Sweet Kingwilliamstown is on their album called Along Blackwater's Bank (Ossian), sung by Tommy O'Sullivan.

Elizabeth


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: Acorn4
Date: 29 Aug 08 - 06:06 AM

Elizabeth,

Thanks for the correction. As I just heard it on the radio I was working phonetically from the pronunciation of the presenter.

Just checked on Youtube and they are on there but not doing that particular song unfortunately.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: Acorn4
Date: 29 Aug 08 - 06:30 AM

..... apparently Sliabh means sleeve, referring to a geog location so perhaps I wasn't so far wrong...

It's actually quite a hard song to sing as it has a big range - bit like Carrickfergus.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: GUEST,morrisbrendon
Date: 29 Aug 08 - 07:07 AM

The name is a play on words...Sliabh (pronounced "shlee-uv", more or less), means a mountain. They play a lot of music from the Sliabh Luachra area of Kerry ("the rushy mountain")...so, musical notes from the mountain or written notes on an album sleeve. Speaking of wordplay, the fiddle player with Sliabh Notes, Matt Cranitch, has published a fiddle tutor called "Take a Bow". I think it's on the Elderly instruments site.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: GUEST,Christy Kearney
Date: 27 Jan 09 - 01:18 PM

The correct place name is Knocknaboul which refers to a townland in Kingswilliamstown (Ballydesmond)parish.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: MartinRyan
Date: 27 Jan 09 - 01:34 PM

Joe

The song is not in Mick Moloney's book - nor in the CD that accompanies it! There was some complicated story behind the two CD's concerned.

Regards

p.s.Jerry O'Reilly's version is likely to be from an oral source - and none the worse for that!


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: David Ingerson
Date: 27 Jan 09 - 10:49 PM

Here, finally, is the version I promised to post last summer. It's from "Down Erin's Lovely Lee: Songs of Cork" edited by Tomas O'Canainn. He collected it from Seamus Mac Mathuna, himself a collector, who said he collected it in the Sliabh Luachra area.

Sweet Kingwilliamstown

My bonnie barque floats light and free across the surging foam.
It bears me far from Inisfail to seek a foreign home.
A lonely exile driven neath misfortunes cruel frown
From my own home and the friends so dear in sweet Kingwilliamstown.

Whilst here upon the deck I stand and watch the surging foam;
Kind thoughts arise all in my mind for friends I'll ne'er see more;
For childhood's days and happy hours how fast the tears roll down,
For my old home and the friends so dear in sweet Kingwilliamstown.

Shall I no more gaze on that shore or view those mountains high,
Or gaze along Blackwater's banks where I roved as a boy;
Or view the sun o'er Knocknabower light up the heather brown,
Before she flings her farewell beams o'er sweet Kingwilliamstown.


The words are essentially the same as the other versions above except in the first line of the second verse, where Seamus might have mixed up the verses, for it's a repeat of the first verse and doesn't rhyme with the second verse. That and the missing fourth verse.

Cheers,

David


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: David Ingerson
Date: 27 Jan 09 - 11:13 PM

As for the Knock-nabower, -naboul, -acummer issue, Seamus apparently sings Knocknabower. I can find no Knocknabower on the largest scale Ordnance Survey (half inch to the mile) near Ballydesmond.

Knocknaboul, as was pointed out above, is a townland a little over two miles west of Ballydesmond.

Knockacummer is a 1342 foot hill about eight miles due northwest of Ballydesmond and is one of the tallest hills in the area (although not by much).

It seems to me that the singer is recalling a hill bathed in the light of a setting sun ("...farewell beams..."). If that's the case, then Knockacummer makes the most sense. From Ballydesmond one could presumably see the sunset light up Knockacummer. The small rise that's near Knocknaboul would only cast a shadow toward the town.

Cheers,

David


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Subject: Lyr Add: SWEET KINGWILLIAMSTOWN (Daniel Buckley)
From: GUEST,Jerry O'Reilly
Date: 28 Jan 09 - 06:55 AM

Transcribed today from the singing of Pa Keane of Gneeveguilla in Sliabh Luachra. Recording made in the summer of 1988. I've heard the song sung by lots of local singers and all of them sing Knocknaboul in the third verse!


SWEET KINGWILLIAMSTOWN
(Daniel Buckley)

My bonnie barque floats light and free
Across the surging foam
It takes me far from Innisfail
To seek a foreign home
A lonely exile driven neath
Misfortune's cruel frown
From my own home and cherished friends
In dear Kingwilliamstown

Whilst here upon the deck I stand
And watch the surging foam
Fresh thoughts arise within in my mind
Of friends I'll ne'er see more
Of moonlight deeds and happy hours
While fast the tears roll down
Still thinking of those friends I've left
In dear Kingwilliamstown

Shall I no more gaze on your shore
Or roam your mountains wild
Or stray along Black Water's banks
Where I roamed when but a child
Or watch the sun o'er Knocknaboul
Light up the heather brown
Before she flings her farewell gleams
O'er sweet Kingwilliamstown

I know not yet but I fondly hope
Where e'er my footsteps roam
For cherished greatly in my mind
Are thoughts of love and home
Though fair is the land wherein I stand
As night falls gently down
May God be with you Motherland
Farewell Kingwilliamstown


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: David Ingerson
Date: 29 Jan 09 - 01:38 AM

Thanks, Jerry, for that bit of information. If local people all sing Knocknaboul, then Knocknaboul it is!

Cheers,

David


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Dec 10 - 09:05 PM

Its KNOCKNABOUL alright. Take it from me...I live in Ballydesmond....this songs' lyrics vary a little from version to version.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: zozimus
Date: 16 Dec 10 - 05:37 AM

For those looking up old maps, Knocknaboul may or may not be present in it's Irish form, Cnoc na mBall, "the hill from where many places can be seen". It has not been mentioned so far that this song is a localised version of "Dear Old Wexford Town" which begins
My bonny barque bounds light and free across the ocean foam
It bears me far from Inisfail to seek a distant home
A lonely exile driven neath misfortunes coldest frown
From my loved home and cherished friends
And Dear Old Wexford Town.
For a fuller version, see www.tbrowne.net/stories in song.
Tim Browne published a book called "Stories in Song Vol 1," a miscellany of Songs, Lyrics and anecdotes from the Barony of Duhallow
in 2007 and is well worth seeking out.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: GUEST,schlimmerkerl
Date: 16 Dec 10 - 05:10 PM

I believe Dan Milner also has this, but i'm not sure if he's recorded it.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: GUEST,Senan Molony
Date: 01 Jan 12 - 01:46 PM

There is a transcription error in the US Inquiry transcript, viz -

Senator SMITH. Had you been living in Ireland?
Mr. BUCKLEY. Yes; I lived in King Williamstown, Town Court.

Of course, what Buckley is saying is:

"Yes; I lived in King Williamstown, County Cork."

There is no 'Town Court' in Ballydesmond.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: Rog Peek
Date: 02 Jan 12 - 01:27 PM

Just a small point, but could I suggest that 'Black Water's banks' should be 'Blackwater's banks', as in David's version.

Rog


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: GUEST,me2u
Date: 09 Apr 12 - 05:03 PM

Easily, the best version I have heard of the song Sweet Kingwilliamstown was by the young Irish Trad band "Óige", who emerged in the early 1990s, with "Cara Dillon" as their first vocalist.

They recorded 3 albums; "Inspiration", "Live" and "Bang On", and Sweet Kingwilliamstown appears on their first album Inspiration.

Due to the common used technology of the early 1990s, the album Inspiration was only ever recorded on cassette format, whereas the later 2 albums (Live, and Bang On) are still available on CD and download.

There is infact a discussion on "the session" website where someone has said of Cara Dillon with Óige's version of this song:

"You don't happen to have Cara singing "Sweet Kingwilliamstown" do you, Murrough. I've never heard better." from this link:

http://www.thesession.org/discussions/display/23346

The band website for Óige can be found at:

http://www.tradcentre.com/oige


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: GUEST,kenny
Date: 10 Apr 12 - 04:30 AM

That was me at "thesession". See also comment above 26th Aug 2008.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Apr 12 - 11:37 AM

Have a look at the last story on this program recently aired by RTE

http://www.rte.ie/player/#!v=1144233

The story will only be valid up until 30th April


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: GUEST,Joe O'Connor Rechtaire CCE
Date: 31 Oct 12 - 08:07 PM

Billy Clifford is Julia Clifford's son ..not her brother .


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: MartinRyan
Date: 25 May 13 - 11:31 AM

For a recording o f this song;

Click here

Regards


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: GUEST,Thady Quill
Date: 31 Dec 15 - 10:28 PM

I'd just like to point out that Knocknacummer would be suitable as would Knocknaboul. Knocknacummer is about halfway between Rockchapel and Newmarket as the bird flies, and is also known as Coolroe.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: Gabriel
Date: 04 Jul 17 - 08:30 AM

Wonderful song.
Made all the more poignant for me by the assertion by Daniel Buckley in his testimony that it was Mrs Astor who threw the shawl over him in the lifeboat. This would have meant that Buckley was on Lifeboat 13. My grandfather's cousin Robert Hopkins from the Ardoyne in Belfast was an able seaman assigned to that lifeboat.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Sweet Kingwilliamstown (Daniel Buckley)^^^
From: GUEST,radriano
Date: 19 Jul 17 - 12:26 PM

A lovely song indeed. I had the privilege of hearing it sung live by Gabriel McArtle at the Singing Workshop at Willie Clancy Festival, Ireland, 1984.

The workshop was a lovely affair. There was an hour's lecture each day and then traditional singers who were attending the festival were brought in to sing for us.

Transcribed from the cassette tape I made at the time, Gabriel McArtle sings:

Sweet Kingwilliamstown
[Singing Workshop at Willie Clancy Festival, Ireland, 1984]
Gabriel McArtle

My bonny barque floats light and free
Across the surging foam
It takes me far from Innisfail
To seek a foreign home
A lonely exile driven 'neath
Misfortune's cruel frown
Far from my home and friends so dear
In sweet Kingwilliamstown

Whilst here alone on deck I stand
And watch the surging foam
Kind thoughts arise all in my heart
Of friends I'll ne'er see more
Of happy hours and childhood days
How fast the tears roll down
To thinking of my own dear home
In sweet Kingwilliamstown

Shall I no more gaze on that shore
Or view those mountains high
Or stroll along Blackwater Side
Where I roamed as a boy
Or view the sun o'er Knockacummer
Fall o'er the heather brown (light up the heather brown)
Before she flings her farewell beams
On sweet Kingwilliamstown

I know not but I fondly hope
Where'er my footsteps fall
Will always linger in my heart
Sweet thoughts of friends at home
So fare thee well, Sweet Desmond Town
As the night comes softly down
Oh, God be with you, Ireland
And sweet Kingwilliamstown


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