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Lyr Add: Katahdin's Battle with the Gale (Ipcar)

Charley Noble 25 Feb 18 - 08:21 PM
ChanteyLass 25 Feb 18 - 09:26 PM
Charley Noble 26 Feb 18 - 05:53 PM
GUEST 26 Feb 18 - 11:26 PM
Charley Noble 27 Feb 18 - 08:00 PM
leeneia 02 Mar 18 - 12:07 PM
Charley Noble 26 Mar 18 - 09:14 PM
GUEST,julia L 27 Mar 18 - 05:52 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: Katahdin's Battle with the Gale
From: Charley Noble
Date: 25 Feb 18 - 08:21 PM

By Charles Ipcar, ©2018 2/17/18
Tune after traditional “When I first Came to This Land”

The Katahdin’s Battle with the Gale

C-----------------------------F--------C
As we steamed out from Bangor Town,
-----F--------C-------G---G7---C
For Boston Harbor we were bound;
------------------------------F----------C
The seas ran high as we shoveled coal;
G---G7-------------C
We did what we could!
-----------F-----------C------G---------C
And we called that coal “Bless My Soul!”
------------------------F--------------C
The old Katahdin, she steamed good;
G----------G7-------C
She did what she could!


Off Cape Porpoise we were assailed
By a raging Northeast Gale;
We used up the coal and turned to wood;
We did what we could!
And we called that wood “You Burn Good!”
And we called that coal “Bless My Soul!”
The old Katahdin, she steamed good;
She did what she could!

As the Gale increased its blow,
Our birch cargo was running low;
We smashed in the cabin doors;
We did what we could!
And we called those doors “Almighty Roar!”
And we called that wood “You Burn Good!”
And we called that coal “Bless My Soul!”
The old Katahdin, she steamed good;
She did what she could!

We soon sighted old Boon Isle,
And in her lee we steamed awhile,
The doors were gone, we tossed in chairs;
We did what we could!
And we called those chairs, “We Don’t Care!”
And we called those doors “Almighty Roar!”
And we called that wood “You Burn Good!”
And we called that coal “Bless My Soul!”
The old Katahdin, she steamed good;
She did what she could!

We steamed all night till the wind went down;
Then set course for Portsmouth Town;
The chairs were gone, we tossed in hams;
We did what we could!
And we called those hams “Great God Damn!”
And we called those chairs, “We Don’t Care!”
And we called those doors “Almighty Roar!”
And we called that wood “You Burn Good!”
And we called that coal “Bless My Soul!”
The old Katahdin, she steamed good;
She did what she could!

Now we’re moored at Portsmouth Pier,
We bid farewell to every fear;
Let’s raise a glass to ham and wood;
We did what we could!
And let’s raise a glass to the old steamship,
Come wind or wave, let her rip!
“To the old Katahdin, she steamed good;
She did what she could!”

Notes:

Katahdin Steamboat Story

Portsmouth Herald:

The steamboat Katahdin, bound from Rockland, Maine, to Boston with 35 passengers and freight aboard, nearly foundered and sank off Boon Island January 9th, 1886, in a raging northeast gale. The Katahdin, a side wheeler of 1,234 tons and 241 feet long, first ran into the gale off Cape Porpoise...

The steamer Katahdin on the night of January 9th, 1886, entered a fierce gale while en route from Boston to Bangor, Maine. Katahdin battled high seas for 10 hours, exhausting her coal supply. To keep her engines and pumps running the crew then burned the ship's furniture, non-structural bulkheads, and cargo including a large shipment of hams.

NavSource:

This is the steamer Katahdin, one of the best-known and longest-lived New England steamers. On the night of January 9, 1886, while en route from Boston to Bangor, she was caught by a fierce gale. She managed to stay offshore, clear of perilous shoals and surf, but she still suffered terribly. Katahdin battled high seas for 10 hours, and in the process burned her entire coal supply. To keep her engines and pumps running it was necessary to feed the hungry boilers whatever fuel could be found, including all the ship's furniture, cargo, and non-structural bulkheads. The fuel situation was so desperate that even a shipment of hams was considered worthwhile fuel! Katahdin is seen here limping into Portsmouth, New Hampshire, the morning after the gale. Although badly battered and many miles short of her destination, she has at least survived the storm, and will be repaired.

Storms and Shipwrecks of New England, p. 153:

The experience of the paddle-steamer Katahdin during the blizzard of January 1886, on the route from Bangor to Boston, gives an idea of what the Portland must have gone through before she foundered in the 1898 gale.

On January 9, 1886, the Katahdin left Bangor for Boston. Running into a heavy gale off Cape Porpoise (Maine), her master, Captain Homer, decided to take no chances and ran to sea. Reaching the vicinity of Boon Island, he tried for shelter and failed. All night long the terrific blast from the northeast continued and the Katahdin kept her head into the wind. The fuel was entirely consumed, however, and a shipment of spoolwood (birch logs), excellent for fuel, was also used. Finally, the ship was driven to a position near the Isle of Shoals. By this time all the spare fixtures and been thrown into the fires and the dismantling of staterooms began.

Frank A. Garnsey of Bangor was the freight clerk:

“I never expected to see land again. I was going down to the engine room and met Captain Pierce. I asked him how long we’d stay up and he said: ‘The old Katahdin won’t last another hour.’ When we began to fill, a list of passengers and crew were made out and placed in a bottle. I was pulling down stateroom doors when land was sighted; everything else had been consumed.”

The Katahdin had sighted Portsmouth Harbor; a short time later, visibly battered and bruised, her houses wrecked, her cargo burned, and her bulkheads smashed in, she limped into safe harbor. Captain Pierce said that it had been a dreadful experience. “I never expected to see shore again. The only thing that saved us was a shift in wind which beat down the seas and gave us a chance to get into Portsmouth.”


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Katahdin's Battle with the Gale
From: ChanteyLass
Date: 25 Feb 18 - 09:26 PM

I'm looking forward to hearing you sing this. NEFFA, maybe? I see you are on the schedule for something with an appropriate title.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Katahdin's Battle with the Gale
From: Charley Noble
Date: 26 Feb 18 - 05:53 PM

ChanteyLass-

Yes, I'll certainly be singing it there at my workshop on "Steamship and Roustabout Songs". I love a good cumulative chorus.

Cheerily,
Charlie Ipcar


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Katahdin's Battle with the Gale
From: GUEST
Date: 26 Feb 18 - 11:26 PM

This mountain still floats.

The Katahdin is a historic steamboat berthed on Moosehead Lake in Greenville, Maine. Built in 1914 at the Bath Iron Works, she at first served the tourist trade on the lake before being converted to a towboat hauling lumber. She was fully restored in the 1990s by the nonprofit Moosehead Maritime Museum, and is again giving tours on the lake. One of the very few surviving early lake boats in Maine, and the oldest vessel afloat built at Bath, she was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Katahdin's Battle with the Gale
From: Charley Noble
Date: 27 Feb 18 - 08:00 PM

The Katahdin on Moosehead Lake was indeed originally a steamboat, now converted to fossil fuel. She is not the same steamboat honored in this song which was a paddlewheel steamboat that made the run from Boston to Bangor for more than 20 years.

However, I encourage everyone to take a cruise on the Moosehead Lake Katahdin. There is a lot to see and afterwards you can dine at the Roadkill Cafe in Greenville (if they are still in operation).

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Katahdin's Battle with the Gale
From: leeneia
Date: 02 Mar 18 - 12:07 PM

Thanks, Charlie!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Katahdin's Battle with the Gale
From: Charley Noble
Date: 26 Mar 18 - 09:14 PM

Here's a link to my recording of this true tale of the Steamboat Katahdin's successful battle with a gale: http://www.charlieipcar.com/lyrics/katahdin_gale.htm

Cheerily,
Charlie Ipcar


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Katahdin's Battle with the Gale
From: GUEST,julia L
Date: 27 Mar 18 - 05:52 PM

Nice job, Charlie!


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