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Shool, shool, shool la rue

DigiTrad:
BUTTERMILK HILL
I'LL SELL MY HAT, I'LL SELL MY COAT
SHULE AGRA or JOHNNY HAS GONE FOR A SOLDIER
SHULE AROON
SHULE AROON 1


Related threads:
Meaning: I'll dye my petticoat (53)
Chords Req: Johnny Has Gone for a Soldier (16)
Gone the rainbow PP&M translation (13)
Chord Req: Siuil a Ruin Chords and sheet ... (33)
(origins) Lyr Req: Siul a Ruin (81)
traditional tunes in Irish gaeilge (32)
Lyr/Chords Req: Johnny has gone for a soldier (7)
Help: Siul a Ruin (36)
Help: Suil A Ruin, correct spelling? (18)
Lyr Req: Shule Aroon (23)
Help: Shule Aroon: sell my rock, rod, reel (59)
Dilemma with 'Siul A Ruin' (24)
(origins) Origins: Johnny Has Gone for a Soldier (15)
Lyr Req: Johnny Has Gone for a Soldier (44)
Lyr Req: Johnny Has Gone for a Soldier (10)
Shule Aroon / Shule Agra / Buttermilk Hill: Scots? (6)
Lyr Req: Johnnie Has Gone for a Soldier (10)
Lyr Add: Mickey's Gone for a Larborer (5)
Lyr Req: Suil A Ruin (6) (closed)
Siul A Run (5) (closed)


Sunny@pacific-ocean.com 07 Jul 97 - 04:16 AM
Helen 07 Jul 97 - 05:09 AM
Kiwi 07 Jul 97 - 09:12 AM
Susan of DT 07 Jul 97 - 05:48 PM
07 Jul 97 - 08:29 PM
Alison 08 Jul 97 - 12:38 AM
GUEST,Steve 16 Nov 03 - 11:11 PM
Bob Bolton 16 Nov 03 - 11:43 PM
vectis 17 Nov 03 - 06:34 AM
Willa 17 Nov 03 - 12:15 PM
Padre 17 Nov 03 - 02:50 PM
GUEST,Karen 25 Feb 04 - 05:28 PM
Allan C. 25 Feb 04 - 07:17 PM
GUEST,Karen 25 Feb 04 - 10:13 PM
GUEST,Tara 06 Aug 07 - 04:50 PM
GUEST,Tom simone 13 Nov 07 - 11:18 PM
Dave'sWife 13 Nov 07 - 11:36 PM
Dave'sWife 14 Nov 07 - 03:33 AM
GUEST,Dáithí 14 Nov 07 - 04:50 AM
GUEST,JTT 14 Nov 07 - 06:29 AM
Declan 14 Nov 07 - 01:53 PM
GUEST,Dáithí 15 Nov 07 - 04:47 AM
GUEST,JTT 17 Nov 07 - 03:11 AM
GUEST 19 Nov 07 - 11:47 AM
GUEST,Dáithí 21 Nov 07 - 05:18 AM
GUEST,A Scot 22 Nov 09 - 12:12 PM
Steve Gardham 22 Nov 09 - 04:06 PM
GUEST 27 Mar 11 - 08:07 AM
GUEST,Guest from Baltimore Md 15 Mar 16 - 03:25 PM
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Subject: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: Sunny@pacific-ocean.com
Date: 07 Jul 97 - 04:16 AM

Wanted: info regarding the following song. I learned this song as a child and have taught it to many children throughout the years, including my 15 year old daughter. It is a fun song for kids, as each time you repeat it, you sing it faster until everyone disolves into giggles!

Shool, shool, shool la rue Shool la rack shack Shool la ba ba coo When I saw my Sally bally Bill Come bibble in a brook, come Laurie (lorry)!


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: Helen
Date: 07 Jul 97 - 05:09 AM

Do a search for Shule Aroon in the database.

Helen


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: Kiwi
Date: 07 Jul 97 - 09:12 AM

I believe the translation is "Come My Love". There's an alternate version to the Shule Aroon listed in the database that I haven't yet found. *shrug* But I have "S'cuil A\ Ruin" done by Anu/na or "Johnny's Gone For Soldier" by Solas, neither of which are quite like the one you described, Sunny.


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: Susan of DT
Date: 07 Jul 97 - 05:48 PM

The words are not always "shule aroon" so first I searched for "shule" and got three hits and hoped we had put a DT number on it, but we haven't, but saw that the fileneme on one was "shularn5" implying that there are at least five of them, so I searched for "shularn*" and found five of them. the gaelic (?) gets turned into all sorts of things.


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Subject: Lyr Add: GONE THE RAINBOW (PP&M)
From:
Date: 07 Jul 97 - 08:29 PM

Here are the lyrics from the Peter, Paul and Mary Web Site, http://www.downeast.net/ppm/ -

GONE THE RAINBOW
(Stookey/Travers/Yarrow/Okun)
Pepamar Music Inc. ASCAP

(Chorus:) Shule, shule, shule-a-roo,
Shule-a-rak-shak, shule-a-ba-ba-coo.
When I saw my Sally Babby Beal
Come bibble in the boo shy Lorey.

Here I sit on Buttermilk Hill;
Who could blame me, cry my fill;
Every tear would turn a mill,
Johnny's gone for a soldier.

(Chorus)

I sold my flax, I sold my wheel,
To buy my love a sword of steel;
So it in battle he might wield,
Johnny's gone for a soldier.

(Chorus)

Oh my baby, oh, my love,
Gone the rainbow, gone the dove.
Your father was my only love;
Johnny's gone for a soldier.

(Chorus)


It's from the (Moving) LP.

-Joe Offer-

Wow! I have apparently found (and fixed) a post from before Joe Offer knew how to insert line breaks. Now that’s ancient history! --JoeClone, 11-Mar-02.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SIUIL A RUIN
From: Alison
Date: 08 Jul 97 - 12:38 AM

Hi

Here are another set of lyrics.
The last line of the verses and the chorus are in Gaelic, however I've done them phonetically because it makes it easier when you don't speak Gaelic.

SIUIL A RUIN Trad.

I would I were on yonder hill
It's there I'd sit and cry my fill
And every tear would turn a mill
Is go jay to mavourneen slawn.

I'll sell my rock, I'll sell my reel,
I'll sell my only spinning wheel,
To buy my love a sword of steel,
Is go jay to mavourneen slawn.

Chorus:
Shule, shule, shule aroon.
Shule go sook here agus shule go cuin,
Shule go doras agus ay-layg lamb
Is go jay to mavourneen slawn.

I'll dye my petticoats, I'll dye them red
And it's round the world I'll beg for bread
Until my parents would wish me dead
Is go jay to mavourneen slawn.

I wish, I wish, I wish in vain
I wish I had my heart again
And vainly think I'd not complain
Is go jay to mavourneen slawn.

And now my love has gone to France
To try his fortune to advance
If he e'er comes back 'tis but a chance
Is go jay to mavourneen slawn.

Chorus Translation:
Go, go, go love
Go smoothly and quietly
Go to the door and escape with me
And may you go safe my darling.

Tells of a woman's love for a soldier who has fled to France after the final surrender in 1691 of the Catholic armies to William of Orange's Protestant forces at Limerick.
These soldiers were "The Wild Geese" who fought for Ireland in the armies of France and Spain.

slainte
Alison


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: GUEST,Steve
Date: 16 Nov 03 - 11:11 PM

Try Peter Paul and Mary "Gone the Rainbow" which is the name of this version of your song (and which I also grew up with) from the album "Moving"


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 16 Nov 03 - 11:43 PM

G'day Steve,

... and which was posted one more post up ... and >6 year ago!

Regards,

Bob


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: vectis
Date: 17 Nov 03 - 06:34 AM

CHORUS
Schule schule schule aroon
Sure, as sure as he loves me
He'll come back and marry me
Johnny has gone for a soldier

I would I were on yonder hill
It's there I'd sit and cry my fill
And every tear would turn a mill
Johnny has gone for a soldier.


I'll sell my rod, I'll sell my reel,
I'll sell my only spinning wheel,
To buy my love a sword of steel,
Johnny has gone for a soldier.


I'll dye my petticoats, I'll dye them red
And it's round the world I'll beg for bread
Until my parents would wish me dead
Johnny has gone for a soldier.


And now my love has gone to France
To try his fortune to advance
If he ever comes back 'tis but a chance
Johnny has gone for a soldier.


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: Willa
Date: 17 Nov 03 - 12:15 PM

The version I sing is almost the same as Alison's (is go day rather than is go jay), with the additional last verse:
I sold my rod, sold my reel, sold my only spinning wheel
Now he's dead upon the field
Is go day too, mavourneen slawn.

Thanks for the translation of the chorus, Alison


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: Padre
Date: 17 Nov 03 - 02:50 PM

From the title, I thought it was the French version of the song.


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: GUEST,Karen
Date: 25 Feb 04 - 05:28 PM

Approximately what time was Siuil, A Ruin composed? Just out of curiousity. Also, my school is having a Saint Patrick's Day celebration of that Wednesday...can anyone recommend any songs in English that would be fast and easy to bring lots of instruments into?

Thanks,

Karen


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: Allan C.
Date: 25 Feb 04 - 07:17 PM

Karen, please take a look at the clickable links at the top of this page for the many discussions we have had about the various versions of this song. Pay particular attention to the one that has (origins) in front of it. That one proposes some possible dates of first publication.

Your other question about easy to learn songs for St. Patrick's Day might be found here and in the links shown in Mary in Kentucky's first post. If you can't find the answers you seek there, I suggest you post a brand new thread with a title such as "Quick & Easy Songs for St. Pat's".


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: GUEST,Karen
Date: 25 Feb 04 - 10:13 PM

Thanks. Will do.


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: GUEST,Tara
Date: 06 Aug 07 - 04:50 PM

I have been curious about the translation of 'Suil a Ruin' for some time as it's kind of my party piece and have spoken with people with better Irish than I and also consulted the internet (which led me to you) and have even tried to translate myself with a dictionary (not as easy as you'd think). I have yet to be given two translations the same.

One suggestion on this page details;

go, go, go my love;
go smoothly & quietly;
go to the door & escape with me
and may you go safe my darling.

It doesn't make sense to me. Why is she asking him to escape with her but wishing him well on his journey?

Has anyone any further thoughts?

Thanks,
Tara


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: GUEST,Tom simone
Date: 13 Nov 07 - 11:18 PM

Siul a Run means "i walk alone" in Irish as far as I know


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: Dave'sWife
Date: 13 Nov 07 - 11:36 PM

Guest Tara, in various other threads and in some fakelore about this song, (as opposed to fokelore), people attribute it to the time of the Wild Geese and suggest that she is discussing going with him. If you look up under "Related Threads" at the top and begin clicking on those links and reading all those threads, you'll find a wealth of information and speculation.


I have my own question - does anyone know whose version of Johnny has Gone For A Soldier that is sung over the closing credits of The History Channels episodes of The Civil War Journal? I have watched the running credits several time and no mention is made. It is sung by a woman with a clear bell-tone voice and she tends to drop just a tiny touch flat on the last word of the second line of each verse and it's quite effective - very haunting.


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: Dave'sWife
Date: 14 Nov 07 - 03:33 AM

I didn't even spell Folklore right. I shouldn't type so fast.

Fakelore = made up Folklore about a topic that sounds like it could be authentic but isn't.


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: GUEST,Dáithí
Date: 14 Nov 07 - 04:50 AM

Guest Tom,
"I walk alone" in Irish would be "Siúilim i m'aonar".

Siúl a rúin does indeed mean "Walk (imperative), oh sweetheart" (or other similar term of endearment)... the word "rún" (of which "rúin" is the vocative form because it is being addressed) literally means "secret". (Compare "secretary = rúnaí")

best wishes
D


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 14 Nov 07 - 06:29 AM

Perhaps we're all wrong, though, and this is the song of the famous French lady of the night who supposedly settled into a Galway attic, putting outside the sign:

La Whore, tar éis a seacht

and worked there happily enough, but for occasional medical problems. Eventually the doctor, called again, exclaimed:

A rash arís!


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: Declan
Date: 14 Nov 07 - 01:53 PM

the phrase "Go dté tú Slán" means may you go safely, but also could mean "May you stay healthy". Éiligh liom Could mean "Elope with me".


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: GUEST,Dáithí
Date: 15 Nov 07 - 04:47 AM

JTT - true enough, groan...half past seven must have been her opening time, then....

If you like Irish/English word play, how about those great book titles and authors - "Below Freezing" by Tommy Fooar
                     "Rush Hour" by Jane Jeffer

Rud ar bith eile?
                     

Go n-éirigh an t-adh leat!
D


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 17 Nov 07 - 03:11 AM

Go raibh míle maith agat!

Seriously, the chorus - sung to a man going on the run before invading soldiers, and probably, like most Irish aristocrats of the 17th-18th century, going off to be slaughtered in Europe fighting other people's wars, means:

Siúl, siúl,siúl, a rún
(Go, go, go, my darling)
['Siúl' literally means 'walk', but is used in some cases to mean 'go'; I remember being told sternly 'Siúl leat' - 'get walking', in effect - as a kid; 'a rún' literally means 'O secret', and is a standard term of affection]
Siúl go socair agus siúl go chiúin
(Go calmly and go silently)
Siúl go doras agus éiligh liom
(Go to the door and return to me)
Is go dtéirn tú, a mhúirnin, slán
(And may you return, darling, safe)


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: GUEST
Date: 19 Nov 07 - 11:47 AM

Siúl (older spelling siubhal) means walk, but in Scottish Gaelic it means travel so I suspect that's the older meaning in Irish as well. I would agree with "go" as a translation.

Éalaigh liom would mean escape with me, I'm not sure about Eiligh liom - éiligh would usually mean demand or require.


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: GUEST,Dáithí
Date: 21 Nov 07 - 05:18 AM

Yes...I too would translate "éalaigh" liom as "elope" or "come away" with me, and that's how I've usually seen it spelled in this song.

I've never seen "éiligh" (meaning demand, claim require) used with "le"..so would therefore conclude that "éalaigh" is the word intended.

JTT - here's another:

""Are you Sure?" by Neil McKinchey...(geddit?)

Slán!
D


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: GUEST,A Scot
Date: 22 Nov 09 - 12:12 PM

I've been told by a renowned authority on Scottish ballads that the song originated in Aberdeenshire, North East Scotland and 'Shule aroon' used to be 'Folla Rule' - an ancient hamlet near Fyvie (mentioned in 'The Bonnie Lass o Fyvie' which Dylan amonf others covered). The lyrics changed after the song was taken overseas with emigrants to the New World. Just an addition to the debate!


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 22 Nov 09 - 04:06 PM

Just to partly back up A Scot's statement here's a part of a 17thc broadside ballad 'The North-countrey Maids Resolution & Love to her Sweetheart'
preamble
Her Daddy and Mammy she'l rather forsake,
Then be separated from her loving Mate:
She sold all her Linnen, her Goods and her Geer
And follows her Sweet-heart his Snapsack to bear.
1
'As from Newcastle I did pass
I heard a blithe and bonny Lass,
Who in the Scottish Army was,
Saying, prethee le me gang with thee man,
Unto a Cavaliero Blade,
As I suppose, her moan she made,
Foe ever more these words she said,
Ile follow my cavalilly man,
       O my dainty Cavalilly man
       My finnikin Cavalilly man
       For God's cause and the Protestants
       I prithee le me gang with thee man.

2
........................
..................
..............
............
I'll sell my Rock and eke my Reel,
And after that my Spinning wheel,
To buy my love a Cap of Speel,
And follow my Cavalilly man.

st 4
I'le pawn my Kirtle and eke my Gowne,
Which cost my Mother many a Crowne,
And goe with thee from Town to Town,
Then prethee le me gang with thee man:
I'll sell my petticoat from my back,
My smock and all ere thou shalt lack,
For either Money, Beer or sack,
The prethee etc

+a fifth stanza.

All of the stanzas in Shule Agra can be found variously on 18th century English and Scottish broadsides, and properly should be considered commonplaces.


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: GUEST
Date: 27 Mar 11 - 08:07 AM

WOW! So many versions! In grade school in the '50s, I learned this as (phonetically):

Shule, shule, shul-e rool,
Shul-e shag-a-rag-a shul-a barba cool
The first time I met silly bolly eel,
Dis come bibbalala boo slow reel.

:-D


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Subject: RE: Shool, shool, shool la rue
From: GUEST,Guest from Baltimore Md
Date: 15 Mar 16 - 03:25 PM

The above reply dated 27Mar11 from Guest is the version I remember from elementary school music book circa 1948-49. I've never forgotten it... (chorus spelled phonetically): I wish I was in Boston City Where all the girls they are so pretty. If I didn't have the time, t'would be a pity, dis com bibba lala boo slow reel. Chorus: (faster) Schule schule schule la rule Schule a shag a rack, schule a barba cue First time I saw a silly bolly eel Dis com bibba lala boo slow reel.


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