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Lyr Req: Willy Reilly

DigiTrad:
RILEY'S COURTSHIP


Related thread:
Tune Req: The Wexford Lovers (19)


GUEST,Alison Cone 07 Jun 00 - 03:31 AM
John Moulden 07 Jun 00 - 06:34 AM
MartinRyan 07 Jun 00 - 09:43 AM
John Moulden 07 Jun 00 - 05:07 PM
Bob Bolton 08 Jun 00 - 08:27 AM
Jim Dixon 04 Nov 09 - 12:46 AM
Joe Offer 17 Aug 13 - 06:41 AM
Jim Carroll 17 Aug 13 - 07:27 AM
Jim Dixon 17 Aug 13 - 10:49 PM
AmyLove 12 Nov 16 - 10:47 PM
AmyLove 12 Nov 16 - 10:57 PM
Jim Carroll 13 Nov 16 - 03:14 AM
AmyLove 13 Nov 16 - 03:20 AM
Jim Carroll 13 Nov 16 - 05:52 AM
AmyLove 13 Nov 16 - 01:35 PM
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Subject: Looking for Willy Reilly
From: GUEST,Alison Cone
Date: 07 Jun 00 - 03:31 AM

I'm looking for the words and music for "Willy Reilly". I have established that it can be found in P. W. Joyce's 'Old Irish Folk Music and Songs' (1909) and I was also directed to faeryland.tamu-commerce.edu/joyce, but have had no joy. I would prefer a gif of the sheet music if possible, or an mp3 file rather than midi - can anyone help me?

Cheers, -Alison-


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Subject: RE: Looking for Willy Reilly
From: John Moulden
Date: 07 Jun 00 - 06:34 AM

Try Colleen Bawn, or the Trial of Willy (Willie) Riley (Reilly)


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Subject: RE: Looking for Willy Reilly
From: MartinRyan
Date: 07 Jun 00 - 09:43 AM

In fact, women seem to have been looking for Willie Reilly for two hundred years!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Looking for Willy Reilly
From: John Moulden
Date: 07 Jun 00 - 05:07 PM

A few refs which may help:

Lomax, Our Singing Country pp.166-168 Laws M10 Huntington, Songs of the People (1990) pp.436-437

Hyland's Mammoth Hibernian Songster (1901) pp.123-124 Universal Irish Song Book (1884) pp.90-91

Walton, New Treasury of Irish Songs & Ballads 1 pp.156-157

Walton, Treasury of Irish Songs & Ballads pp.40-41

Greenleaf & Mansfield, Ballads & Sea Songs of Newfoundland pp.184-186

Christie, Traditional Ballad Airs 2 pp.144-145

BBC recording 29886 Lenihan, Tom

Carnell, Ballads in the Charles Harding Firth Collection No.F48

Madden Collection 25 (Irish & Scots)Item no.517 (Cambridge Univ. Lib) Madden Collection 25 (Irish & Scots) Item no.519


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Subject: RE: Looking for Willy Reilly
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 08 Jun 00 - 08:27 AM

G'day Alison,

I just had a look (and listen) to the version in the DigiTrad, here on Mudcat. That version's (collected) tune doesn't sound anything like the Frank Gardiner tune, so it doesn't help you. However the excellent list above looks promising.

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: Lyr Add: WILLY REILLY
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 04 Nov 09 - 12:46 AM

From The Ballad Poetry of Ireland, 5th edition, edited by Charles Gavan Duffy (Dublin: James Duffy, 1845), page 244:


WILLY REILLY.

Willy Reilly was the first ballad I ever heard recited, and it made a painfully vivid impression on my mind. I have never forgotten the smallest incident of it. The story on which it is founded, happened some sixty years ago; and as the lover was a young Catholic farmer and the lady's family of high Orange principles, it got a party character, which, no doubt, contributed to its great popularity. There is no family under the rank of gentry, in the inland counties of Ulster, where it is not familiarly known. Nurses and seamstresses, the honorary guardians of national songs and legends, have taken it into special favour, and preserved its popularity.

Mr. Carleton (to whose loving memory of all our Northern traditions I owe the present copy,) tells me, that he was accustomed, when a boy, to hear it sung by his mother, when it took such powerful hold of his imagination that to this hour it moves him as it did at first. He has long intended to make it the foundation of a national novel, exhibiting the customs and prejudices of the unhappy period in which it is laid. Some deduction must be made for early impressions, but it is impossible to deny it great tenderness and remarkable dramatic power. Observe, for a striking instance of the latter, the abrupt opening and close of the first verse, and a similar instance in the thirteenth verse.


1. "Oh! rise up Willy Reilly and come along with me,
I mean for to go with you and leave this counterie,*
To leave my father's dwelling-house, his houses and free land;"
And away goes Willy Reilly and his dear Coolen Bawn.†

* Country is commonly pronounced in Ulster Counterry.
† Fair young girl.


2. They go by hills and mountains, and by yon lonesome plain,
Through shady groves and valleys all dangers to refrain;
But her father followed after with a well-arm'd band,
And taken was poor Reilly and his dear Coolen Bawn.

3. It's home then she was taken, and in her closet bound,
Poor Reilly all in Sligo jail lay on the stony ground,
'Till at the bar of justice before the Judge he'd stand.
For nothing but the stealing of his dear Coolen Bawn.

4. "Now in the cold, cold iron, my hands and feet are bound,
I'm handcuffed like a murderer, and tied unto the ground,
But all the toil and slavery I'm willing for to stand,
Still hoping to be succoured by my dear Coolen Bawn."

5. The jailor's son to Reilly goes, and thus to him did say,
"Oh! get up Willy Reilly you must appear this day,
For great squire Foillard's anger you never can withstand,
I'm afeer'd* you'll suffer sorely for your dear Coolen Bawn."

* Afraid.

6. Now Willy's drest from top to toe all in a suit of green,
His hair hangs o'er his shoulders most glorious to be seen;
He's tall and straight, and comely as any could be found,
He's fit for Foillard's daughter, was she heiress to a crown.

7. "This is the news young Reilly, last night that I did hear,
The lady's oath will hang you or else will set you clear;"
"If that be so," says Reilly, "her pleasure I will stand,
Still hoping to be succoured by my dear Coolen Bawn."

8. The Judge he said, "this lady being in her tender youth,
If Reilly has deluded her, she will declare the truth;"
Then, like a moving beauty bright, before him she did stand,
"You're welcome there my heart's delight and dear Coolen Bawn."

9. "Oh, gentlemen," squire Foillard said, "with pity look on me,
This villain came amongst us to disgrace our family,
And by his base contrivances this villany was planned,
If I don't get satisfaction I'll quit this Irish land."

10. The lady with a tear began, and thus replied she,
"The fault is none of Reilly's, the blame lies all on me,
I forced him for to leave his place and come along with me,
I loved him out of measure which wrought our destiny."

11. Out bespoke the noble Fox* at the table he stood by,
"Oh! gentlemen consider on this extremity,
To hang a man for love is a murder you may see,
So spare the life of Reilly, let him leave this counterie."

* The prisoner's counsel.

12. "Good, my lord, he stole from her her diamonds and her rings,
Gold watch and silver buckles, and many precious things,
Which cost me in bright guineas more than five hundred pounds,
I'll have the life of Reilly should I lose ten thousand pounds."

13. "Good, my lord, I gave them him as tokens of true love,
And when we are a-parting I will them all remove,
If you have got them, Reilly, pray send them home to me."
"I will my loving lady with many thanks to thee."

14. "There is a ring among them I allow yourself to wear,
With thirty locket diamonds well set in silver fair,
And as a true-love token wear it on your right hand,
That you'll think on my poor broken heart when you're in foreign lands."

15. Then out spoke noble Fox, "you may let the prisoner go,
The lady's oath has cleared him, as the Jury all may know,
She has released her own true love, she has renewed his name.
May her honour bright gain high estate, and her offspring rise to fame.


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Subject: ADD Version: Willie Reilly
From: Joe Offer
Date: 17 Aug 13 - 06:41 AM

Here is the text from P. W. Joyce's Old Irish Folk Music and Songs (1909) - pages 230-232


THE JOYCE COLLECTION.

420. WILLIE REILLY.

The event commemorated in this ballad occurred towards the end of the eighteenth century, and the scene is near Bundoran, beside the boundaries of the three counties, Donegal, Fermanagh, and Sligo, where the ruined house of the great Squire Folliard is still to be seen. The proper family-name is Ffollott, but the people always pronounce it Folliard. The whole story is still vividly remembered in the district: and Carleton has founded on it his novel of "Willie Reilly." The penal laws were then in force, and it was very dangerous for a young Catholic Irishman to run away with the daughter of a powerful Protestant local Squire.

The song, with its pretty air, was known and sung all over Ireland, so that it has clung to my memory from my earliest days. I well remember on one occasion singing it with unbounded applause for a number of workmen at their dinner in our kitchen when I was about ten years of age.

The words have been often printed, both in books and on ballad-sheets of which I have several copies. They will be found in Duffy's "Ballad Poetry of Ireland," as he got them from Carleton. The copy I give here differs from this in some words and phrases. I give the air chiefly from memory : but Forde has several settings in his great MS. collection.

WILLIE REILLY

"Come rise up, Willie Reilly, and come along with me;
I mean to go away with you, and leave this counterie;
I'll leave my father's dwelling, his money and free land":
And away goes Willie Reilly and his won dear Cooleen Bawn.

O'er lofty hills and mountains, through silent groves and plains.
Through shady groves and valleys all danger to refrain:
His father followed after with his well-armed band.
And taken was poor Reilly and his own dear Cooleen Bawn.

It's home then she was taken and in her closet bound;
Poor Reilly all in Sligo jail lay on the stony ground;
Till at the bar of justice before the judge he'd stand,
For nothing but the taking of his own dear Cooleen Bawn.

"And now I'm in cold irons, my hands and feet are bound;
I'm handcuffed like a murderer and tied unto the ground;
But all this toil and slavery I'm willing for to stand.
In hopes I'll be saved by my own dear Cooleen Bawn."

The jailer's son to Reilly goes and thus to him did say:—
"O rise up, Willie Reilly, you must appear this day:
The great Squire Folliard's anger you never can withstand;
I fear you'll suffer sore for your own dear Cooleen Bawn.

"This is the news, O'Reilly, last night I heard of thee;
The lady's oath will hang you or else will set you free":
"If that be true," said Reilly, "with pleasure I will stand.
In hopes I'll be saved by my own dear Cooleen Bawn."

Now Willie's drest from top to toe all in a suit of green,
His hair hangs o'er his shoulders most glorious to be seen;
He's tall and straight and comely as any could be found;
He's fit for Folliard's daughter was she heiress to a crown.

The judge he said, "This lady being in her tender youth,
If Reilly has deluded her she will declare the truth":
Then like a moving beauty bright before them she did stand:—
"You're welcome there, my heart's delight, my own dear Cooleen Bawn!"

"O gentlemen," Squire Folliard said, "with pity look on me,
This villain came amongst us to disgrace my family;
And by his base contrivance this villainy was plann'd:
I'll have the life of Reilly or I'll leave my native land!"

The lady all in tears began, and thus replied she:—
"The fault is none of Reilly's, the blame is all on me:
I forced him for to leave his place and come along with me:
I loved out of measure, which proved our destiny."

Then out bespoke the noble Fox,*" at the table as he stood by:—
"O gentlemen, consider in this extremity;
To hang a man for love is a murder you may see.
So spare the life of Reilly to leave this counterie!"

"Good, my lord, he stole from her her jewels and gold rings,
Gold watch and silver buckles and many a precious thing,
Which cost me in bright value above two thousand pounds;
I'll have the life of Reilly or my estate I'll drown!"**

"Good, my lord, I gave them in token of my true love,
And now that we are parting I'll have them all removed;
If you have them, O'Reilly, pray send them back to me":
"I will, my loving lady, with many thanks," said he.

"There is one ring among them which I gave you to wear,
With thirty diamond lockets, well set in silver hair;
As a token of my true love wear it on your right hand.
That you may think on my broken heart, when in a foreign land!"

Then out bespoke the noble Fox, "Pray let the prisoner go.
The lady's oath has cleared him, as the jury all may know:
She has released her own truelove and has renewed his name:
That her honour great may gain estate and always lasting fame!"

** "I'll have the life of Reilly or my estate I'll drown!" - meaning "I'll have the life of Reilly if I were to drown my estate in debt by law proceedings.

Text and music notation available at http://archive.org/stream/oldirishfolkmusi00royauoft#page/230/mode/1up


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Willy Reilly
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 17 Aug 13 - 07:27 AM

Tom Lenihan's lovely version can be found on the still available double cassette and book of his songs, 'Mount Callan Garland'.
This handy article (Roly Brown?) provides loads of context for both the ballad and the story.
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/bbals_31.htm
Jim Carroll


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Subject: Lyr Add: WILLIAM REILY'S COURTSHIP
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 17 Aug 13 - 10:49 PM

Here's a longer version, from The Forget-Me-Not Songster: Containing a Choice Collection of Old Ballad Songs as Sung by Our Grandmothers (Boston: G. W. Cottrell, [no date]), page 181:


WILLIAM REILY'S COURTSHIP.

1. 'Twas on a pleasant morning, all in the bloom of spring,
When as the cheerful songsters in concert sweet did sing,
The primrose and the daisy bespangled every lawn,
In an arbour I espied my dear Coolen Bawn.

2. I stood awhile amazing, quite struck with surprise,
On her with rapture gazed, while from her bright eyes,
She shot such killing glances, my heart away was drawn,
She ravished all my senses, my fair Coolen Bawn.

3. I tremblingly addressed her, hail, matchless fair maid,
You have with grief oppressed me, and I am much afraid,
Except you cure my anguish, which now is in its dawn,
You'll cause my sad overthrow, my sweet Coolen Bawn.

4. Then with a gentle smile she replied unto me,
I cannot tyrannize, dear Willie, over thee;
My father he is wealthy, and gives severe command,
If you but gain his favour, I'll be your Coolen Bawn.

5. In rapture I embraced her, we swore eternal love,
And nought should separate us, except the power above;
I hired with her father, and left my friends and land,
That with pleasure I might gaze on my fair Coolen Bawn.

6. I served him a twelvemonth, right faithfully and just,
Although not used to labour, was true to my trust;
I valued not my wages, I would not it demand,
For I could live for ages with my Coolen Bawn.

7. One morning, as her father and I walked out alone,
I asked him for his daughter, saying, sir, it is well known,
I have a well-stock'd farm, five hundred pounds in hand,
Which I'll share with your daughter, my fair Coolen Bawn.

8. Her father full of anger, most scornfully did frown,
Saying, here are your wages, now, sir, depart the town,
Increasing still his anger, he bid me quick begone,
For none but a rich squire shall wed my Coolen Bawn.

9. I went unto his daughter, and told her my sad tale,
Oppressed with grief and anguish, we both did weep and wail;
She said, my dearest Reily, the thought I can't withstand,
That in sorrow you should leave me, your dear Coolen Bawn.

10. A horse I did get ready, in the silent night.
Having no other remedy, we quick took our flight.
The horse he chanced to stumble, and threw both along,
Confused, and sorely bruised, me and my dear Coolen Bawn.

11. Again we quickly mounted, and swiftly rode away,
O'er hills and lofty mountains, we travelled night and day,
Her father swift pursued us, with his well chosen band,
And I was overtaken, with my fair Coolen Bawn.

12. Committed straight to prison, there to lament and wail,
And utter my complaints to a dark and dismal jail,
Loaded with heavy irons, 'till my trial shall come on,
But I'll bear their utmost malice, for my dear Coolen Bawn.

13. If it should please kind fortune once more to set me free,
For well I know my charmer is constant unto me.
Spite of her father's anger, his cruelty and scorn,
I hope to wed my heart's delight, my dear Coolen Bawn.

REILY'S TRIAL.

14. Come, rise up, William Reily, and come along with me,
I mean for to go with you, and leave this country;
I'll forsake my father's dwelling, his houses and rich land,
And go along with you, love, my dear Coolen Bawn.

15. Over lofty hills and mountains, along the lonesome dales,
Through shady groves and fountains, rich meadows and sweet vales,
We climbed the ragged woods, and rid o'er silent lawn,
But l was overtaken with my dear Coolen Bawn.

16. They hurried me to prison, my hands and feet they bound,
Confined me like a murderer, with chains unto the ground;
But this hard, cruel treatment, most cheerfully I'll stand.
Ten thousand deaths I'd suffer, for my dearest Coolen Bawn.

17. In came the jailer's son, and to Reily he did say,
Rise up, unhappy Reily, you must appear to-day,
Proud squire Falliard's anger and power to withstand,
I fear you'll suffer sorely, for your dear Coolen Bawn.

18. This is the news, young Reily, last night I heard of thee;
The lady's oath will hang you, or else will set you free,
If that is true, said Reily, some hopes begin to dawn,
For I never can be injured by my dear Coolen Bawn.

19. The lady she is sensible, and her tender youth,
If Reily has deluded her, she will declare the truth;
Then, like a spotless angel, before them she did stand,
You are welcome here, said Reily, my dear Coolen Bawn.

20. Next spoke the noble Fox, who stood attentive by,
Gentleman of the jury, for justice we reply,
To hang a man for love, is foul murder, you may see,
So save the life of Reily, and banished let him be.

21. Then spoke the lovely lady, with tears in her eyes,
The fault is not sweet Reily's, on me alone it lies;
I made him leave his home, sir, and go along with me,
I love him to distraction, such is my destiny.

22. The noble lord replied, we may let the prisoner go,
The lady hath quite clear'd him, the jury well doth know,
She has released young Reily, the bill must be withdrawn,
Then set at large the lover of the fair Coolen Bawn.

23. But stop, my lord, he stole her bright jewels and nice rings,
Gold watch, and diamond buckles, with many costly things;
I gave them to my daughter;—they cost a thousand pound,
When Reily was first taken, those things with him were found.

24. She said, my lord, I gave them in token of true love,
He never stole my jewels, I swear by all above,
If you have got them, Reily, pray send them home to me;
I will, my generous lady, with my thanks, said he.

25. There is a ring amongst them, I wish for you to wear,
'Tis set with costly diamonds, and plated with my hair;
As a token of true friendship, wear it on your right hand,
Think of my broken heart, love, when in a foreign land.

REILY'S ANSWER, RELEASEMENT AND MARRIAGE WITH COOLEN BAWN.

26. You tender hearted lovers, attend unto my theme,
The hardships of young Reily I mean now to explain,
Who, for stealing of an heiress, before the court did stand,
Ordered for transportation unto a foreign land.

27. The daughter of Squire Falliard, this lady proved to be,
As blooming as an angel, and born of high degree;
For her, young William Reily, both night and day doth wail,
Loaded with heavy irons, confined in Sligo jail.

28. Like some poor malefactor, transported he must be;
The lady cries, dear Reily, your face I ne'er shall see,
Cruel hearted father, thou art the only one
That banished William Reily from his dear Coolen Bawn.

29. Her father in a passion, unto the lady said,
For your foul disobedience, you shall be conveyed
Unto a lonesome chamber, there repent the deed,
Twelve months on bread and water, you shall be forced to feed.

30. Then unto a dark chamber, his daughter he did hie,
With nothing but coarse blankets and straw, whereon to lie;
She cried, dear William Reily, 'tis for my sake alone,
That you with grief and sorrow, in Sligo jail doth moan.

31. Three nights this lovely lady in grief and sorrow spent.
Till overcome with anguish, she quite distracted went;
She wrung her hands and tore her hair, crying, my only dear,
My cruel-hearted father has used you most severe.

32. Unto a private mad house, they hurried her away,
Where she was heard each morning, for to weep and pray;
Her chains loud she'd rattle, and then she'd cry and rave,
For me, poor William Reily is treated like a slave.

33. Alas! dear William Reily, if I once more could see,
From my hard father's anger, I'd try to set him free;
I'd enfold him in my arms, from him I ne'er would part;
Although I'm here confined, young Reily has my heart.

34. Now we will leave this fair one, in sorrow for to wail,
And speak of William Reily, confined in Sligo jail.
Who, with twenty other criminals, to Dublin marched away,
To enter on board a transport, bound straight to Botany Bay.

35. When in Dublin they arrived they were conveyed to jail,
Until the transport ship should be ready for to sail,
Poor Reily cried, squire Falliard, cruel-hearted man,
In Bedlam lies your daughter, my fair Coolen Bawn.

36. But fortune to poor Reily, happened to prove kind,
For while he lay in irons, a thought came in his mind;
A petition from the prison, he to the castle sent,
Unto the lord lieutenant, whose heart it did relent.

37. The noble lord lieutenant did to the prison haste,
And there young William Reily, he speedily released;
With him into Bedlam, straightway he went anon,
Likewise released his jewel, the fair Coolen Bawn.

38. As soon as the lady her true love did behold,
She in her snowy arms, young Reily did enfold,
Her senses quick revived, they for a parson sent,
Who married this young couple to their hearts' content.

39. A license from the primate was got immediately,
And constant William Reily was wed to his lady,
A feast was then prepared which lasted four days long;
Success attend young Reily, and his fair Coolen Bawn.

40. Soon as her father heard it, his heart it did relent,
He cried, for my offences, I sorely do repent,
No mortal, sure, can hinder what heaven doth decree,
And then straight off to Dublin, he rode immediately.

41. Soon as he into Dublin, to the young couple came,
He said, my dearest children, I have been much to blame,
But now you shall live happy, with me in Sligo town,
A fortune I will give you of thirty thousand pounds.

42. And, as it is God's will that I have no child but thee,
I beg it as a blessing that yon will live with me,
And at my death you shall possess my houses and free land;
My blessings on you, Reily, and your dear Coolen Bawn.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Willy Reilly
From: AmyLove
Date: 12 Nov 16 - 10:47 PM

I searched "William Reilly's Courtship" and here I found this:

William Riley's Courtship [Laws M9]

DESCRIPTION: William falls in love with Colleen at sight. Although warned about her harsh father, he seeks employment from the old man to be near Colleen. At last he asks to marry her. He is fired. The two try to elope. They are captured; the father has Riley jailed
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1909 (collected by Olive Dame Campbell; in SharpAp); +1881 (Christie, _Traditional Ballad Airs II_)
KEYWORDS: love courting father elopement prison servant
FOUND IN: US(MA,So) Canada(Mar) Ireland
REFERENCES (10 citations):
Laws M9, "William Riley's Courtship"
Hayward-Ulster, pp. 96-98, "Willy Reilly's Courtship" (1 text)
Randolph 114, "Coleen Bawn" (1 text, with the name spelled "Coleen" in the title but "Colleen" in the text; 1 tune)
FSCatskills 53, "Fair Julian Bond" (1 text, 1 tune. The opening of this ballad clearly resembles Laws M9, but the conclusion is closer to M10. The fragmentary state of the text may indicate a conflate version)
Carey-MarylandFolkLegends, pp. 105-109, "William Riley" (1 text, very long, which appears to combine "William Riley's Courtship" [Laws M9] and William (Willie) Riley (Riley's Trial)" [Laws M10])
LPound-ABS, 38, pp.86-89, "William Riley's Courtship" (1 text)
Creighton-NovaScotia 74, "Courtship of Willie Riley" (1 very long text, 1 tune)
SharpAp 104, "Loving Reilly" (2 texts, 2 tunes)
WolfAmericanSongSheets, #1987, p. 137, "Reiley's Courtship" (3 references)
cf. Gardner/Chickering, pp. 482-483, "William Reily's Courtship," "Reily's Trial," "Reily's Answer, Releasement, and Marriage with Coolen Bawn" (source notes only)
Roud #537
RECORDINGS:
cf. "The Footboy" (plot)
CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "William (Willie) Riley (Riley's Trial)" [Laws M10]
cf. "Erin's Lovely Home" [Laws M6] (plot)
cf. "Henry Connors" [Laws M5] (plot)
cf. "Jock Scott" (plot)
cf. "The Footboy" (plot)
NOTES: Laws, following Cox, considers the three William Riley ballads (this one, William Reilly's Trial [Laws M10], and "Reilly's Answer, Releasement, and Marriage with Coleen Bawn" -- the last supposedly not found in tradition) to be a set of songs about the same character. The songs overlap, however, and may be the result of separate composition, with either M9 or M10 inspiring the other two. - RBW
Laws considers Creighton-NovaScotia 74 to be both M9 and M10. This 78 verse version is divided by Creighton into "Riley's Courtship" (26 verses: meets Laws' description of M9), "Trial" (20 verses: meets Laws' description of M10), "Marriage" (32 verses: meets Laws' description "which has not, so far as I know," says Laws, "been recorded from tradition, Riley is sentenced to be transported and is freed through his own petition to the Lord Lieutenant in time to rescue the girl from Bedlam and marry her." What am I missing? As I've noted, Creighton-NovaScotia 74, is one of Laws' sources for M9 and M10: why didn't he consider it for the "not ... recorded" Mx?). - BS
Last updated in version 3.5
File: LM09


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Willy Reilly
From: AmyLove
Date: 12 Nov 16 - 10:57 PM

Also if anyone is interested in watching the 1918 film Willy Reilly and His Colleen Bawn, you can do so here and here.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Willy Reilly
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 13 Nov 16 - 03:14 AM

Tom Lenihan's version can be heard
HERE
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Willy Reilly
From: AmyLove
Date: 13 Nov 16 - 03:20 AM

And if you're interested in reading the William Carleton novel Willy Reilly and His Dear Cooleen Bawn, you can do so here.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Willy Reilly
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 13 Nov 16 - 05:52 AM

Up to the mid 1960s, entertainment in rural Ireland included FIT-UPS
Willie Reilly and hid Colleen Bawn was one of the favourite productions.
My favourite local pub (now sadly deceased) had an old photograph of the play hung up on the wall.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Willy Reilly
From: AmyLove
Date: 13 Nov 16 - 01:35 PM

I would've loved to have seen that play. I'm going to watch the film eventually. I started reading the Carleton novel last night. (It was my plan to read the novel that got me exploring the song.) There's some interesting information about the song in the Preface to the First Edition ( here ), which I recommend reading even if one isn't interested in reading the novel. Apparently there were a number of vulgar versions of the song. If anyone here has information about this, please share.

In this mudcat thread about Willy Reilly, Peggy Seeger's version is mentioned. You can listen to it here and look at the lyrics and some remarks Seeger made about the song here.


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