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Lyr Req/Add: In Praise of the City of Mullingar

DigiTrad:
PAT OF MULLINGAR


Related threads:
ADD: Pat of Mullingar/The Man from Mullingar^^^ (27)
Lyr Req: Pat O'Mullingar (from The Irish Rovers) (4)


In Mudcat MIDIs:
In Praise of the City of Mullingar [tune by Colm O Lochlainn]


jnugent@socrates.berkeley.edu 27 Nov 98 - 12:58 AM
Martin Ryan. 27 Nov 98 - 02:57 AM
Paddy 28 Nov 98 - 02:41 PM
Martin Ryan. 28 Nov 98 - 03:57 PM
dick greenhaus 29 Nov 98 - 06:06 PM
Martin Ryan. 30 Nov 98 - 06:24 AM
Airto 31 Aug 00 - 09:45 AM
Quincy 31 Aug 00 - 10:01 AM
Airto 31 Aug 00 - 10:11 AM
MartinRyan 31 Aug 00 - 10:53 AM
Airto 31 Aug 00 - 12:11 PM
Airto 01 Sep 00 - 09:35 AM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 01 Sep 00 - 10:44 AM
Airto 01 Sep 00 - 12:45 PM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 01 Sep 00 - 01:15 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 01 Sep 00 - 02:41 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 01 Sep 00 - 04:13 PM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 01 Sep 00 - 05:45 PM
Airto 04 Sep 00 - 06:02 AM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 04 Sep 00 - 11:58 AM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 07 Sep 00 - 03:21 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 07 Sep 00 - 04:22 PM
MartinRyan 10 Oct 00 - 02:54 PM
Airto 20 Oct 00 - 12:19 PM
GUEST 25 Oct 02 - 05:00 PM
Uncle_DaveO 25 Oct 02 - 05:08 PM
GUEST,weerover 25 Oct 02 - 06:01 PM
GUEST,weerover 25 Oct 02 - 06:17 PM
MartinRyan 25 Oct 02 - 06:31 PM
Herga Kitty 25 Oct 02 - 06:54 PM
MartinRyan 26 Oct 02 - 03:05 AM
GUEST,forty two 26 Oct 02 - 07:29 AM
GUEST,forty two 26 Oct 02 - 07:31 AM
GUEST,John in Indy 26 Oct 02 - 01:11 PM
MartinRyan 28 Oct 02 - 07:08 PM
Mr Happy 25 Jun 08 - 08:19 AM
Joe Offer 30 Jul 09 - 06:20 PM
Joe Offer 30 Jul 09 - 06:42 PM
GUEST,DannyC 30 Jul 09 - 07:08 PM
Jim Dixon 11 Aug 09 - 01:53 AM
MartinRyan 11 Aug 09 - 03:21 AM
Joe Offer 15 Aug 09 - 10:48 PM
Mr Happy 16 Aug 09 - 08:32 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 16 Aug 09 - 09:38 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 16 Aug 09 - 09:41 AM
MartinRyan 29 Mar 12 - 05:31 AM
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Subject: RE: Need words for: Town of Mullingar
From: jnugent@socrates.berkeley.edu
Date: 27 Nov 98 - 12:58 AM

hi guys.....

there's an old song bout Mullingar that's got some amazing lyrics...does anybody have them? some of the words go like this...
    And in conclusion I'll make allusion
    To the gorgeous females that there abound
    Celestial creatures with wondrous features
    And tapered ankles that skim the ground.
i think it might be called "the town of Mullingar."

really appreciate it if somebody could get me these.

thanx people.


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: Martin Ryan.
Date: 27 Nov 98 - 02:57 AM

jnugent

Thought this was in the DT. I'll put it up when I get a chance.

Regards


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Subject: Lyr Add: IN PRAISE OF THE CITY OF MULLINGAR
From: Paddy
Date: 28 Nov 98 - 02:41 PM

Words for Mullingar

IN PRAISE OF THE CITY OF MULLINGAR

You may strain your muscles
To brag of Brussels,
Of London, Paris or Timbuctoo
Constantinople
Or Sebastople,
Vienna, Naples or Tongtaboo
Of Copenhagen
Madrid, Kilbeggan
Or the capital of the Russian Czar
But they're all inferior to
The vast superior
And lovely city of Mullingar

That fair metropolis
So great and popolous
Adorns the region of sweet Westmeath
That fertile county
Which nature's bounty
Has richly gifted with bog and heath
Them scenes so charming
Where snipes a-swarming
Attract the sportsman that come from far
And whoever wishes
May catch fine fishes
In deep Loch Owel near Mullingar

I could stray forever
By Brusna's river
And watch its waters in their sparkling fall
And the ganders swimmin'
And lightly skimmin'
O'er the crystal bosom of the Royal canal
Or on Thursday wander
'Mid pigs so tender
And geese and turkeys on many a car
Exchangin' pleasantry
With the fine bold peasantry
That throng the market at Mullingar

Ye nine, inspire me
With rapture fire me
To sing the buildings both old and new
The majestic courthouse
The spacious workhouse
The church and steeple which adorn the view
There's a barrack airy
For the military (militaery)
Where the brave repose from the toils of war
Five schools, a nunnery
And a thrivin' tannery
In the lovely city of Mullingar

The railway station
With admiration
I next must mention in terms of praise
Where trains a-rollin'
And engines howlin'
Strike each beholder with wild amaze
And then there's main street
That broad an clean (clane) street
With its rows of gas lamps that shine afar
I could spake a lecture on the architecture
Of the lovely city of Mullingar

The men of genius
Contemporaneous
Approach spontaneous this favoured spot
And good society
And great variety
Of entertainment is still their lot
The neighbouring quality
For hospitality
And conviviality unequalled are
And from December
Until November
There's still divarsion in Mullingar

Now, in conclusion
I make allusion
To the beauteous females that here abound
Celestial creatures
With lovely features
And tapered ankles that skim the ground
But this suspends me
The theme transcends me
My muse's powers are too weak by far
It would take Catullus
Or likewise Tibullus
To sing the praises of Mullingar

Magnificient !! - Paddy


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: Martin Ryan.
Date: 28 Nov 98 - 03:57 PM

Paddy

Well done!Fortunately I checked in here before I set about extracting a copy from my creaking Mac database!

Incidentally: the ancient city of Mullingar recently celebrated the 150th anniversary - of the railway station!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 29 Nov 98 - 06:06 PM

Funny. I checked out "Mullingar" and it seemed to me that I got four hits, including Pat of Mullingar.


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: Martin Ryan.
Date: 30 Nov 98 - 06:24 AM

Yes Dan - but not the one we were looking for!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Need words for Mullingar
From: Airto
Date: 31 Aug 00 - 09:45 AM

I was looking for In Praise of Mullingar months ago, finally got it off a friend, and now I find it was hiding here on this old thread all the time - see paddymac above. It's a great song and belongs in the DT. Either it didn't make it in through an oversight or it fell out again (can that happen?). Does anyone know anything about the song's origins?

By the way, it might help to know that Mullingar is a typical Irish midlands town not particularly noted for anything.


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: Quincy
Date: 31 Aug 00 - 10:01 AM

Better not let Joe Dolan hear that Mullingar isn't noted for anything!!!!!

Yvonne


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: Airto
Date: 31 Aug 00 - 10:11 AM

I was trying to be kind to Mullingar, Quincy.


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: MartinRyan
Date: 31 Aug 00 - 10:53 AM

Airto

As far as I know, there was a fashion for songs like this around mid 19C. The reference to Sebastopol fits the date.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: Airto
Date: 31 Aug 00 - 12:11 PM

Indeed, Martin, and as you pointed out yourself above, Mullingar railway station recently celebrated its 150th anniversary. I'd say its definitely mid to late 19th century. The parody of classical poetry also points in this direction.

Incidentally, the version I've heard differs from paddymac's where the station is concerned. The line "its stately portals fit for immortals" is substituted for "its trains a-rolling and engines howling".

You mention a fashion for this type of song. Can you or anyone else steer me towards any others?

All the best,

Arthur


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: Airto
Date: 01 Sep 00 - 09:35 AM

Ah Joe Dolan, Quincy, a man with the voice of a screeching pig. Himself and Demis Roussos are in a class of their own. In a high security unit, I hope.


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 01 Sep 00 - 10:44 AM

A song called "Sweet Castlehyde" is often mentioned as the first of these. Others include "The Praises of Kingstown Harbour", which James N Healy dates to a street ballad of 1821, the year George the Fourth visited what is now called Dun Laoghaire!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: Airto
Date: 01 Sep 00 - 12:45 PM

Thanks for your suggestions, Martin. A search for Sweet Castlehyde and the Praises of Kingstown failed to yield the lyrics but it brought me to this fascinating article (sorry I haven't yet mastered blue clickies): http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/hedg_sch.htm

The author (Julie Henigan)suggests that In Praise of Mullingar is a parody of a genre of songs associated with hedge school scholars and teachers but doesn't point out the this song must have come rather later.

The article also quotes a verse from Sweet Castlehyde. Incidentally this song presumably is about the same property that Michael Flatley bought last year for over IR£3 million. It seems quite appropriate that Castle Hyde once again has an owner with a massive ego.

Any ideas anyone where to get the lyrics for both it and the Kingstown song?

Arthur O'Malley


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 01 Sep 00 - 01:15 PM

Arthur

I have words to the Kingstown one - will try to type up part at least when I get a chance. Don't seem to have "Castlehyde" anywhere - though I know of a few books which have it. One of Healy's "Songs from the Pubs of Ireland" books may have it - anyone got a copy? I'd expect broadside copies to exist, but a quick search in the Bodleian draws a blank.

The term "hedge school" would be applied to anything before the advent of the National Schools - early 19C., incidentally.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 01 Sep 00 - 02:41 PM

There's a story about the writing of the song "Castlehyde" in T. Crofton Croker's 'Popular Songs of Ireland' under "Groves of Blarney" (no index or table of contents in my 1886 reprint of the 1838 edition). The tune was composed by James Oswald and named after his place of business in London, "St. Martin's Churchyard" (#1175 in 'Sources of Irish Traditional Music', I, 1998). The tune was later called "Groves of Blarney", "Castlehyde", and "Bells of Shandon" among other titles.


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 01 Sep 00 - 04:13 PM

There are several copies of "Castle Hyde" on the Bodley Ballads website (do simultaneous search on both words). I knew I had seen it somewhere recently, but my earlier search under "Castlehyde" turned up nothing.


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 01 Sep 00 - 05:45 PM

Thanks Bruce - I had made the same mistake with Castlehyde. I actually have a copy of Croker's book - but couldn't find it!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: Airto
Date: 04 Sep 00 - 06:02 AM

Thanks very much, Martin and Bruce for your help.

I too had searched on the Bodley site with "Castlehyde" and found nothing. It's not as obviously a parody as the Mullingar song. The master of Castle Hyde might have been inclined to take the whole thing at face value, do you think?

I look forward, Martin, to seeing the Kingstown Harbour lyrics.

Thanks again,

Arthur O'Malley


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 04 Sep 00 - 11:58 AM

You're quite right Arhthur. As far as I know, CastleHyde was intended ot be serious - but the owner didn't like it!

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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 07 Sep 00 - 03:21 PM

P.W. Joyce, in his "Old Irish Folk Music and songs" (1909), writes as follows:

"A collection of Irish Folk Songs would be incomplete without this celebrated composition (Castlehyde). The words have been published already more than once - but there is no need for me to copy from anyone inasmuch as I remember the song-every word - from my boyhood days, by hearing the people sing it; for it was a general favourite. The song is commonly regarded as a type of the absurd English songs composed by some of the Irish peasant bards who knew English only imperfectly; and it certainly contains several ludricous expressions. But passing by these, and looking at the song as a whole, it is well conceived and very spirited. The poet had a true conception of what a song should be, but had to express it imperfectly in what was to him a foreign language. Of all this every reader can judge for himself, as I give the song entire.

In burlesque imitation of this song, Mr. Richard Alfred Milliken of Cork composed his vile caricature, "The Groves of Blarney": and this song- working as a sort of microbe- gave origin to a number of imitations of the same general character: though none of them ever surpassed Milliken's piece of buffoonery. They did not in any sense represent the people - they represented nothing indeed but the depraved taste of the several writers. Songs of this class, however, though they once swarmed in the south of Ireland, have, I am glad to say, died out."

Regards


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 07 Sep 00 - 04:22 PM

Thanks Martin. I have Joyce's book, but forgot all about that being in it.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE PRAISES OF KINGSTOWN HARBOUR
From: MartinRyan
Date: 10 Oct 00 - 02:54 PM

Here's a sample of the 12 verses of "In Praise os Kingstwon Harbour", as given in Sparlings "Irish Minstrelsy" :

The Praises of Kingstown Harbour

Ye bucks and rakes from foreign nations
That roll throuigh cities and seaport towns
It is concerning a spacious harbour
Whose worthy praises I mean to sound.
With sweet arrangements, well situated
On a rising view to the lovely quay
Where you may observe all the mariners rolling
And topsails shivering in the happy bay

The purling rills and the sloping hills
Where the bucks trip over from the dreaded hounds
Their cries are sounding, all the vale's resounding
While the hare runs startled in her merry rounds
The silent anglers are gently sporting
And whalebone bending with free goodwill
While the carp and bream they are trepanning
From sweet Dunleary round to Dalkey Hill

......
I roved from Mallow to sweet Killarney
Through Shelton Abbey by the Ovoca side
Through dazzling Courtown and Ballyarthur
And Cololnel Talbot's of Malahide
To the grand O'Neill's in the Country Antrim
To Poolafooca and great Burton Hall
And in all my ranging throughout this nation
Sweet noble Kingstown exceeds them all

......

Regards


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Subject: RE: Need words for
From: Airto
Date: 20 Oct 00 - 12:19 PM

Brilliant!

Thanks very much, Martin


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Subject: Lyr Req: Mullingar
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Oct 02 - 05:00 PM

Some years ago in a singaround at a folk festival I heard an Irish guy sing a whimsical song about the attractions Mullingar had to offer. It was to the tune of "Preab San Ol", the first line went something like "Why waste your muscles to talk of Brussels...". Any takers?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mullingar
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 25 Oct 02 - 05:08 PM

A friend sings this. I'll try to get the words from him.

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mullingar
From: GUEST,weerover
Date: 25 Oct 02 - 06:01 PM

A thousand thanks, this is a wonderful ditty. Forgot to add my "handle" to original post - BTW, I'm Paddy too (or is that Paddy II?)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mullingar
From: GUEST,weerover
Date: 25 Oct 02 - 06:17 PM

Any info on the author of this absolute gem - surely no "one-hit wonder"?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mullingar
From: MartinRyan
Date: 25 Oct 02 - 06:31 PM

I don't think it's known who wrote it.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mullingar
From: Herga Kitty
Date: 25 Oct 02 - 06:54 PM

My copy of O Lochlainn's "More Irish Street Ballads" (in which "In praise of the City of Mullingar" is no 87) says that he had known fragments of Mullingar from schooldays, and that it appeared in "Songs and Fables" by Professor W J Rankine (Glasgow, Maclehose, 1874).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mullingar
From: MartinRyan
Date: 26 Oct 02 - 03:05 AM

Interestingly, O'Lochlainn says that he (O'L) "invented or composed (the tune) for Preab san Ol , a convivial song by Richard Barret, the Erris poet."

It's not clear if he is suggesting Rankine wrote the song. Wonder if his book is in the Irish Traditional Music Archive/ I'l have a look.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Need words for 'The Man from Mullingar'
From: GUEST,forty two
Date: 26 Oct 02 - 07:29 AM

Ah! wonderful to see this song again. I heard it at the first Edinbufgh Folk Festival - when was that 1977 or 78 - sung by a guy from Mullingar. He gave me the words then which I went and lost and the tune is right out of my head. Do you know where I get the air or the sheet music?


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Subject: RE: Need words for 'The Man from Mullingar'
From: GUEST,forty two
Date: 26 Oct 02 - 07:31 AM

Sorry, air for "In Praise Of Mullingar"


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Subject: RE: Need words for 'The Man from Mullingar'
From: GUEST,John in Indy
Date: 26 Oct 02 - 01:11 PM

In verse four, the version I know starts: "Your muse inspire me..." instead of "nine", the former makes more sense to me. Otherwise there are few and very minor differences, not worth mentioning. It's a cool song!


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Subject: RE: Need words for 'The Man from Mullingar'
From: MartinRyan
Date: 28 Oct 02 - 07:08 PM

John

There were Nine Muses! They turn up in a quite a few mock-classical songs such as thie.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Man from Mullingar
From: Mr Happy
Date: 25 Jun 08 - 08:19 AM

Seems this tune is elusive!

I've searched for the dots under a number of titles, Dublin City [Union] which has a midi in the DT, Preab San Ol, and 'In Praise of Mullingar'

Anyone know if the tune's got other names to aid my search?


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Subject: RE: req/ADD: In Praise of the City of Mullingar
From: Joe Offer
Date: 30 Jul 09 - 06:20 PM

Not much in the Traditional Ballad Index:

In Praise of the City of Mullingar

DESCRIPTION: "Ye may strain your muscles to brag of Brussels" or any other great city "But they're all far inferior" to Mullingar. The singer describes many scenes, the Royal Canal, the courthouse and workhouse, railway station, and finally "the beauteous females"
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1874 (_Songs and Fables_ by Professor W.J. Rankine, according to OLochlainn-More)
KEYWORDS: humorous nonballad beauty
FOUND IN: Ireland
REFERENCES (1 citation):
OLochlainn-More 87, "In Praise of the City of Mullingar" (1 text, 1 tune)
Notes: Mullingar is in County Westmeath, Ireland. - BS
File: OLcM087

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Bibiography
Go to the Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2007 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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Subject: ADD Version: In Praise of the City of Mullingar
From: Joe Offer
Date: 30 Jul 09 - 06:42 PM

This is almost the same as what Paddy posted above, but there are a few interesting differences.
-Joe-

IN PRAISE OF THE CITY OF MULLINGAR

You may strain your muscles To brag of Brussels,
Of London, Paris or Timbuctoo
Constantinople Or Sebastople,
Vienna, Naples or Tongataboo
Of Copenhagen, Madrid, Kilbeggan
Or the capital of the Rooshian Czar
But they're all infarior to The vast, suparior,
And gorgeous city of Mullingar

That fair metropolis So great and populous,
Adorns the region of sweet Westmeath,
That fertile county Which nature's bounty
Has richly gifted with bog and heath.
Them scenes so charming Where snipes a-swarming
Attract the sportsman that come from far;
And whoever wishes May catch fine fishes
In deep Loch Owel near Mullingar

I could stray forever By Brusna's river,
And watch its waters in their sparkling fall
And the ganders swimmin' And lightly skimmin'
O'er the crystal bosom of the Roy'l canal;
Or on Thursdays wander 'Mid pigs so tender,
And geese and turkeys on many a car,
Exchangin' pleasantry With the fine bold peasantry
That throng the market at Mullingar.

Ye nine, inspire me, With rapture fire me
To sing the buildings, both old and new,
The majestic court-house And the spacious workhouse,
And the church and steeple which adorn the view.
Then there's barracks airy For the military,
Where the brave repose from the toils of war;
Five schools, a nunnery, And a thrivin' tannery,
In the lovely city of Mullingar.

The railway station With admiration
I next must mention in terms of praise,
Where trains a-rollin' And ingines howlin'
Strike each beholder with wild amaze.
And then there's Main Street That broad and clean street,
With its rows of gas-lamps that shine afar;
I could spake a lecture on the architecture
Of the gorgeous city of Mullingar.

The men of genius, Contemporaneous
Approach spontaneous this favoured spot,
Where good society And great variety
Of entertainment is still their lot.
The neighbouring quality For hospitality
And conviviality unequalled are;
And from December Until November
There's still divarsion in Mullingar.

Now, in conclusion, I make allusion
To the beauteous females that here abound;
Celestial creatures With lovely features
And taper(ed) ankles that skim the ground.
But this suspends me, The theme transcends me -
My muse's powers are too weak by far;
It would take Catullus, Likewise Tibullus,
To sing the beauties of Mullingar.


from More Irish Street Ballads, by Colm O Lochlainn, 1965
page 172, #87

O Lochlainn found the lyrics in Songs and Fables, by Professor W.J. Rankine (Glasgow: Maclehose, 1874)


tune (written by Colm O Lochlainn):

Click to play


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Subject: RE: req/ADD: In Praise of the City of Mullingar
From: GUEST,DannyC
Date: 30 Jul 09 - 07:08 PM

Terry Winch (boxplayer/poet) penned a clever variation of this humorous song entitled "In Praise of Baltimore" (Maryland, USA)


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Subject: Lyr Add: ODE IN PRAISE OF THE CITY OF MULLINGAR
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 11 Aug 09 - 01:53 AM

The original was written in dialect:

From Songs and Fables by William J. Macquorn Rankine (Glasgow: James Maclehose, 1874), page 61:

ODE IN PRAISE OF THE CITY OF MULLINGAR.
Air—The Deserter—"If sadly thinking."

1. Ye may sthrain your muscles
To brag of Brussels,
Of London, Paris, or Timbuctoo,
Constantinople,
Or Sebastople,
Vienna, Naples, or Tongataboo,
Of Copenhagen,
Madrid, Kilbeggan,
Or the Capital iv the Rooshian Czar;
But they're all infarior
To the vast, suparior,
And gorgeous city of Mullingar.

2. That fair metropolis,
So great and populous,
Adorns the ragions iv sweet Westmeath,
That fertile county
Which nature's bounty
Has richly gifted with bog and heath.
Thim scenes so charming,
Where snipes a-swarming
Attract the sportsman that comes from far;
And whoever wishes
May catch fine fishes
In deep Lough Owel near Mullingar.

3. I could stray for ever
By Brusna's river,
And watch its waters in their sparkling fall,
And the gandhers swimmin'
And lightly skimmin'
O'er the crystial bosom of the Roy'l Canal;
Or on Thursdays wander,
'Mid pigs so tender,
And geese and turkeys on many a car,
Exchangin' pleasantry
With the fine bowld pisantry
That throng the market at Mullingar.

4. Ye nine, inspire me,
And with rapture fire me
To sing the buildings, both ould and new,
The majestic court-house,
And the spacious workhouse,
And the church and steeple which adorn the view.
Then there's barracks airy
For the military,
Where the brave repose from the toils iv war;
Five schools, a nunnery,
And a thrivin' tannery,
In the gorgeous city of Mullingar.

5. The railway station
With admiration
I next must mintion in terms of praise,
Where trains a-rowlin'
And ingynes howlin'
Strike each behowlder with wild amaze.
And then there's Main Street,
That broad and clane street,
With its rows of gas-lamps that shine afar;
I could spake a lecture
On the architecture
Of the gorgeous city of Mullingar.

6. The men of genius
Contemporaneous
Approach spontaneous this favoured spot,
Where good society
And great variety
Of entertainment is still their lot.
The neighbouring quality
For hospitality
And conviviality unequalled are;
And from December
Until November
There's still divarsion in Mullingar.

7. Now, in conclusion,
I make allusion
To the beauteous females that here abound;
Celestial cratures,
With lovely fatures,
And taper ankles that skim the ground.
But this suspinds me,
For the thame transcinds me—
My muse's powers are too wake by far;
It would take Catullus,
And likewise Tibullus,
To sing the beauties of Mullingar.


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Subject: RE: req/ADD: In Praise of the City of Mullingar
From: MartinRyan
Date: 11 Aug 09 - 03:21 AM

Couldn't get through to the text on that link - but found a (poor) OCR copy HERE.

Regards


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Subject: RE: req/ADD: In Praise of the City of Mullingar
From: Joe Offer
Date: 15 Aug 09 - 10:48 PM

Got the tune from O Lochlainn transcribed. Does it sound right?
-Joe-


Click to play


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Subject: RE: req/ADD: In Praise of the City of Mullingar
From: Mr Happy
Date: 16 Aug 09 - 08:32 AM

Anyone know from where the dots music may be obtained?


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Subject: RE: req/ADD: In Praise of the City of Mullingar
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 16 Aug 09 - 09:38 AM

Here's the abc from O'Lochlainn - should be the same tune as the midi in Mudcat Midis linked above.

Mick



X:1
T:In Praise Of The City Of Mullingar
S:Colm O'Lochlainn - More Irish Street Ballads
L:1/8
M:3/4
K:F
F/F/ C>C|F2 Ac BA|G2 D>D E>E|C2 E>G F>E|F3
w:Ye may strain your mus-cles to brag of Brus-sels, of Lon-don, Pa-ris or Tim-buc-too
C C>C|F2 A>c B>A|G2 D>D E>E|CC EG F>E|F3
w:Con-stan-ti-no-ple, or Seb-as-to-ple, Vi-en-na, Na-ples, or To-nga-ta-boo
A Ac|d2 cc G>A|B2 BG/G/ AB|c2 G>F D>C|C3
w:Of Co-pen-ha-gen, Ma-drid, Kil-beg-gan, or the Ca-pi-tal of the Roo-shian Czar.
F/F/ CC|F2 Ac/c/ BA|G2 DD E>E|C<C (EF) F>E|F4||]
w:But they're all in-far-ior to the vast, su-pa-rior, and gor-geous ci-ty of_ Mul-lin-gar.


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Subject: RE: req/ADD: In Praise of the City of Mullingar
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 16 Aug 09 - 09:41 AM

I should also mention that Pat of Mullingar linked in the songs at the top is no relation to In Praise of the City of Mullingar.

Mick


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: In Praise of the City of Mullingar
From: MartinRyan
Date: 29 Mar 12 - 05:31 AM

The "barracks airy for the mili-it-tary" closed for the last time yesterday, after more than two centuries.

Regards


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