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Lyr Add: Huntingtower

In Mudcat MIDIs:
Duke of Athol


Frank Phillips 08 Jun 97 - 08:36 PM
Bo 08 Jun 97 - 10:55 PM
Frank Phillips 08 Jun 97 - 11:02 PM
Murray 09 Jun 97 - 07:31 PM
Bo 09 Jun 97 - 11:02 PM
Alan of Australia 11 Jun 97 - 12:02 PM
Jim Dixon 04 Nov 07 - 12:28 PM
GUEST,Young Hunting Tower! 05 Nov 07 - 08:36 AM
Jim Dixon 28 Jan 18 - 06:55 PM
GUEST,threelegsoman 29 Jan 18 - 03:02 AM
Tattie Bogle 29 Jan 18 - 04:18 PM
Jim Dixon 08 Feb 18 - 11:57 AM
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Subject: Lyr Add: HUNTING TOWER
From: Frank Phillips
Date: 08 Jun 97 - 08:36 PM

I was trying to learn the song Hunting Tower from the Corrie's songbook but there seemed to be some "holes" in the thread of the logic. I checked another source and got a version that functions properly as a call-and-answer song with one verse for each protagonist (who are of opposite gender).

I checked DT and got only Duke of Athol, which is obviously the basis for the song but is not identical. If my insertion of the BR's is correct "Hunting Tower" or "Huntingtower" should appear in some logical form below.

When ye gang awa, Jamie,
Far across the sea, laddie;
When ye gang to Germanie,
What will you send to me laddie?

I'll send ye a braw new gown, Jeanie,
I'll send ye a braw new gown, lassie,
And it shall be o' silk and gowd,
Wi' Valenciennes set round, laddie.

That's nae gift ava', Jamie,
That's nae gift ava', laddie;
There's ne'er a gown in a' the land,
I'd like when you're awa, laddie.

When I come back again, Jeanie,
When I come back again, lassie,
I'll bring wi' me a gallant gay,
To be your ain gude man, lassie.

Be my gude man your sel', Jamie,
Be my gude man your sel', laddie;
And tak' me owre to Gemanie,
Wi' you at hame to dwell, laddie.

I dinna ken how that wad do, Jeanie,
I dinna see how that can be , lassie,
For I've a wife and bairnies three,
And I'm no sure how ye'd 'gree, lassie.

Ye should hae telt me that in time, Jamie,
Ye should hae telt me that lang syne, laddie;
For had I kent o' your fause heart,
You ne'er had gotten mine, laddie.
(*** in the first 2 lines leave out the "that" and run the "me" into the next word or you'll never scan)

Your een were like a spell, Jeanie,
Your een were like a spell, lassie,
That ilka day bewitched me sae,
I could na help my sel' lassie.

Gae back to you wife and hame, Jamie,
Gae back to your bairnies three, laddie;
And I will pray they ne'er may thole,
A broken hear like mine, laddie.

Dry that tearfu' e'e, Jeanie,
Dry that tearfu' e'e, lassie;
I've neither wife nor bairnies three,
And I'll wed nane but thee, lassie.

Think weel for fear ye rue, Jamie,
Think weel for fear ye rue, laddie;
For I ha'e neither gow'd nor land,
To be a match for you laddie.

Blair in Athol's mine, Jeanie,
Blair in Athol's mine, lassie:
St Johnston's bow'r and Hunting tow'r,
And a' that's mine is thine lassie.

(For a duet you can repeat the last verse with both singing simultaneously as follows

MALE: Blair in Athol's mine, Jeanie. FEMALE: Blair in Athol's thine, Jamie.
MALE: Blair in Athol's mine, lassie. FEMALE: Blair in Athol's thine, laddie.
BOTH: St Johnston's bow'r and Hunting tow'r,
MALE: And a' that's mine is thine, lassie. FEMALE: And a' that's thine is mine, laddie.

ava=at all (but maybe this should just be " at a' "
gowd=gold
telt=told
'gree = agree
thole=endure,
St. Johnston= Perth.


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Subject: RE: Huntingtower: Lyrics provided
From: Bo
Date: 08 Jun 97 - 10:55 PM

Thanx muchly,

Any background info about the song in any of your sources?

bo


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Subject: RE: Huntingtower: Lyrics provided
From: Frank Phillips
Date: 08 Jun 97 - 11:02 PM

The Corries song book says merely "Traditional". The other was a loose page stuck inside another second hand book that I bought. It has nothing at the heading of the song except the title. As I mentioned, it seems to be an adaptation of the Duke of Athol song in the DT. But that is just a guess. There is nothing to prevent the two from being parallel descendents from another primeval ballad. BUT that is just another guess.

Any musical historians out there?

Frank


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Subject: RE: Huntingtower: Lyrics provided
From: Murray
Date: 09 Jun 97 - 07:31 PM

The song derives [somehow] from a ballad collected around 1800 or so, called "Ritchie Story" (NOT "Ritchie's Story" as the DT has it). The version in DT is from Kinloch's book of 1827, but it's not a very good one, and I don't think it's been sung since!! "Huntingtower (one word, by the way, like "gudeman", which = "husband") is in several books, in fairly constant form, though there are variations, as generally happens. I collected a version in 1958 from a grand old gent from Aberdeenshire, who sang it with his daughter, harmonising nicely on the repeat of the last stanza. [Variants:3.3 in a' the toon [this rhymes, notice] 3.4 I'd wear 10.1 Dry up that 10.2 My story's a' a lee, lassie 10.3 For I hae neither wife for weans 11.3 neither hoose nor ha' 12.2 Little Dunkeld is mine, lassie.] The tune has been collected as a vehicle for the "R.S." ballad, and the ancestor turns out to be that of another 17th century ballad, "The Scotch Wedding between Jockey and Jenny" (in Pills to Purge Melancholy, ed. of 1719-20, V.42); it seems also related to the tune of "Braw braw lads of Gala Water".[Note typo: "hear" should be "heart".] As for the factual background of the song, the Duke of Athol, supposedly the hero (a Murray by name, head of my clan) has nothing to do with it, of course. It's just a romantic tale--the idea of pretending (poverty, marriage) and turning out to be single landed gentry crops up in several songs. Lady Nairne, who made quite an industry of improving old Scots songs to make them more genteel, did for this one too, and the result is quite sad. You don't need to edit st. 7, as recommended above (you'd have to fix #6 as well). When sung freely, it works, you just have to make sure to get the accent (first beat of the measure) on the words "ken" and "telt".


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Subject: RE: Huntingtower: Lyrics provided
From: Bo
Date: 09 Jun 97 - 11:02 PM

Thanx Murry, thats a peck o background.

I take it from your post that your special interest is Scots Folksong. Can you recommend any online sources for material music and\or lyrics?

thanx again

Bo


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Subject: RE: Huntingtower: Lyrics provided
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 11 Jun 97 - 12:02 PM

Here is the tune in Tonic Sol-fa as found in a very old book (see the thread "Old Scottish Song Book") I have of Scottish songs:

|d:-.d:d:r|m:-:r.d:-. |
|d:-.d:m:s|d>:-.t:l.s:-. |
|l:-.t:d>:l|s:-.m:m.r
:d|f:-.f:m:s|r:-.m:r.d:-||

The words are almost the same as above (verse 3 has ava, not ava', verse 4 has guidman etc.)

For an explanation of Tonic Sol-fa see the thread "Sol-fa notation".

As you'll see from the "Old Scottish Song Book" thread I'm looking for information about my book. Please check out this thread.

Cheers,
Alan


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHEN YE GANG AWA JAMIE / DUKE OF ATHOL
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 04 Nov 07 - 12:28 PM

Found with Google Book Search in "The Harp of Perthshire: A Collection of Songs, Ballads, and Other Poetical Pieces…" by Robert Ford, 1893.

WHEN YE GANG AWA, JAMIE.*

She—WHEN ye gang awa, Jamie,
Far across the sea, laddie;
When ye gang to Germanie,
What will ye send to me, laddie?

He—I'll send ye a braw new gown, Jeanie,
I'll send ye a braw new gown, lassie;
And it shall be o' silk and gowd,
Wi' Valenciennes set round, lassie.

She—That's nae gift ava, Jamie,
That's nae gift ava, laddie;
There's ne'er a gown in a' the toun,
I'd like, when ye're awa', laddie.

He—When I come back again, Jeanie,
When I come back, lassie,
I'll bring wi' me a gallant gay,
To be your ain gudeman, lassie.

She—Be my gudeman yoursel', Jamie,
Be my gudeman yoursel', laddie,
An' tak' me ower to Germanie,
Wi' you at hame to dwell, laddie.

He—I ken na how that would do, Jeanie,
I ken na how that can be, lassie,
For I've a wife and bairnies three,
An' I'm feart ye wadna gree, lassie.

She—You should tell'd me that in time, Jamie,
You should tell'd me that in time, laddie,
For had I kent o' your fause heart,
You ne'er had gotten mine, laddie.

He—Your een were like a spell, Jeanie,
Your een were like a spell, lassie;
That ilka day bewitch'd me sae,
I couldna help mysel', lassie.

She—Gae back to your wife and hame, Jamie,
Gae back to your bairnies three, laddie,
And I will pray they ne'er may thole,
A broken heart like me, laddie.

He—Dry that tearfu' e'e, Jeanie,
My story's a' a lee, lassie,
I've neither wife nor bairnies three,
And I'll wed nane but thee, lassie.

She—Think weel for fear ye rue, Jamie,
Think weel for fear ye rue, laddie,
For I hae neither gowd nor lands,
To be a match for you, laddie.

He—Blair in Athole's mine, Jeanie,
Little Dunkeld is mine, lassie,
St. Johnston's bower, and Hunting-tower,
An' a' that's mine is thine, lassie.

ANONYMOUS.
-----

*The original of this popular song, under the title of "The Duke of Athol," was first printed in Mr. Kinloch's collection, where it is said to have been taken from the recitation of an idiot boy in Wishaw. It runs as follows:—

"I am gaing awa', Jeanie,
I am gaing awa',
I am gaing ayont the saut seas,
I am gaing sae far awa'."

"Whan will ye marry me, Jamie?
Whan will ye marry me?
Will ye tak' me to your countrie,
Or will ye marry me?"

"How can I marry thee, Jeanie,
How can I marry thee?
When I've a wife and bairns three,
Twa wad na weill agree."

"Wae be to your fause tongue, Jamie,
Wae be to your fause tongue;
Ye promised for to marry me,
Aid has a wife at hame."

"If my wife wad dee, Jeanie,
And sae my bairns three,
I wad tak' ye to my ain countrie.
And married we wad be."

"O, an' your head war sair, Jamie,
O, an' your head war sair,
I'd tak' the napkin frae my neck,
And tie doun your yellow hair."

"I hae nae wife at a', Jeanie,
I hae nae wife at a',
I hae neither wife nor bairns three,
I said it to try thee.

"Blair in Athol is mine, Jeanie,
Blair in Athol is mine;
Bonnie Dunkeld is whare I dwell,
And the boats o' Garry's mine."

Whether the narrative had any origin in fact no one appears to know. There is a rendering of the song by the Baroness Nairne, but the above version, the author of which is unknown, is the one of universal favour.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hunting Tower
From: GUEST,Young Hunting Tower!
Date: 05 Nov 07 - 08:36 AM

Belle Stewart had it and recorded it. I've never heard Sheila sing it, but she may well do.


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Subject: Lyr Add: HUNTINGTOWER (Nairne)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 28 Jan 18 - 06:55 PM

From Life and Songs of the Baroness Nairne edited by the Rev. Charles Rogers (London: Charles Griffin and Co., 1869), page 177:


HUNTINGTOWER.

When ye gang awa', Jamie,
When ye gang awa', laddie,
What will ye gi'e my heart to cheer,
When ye are far awa', Jamie?

I'll gi'e ye a braw new goun, Jeanie,
I'll gi'e ye a braw new goun, lassie,
An' it will be a silken ane,
Wi' Valenciennes trimm'd round, Jeanie.

O that's nae luve at a', laddie,
That's nae luve at a', Jamie;
How could I bear braw gouns to wear,
When ye are far awa', laddie!

But mind me when awa', Jamie,
Mind me when awa', laddie,
For out o' sicht is out o' mind
Wi' mony folk, we ken, Jamie.

Oh! that can never be, Jeanie,
Forgot ye ne'er can be, lassie;
Oh gang wi' me to the north countrie,
My bonny bride to be, Jeanie.

The hills are grand and hie, Jeanie,
The burnies rinnin' clear, lassie,
'Mang birks and braes, where the wild deer strays,
Oh cum wi' me and 'see, lassie.

I winna gang wi' thee, laddie,
I tell't ye sae afore, Jamie;
Till free consent my parents gi'e,
I canna gang wi' thee, Jamie.

But when ye're wed to me, Jeanie,
Then they will forgi'e, lassie;
How can ye be sae cauld to me,
Wha's lo'ed ye weel and lang, lassie?

No sae lang as them, laddie,
No sae lang as them, Jamie;
A grief to them I wadna be,
No for the Duke himsel', Jamie.

We'll save our penny fee, laddie,
To keep frae poortith free, Jamie;
An' then their blessing they will gi'e,
Baith to you an' me, Jamie.

Huntingtower is mine, lassie,
Huntingtower is mine, Jeanie;
Huntingtower, an' Blairnagower,
An' a' that's mine is thine, Jeanie!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Huntingtower
From: GUEST,threelegsoman
Date: 29 Jan 18 - 03:02 AM

I found the lyrics to this song on a site http://www.contemplator.com/folk.html Songs from England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales and America.
My own version can be found at:
Huntingtower (Including lyrics and chords)

As an introduction to the song I wrote the following:

The following information about this song comes from the sister site to Songs of the Sea:
This ballad is also known as The Duke of Athol and The Duke of Athol's Courtship. It appeared in George Kinloch's Ancient Scottish Ballads (1827).
The Duke of Athol appears as an appendix to Child Ballad #232 (Richie Story). Child felt it was "too well known to require citing" (Child, Vol. IV, 299). Richie Story dated from 1802.

For a complete list of Child Ballads at this site go to Francis J. Child Ballads.

Another male/female courtship song is Madam, Will You Walk?.

(thole = bear)

As the Isle of Man was for a period under the rule of the Dukes of Athol, I feel sure that this song would have been well known here in the 1800s.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Huntingtower
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 29 Jan 18 - 04:18 PM

Thanks: I posted this title (but not the lyrics) on the thread about "Dialogue songs" and for me, it's one of the best!


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Subject: Lyr Add: HUNTINGTOWER
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 08 Feb 18 - 11:57 AM

These lyrics, along with musical notation, can be seen in The Songs of Scotland by J. Pittman and Colin Brown (London: Boosey & Co., 1873), page 5. I have boldfaced the words that are different from those in the above versions:

HUNTINGTOWER; or, WHEN YE GANG AWA, JAMIE

JEANIE. When ye gang awa, Jamie,
Far across the sea, laddie,
When ye gang to Germanie,
What will ye send to me, laddie?

JAMIE. I'll send ye a braw new gown, Jeanie,
The brawest in the town, lassie;
And it shall be o' silk and gowd,
Wi' Valenciennes set round, lassie.

JEANIE. That's nae gift ava, Jamie,
Silk and gowd and a', laddie,
There's ne'er a gown in a' the land
I'd like when ye're awa, laddle.

JAMIE. When I come back again, Jeanie,
Frae a foreign land, lassie,
I'll bring wi' me a gallant gay,
To be your ain gudeman, lassie.

JEANIE. Be my gudeman yoursel', Jamie,
Marry me yoursel', laddie,
And tak' me ower to Germanie,
Wi' you at hame to dwell, laddie.

JAMIE. I dinna ken how that wad do, Jeanie,
I dinna see how that can be, lassie,
For I've a wife and bairnies three,
And I'm no sure how ye?d agree, lassie.

JEANIE. Ye should hae telt me that in time, Jamie,
Ye should hae telt me that lang syne, laddie,
For had I kent o' your fause heart,
Ye ne'er had gotten mine, laddie.

JAMIE. Your een were like a spell, Jeanie,
Mair sweet than I could tell, lassie,
That ilka day bewitch'd me sae,
I couldna help mysel', lassie.

JEANIE. Gae back to your wife and hame, Jamie,
Gae back to your bairnies three, laddie,
And I will pray they ne'er may thole
A braken heart like me, laddie.

JAMIE. Dry that tearfu' e'e, Jeanie,
Grieve nae mair for me, lassie, [or, "My tale is a' a lee, lassie"]*
I've neither wife nor bairnies three,
And I'll wed nane but thee, lassie.

JEANIE. Think weel, for fear you rue, Jamie,
Ye'll no get ane mare true, laddie;
But I have neither gowd nor lands,
To be a match for you, laddie.

JAMIE. Blair in Athol's mine, lassie,
Fair Dunkeld is mine, lassie,
Saint Johnstoun's bower, and Huntingtower,
And a' that's mine is thine, lassie.

[* This alternate line is taken from Maclagan's Musical Age Songster (London: The Music Publishing Company, 1864), page 4.]


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