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Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War

DigiTrad:
FREIHEIT
HANS BEIMLER
LA QUINCE BRIGADA
LOS CUATROS GENERALES
SI ME QUIERES ESCRIBIR
VENGA JALEO
VIVA LA QUINCE BRIGADA


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GeoffLawes 07 Jun 11 - 06:52 PM
GeoffLawes 01 Jun 11 - 06:52 PM
mikesamwild 29 May 11 - 09:06 AM
GeoffLawes 09 May 11 - 07:03 PM
GeoffLawes 20 Apr 11 - 07:30 PM
mikesamwild 18 Apr 11 - 12:33 PM
mikesamwild 17 Apr 11 - 01:12 PM
GUEST 10 Mar 11 - 12:03 PM
GeoffLawes 20 Feb 11 - 05:43 PM
GeoffLawes 20 Feb 11 - 01:10 PM
mikesamwild 18 Feb 11 - 10:31 AM
mikesamwild 18 Feb 11 - 10:27 AM
GeoffLawes 11 Feb 11 - 05:38 PM
GeoffLawes 06 Feb 11 - 10:31 AM
GeoffLawes 30 Jan 11 - 09:11 PM
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GeoffLawes 30 Jan 11 - 08:39 PM
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GeoffLawes 14 Oct 10 - 07:12 PM
GUEST,Andy Roberts 09 Jul 10 - 06:04 AM
GeoffLawes 11 Jun 10 - 12:29 PM
Tattie Bogle 21 May 10 - 03:25 PM
GeoffLawes 09 May 10 - 07:06 PM
GUEST,Duncan Longstaff 08 May 10 - 08:08 AM
mikesamwild 27 Apr 10 - 01:19 PM
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GeoffLawes 24 Apr 10 - 07:05 PM
GUEST,Guest-Tim Parker 20 Apr 10 - 11:05 PM
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mikesamwild 19 Apr 10 - 02:37 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: COMMUNIST VERSION OF SUSSEX BY THE SEA
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 07 Jun 11 - 06:52 PM

COMMUNIST VERSION OF SUSSEX BY THE SEA

by Ernie Trory

Brass Band version of the Tune on YouTube
HERE

Now is the time for marching, under our banners red,
Rank upon rank advancing, surely we forge ahead,
So let your voices ring, comrades, all who would be free,
And we'll sing a song as we march along,
Of peace and liberty.
For we are the men from Sussex, Sussex by the sea,
We plough and sow and reap and mow, and useful men are we,
And when you go from Sussex, wherever you may be,
You can tell them all that we stand or fall,
For peace and liberty.

Sussex, Sussex men are we,
On our march to victory,
Workingmen unite, we can win the fight,
And Sussex shall be free.

Out of the years of struggle, out of the years of toil,
Stride forth the people's heroes, sons of the Sussex soil,
The banner that they raised aloft, our heritage today,
We will bear with pride, marching side by side,
Where they have led the way.
Far o'er the seas we wander, wide through the world we roam,
Into the Spanish trenches, fighting for those at home,
Wherever there's a fight, comrades, to save democracy.
You can be sure then, you will find the men,
Of Sussex by the sea.

These words are reproduced from Between The Wars" (Recollections Of A Communist Organiser), Ernie Trory, Crabtree Press 1974. ISBN 0950350303 & 9780950350301

The book is the recollections of Ernie Trory, a communist historian and party organiser from Sussex who says in the bookthat he wrote new words for the famous Sussex song ( Wikipedia entry) especially for a Communist Party demonstration in 1938.He says, on pages 112 and 113:

The whole Party threw itself whole-heartedly into the preliminary work of producing historical banners, making flags and generally giving publicity to the forthcoming event. A thousand copies of a souvenir programme were printed and put on sale well in advance. For the first time the Brighton and Hove Herald gave us an advanced write-up, commenting on our programme as follows:

" The souvenir programme of the march sets out the part that Sussex men have played in history, and mentions such figures as Jack Cade, Deryk Carver and Tom Paine. It refers to the foundations of the Brighton Communist Party in 1926, and finishes up with the significant line, '1937: Tom Elloit, secretary of the Worthing Labour Party, is killed in action. somewhere in Spain'
" On the back of the pamphlet are set out a Communist version of 'Sussex by the Sea' and the 'International'."
The song referred to, "Sussex by the Sea"," was in its original form adopted as the marching song of the Sussex County Regiment. We kept the tune, which went with a good swing, but I rewrote the words giving them the social significance needed for our forthcoming demonstration. Later our version became very popular in the Labour Movement and in many ways better known than the original.

On the Sunday afternoon of the 7th August 1938, the demonstration lined up in front of the Brighton Labour Club in London Road, headed by the South West London Workers' Band, borrowed for the occasion.
Behind the band massed red flags were carried by gaily dressed girls. Then came the historical banners interspersed with the branch banners of the four main branches. The whistle blew and the drums thunderedout, bugles sounded and the march moved forward. After the bugles had played for some time they stopped and the marchers began to sing:

"Now is the time for marching, under our banners red,
Rank upon rank advancing, surely we forge ahead,
So let your voices ring, comrades, all who would be free,
And we'll sing a song as we march along,
Of peace and liberty.
For we are the men from Sussex, Sussex by the sea,
We plough and sow and reap and mow, and useful men are we,
And when you go from Sussex, wherever you may be,
You can tell them all that we stand or fall,
For peace and liberty.
Sussex, Sussex men are we,
On our march to victory,
Workingmen unite, we can win the fight,
And Sussex shall be free."

The marchers stepped out happily through Castle Square, singing as they went. Everyone was surprised at the strength of the Communist Party in Sussex could show, Curious sightseers craned their necks to read the inscriptions on the banners. We felt conscious of our responsibility for carrying on the traditions of those who had fought in the past.

"Out of the years of struggle, out of the years of toil,
Stride forth the people's heroes, sons of the Sussex soil,
The banner that they raised aloft, our heritage today,
We will bear with pride, marching side by side,
Where they have led the way."

At the Clock Tower the police had to hold up the traffic, while we turned into West Street> The salt sea air blew up from the sea, blowing the banners proudly. The holiday crowds stopped to watch the procession, commenting on the portraits of the Sussex men fighting in Spain.
"Far o'er the seas we wander, wide through the world we roam,
Into the Spanish trenches, fighting for those at home,
Wherever there's a fight, comrades, to save democracy.
You can be sure then, you will find the men,
Of Sussex by the sea."


Many thanks to Mike Anderson, of the International Brigades Memorial Trust who drew my attention to this song and sent me the information which I needed to compile this post.

A Mudcat thread about the original song and other variants

Does anyone have more information about this song?

Because this thread has now become so long and complex I have also posted this appeal for information on a dedicated Mudcat thread HERE


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Subject: Lyr Add: ALWAYS THE CAUSE
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 01 Jun 11 - 06:52 PM

ALWAYS THE CAUSE
Words and Music by Al Stewart
Always the Cause AL STEWART (YouTube video)

Bad news over the great divide
Comes in from every side
Still hope won't be denied
There was always the Cause
There was always the Cause

Oh La Pasionara sang
This day, no pasaran!
It echoed out in Catalan
There was always the Cause
There was always the Cause

Mariposa
Late nights waiting on the Via Dolorosa
Hold me closer
Not long now, oh ma bella hermosa
There was always the Cause

Setbacks come at every turn
New ways are hard to learn
Tonight I saw Guernica burn
There was always the Cause
There was always the Cause

Mariposa
Late nights waiting on the Via Dolorosa
Hold me closer
Not long now, oh ma bella hermosa
There was always the Cause

Three years gone in the heart of Spain
He brings home a quiet pain,
He'll never be that young again,
There was always the Cause,
There was always the Cause,

Thanks to Mike Anderson of the International Brigades Memorial Trust for suggesting this song.
Wikipedia information about the Album on which this song was released

Recorded November 1994 – March 1995


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: mikesamwild
Date: 29 May 11 - 09:06 AM

I've just been rereading a book published in Rotherham about Tommy James who was in Spain

A lion of a man ed Brian Lewis & Bill Gledhill . In Pounded Earth TJs memoir p68 he mentions waiting to go to Brunete in June 37 thousands of men stretched outon tehbgarss, uncannily quiet 'suddenly the silence was broken by the strains of Tipperary coming from the British lines followed by a medley of music hall songs. Soon all the Brigade was singing, ech man in his particular tongue concluding with The Internationale. That night before the battle thousands stood u and sang. That was after the slaughter at Jarama earlier in the year.
On p 91 after the terrible onslaught at Brunete he mentions listening to Danny Boy being sung by an Irish Comrade in the moonlightand thinking back to the earlier mass sing on night of July 5th 1937

The power of song and the resilience of young men!


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 09 May 11 - 07:03 PM

PEOPLE'S FRONT

Words and Music by Edward Brangwyn

This song appears on page 54 of Canciones de las Brigadas Internacionales , the International Brigades Songbook, originally published in Barcelona in 1938.
The songbook gives no more information about the song or the writer, Edward Brangwyn, and so I have begun a new Mudcat thread to see if anyone knows more. The thread can be reached using this link:
EDWARD BRANGWYN,30's songwriter,INFO?
The new thread also includes a link to Google Books which shows the words and music for the song.


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 20 Apr 11 - 07:30 PM

ONCE A JOLLY FRANCO

TUNE: Waltzing Matilda

there is so far only a fragment of the lyrics to this song which was posted by GUEST: Gerry in another Mudcat thread called Australia and the Spanish Civil War which can be seen
HERE


Once a jolly Franco started up a civil war
Liking himself as the top dog you see
....
Aeroplanes from Italy are raining bombs on wrecked Madrid
Gunners from the Volga side are firing merrily
And the League still declares, with the simple faith of infancy
Non-intervention's a reality.

Thanks Gerry.
Does anyone have more of the song which was culled from Amirah Inglis' book Australians in the Spanish Civil War


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: mikesamwild
Date: 18 Apr 11 - 12:33 PM

Re The olives bleeding , when we were at Jarama in March they were harvesting some black olives . I squahed some and the juice was red and bitter. So a great image.

I found several ancient trees with shrapnel embedded in the trunks from 74 years ago The battle was Feb 1937.. We found sardine tins and bullets etc all preserved as the limestone soil is dry and the climate is better than ours!


I read the poem by John Lepper where he says 'Death stalked the olive groves
His leaden finger beckoned again and again.' Somebody set that to music it was on youtube

I found it very powerful at the spot where my uncle Bert was killed along with Clem Beckett, Christopher St.John Sprigg (aka Caudwell) (Sprigg) and so many others - and my dad Sam was wounded on Feb 12 th 1937


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: mikesamwild
Date: 17 Apr 11 - 01:12 PM

AT THE SIEGE OF MADRID
By Robb Johnson
There is a good youtube of Robb Johnson singing The Siege of madrid , one of his.
At The Siege Of Madrid ROBB JOHNSON

I've just been sent a copy by Allen Warren in Barcelona, of a facsimile page in a book of Harry Pollitt in Spain where he mentions a Christmas party in 1937 where they sang songs such as One finger one thumb keep moving and Frankie and Johhny so it wasn't all The International!

I've sent it to Richard Thorpe of the IB Memorial Trust who is coordinating a songbook. He is in La Columna a reenactment socety in UK.

I think a more comprehensive book like the Poetry book published by IBMT would be good Geoff.

I was out at Jarama in March for the memorial march near Madrid and visted the battle site where my uncle Bert Maskey was killed and my dad Sam was wounded on the first day (Feb 1937).

At the meal in Morata there were songs from the various natinalities represented and I sang Our Open Eyes.



Martin Simpson told me he is recording Jamie Foyers with Dick Gaughan.


At a dedication at the memorial to Charlie Donnelly I realised the line 'Even the olives were bleeding' from his poem found its way into Christy's Viva la Quince Brigada.


The IBMT have asked for a proposal for the CD so any ideas welcome .

MySpace Link


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Mar 11 - 12:03 PM

Jamie O'Reilly FYI for your list.
Here are the songs Michael Smith and I recorded in English on Pasiones: Songs of the Spanish Civil War, recorded at
WFMT studios in Chicago 1997. Please include us in the list of folks who recorded these stirring songs. The live Pasiones by Peter Glazer, son of Tom Glazer. We will be performing it live AGAIN this Oct in Chicago in honor of the 75th anniversary of the International Brigades
in Spain. Song of the United Front, Peat Bog Soldiers, Comrade We Love You, Quartermaster's Store, Gunner Name of Bill (new Music by Michael Smith, setting words of Theodore Cogswell). Sweet Cookhouse, Young Man from Alcala, Los Cuatro Generales, Five O'Clock in the Afternoon (Eng translation of Lorca, new music by Michael Smith), Beloved Comrade, Jarama

The Spanish Civil War Songs - Who Sings What? thread is HERE



From: GeoffLawes - PM
Date: 10 Mar 11 - 08:03 PM

Hi Jamie I have posted you and Michael Smith as performers of most of the songs you give on the Mudcat thread to which I have provided a link above.

Could you ( or anyone else) provide the words for Gunner Name of Bill which is not a song included in this Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War thread so far? I found Theodore Cogswell on Wikipedia,HERE,
where it says he was an ambulance driver in the SCW. Did he write the poem during the war or later? Any more information about the poem or the song or Theodore Cogswell would be good.

Regards, Geoff


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 20 Feb 11 - 05:43 PM

Does anyone know anything about the song HANS BEIMLER KAMERAD as sung by Notorious Goose from Ireland.This song is in English and does not use the old German tune Ich Hatt'Einen Kameraden as Ernst Busch did when he re-wrote the song as a tribute to Hans Beimler in 1937. This is a YouTube video of the English/Irish song.

Hans Beimler Kamerad by Notorious Goose

as compared with
HANS BEIMLER by Ernst Busch

But the words in the English/Irish version seem to be a translation/rewrite of the Busch song.


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 20 Feb 11 - 01:10 PM

What book is that Mike - I wonder if it was really a concertina? People are often unsure what a concertina is and use it as a generic term for any squeezy free-reed instrument. I have never come across mention of a concertina in memoires of the SCW although I have seen pictures of Brigaders with accordians and possibly a melodeon in one photo of the Abraham Lincoln Battalion. The Bandoneon is a more likely possibilty if it were a Spaniard or South American playing it. But if it was a concertina that would be very interesting.


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: mikesamwild
Date: 18 Feb 11 - 10:31 AM

I'm just reading a book about Jarama and Harry Pollitt in a letter mentioned marching to a concertina and singing The Internationale at a memorial near Madrid after the battle where so many IBrs died.


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: mikesamwild
Date: 18 Feb 11 - 10:27 AM

Good song- Geordie sang it tome on the phone sounds good and I'm glad it's been passed on

Here's a version of the poem by John Lepper set to music and guitar / Lepper fought at Jarama ad came home shortly after but no trace after spain is kown apparently.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBJZAHmnUts

Martin Simpson told me the other night he has Jamie Foyers on his new album.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SALUD INTERNATIONAL BRIGADE!
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 11 Feb 11 - 05:38 PM


SALUD INTERNATIONAL BRIGADE!


By Jim Brown
   

Salud International Brigade!
We honour the gallant part you played,
Remembered with pride on the banks of the Clyde,
Salud International Brigade!

From Scotland and every place they came,
To fight with the working class of Spain,
And they helped defend Madrid,
When Franco made his bid,
In the bombing and the shelling and the flame.
Salud International Brigade!
We honour the gallant part you played,
Remembered with pride on the banks of the Clyde,
Salud International Brigade!

When Franco said he'd pass they answered'Never!'
Said those heroes whose names will live forever,
And how valiantly they tried to halt that fascist tide.
From Jarama Valley to the Ebro River.
Salud International Brigade!
We honour the gallant part you played,
Remembered with pride on the banks of the Clyde,
Salud International Brigade!

Passionaria, her statue stands today,
On the banks of the Clyde at Customs Quay,
In memory of the time when from shipyard and from mine,
Those volunteers they chose to make their way.
Salud International Brigade!
We honour the gallant part you played,
Remembered with pride on the banks of the Clyde,
Salud International Brigade!

Better to die fighting on your feet ,
Than live forever on your knees,
And if the fascists rise again, the way they did in Spain,
We'll know the truth there was in words like these,
Salud International Brigade!
We honour the gallant part you played,
Remembered with pride on the banks of the Clyde,
Salud International Brigade!

© Jim Brown

The words and music for this song were written by Jim Brown of Cumbernauld, Scotland who died at the end of 2010. Thank you to Joan Brown for permission to post Jim's great song here and to Geordie McIntyre for sending it to me.
Jim Brown recorded the song on his cassette tape album My Old Guitar which contains other songs written by Jim.
The song is now performed by Geordie McIntyre.


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 06 Feb 11 - 10:31 AM

Here are some performances of Jarama/ Jarama Valley with a variety of lyrics and tunes:
EWAN Mc LENNAN
PETE SEEGER & THE ALMANAC SINGERS
WOODY GUTHRIE
ARLO GUTHRIE & PETE SEEGER
DAVID ROVICS


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 30 Jan 11 - 09:11 PM


LETTER FROM BILBAO

By Lowest Of The Low

Letter From Bilbao by Lowest of the Low on YouTube Letter From Bilbao by Lowest of the Low on YouTube


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 30 Jan 11 - 09:01 PM


ETHEL ON THE AIRWAYS

By Alister Hulett

Alistair Hulett performs ETHEL ON THE AIRWAVES a song about Scots Anarchist Ethel McDonald.


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 30 Jan 11 - 08:39 PM


SKETCHES OF SPAIN

By Nits

Sketches of Spain performed by Nits -

Does anyone know who the writer is in Nits?


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 30 Jan 11 - 08:32 PM


THE VOLUNTEER

By Stevie (?)

YouTube performance of THE VOLUNTEER by Stevie

Does anyone know his surname?

From: GeoffLawes
Date: 6 May 11 - 08:32 PM

Jim Jump writing in the International Brigades Memorial Trust's IBMT Newsletter ,Issue 29/ Spring 2011, says that it is STEVE SIMPSON
and gives this additional soundcloud link to an audio performance of the song
a http://soundcloud.com/stevieoneblokeonemandolin/the-volunteer


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Subject: Lyr Add: THESE DAYS
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 30 Jan 11 - 07:43 PM


THESE DAYS

By Lothian 121

I was thinking late last night,
Have we forgot the meaning of sacrifice?
My grandparents’ generation well they didn’t think twice,
I wonder if it’d be the same these days.

Grandad had just fifteen years,
When he left me in my playroom ? without shedding a tear,
To fight Franco’s army with the other volunteers,
Could have been a thousand years ago.

I can’t imagine what he’d seen,
A catalogue of violence by the age of eighteen,
Things we’d only experience on the T.V. screen,
I don’t know if I could cope with that.

Two years later tired and sore,
He returned to a country on the brink of war,
He began to fight for something that’s worth fighting for,
Well they wouldn’t know a thing about that.

I was thinking late last night,
Have we forgot the meaning of sacrifice?
My grandparents’ generation well they didn’t think twice,
I don’t think it’d be the same these days.

Can anyone correct the words that I could not work out?

Here is a link to a YouTube video featuring These Days by a band called Lothian 121

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47WGSJglkjw

On another site, fm Radio, it says Lothian 121 are a Scottish band, based in Edinburgh and the Scottish Borders. They have recorded four albums of songs since 1999

Does anyone know more about the song or the songwriters?



HERE is another Mudcat thread devoted to collecting information about this song. Thank you, Mick Pearce (MCP), for the suggestions on that thread which I have incorporated into the lyrics above. The words suggested by Mick do sound like what is being sung although their meaning in the song seems obscure.


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 02 Jan 11 - 07:27 PM

BELOVED COMRADE


by Lewis Allen (w)& Fred Katz (m) (Abel Meeropol)


The song Beloved Comrade has words written by Abel Meeropol under his pen name, Lewis Allen and is associated with the Spanish Civil War as a result of its having appeared on several records about the war and by virtue of its having been performed at memorial meetings of International Brigaders in memory of their dead comrades.

Here is a link to another Mudcat thread which I have used to collect information about the origin and provenance of the song.
Origins: Beloved Comrade: Spanish Civil War Song?

That thread includes links to a recording of the song by Josh White and the full set of lyrics.

The current state of information uncovered in that thread is that the song is by Lewis Allen & Fred Katz and was probably written in 1944 for a radio play scripted by Langston Hughes about race relations in the US army. However, Alan Lomax is credited with having helped in the selection of songs for this BBC broadcast and it is theoretically possible that the song had been written at an earlier date specifically about the Spanish Civil War On another Mudcat thread Joe Offer kindly posted the entries from some People's Songs publications which say that the song was written for combatants of the Spanish Civil War These may be seen using the following link Mudcat thread with Peoples Songs reference HERE
Thanks Joe
Any further firm evidence would be welcome.


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Subject: Lyr Add: WE ARE THE FIGHTING ANTI-FASCISTS
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 27 Dec 10 - 08:17 PM

WE ARE THE FIGHTING ANTI-FASCISTS


We are the fighting anti-fascists,
We're members of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade,
We are the fighting anti-fascists,
And we'll stay here, until the fascist tomb is laid.
And when we get back home once more,
We'll do, we'll do the same thing there.
And when we get back home once more,
We'll do the same thing there.


These are the words to a song sung by Milton Wolff, once the commanding officer of the Abraham Lincoln Battalion during the Spanish Civil War, as he sings them in the film The Good Fight. You can see and hear him singing the song on part VI of the film as it appears on YouTube
Milton Wolff singing at 3.27/8.51 secs on THE GOOD FIGHT video

I used the first line of the song as its title:Does anyone know if that is correct, if there is any more of the song or who wrote it? I suspect the tune used is one borrowed from a song well known in the thirties: can anyone name that tune? Does anyone know anything more about the song?


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Subject: Lyr Add: PAUL ROBESON (Sumishta Brahm)
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 12:14 PM

PAUL ROBESON
By Sumishta Brahm


Paul Robeson in the middle of a war
with Love in his heart...

In the middle of a war Paul Robeson
before the Second World War in a small
town in Spain where the bullets flew and fell like rain

In the middle of a war Paul Robeson
with microphone and speakers in the air
sending his beautiful voice everywhere

Paul Robeson in the middle of a war
sing "'Ol Man River" in the middle of a war
and the guns stopped killing
yeah the guns stopped killing

Paul Robeson with a silence all around
singing about injustice
and who is to blame when we are all equal
to God we're all the same
I hope to God ...we're all the same

Paul Robeson in the middle of a war
I think of you when I feel so pulled apart
when all I'm doing is what I believe in my heart

Paul Robeson reminds to be
a human being with individuality
In the middle of a war
if that's how it has to be...

Paul Robeson in the middle of a war
with love in his heart.

Hear it Here


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 15 Dec 10 - 07:55 AM


PAUL ROBESON
By Sumishta Brahm


I have just found a song about Paul Robeson in the Spanish Civil War written by Sumishta Brahm on the UNION SONGS site.
Performance of PAUL ROBESON by Sumishta Brahm

The site also prints the full lyrics to the song which was written in 1987.


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Subject: Lyr Add: CASUALTIES WE HERE RECALL
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 06 Dec 10 - 07:15 PM


CASUALTIES WE HERE RECALL


By Manus O'Riordan, Blanaid Salkeld, Leslie Daiken and Ewart Milne.


I have received Casualties We Here Recall from Manus O'Riordan. It is a setting by Manus O'Riordan of Blanaid Salkeld's poem, Casualties to the air and chorus of the Spanish Republican song, El Quinto regimiento; with cadenzas based on Spanish flamenco, Yiddish folk and Hebrew liturgical melodies and additional lines from Leslie Daiken's poem, To S O'S on the death of FR Higgins, and Ewart Milne's poem, Thinking of Artolas.

The song was sung by Manus O'Riordan in San Francisco on March 30, 2008 at Bay Area ALBA Reunion, after the unveiling of Abraham Lincoln Brigade Monument. It makes special mention of Charlie Donnelly Commander of the James Connolly (Irish) Section, Abraham Lincoln Battalion Killed at Jarama, February 27, 1937.

The lyrics are printed below and are followed by an article written by Manus about the song which was published in Labour History News, Summer 1993, pp 12-13.


                        Casualties We Here Recall

Salkeld            Who would think the Spanish war
                        Flared like new tenure of a star
                        The way our rhymes and writing are (Repeat)

Chorus            Venga, jaleo, jaleo
                        Sueño de una ametralledora
                        Y Franco, se va paseo. (Repeat)

Salkeld            That Hilliard spilled his boxer's blood
                        Through Albecete's snow and mud
                        And smiled to comrade death: Salud!

Chorus            Venga, jaleo, jaleo
                         Hear that avenging machine-gun
                         It will be the end of Franco. (Repeat)

Daiken              I too have heard companions' voices die
cadenza            O splendid fledglings they, in fiery fettle!
[flamenco         Caudwell and John Cornford
melody]            And Cathal Donnelly, our Cathal Donnelly,
                         Stormcocks atune with Lorca, shot down in battle
                         Young Charlie's cenotaph – Jarama's olive trees!

Salkeld            That Charlie Donnelly, small and frail,
                        And flushed with youth, was rendered pale –
                        But not with fear, in what queer squalor
                        Was smashed up his so ordered valour.
                        That rhythm, that steely earnestness,
                        That peace of poetry to bless
                        Discordant thoughts of divers men –
                        Blue gaze that burned up lie and stain.
                        Put out by death.

Chorus            Venga, jaleo, jaleo
                        Sueño de una ametralledora
                        Y Franco, se va paseo. (Repeat)

Salkeld            Put out by death. I keep my breath
                        So many grow upon my stem
                        I cannot take their sap from them. (Repeat)

Salkeld            But to right charity with spurs
cadenza           Through spite's asperity infernal –
flamenco         My verity of verse (Repeat)
melody            Is nothing else (Repeat)
                        But rattle of light shells -         } Repeat
                        light shells with no kernel        } phrase

Chorus            Venga, jaleo, jaleo
                        Sueño de una ametralledora
                        Y Franco, se va paseo. (Repeat)

Milne              Sirs and Señoras, let me end my story
cadenza            I show you earth, earth formally
flamenco         And two on guard with the junipers.
melody            Two – Gael and Jew – side by side in a trench
                        Two who came from imprisonment.

Yiddish            Gael because of Wolfe Tone
melody            Jew because of human love
[Milne]            The same for Jew as German
                        Frail fragments both of them.

Hebrew            I set them together
melody            Izzy Kupchik and Charlie Donnelly
[Milne]            And of that date with death
                        Among the junipers, I say only:
                        They kept it.

Salkeld            Since Irish boys, they strove and are
                        Knit to that alien soil, where war
                        Burns like the inception of a star
                        Those casualties we here recall.

Finale            But come and see now and hear how
(MO'R)         That flickering flame of Freedom
                       Will yet see the end of Franco.
                       Yes! It did see the end of Franco!



Genesis of a Song for Charlie Donnelly

Written by Manus O'Riordan
Published in Labour History News, Summer 1993, pp 12-13


In November 1987 I gave a lecture and record recital at the Irish Jewish Museum on the theme of Irish and Jewish volunteers in the Spanish anti-fascist war. In contrast to the catholic triumphalism and anti-Semitism appealed to in support of Franco by Eoin O'Duffy's Christian Front, the cause of the Spanish Republic was one that transcended sectarian and ethnic boundaries and united individuals from a diversity of traditions. During that lecture I cited a number of Irish poets to illustrate the point. Foremost among them was, of course the Catholic-born poet from Co Tyrone, Charlie Donnelly, who fell in the ranks of the International Brigades at the battle of Jarama on February 27, 1937.

Among the writings from which I quoted were lines from, Thinking of Artolas, by the Irish protestant poet Ewart Milne, who had himself worked tirelessly for the ambulance service of the Spanish Republic. In these lines Milne mourned the death of his friend Donnelly, and for Izzy Kupchik, a German Jewish ambulance driver, who had also been killed by the fascists in Spain… Another reading was of lines from a poem entitled, To S O'S on the death of FR Higgins, in which the name of Charlie Donnelly was linked with that of Spain's most outstanding poet of that era, Federico García Lorca, who was murdered by the fascists in August, 1936, and also the names of the English poets and International Brigaders, John Cornford, who fell at Cordoba in December, 1936, and Christopher Caudwell, who fell at Jarama in February, 1937. The Dublin Jewish poet, Leslie Daiken was the author of those particular lines in remembrance of his close friend. Indeed, it was with Daiken that Donnelly had lodged in London during 1936 as they jointly edited the Irish Front on behalf of the Republican Congress.

It was not until Joseph Donnelly launched The Life and Poems of Charlie Donnelly on his brother's anniversary in 1988 that I first read Blanaid Salkeld's powerful poem entitled Casualties in which she linked Donnelly's death with that of another International Brigader killed at Jarama, the Church of Ireland clergyman, and former Irish champion boxer, ther Reverend Robert M Hilliard. When I returned to that poem tow years later in February 1990, I found myself humming it to the air of El Quinto Regimiento, a republican song of the Spanish anti-fascist war made know world-wide shortly afterwards by Pete Seeger's recording of it.

I decided to try and merge Irish poem and Spanish air into a song for Charlie Donnelly. This approach worked for most of the poem until toward the end, its rhythm changed radically. But here again the International Brigades came to the rescue! I recalled the air of Desde Cádiz, a Spanish flamenco song which had been recorded by the New York Jewish International Brigader, Mac Parker. (For Parker's Irish connections see Saothar 13.) This provided me with the opportunity to retain all of Salkeld's lines but with the change of rhythm being accommodated as a cadenza based on that particular flamenco melody.

Having done it once, I tried it twice again. I could now also include Daiken's lines for Donnelly without much difficulty as another Desde Cádiz cadenza and five of Milne's lines in the same way. The remainder of Milne's lines however, required a further melodic departure. Since these lines referred specifically to the jewish volunteer, Izzy Kupchik, I drew on two Jewish melodies, the first being the Yiddish folksong, Oyjn Oyvn and the second being a Hebrew liturgical chant which Max Parker had also recorded while illustrating its melodic and rhythmic kinship to flamenco. And so it was that verses written by Irish catholic, protest and and jewish poets became a song, set to Spanish and jewish melodies – all fittingly inspired by the unifying spirit of internationalism which had been embodied in the defence of the Spanish Republic.

A final note on the singing of the song itself. On March 9, 1993 the death took place of Beatrice Behan (nee Salkeld), whom I had first met with her husband, Brendan, during my early childhood. The last occasion on which we met was at the Irish Labour History Museum on November 18, 1991 at the evening of reminiscence and song which marked the presentation to the museum of the memorial banner of the Connolly Column. I had made a particular point of inviting Beatrice to be present to that she might hear the poem by her grandmother, Blanaid Salkeld turned into song. It was a grand evening and a good way to say goodbye.


( Thanks to Flick for all the re-typing)


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Subject: Lyr Add: A TOAST TO THOSE WHO ARE GONE
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 05 Dec 10 - 10:51 AM


A TOAST TO THOSE WHO ARE GONE

By Phil Ochs

      
Many's the hour I've lain by my window
And thought of the people who carried the burden   
Who marched in the strange fields in search of an answer   
And ended their journeys an unwilling hero.

CHORUS
So here's a song to those who are gone with never a reason why   
And a toast of the wine at the end of the line
And a toll of the bell for the next one to die.



Back in the coal fields of old Harlan county
Some talked of the union, some talked of good wages
And they lined them up in the dark of the forest
And shot them down without asking no questions.


And over the ocean, to the red Spanish soil
Came the Lincoln Brigade with their dreams of a victory
But they fell to the fire of Germany's bombing
And they fell 'cause nobody would hear their sad warning.


In old Alabama, in old Mississippi
Two states of the union so often found guilty
They came on the buses, they came on the marches
And they lay in the jails or they fell by the highway.


The state it was Texas, the town it was Dallas
In the flash of a rifle a life was soon over
And nobody thought of the past million murders
And the long list of irony had found a new champion.


Thanks to MudcatGUESTS Gerry and Rog who gave me the leads which enabled me to make this post. The Mudcat thread on which this information can be reached is
HERE

These lyrics are taken, with thanks to Trent, from The Phil Ochs Lyric Index
where guitar chords are also printed

HERE is a YouTube Performance of the Song by Raymond Crooke


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Subject: Lyr Add: FREEDOM'S GALTEE BOYS
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 02 Dec 10 - 01:07 PM


FREEDOM'S GALTEE BOYS

By Patsy Halloran, Christy Moore and Manus O'Riordan

I have just received an email from Manus O'Riordan with the words to Freedom's Galtee Boys which is a version of the well known Irish song The Galtee Mountain Boy to which Manus added verses for his performance at the inauguration of the Kit Conway Memorial at Burncourt, Tipperary in 2005.Following, are first, the interesting notes Manus gives to the song and then the complete lyrics. Under the lyrics I have put a link to a YouTube video to shows the tune.



"THE GALTEE MOUNTAIN BOY" SUNG BY MANUS O'RIORDAN

The village of Burncourt, County Tipperary lies in the valley between the Galtee and Knockmealdown mountains. Known as Rehill until the mid 17th century - and Rehill still survives as the name of one of the local townlands - Burncourt derived its name from the imposing ruins of the castle adjacent to the village, burned in 1650 as Cromwell's army laid waste to our country. [Not every Republican development can be viewed positively in Ireland, particularly when the English Republican leader Oliver Cromwell set about his mass murder of "the mere Irish"!]   



"FREEDOM'S GALTEE BOYS"
"The Galtee Mountain Boy" is a popular song of the Irish War of Independence and Civil War, and was composed by Patsy Halloran. It was recorded by Christy Moore, who is best known to all those with a particular interest in the history of the Spanish Anti-Fascist War for his song paying tribute to 15th International Brigade's Irish volunteers, "Viva La Quince Brigada". When Christy recorded "The Galtee Mountain Boy" he also added a fourth verse. A further five verses have now been added by Manus O'Riordan to mark the unveiling of the Kit Conway memorial, and the song was sung by him at the unveiling ceremony itself.


I joined the Flying Column in 19 and 19,

In Cork with Sean Moylan, in Tipperary with Dan Breen.

Arrested by Free Staters and sentenced for to die.

Farewell to Tipperary, said the Galtee mountain boy.



We went across the valleys and over the hilltops green,

Where we met with Dinny Lacey, Sean Hogan and Dan Breen,

Sean Moylan and his gallant men that kept the flag flying high.

Farewell to Tipperary, said the Galtee mountain boy.



We tracked the Dublin mountains, we were rebels on the run.

Though hunted night and morning, we were outlaws but free men.

We tracked the Wicklow mountains as the sun was shining high.

Farewell to Tipperary, said the Galtee mountain boy.



I bid farewell to old Clonmel that I never more will see,

And to the Galtee mountains that oft times sheltered me.

The men who fought for liberty and who died without a sigh,

May their cause be ne'er forgotten, said the Galtee mountain boy.



So gathered here, let's raise a cheer for Burncourt's native sons,

Jack Ryan and Michael Guerin, defending with their guns

The Republic and Dail Eireann, the Irish people's choice.

First in the fray brave Kit Conway, with John Kearney and the Boys.



At Ballyporeen Kit's courage was seen on that Flying Column raid.

Of no RIC, nor Auxies, nor Tans was he afraid.

"A leader bold, in Tom Barry's mould!" - his commander would exclaim.

For freedom's light to the death he would fight on a war-scorched hill in Spain.



'36 the year, defying fear, saw the Spanish people vote

A Republic for the Rights of Man! But Franco would revolt.

Gernika ablaze from Hitler's planes, the Republic overthrown,

Despite the brave 15th Brigade, Kit Conway to the fore.



Outside Madrid 10,000 killed in Jarama's vale of tears.

In that war's hell Kit Conway fell that Spain might yet be free.

And with freedom Spain a gravestone raised, thanks gave in '94,

Where thousands lay with Kit Conway, far away from Galteemore.



In the year '05, Kit's name to inscribe, 'twas to Burncourt that we came,

Tipperary's fighting story to honour and proclaim!

With his comrades from the War in Spain, Mick O'Riordan and Bob Doyle,

A plaque unveiled, Kit Conway praised. Here's to freedom's Galtee Boys!


Manus O'Riordan

THE GALTEE MOUNTAIN BOY sung by Christy Moore in 1979


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Subject: Lyr Add: ANTYFASCIST STEVE (Woody Guthrie)
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 30 Nov 10 - 07:33 PM


ANTYFASCIST STEVE

By Woody Guthrie

I came across a reference to a little known Woody Guthrie song about the Spanish Civil War. I then started a new Mudcat thread to find out more about the song and this has quickly produced interesting results both about the Woody Guthrie song and about Joe Strummer whose song Spanish Bombs is in the above list.

WGuthrie song about BrigaderSteve Nelson THREAD HERE

The following is an extract about Woody Guthrie's song Antyfascist Steve from Nora's Page of the Official Woody Guthrie Website dated May 2001 and is reproduced with the permission of The Woody Guthrie Foundation. The full text of Nora Guthrie's web posting can be read at the link HERE (Thanks to BrooklynJay.)

Peter Glazer's production "Pasiones-Songs of the Spanish Civil War" followed the speakers. Jamie O'Reilly, Michael Smith and Katrina O'Reilly once again moved me to tears. Peter also produced the show "Woody Guthrie, American Balladeer" which has been touring the country and Europe on and off now for over 15 years. Well, it had me wondering if Woody had ever written a song about the Spanish Civil War?

The next day, I found a song in the archives called "Antyfascist Steve" which was written September 18th, 1953 while in Topanga Canyon, CA. It begins:

"I guess tears run to my eyes
Day I kissed you that goodbye
Headin over t' Spain t' fight
On my New Yorky ship that nite.
I says if I can stop Franco now
Maybe I'll mess Hitler up somehow
My hundred comrades on my shipsdeck
Gonna let Wall Street know we tried."

Following six more verses it's signed, "to my friend Stevey".

Thanks to Tiffany Colannino,the Archivist at the Woody Guthrie Archives.
Thanks also to Peregrina for helping me to get to see the full text of Antyfascist Steve.The full text is available in the magazine article Woody Guthrie's Lost Song To Lincoln Vet Steve Nelson written by Paul C Mischler which can be found on the two following pay-to-view sites.
http://www.jstor.org/pss/40404193

http://www.atypon-link.com/GPI/doi/abs/10.1521/siso.68.3.329.40302?journalCode=siso

I have not yet received permission to reproduce the complete set of lyrics.

UPDATE 07-12-2010
I have tried to get permission to reproduce the full lyrics and eventually arrived at the Hal Leonard Corporation in whose power it is to give permission HERE But the FAQ on their website say
Do you ever grant gratis permission?
We receive a number of requests from charitable or non-profit organizations. In an effort to be fair and equitable in our handling of these requests, it is our general policy not to grant gratis permission.


-------------

"But on the other side it didn't say nothing.
That sign was made for you and me"

Who wrote that?


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Subject: Lyr Add: UNDERNEATH THE SPANISH STARS
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 14 Oct 10 - 07:12 PM


UNDERNEATH THE SPANISH STARS


By Edith Segal

Oh I dreamed of Spanish gardens, señoritas and guitars,
Spanish moonlight, lovers dancing underneath the Spanish stars.
And I fancied I would go there, quite romantic was I then
to dance and click the castanets, Lo recuerdo muy bien.

Oh I never stopped to think at all that there might come a war,
stain my pretty Spanish shawl and break my sweet guitar.
And now I think it's time ot waken, end my dreaming of romance,
and join the anti-fascists to halt Franco's advance.
...
And when that's done we'll dance again and we'll sing and strum guitars,
and live again and love again underneath the Spanish stars.

Poem and Melody
Copyright 1981 by Edith Segal
published with chordal arrangement by Maddy Simon
recorded by Helene Williams and piano accompaniment by Leonard Lehrman, 1990

The lyrics for this song have been copied from a post by Leonard Lehrman on another Mudcat thread called
Lyr Req: Underneath the Spanish Stars-Moe Fishman
which was started to find out about this song. That thread gives further details about the song and can be reached using the link
HERE

Leonard Lehreman has now posted Underneath The Spanish Stars sung by Helene Williams on YOUTUBE

Thank you Leonard Lehreman

Jim Dixon on the other thread says that there is a song called UNDERNEATH THE SPANISH STARS, written by Jack Payne and Irving King, published in 1930.Does anyone know if that song uses the same tune as the one used in the Helene Williams YouTube video?



From: GeoffLawes - PM
Date: 15 Oct 10 - 05:35 PM

I have found a sound clip of an Al Bowlly recording of Underneath The Spanish Stars. The clip does not have Al Bowlly singing and seems like only the introduction to the song but even so the tune does not seem as if it is going the same way as the tune for the Edith Segal song. Listen for yourself , Number 3 on this site, HERE


If anyone else can shed light on any connection it would be good but otherwise it looks as if Edith Segal's song is unconnected with the better known Payne/Bowlly song.



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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GUEST,Andy Roberts
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 06:04 AM


GUERNIKA

By Andy Roberts

Hello, I was pointed to this thread by a report in a copy of the International Brigade Memorial Trust Newsletter passed on to me by Bob Cash in Romford.

I visited the north of Spain in 2003 and happened upon a meeting in the town square at Guernica Lomo to commemorate the day that town was firebombed in 1937. It was of course, a very emotional experience. The next day I began writing the song which I have titled "Gernika" interspersing the history with my own travel story. I've since recorded the song and published the lyrics both in English and in Basque which can be viewed at

Gernika

From the above link you can listen to the recording, download the mp3 file, read about it, view the lyrics and a youtube video of a live performance.

If there's any other information you require please ask.

Andy Roberts

Thanks for posting your song Andy -Geoff


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 11 Jun 10 - 12:29 PM


SALUD BRIGADISTA

Jim Jump told me in an email that a band called Foundlings have recorded a song dedicated to Brigader Bob Doyle called 'Salud Brigadista'. I have found a snatch of it on this site:
Salud Brigadista - FOUNDLINGS
If anyone can supply the lyrics or more information, please do.

Geoff


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Subject: Lyr Add: HASTA LUEGO a.k.a. FITBA NOT WAR
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 21 May 10 - 03:25 PM


HASTA LUEGO aka Fitba Not War
By Frank Rae

At Wednesday's Songwriting Competition at Edinburgh Folk Club just this week, third prize went to Frank Rae for his song "Fitba Not War" - also inspired by the Spanish Civil War.


From: GeoffLawes - PM
Date: 03 Jun 10 - 07:36 AM
Thank you Tattie Bogle, I have found Frank Rae's My Space and although the SCW song is not up there yet I guess he will put it up some time and so here is a link for future use :
http://www.myspace.com/frankrae2
This song has been recorded on the CD From Blantyre to Barcelona by Frank Rae under the title of Hasta Luego.
> Further details of this CD can be found here thread.cfm?threadid=143174
I will try to obtain the words and post them here.


A YouTube recording of Frank Rae singing his song Hasta Luego is now accessible HERE http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Js_h1nR7iY The song was is to be re-released on a new Greentrax recording on August 1st called No Pasaran (They shall not pass) - Scots in the Spanish Civil War. See http://www.greentrax.com/music/artists/reviews/no-pasaran/

This song was originally recorded on the CD From Blantyre to Barcelona Further details of this CD can be found here thread.cfm?threadid=143174

Rab didnae go tae the fitba' that day
Well, the league, it wis jist aboot won anyway
He said he had something he jist hid tae dae
And he spoke aboot folk he called fascists
He said you're auld enough noo Tam tae go on your own
I'm sure that ye ken the right bus tae get on
But I wisnae tae tell oor Ma where he wis goin'
Then he said he was headin' for Paris

He said gae me a hug and gae me a smile
Ask a man and he'll lift you ower the turnstile
Wave your red banner and hear the crowd roar
But always remember it's fitba' no war

At the end of our road Rab bumped intae some mates
Who quizzed him aboot the International Brigades
They said he was daft he said he couldnae wait
Tae march intae Spain wi' his brothers
Rab telt them a' that tae him it wis clear
If we don't fight them there, we will fight them here
He asked them tae join him said there's nuthin' tae fear
Jist as long as we a' stick thegither

He said ….etc

Rab said life's no like fitba' when the sides are a' square
Wi' a ref in the middle tae make sure it's fair
Sometimes the others need mair than oor prayers
And he, fur wan, widnae ignore them
Then he slipped me a tanner, tae spend at the game
Said "Hasta Luego", whatever that meant
He ruffled my hair, smiled, turned then went
And that was the last time I saw him

He said…..etc

So I gave him a hug and I gave him a smile
I asked a man and he lifted me ower the turnstile
I waved my red banner and hear the crowd roar
And I always remember, it's fitba' no war

© Frank Rae
HEAR THE SONG HERE

Thanks to Frank Rae who supplied the words in the West Central Scottish vernacular in which he wrote them. The words are collected from another Mudcat thread here: thread.cfm?threadid=145987&messages=12#top And thanks to all who contributed to that thread with helpful corrections to my own earlier attempt to transcribe the song from the recording.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SONG FOR JAMES MOIR
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 09 May 10 - 07:06 PM

SONG FOR JAMES MOIR

By Ian McLaren


"I've travelled far to join the fight.
Hiked across the Pyrenees, under dead of night.
My country's failed me, they had no right.
That's the reason here is where I lay my head tonight.


I'm only 20, my future bright.
But if I don't reach 21, I'll die knowing we were right.
My country's failed me, they had no right.
That's the reason here is where I lay my head tonight.


In this dark hole how do you think I feel?
The fear of death it haunts me as I hear my comrades squeal.
My country's failed me, they had no right.
That's the reason here is where I lay my head tonight.


I close my eyes and dream of better days.
And I wonder how these fascists justify their wicked ways.
So heads of state, unite in shame
And may your sleep be troubled by your role within this game.


My country's failed me, they had no right.
That's the reason here is where I lay my head tonight."


WEB SOURCE OF LYRICS
This song seems to have been written for a production presented at Perth Museum and Art Gallery on Thursday May 10th 2007 in honour of Perthshire's International Brigaders and was narrated by the historian Paul Phillipou.

I am trying to find out more information about the song but if anyone can add anything please do.

Regards, Geoff


From: GUEST,IanMcLaren - PM
Date: 20 May 10 - 03:05 PM

I am the writer of the song "Song for James Moir". It was written specially for the production "Not to a Fanfare of Trumpets" and was my response to reading the script of the production and trying to get inside the mind of the young volunteer James Moir. The song has since been performed at numerous fundraising events with guitar and harmonica accompaniment. The lyrics attempt to voice the frustration felt at the UK Government's non-interventionist stance and highlight how to this day heads of state can abdicate responsibility when it suits them to do so. I have not as yet recorded the song as it is a markedly different style to that which I usually write for my band Wang Dang Delta.


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GUEST,Duncan Longstaff
Date: 08 May 10 - 08:08 AM

BRIGADER JOHN LONGSTAFF AND SPANISH CIVIL WAR MUSIC

My father was Johnny Longstaff who was the runner for No2 Company of the British Battalion of the 15th International Brigade, He had 3 records of the Spanish Civil war Songs these were the two Folkways Lp's which include some songs in English and the Ian Campbell Ep Songs of Protest which included "Viva La Quince Brigada" sung in Spanish.
My father told me that Alan Bush the Marxist composer thought that my father would have a fine voice when he heard his deep north east accent, how wrong, he was affectionately known by the family as "foghorn" when he tried to sing.

I see there is a thread regarding Miles Tomalin and the photograph of the Anti Tank Battery taken in late 1937, I have a copy of this photo' my father has indicated some of those present, left to right in backgound 1)Allan Gilchrist,2)Chris Smith 3,4,5,6,7,)? 8) Miles Tomalin with recorder 9)? in foreground 10)? 11) Johnny Longstaff 12) Otto Estenson. Remainder unknown.
From my dads unpublished memoirs he records just before the battle of the Ebro "Folk singing was also appreciated by all present, this was sometimes organised by Miles Tomalin who served in the Brigades Anti Tank Battery, and his playing of the penny whistle was legendary".unfortunately does not mention which songs these were.


From: GeoffLawes - PM
Date: 09 May 10 - 09:39 AM
Duncan Longstaff: thank you for your post about your father's SCW records. If anyone is interested in seeing the songs included on these records the following links will give track lists.

SONGS OF THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR VOLUME 1 FOLKWAYS RECORDS

SONGS OF THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR VOLUME 2 FOLKWAYS RECORDS,1966

SONGS OF PROTEST EP - Ian Campbell Folk Group Topic Records, 1962

Your information about Miles Tomalin and the musicians in the anti-tank battery was interesting - I have not seen such a complete list of the men's names before. By chance the photo you refer to is on the cover of the new book Antifascistas, and Amazon have a picture of the cover which you can see using the following link:
PHOTO OF THE ANTI -TANK MUSICIANS OF THE 15th BRIGADE
It is not the clearest reproduction of the photo but it is the best I found available - if anyone can give a link to a better image then please do.

Regards, Geoff



From: mikesamwild - PM
Date: 13 May 10 - 09:54 AM

hi Duncan. my dad talked about yours. A runner was a tough job and he admired their guts! Terry Ward was one who lost a leg aged about 18 and he lived with us in Manchester for quite a while afterwards. People were very supportive of each other after Spain.

Thanks for info on that picture it's more names I didn't have too. I just read Antifascistas - it came out to accompany a very good travelling exibition put together by IBMT members.


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: mikesamwild
Date: 27 Apr 10 - 01:19 PM

I meant great singers!:)


By the way , I wrote a song based around a verse from the poem by John Lepper, Battle of Jarama 1937.

The second verse:

Death stalked the olive trees
Picking his men
His leaden finger beckoned
Again and again


it always gripped me from being a kid.


All I know is that he was a journalist who was already in Spain, then joined up and was sent to the front, was 'traumatised' and went AWOL and was then imprisoned and later repatriated in September 1937. He returned to Britain but there seem to be no record of his later life. Has anyone any details or contacts etc?


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: mikesamwild
Date: 26 Apr 10 - 04:08 PM

There's a Wikipedia entry on the Percy French song


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: mikesamwild
Date: 26 Apr 10 - 04:02 PM

My dad said they made up a version of O'Slattery's Mounted Foot I may be able to trawl it up. He sang the O'Slattery version and I've got a letter from the bereaved parent of a Brigader whose son had told them in a letter of Sam's comic songs.

Oh you've heard of Julius Caesar and the great Napoleon too
And how the Turks and Russians beat the French at Waterloo
But there's a page of history that stll reamins uncut
and that's the gallant story of O'Slattery's mounted foot. etc


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Subject: Lyr Add: O'DUFFY'S IRONSIDES
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 24 Apr 10 - 07:05 PM

O'DUFFY'S IRONSIDES

By Diarmuid Fitzpatrick, 1936

Possibly amended by Brendan Behan

Air: The Valley of Knockanure.
Tune available in Digitrad HERE


Let loose my fierce crusaders,
O'Duffy wildly cried,
My grim and bold mosstroopers,
That poached by Shannon side,
Their shirts are blue, their backs are strong,
They've cobwebs on the brain,
And if Franco's moors are beaten.
My Irish troops remain

In old Dublin town my name is tarred,
On pavement and slum wall.
In thousands on her Christian Front,
The starving children call.
But with my gallant ironsides,
They call to us in vain,
For we're off to slaughter workers in,
The sunny land of Spain.

At Badajo's red ramparts,
The Spanish workers died,
O'Duffy's bellowing Animal Gang,
Sing hymns of hate with pride.
The sleuths that called for Connolly's blood,
And Sean MacDiarmuid's too,
Are panting still for worker's gore,
From Spain and far Peru.

Fall in! Fall in! O'Duffy cried,
There's work in Spain to do,
A harp and crown we all will gain,
And shoot the toilers through.
In Paradise an Irish harp,
A Moor to dance a jig,
A traitor's hope, a hangman's rope,
An Irish peeler's pig.

The lyrics above and the information below is taken from the article The Authorship Of The Somhairle Macallistair Ballads by H. Gustav Klaus, Irish University Review, Vol 26,No 1 (Spring – Summer, 1996), pp. 107-117

Dairmuid Fitzpatrick subsequently became involved in Republican politics and from some time in the nineteen thirties organised Na Fianna Eireann, the Irish Republican Youth Movement. It was here that he would have met the young Brendan Behan (born 1923). One of the many songs in Behan's unfinished play Richard's Cork Leg is an adapted version of Fitzpatrick's ballad "O'Duffy's Ironsides", originally published in The Worker of 1936 as " Brigade Ballad No3" and signed, not Somhairle Macallistair, but " Tom Moore junior.


Behan's version retains four of the original eight stanzas, but presents them in a different order with minor amendments in several lines." A harp and crown we all will gain", for example, originally ran " A martyr's crown we all will gain". The Hero sings the ballad as a " welcome" to one of the Blueshirts "that was out fighting against the Communists in Spain". This is exactly in keeping with the original intention of the song. I am,of course, not suggesting here a direct handling down of the material- Fitzpatrick was much too secretive about his literary exploits- merely that "O'Duffy's Ironsides" passed into leftwing folklore of the day and may have been sung by the Republican Scouts on a number of occasions.And in the process, as happens with oral transmissions, the song was to some extent reshaped.

Alternatively Behan may have spotted " O'Duffy's Ironsides" in publications for sale in the Communist Bookshop in Ormond Quay, which he used to frequent after school.



O'Duffy's Ironsides sung by Ronnie Drew


Guaranteed, Ronnie Drew, Record Cover and Track ListClick the triangle by the title to hear extract

INFORMATION ABOUT RICHARD'S CORK LEG

The Tune is described as Traditional: can anyone name it please?


Subject: RE: Tune Req: O'Duffy's Ironsides, on Ronnie Drew LP THREAD LINK HERE
From: Fred McCormick - PM
Date: 25 Apr 10 - 12:18 PM

The tune is The Valley of Knockanure.
Thanks Fred,Regards, Geoff


From: GeoffLawes - PM
Date: 23 Oct 10 - 09:02 AM

The following information and the set of complete original lyrics for O'DUFFY'S IRONSIDES is taken with the kind permission of Lynda Walker from her songbook of Spanish Civil War-related songs called THEIR SONGS NOT FORGOTTEN published in Belfast in 2006.

The following information and the set of complete original lyrics for O'DUFFY'S IRONSIDES is taken with the kind permission of Lynda Walker from her songbook of Spanish Civil War-related songs called THEIR SONGS NOT FORGOTTEN published in Belfast in 2006.

O'DUFFY'S IRONSIDES
Somhairle Mac Alastair


You've heard of Slattery's Light Dragoons,
Who fought at Waterloo,
And those who ran at Bunker Hill—
Or bunked at Timbuktu?
There's still a page in history
Which may never be uncut,
To tell the glorious story of
O'Duffy's Mounted Foot.

In old Dublin town my name is tarred
On pavement and slum wall,
In thousands on its Christian Front
The starving children call.
But with my gallant Ironsides
They call to us in vain,
For we're off to slaughter workers
In the sunny land in Spain.

"Let loose my fierce Crusaders!"
O'Duffy wildly cries,
"My grim and bold moss-troopers
That poached by Shannonsides.
Their shirts are blue, their backs are strong,
They've cobwebs on the brain;
If Franco's troops are beaten down
My Irish troops remain.

"Fall in, fall in!" O'Duffy cries,
"There's work in Spain to do;
A martyr's crown we all will gain,
And shoot the toilers through.
In paradise an Irish harp,
A Moor to dance a jig,
A traitor's hope, a hangman's rope,
An Irish peeler's pig."

On Badajoz' red ramparts
The Spanish workers died,
And Duffy's bellowing Animal Gang
Sang hymns of hate and pride.
The sleuths who called for Connolly's blood,
And Seán Mac Diarmada's too,
Are panting for the workers' gore,
From Spain to far Peru.

"Bring forth my warhorse Rosinante,"
The bold O'Duffy cries;
"My squire, Patsy Panza,
The man who never lies;
My peeler's baton in my hand,
A gay knight-errant I;
Oh, Allah guide our gallant band,
And Hitler guard the sky.

Put on my suit of Daily Mail,
A crescent on my back,
And hoist the Independent flag
The Freeman's Castle Hack.
My name is tarred in Dublin town,
On pavement and slum wall,
But far away in distant Spain
Grandee and landlord call.
With Foreign Legion, Rif and Moor,
We'll fight for Al-fon-so,
And the fame of Duffy's Ironsides
Will down the ages go.

On the village pump in Skibbereen
An eagle screams its woe
As it hears the tramp of armèd men
From the bogs of Timahoe.
The war drums roll in Dublin town,
And from each lusty throat
The Fascists sing the ancient hymn,
"The Peeler and the Goat."

Somhairle Mac Alastair was the pseudonym of Diarmuid Mac Giolla Phádraig. For more background to this song and its writer see Connolly Column by Michael O'Riordan (1979), p. 38–40, and the 2005 edition, p. 2.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MANANA SONG
From: GUEST,Guest-Tim Parker
Date: 20 Apr 10 - 11:05 PM

MANANA SONG

Sung by Max Parker
On LP Al Tocar Diana, At Dawn Break: Songs From A Franco Prison
Folkways Records Album No FH 5435, 1982
FOLKWAYS RECORDING DETAILS Then click on the ► symbol 108 to hear a performance extract.

There are many words in Spanish that we would like to know.
Dictionaries they are scarce as roses in the snow.
But there is one word in Spanish that you never ought to miss.
So listen carefully and you will find that it is this:

Manana. Manana. That old familiar cry.
Manana. Manana. We'll hear it 'til we die.

When will the kitchen have in stock a grapefruit or banana?
Cook shakes his head and whispers low that mystic word, "Manana."

Manana si, ahora no. No tengo cambio.
Regancha, regancha, regancha. No hay, no hay, no hay.
Yo comprendo. Yo entiendo. Hablo, hablas, habla. Hablamos, hablais, hablan.

the following is an excerpt from notes to Al Tocar Diana, Max Parker, Folkways FW 05435:Album Notes pdf


Note: "I have no change" was in general reference to the currency complications in Republican sectors. Under conditions of the National Front's sabotage of currency basis, each village, town and city had to use different currencies. Hence, frequently, no change for out of town money!




From: GeoffLawes - PM
Date: 29 Dec 2010
I have started a fresh thread requesting information called MANANA: 1930's& Spanish Civil War Song HERE. It gives new information and lyrics to the song as performed by Ed Balchowsky plus a link to his singing of the song in the film The Good Fight.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SONG OF THE AMERICAN CONSOL
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 20 Apr 10 - 07:57 PM

SONG OF THE AMERICAN CONSOL


Sung by Max Parker
On LP Al Tocar Diana, At Dawn Break: Songs From A Franco Prison
Folkways Records Album No FH 5435, 1982
FOLKWAYS RECORDING DETAILS Click on the ► symbol 106 to hear a performance extract.



CHORUS
Honey, honey, honey, honey, etc.
Comrades we love you, honey
Comrades we love you, honey
Love you in the springtime and the fall.
Comrades we love you, honey
Comrades we love you, honey, love you best of all,

"Oh the border is closed. You better turn back."
Were the words of the American consol.
(Words of the American consol.)
But we all laughed , 'cause we all knew
He was only straining his tonsil.

Oh the border is closed, and the guards are there.
Oh pray what can we do? (Pray what can we do?)
As you can see, our task must be,
To climb the Pyrenees.

Oh I had a dream the other night that put me in good humor.
(Put me in good humor.)
When I awoke, I found that dream,
Was just a lousy rumor

March on to kill the Fascist beast.
"Forward to the front we say". (" Forward to the front we say".)
At six o'clock our sergeant says,
"Forward to do K.P."


Excerpts From The Album Notes pdf


'Manana Song and Song of the American Consol may, in part, be parodies of American pop songs of the day. Other songs sung in the prison included current songs like Stardust and Smoke Gets In Your Eyes, and various camp, folk and union songs.'

'Attributed to the singing group, the Convulsionaries, most of whom died in Spain.The songs chorus welcomes arriving Lincoln recruits, brave young men of goodwill who are hence "loved best of all".'


Does anyone recognise a popular song of the thirties of which this song could be a parody? The line 'Love you in the Springtime and the Fall'
makes me think of the song 'Little Eyes, I Love You' which I recall singing in pubs forty years ago down in St Just, Cornwall. The whole pub would be crowded and singing. The chorus of 'American Consol'would fit the tune of the chorus for 'Little Eyes' but I don't recall the tune for the verse part.

Does anyone know anything more about the Convulsionaries?

Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War From: GeoffLawes - PM
Date: 20 Apr 10 - 08:29 PM
I have done some Googling and found things which make me pretty sure that the American Consol is a parody of whichever song Little Eyes (or Little Lize) is itself based on.Here is a link to a site dealing with Cornish Folksongs which gives the Cornish lyrics and traces them back to a recording by THE DEEP RIVER BOYS issued in the 1950's but speculating that there was an earlier version.CORNISH LYRICS of LITTLE EYES
Here is a link to the singing of Little eyes in its Cornish version.
SINGING OF LITTLE EYES

If you compare the lyrics of American Consol and Little Eyes I am sure you will agree that there are too many similar phrases for these songs not to have a common source. Honey, honey, it convinces me.

Little Eyes
I dreamed a dream, the other night
The strangest dream of all
I dreamed I saw you kissing her
Behind the garden wall
Chorus:
And she said:
Little eyes I love you (honey!)
Little eyes I love you
I love you in the springtime and the fall (fall-fall-fall)
Little eyes I love you (honey!)
Little eyes I love you
I love you best of all.

I took my true love down the lane
Beneath the spreading pine
I put my arms around her waist
And pressed her lips to mine

And she said: (chorus)

I took her round to my back yard
To see my turtle dove
O tell me honey tell me true
Who is the one you love.

And she said: (chorus)

Does anyone recognise a common ancestor for these songs dating to the 1930's?

From: mikesamwild - PM
Date: 21 Apr 10 - 07:27 AM

just dredged up

I had a dream the other night
The funniest dream of a-a-all
I dreamed I saw a great big man
behind the garden wall

Oh, Elize ah loves yah
Elize ah oves yah
ah loves you in the springtime and the the fa-a-a-all
Elize ah loves yah, Elize ah loves yah
Ah loves you the best of all.

I took her round to my backdoor ( or sometmes ' she came around to my bedside')
to see my turtle d-o-o-ove
Now tell me honey come tell me true
who is the one you love?
dah dah dah ' Elize etc

Repeat chorus started slow and built up to quite a few repeat choruses.


From: GeoffLawes - PM
Date: 21 Apr 10 - 10:03 AM
I have found sheet music for HONEY/LITTLE 'LIZE dated 1898 HERE


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: mikesamwild
Date: 19 Apr 10 - 02:37 PM

BRIGADER MILES TOMALIN AS A PERFORMER

Miles Tomalin had a musical group and there's a well known picture. I think they were the antitank crew and a bit 'eccentric'. i've seen photos witha mandolin and recorder.


From: GeoffLawes - PM
Date: 19 Apr 10 - 08:29 PM
Hi Mike, yes I've also seen that picture of Miles Tomalin playing the recorder with the anti-tank battery where someone,unnamed is playing the mandolin - it is in James Hopkins book INTO THE HEART OF THE FIRE, and some other books. Tomalin apparently inscribed his recorder with the names of the SCW battles in which he fought.

The writer and poet Miles Tomalin went to Spain in 1937. Shown here are his recorder, inscribed with the names of the battles in which he fought - extract from catalogue of the items displayed in cases in the exhibition 'Spanish Civil War - Dreams and Nightmares'held at The Imperial War Museum , London,, 20 October 2001 - 28 April 2002).

LINK, scroll down to CASE F: INTERNATIONAL BRIGADE and BRITISH VOLUNTEERS IN SPAIN

Does anyone know anything about the type of music he performed? I found this in the FolkTrax on-line catalogue


TOMALIN, Miles - England\ Songmaker\ 1971 -- ZOOM MUSIC JAM 1971 (M) Advent of Steam accomp Steve BENBOW (voc/ gtr) with Denny WRIGHT (bass) All comp songs HERE

which suggests a connection with folk music ,after the SCW at least.


From: GeofLawes - PM
Date: 08 July 2012 LINK to photo of Miles Tomalin and the Anti-Tank Battery in the book International Brigades in Spain 1936-39 By Ken Bradley & Mike Chappell

If you scroll down to the next page in the book, p.54, there is another photo of Miles Tomalin , on the left with his arms folded.
Mike, your father, Sam Wild is pictured on page 55 with Bob Cooney standing behind him.


From: GeofLawes - PM
Date: 10 July 2012 Thanks to Almudina Cros who enquired about the recorder for me and writes I asked Stefany Tomalin about the recorder, and she said it is in the Imperial War Museum! She gave them lots of stuff, including the recorder, which YES, had the battles inscribed in it! So the Imperial War Museum might want to start cleaning their archives and they'd better find this precious instrument!


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 14 Apr 10 - 08:45 PM

CANADA AND THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR


The opening few paragraphs of Chapter 9 of Michael Petrou's book called RENEGADES are about singing among the Canadian Brigaders.He says:

'Singing was a popular pastime among volunteers in the International Brigades, as it has always been for soldiers in any army. At night Canadians could occasionally hear Moors or Spaniards singing in the trenches opposite them. A few of the Internationals even had guitars and other musical instruments. Most of their songs were generic, if beautiful, odes to fighting fascism and working-class solidarity. Some were sung in Spanish; some were not. The American Finn Carl Syvanen recalls that in the predawn gloom before the internationals launched their attack on Brunete, a Canadian nicknamed K.O. because of his boxing talents broke the tension by shouting out the lyrics of Robert Service's classic poem " the Shooting Of Dan McGrew"." A bunch of the boys were whooping it up in the Malamute saloon," he sang reciting the story of a barroom shooting that happened one frozen night during the Yukon gold rush to several hundred men about to sweep across a scorching Spanish plain to attack a village bearing the familiar name of Canada. (Villanueva de la Canada)

None of this was particularly out of the ordinary in a war that had such an international character, and it certainly wasn't anything to worry the commanders and political commissars of the internationals in Spain. But some Caanadians imported songs that soon caused consternation among their political bosses, such as this marching song:

I want to go home,
I don't wanna die
Machine guns they rattle
The cannons they roar
I don't want to go to the front any more

Oh take me over the sea
Where Franco can't get at me
Oh! My! I'm too young to die
I wanna to go home!

Irving Weisseman, a political commissar and leading American communist in Spain, decided, along with his fellow commissars, that it was unacceptable for anti-fascist volunteers to sing such lyrics and tried to stamp out the song.

" We commissars had a hell of a time because we had to fight that song," he said. "At least we thought- we were very solemn and straight-laced - we thought we had to fight it... This song became the chant of the people who just felt, what the hell were we there for?" Weissman did not say if the commissars' censorship campaign had any success, but it seems unlikely.

In truth there was little seditious about the song. According to Weissman, it originated with Canadian soldiers in the First World War and was simply adapted to Spain.'


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 14 Apr 10 - 08:34 PM

QUESTIONS THAT STILL NEED ANSWERS



JIM CARROLL's father sang a song including the fragment :
....... from Gandesa to the sea.
And keep your bloody head down and don't shoot me.

Can anyone give us the rest?






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Subject: Lyr Add: I WANT TO GO HOME
From: GUEST,John Fisher
Date: 14 Apr 10 - 04:39 PM

I WANT TO GO HOME

My dad was a member of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade (see Harry Fisher, Comrades, Tales of a Brigadista in the Spanish Civil War, University of Nebraska Press, 1997).

He loved Viva La Quince Brigada, and the other SCW songs. But he always said that's not actually what the guys sang in Spain. The song he remembered best, and still loved to sing decades later was a remake of an old WWI song with the lyrics...

I want to go home, I want to go home
Machine guns they rattle and cannons they roar
I don't want to go to the front any more
So take me over the sea
Where the fascists can't get at me
Oh, my, I'm too young to die
I want to go home

I've never seen the song recorded.

John Fisher
johnbfisher@earthlink.net


From: GeoffLawes - PM
Date: 14 Apr 10 - 08:34 PM
Hi GUEST John Fisher,

I have just come across this very song in Michael Petrou's book,RENEGADES, about the Canadian volunteers in Spain. Below are the words as Petrou writes them and you will see that one or two of the words are slightly different.

I want to go home,
I don't wanna die
Machine guns they rattle
The cannons they roar
I don't want to go to the front any more

Oh take me over the sea
Where Franco can't get at me
Oh! My! I'm too young to die
I wanna to go home!

Petrou's footnote to these lyrics says he got them from Irving Weissman who was being interviewed by Mac Reynolds, circa 1965 and that the interview is now kept in The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio Archive.

This song is based on a World War One song written by a Canadian called Gitz Rice and here is some more information about the original songwriter and song.
LINK TO ORIGINAL SHEET MUSIC
Newspaper Cutting 'THE STORY OF GITZ RICE'
OBITURARY of GITZ RICE


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 14 Apr 10 - 09:37 AM

NO PASARAN

By Gary Kaye

I have just discovered this song on YouTube.
It is obviously a fairly recent song. Does anyone know any more about the song or the singer? Was anyone at the performance?

NO PASARAN

On Cable Street where comrades meet
They stopped the fascists in their tracks
As side by side they stood with pride
They turned the black shirt bastards back
Then down in Spain they felt the pain
Those comrades fought and there they fell
With Stalin’s help a blow was dealt
They damned the fascists into hell

No pasaran No pasaran We will not yield these streets today
No pasaran No pasaran The people here will have their say

People said no, rivers won’t flow
The blood will not spill in our land
So Powell’s words stopped being heard
As decent people took a stand
Monsieur Le Pen he tried again
To be a fascist President
People of France they took their chance
And knocked him down with common sense

No pasaran No pasaran We will not yield these streets today
No pasaran No pasaran The people here will have their say

The BNP spread their disease
And dress it up as politics
We are not fooled we won’t be ruled
By those who stand there spouting shit
This war’s not won it’s just begun
For every woman, child and man
So don’t give in ‘cos we can win If we cry out No pasaran

No pasaran No pasaran We will not yield these streets today
No pasaran No pasaran The people here will have their say


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GUEST,Bruce Barthol
Date: 12 Apr 10 - 01:17 PM

BADAJOZ
By Bruce Barthol

Hello Geoff,

I suppose you have Taste Of Ashes from Spain In My Heart. There's another song, Badajoz, which like Taste Of Ashes is from the SF Mime Troupe's play Spain '36. I put it out on my cd, and have performed it at the vet's events and other places.
Salud,
Bruce

Album Title: The Decline & Fall of Everything Release Date: 1/1/2008

A short part of the song can be sampled HERE


Another, different sample here http://www.allmusic.com/album/the-decline-amp-fall-of-everything-mw0001685885


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 10 Apr 10 - 08:22 PM

NEW ZEALAND AND THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR

Does anyone have this book,

Kiwi Companeros: New Zealand and the Spanish Civil War by Mark Derby?

If so has it got anything about songs or singing in it?


From: GeoffLawes - PM
Date: 14 Apr 10 -
There is now a separate thread on New Zealand
NEW ZEALAND AND THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GUEST,Gerry
Date: 09 Apr 10 - 06:29 PM

NON-INTERVENTION
Amirah Inglis, Australians in the Spanish Civil War, page 26, refers to a Sydney University songbook, Dirt Cheap, from 1938, which had the lyrics of Non-Intervention, to be sung to the tune of Waltzing Matilda. Inglis gives bits and pieces of the lyrics:

Once a jolly Franco started up a civil war
Liking himself as the top dog you see
....
Aeroplanes from Italy are raining bombs on wrecked Madrid
Gunners from the Volga side are firing merrily
And the League still declares, with the simple faith of infancy
Non-intervention's a reality.

Apparently the song had a go at all the parties to the dispute, but above all, the League of Nations.


From: GeoffLawes -
Date: 14 Apr 10 -

Does anyone know more of the words?


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 08 Apr 10 - 06:14 PM

ABRAHAM LINCOLN LIVES (WALKS) AGAIN
By Lewis Allan ( Abel Meeropol)

Does anyone have the lyrics or more information about a song sung by Tony Seletan called Abraham Lincoln Walks Again?
Here is a link to a site with some information and the facility to play a bit of the song
George & Ruth--Songs and Letters of the Spanish Civil War CD,Tony Saletan et al Click on the ► symbol 23 to hear a performance extract.




From: GeoffLawes - PM
Date: 23 Dec 10 - 12:34 PM
I have now discovered that the song, Abraham Lincoln Walks Again which appears on the CD George & Ruth--Songs and Letters of the Spanish Civil War, performed by Tony Saletan, was actually written by Lewis Allan, aka Abel Meeropol, in 1938. It was probably originally called Abraham Lincoln Lives Again.

I have begun another thread on Mudcat HERE giving references for this new information and asking for offers of further information and a complete set of lyrics.


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Subject: Lyr Add: BALLAD OF HEROES
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 07 Apr 10 - 03:23 PM

BALLAD OF HEROES

Dear Geoff Lawes,

I understand from the IBMT that you are collecting songs about the Spanish Civil War.

The attached was not a popular song, but it was performed at the concert to mark the return of the last British Briagders from Spain in 1939.

Best,

Andy Croft




The premiere of Ballad of Heroes was part of the 1939 'Festival of Music and the People'. It was organised by a team comprising the poet Randall Swingler, the composer Alan Rawsthorne, John Allen, Parry Jones, Margaret Leona and representatives of the London Labour Choral Union, Labour Stage and the London Co-operative Societies' Joint Education Committee. Alan Bush was the chairman, Edward Clark (secretary of the ISCM) the organising secretary and Will Sahnow the treasurer. The Festival was attended by over 10,000 people ; more than 1,000 people took part.

The Festival consisted of three concerts. The first was a performance, on Saturday 1 April at the Royal Albert Hall, of Music and the People, a historical pageant written by Swingler and set to music by twelve composers - Vaughan Williams, Arnold Cooke, Elizabeth Lutyens, Victor Yates, Edmund Rubbra, Erik Chisholm, Christian Darnton, Frederic Austin, Norman Demuth, Alan Bush, Elizabeth Maconchy and Alan Rawsthorne. Paul Robeson and Parry Jones were the principal singers, but there were five hundred other voices too - from twenty-three London Co-operative choirs (the Rhondda Unity Male Voice Choir also sang). There were a hundred dancers. Arnold Goldsborough was on the Albert Hall organ, while Alan Bush himself conducted the People's Festival Wind Band. The decor was by Michael Ross and Barbara Allen, and the Pageant was directed by John Allen.

The second concert was on 3 April at the Conway Hall, where the Fleet Street Choir conducted by TB Lawrence, sang works by Vaughan Williams, Percy Grainger, Zoltan Kodaly, Hans Eisler and Schonberg. 'Medvedeff and his Balalaika Orchestra' performed popular Soviet songs.

The third concert was on Wednesday 5 April, at the Queen's Hall. The London Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Constant Lambert, (leader George Stratton) were joined by 300 voices from twelve Co-operative and Labour choirs. The concert was the occasion for the first public performance in Britain of Bush's Piano Concerto (Swingler's text sung by Dennis Noble, with Bush at the piano) and the premiere of Benjamin Britten's Ballad of Heroes. Written to mark the return of the last British volunteers from Spain, and to honour the men of the British Battalion who did not return, the libretto was by Auden and Swingler. Ballad of Heroes opens with Swingler's stately 'Funeral March' :

You who stand at doors, wiping hands on aprons,
You who lean at the corner saying : 'We have done our best,'
You who shrug your shoulders and you who smile
To conceal your life's despair and its evil taste,
To you we speak, you numberless Englishmen,
To remind you of the greatness still among you
Created by these men who go from our towns
To fight for peace, for liberty, and for you.
They were men who hated death and loved life,
Who were afraid, and fought against their fear !
Men who wished to create and not to destroy,
But knew the time must come to destroy the destroyer.
For they have restored your power and pride,
Your life is yours, for which they died.

This was followed by part of Auden's 'It's Farewell to the Drawing-room's Civilised Cry,' the beguiling, handsome voice of the Devil who has 'broken parole' - the voice of Fascism and War. The third movement combined texts by both Swingler and Auden. The chorus sang verses by Auden from On the Frontier ('They die to make men just/ And worthy of the earth') as the lowered flags of the British Battalion were carried into the hall and Walter Widdop's tenor voice sang Swingler's lovely
recitative :

Still tho' the scene of possible Summer recedes,
And the guns can be heard across the hills
Like waves at night : though crawling suburbs fill
Their valleys with the stench of idleness like rotting weeds,
And desire unacted breeds its pestilence.
Yet still below the soot the roots are sure
And beyond the guns there is another murmur,
Like pigeons flying unnotic'd over continents
With secret messages of peace : and at the centre
Of the wheeling conflict the heart is calmer,
The promise nearer than ever it came before.

The above information was kindly supplied to me by Andy Croft and here is a sound sample Ballad of Heroes Another sample of Ballad of Heroes can be heard as an added soundtrack to the following Youtube video "Original film of the return of the International Brigade British Battalion 07.12.1938" HERE Ballad of Heroes


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Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes
Date: 04 Apr 10 - 07:25 PM


AUSTRALIA AND THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR

What about Australia? Are there any songs about Australian International Brigaders? There were 66 volunteers from Australia
Aussies in The Spanish Civil War by David Leach


Subject: RE: Songs in English about the Spanish Civil War
From: GeoffLawes - PM
Date: 11 Apr 10

This is a link to another Mudcat thread which takes up this issue Australia and the Spanish Civil War


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