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Songs about women & the sea

DigiTrad:
AN DO/RD FIANNA:
GRANNY WALE NOTES


Related threads:
Graniale / Granuaile (17)
Chord Req: Granuaile - as per Cathie Ryan (3)
Lyr Req: Oro, 'Se do Bheatha a Bhaile (28)
Lyr Req: Poor old Grainne Mhaol (10)
Irish myth question-Grannuaile? (12)
Tune Req: Granuaile (10)
(origins) Origin: Grace O'Malley (8)
Lyr Add: Grainne Mhaol (2)


Susan-Marie 15 Dec 97 - 09:28 AM
Wolfgang Hell 15 Dec 97 - 10:04 AM
Bert 15 Dec 97 - 10:29 AM
Susan-Marie 15 Dec 97 - 12:16 PM
judy 15 Dec 97 - 01:44 PM
Petra A. Cosgrove 15 Dec 97 - 06:13 PM
Moira Cameron 15 Dec 97 - 07:21 PM
Barry 15 Dec 97 - 07:45 PM
Bruce O. 15 Dec 97 - 08:42 PM
Susan-Marie 16 Dec 97 - 08:48 AM
Wolfgang Hell 16 Dec 97 - 09:46 AM
Wolfgang 16 Dec 97 - 09:53 AM
Bruce O. 16 Dec 97 - 10:41 AM
Susan-Marie 16 Dec 97 - 01:16 PM
Petra A. Cosgrove 16 Dec 97 - 03:37 PM
Bruce O. 16 Dec 97 - 06:12 PM
Dale Rose 16 Dec 97 - 06:38 PM
Petra A. Cosgrove 16 Dec 97 - 10:50 PM
Susan-Marie 17 Dec 97 - 10:11 AM
Jon W. 17 Dec 97 - 10:20 AM
Dale Rose 17 Dec 97 - 10:36 AM
Moira Cameron 17 Dec 97 - 01:41 PM
Rebecca H 17 Dec 97 - 10:00 PM
Petra A. Cosgrove 17 Dec 97 - 10:09 PM
harpgirl 18 Dec 97 - 12:01 AM
Alan of Australia 18 Dec 97 - 01:56 AM
Petra A. Cosgrove 18 Dec 97 - 05:38 PM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 18 Dec 97 - 07:15 PM
Susan-Marie 22 Dec 97 - 08:36 AM
Earl 22 Dec 97 - 08:56 AM
Jon W. 22 Dec 97 - 12:29 PM
Barry 22 Dec 97 - 04:37 PM
Moira Cameron 23 Dec 97 - 02:32 PM
Bert 23 Dec 97 - 03:10 PM
harpgirl 07 Mar 00 - 08:57 AM
Grab 08 Mar 00 - 08:15 AM
Wavestar 08 Mar 00 - 11:24 AM
harpgirl 01 Jul 00 - 06:10 PM
Chanteyranger 02 Jul 00 - 05:58 AM
karen k 02 Jul 00 - 06:43 AM
GUEST,shlenny from Bloomington 02 Jul 00 - 07:05 AM
GUEST,Bill Scotland 02 Jul 00 - 01:58 PM
Chanteyranger 02 Jul 00 - 07:30 PM
karen k 02 Jul 00 - 08:23 PM
IanC 03 Jul 00 - 08:36 AM
IanC 03 Jul 00 - 08:49 AM
A Wandering Minstrel 03 Jul 00 - 09:03 AM
Chanteyranger 03 Jul 00 - 12:38 PM
Melani 03 Jul 00 - 03:31 PM
harpgirl 08 Oct 01 - 02:07 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: HANDSOME CABIN BOY^^^
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 15 Dec 97 - 09:28 AM

I'm putting together a set of traditional songs about women and the sea. In addition to a few "my love has left me for the sea" songs, I'd like to do some that have women in a more active role. For example, Maid on the Shore (woman as a pirate), Handsome Cabin Boy (woman becomes sailor, gets pregnant), and Willie Taylor's True Love (woman becomes sailor, finds her false love, shoots him). I found a few variations on these themes in the DTdatabase, as well as couple of mermaid songs. I'd appreciate additional suggestions on themes or songs I've missed.

Since Handsome Cabin Boy isn't in the database, here it is:

HANDSOME CABIN BOY

'Tis of a lusty female, and you must understand
Her heart bein' set on ramblin' unto a foreign land
She dressed herself in sailor's clothes or so it did appear
And she signed with a captain to serve him for a year.

The captain's wife, her bein' on board, her heart was filled with joy
To think the captain had engaged such a handsome cabin boy
And many's the time she slipped a kiss and she would have liked to toy
But 'twas the captain discovered the secret of the handsome cabin boy.

Whose cheeks they were like roses, his hair was all in curls
Many's the time the sailors said "Well he looks just like a girl"
But eatin' of the captain's biscuits her color did destroy
And the waist did swell of pretty young Nell, the handsome cabin boy.

'Twas off the Bay of Biscay our gallant ship did plow
One night amongst the sailors there arose a terrible row
It tumbled the men from out their bunks, their sleep it did destroy
Terrible cursin' and a moanin' from the handsome cabin boy.

It's "Doctor dear, oh doctor!" the cabin boy did cry
"My time has come I am undone, and surely I will die!"
The doctor comes a runnin' a smilin' at the fun
For to think a cabin boy should have a daughter or a son.

The sailors, when they heard the news, they all did stand and stare
"The child belongs to none of us" they solemnly did declare
The captain's wife, she says to him "My dear, I wish you joy"
"For 'twas either you or I betrayed the handsome cabin boy".

So sailors take your tot of rum and drink good health to trade
And likewise to the sailor lad that was neither man nor maid
Here's hopin' the wars don't rise again our sailors to destroy
And here's hopin' for a jolly lot more like the handsome cabin boy. ^^^


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Wolfgang Hell
Date: 15 Dec 97 - 10:04 AM

Susan-Marie, "Female smuggler" and "Female sailor bold" from the DT-database (which has, by the way, Handsome Cabin Boy), not a very active role in "Dreadful ghost"...I just see that entering "@transvestite @sailor" brings all these and many others, active role or much less active.
Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Bert
Date: 15 Dec 97 - 10:29 AM

Do a Forum search for Grace Darling.


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 15 Dec 97 - 12:16 PM

Bert and Wolfgang - Thanks for the suggestions (I keep forgetting that the keywords aren't infallible: Handsome Cabin Boy didn't show up under "sea" so I assumed it wasn't there).


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: judy
Date: 15 Dec 97 - 01:44 PM

I love the "Lady Leroy" which has two versions in the DT. I've heard the second one done by an Irish group: "Oisin".

In this song the rich woman disguises herself as a man to buy a ship from her own father to run off with her sailor. The father sends one of his captains after them, they fight, the Lady Leroy (the name of the ship, not the woman) wins and they escape to Boston:

Here's a health to pretty Polly! Long may she enjoy Her proudest of heros and the Lady Leroy

judy


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Petra A. Cosgrove
Date: 15 Dec 97 - 06:13 PM

If you feel like doing one in gaelic, use keyword Grainne, or Grania, I haven't the first clue where you would find the music unfortunately... But it's a song about Grainne Ni' Mhaille, (Grace O'Malley) a real life, historically accurate Irish pirate in the 17th century... (she lived at the same time as Elizabeth I, R.)

Pei


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Subject: Lyr Add: FEMALE RAMBLING SAILOR (from Ian Robb)^^^
From: Moira Cameron
Date: 15 Dec 97 - 07:21 PM

Don't forget "Female Ramblin' Sailor":

FEMALE RAMBLING SAILOR

Source: Ian Robb
Topics: Australian, English, Sailor/ship, Women.

Come all young maids both near and far,
And listen to my ditty;
'Twas near Gravesend there lived a maid--
She was both neat and pretty.
Her own true love was pressed away
And drowned in some foreign sea;
Which caused this fair maid for to say:
"I'll be a ramblin' sailor."

So with jacket blue and trousers white,
Just like a sailor, neat and tight;
The sea it was the heart's delight
Of the female rambling sailor.
From stem to stern she bravely goes;
She braves all dangers, fears no foes.
But soon you'll hear of the overthrow
Of the female rambling sailor.

For although her courage did not fail
'Twas stormy seas and wintry gales
That o'er this fair maid did prevail--
The female rambling sailor.
From stem to stern she bravely went,
Where offtimes she'd been many,
But her hand it slipped and down she fell.
She calmly bade this world farewell.

And when her lily-white breast in view it came
They found it was a female's frame.
Rebbecca Younge it was the name
Of the female rambling sailor.
On the river Thames she is known well.
No sailor there could her excel.
Let fall one tear as a last farewell
To the female rambling sailor.

So come all young maids, both near and far,
And listen to my story.
Her body is anchored in the ground--
Let's hope her soul's in glory.
May the willows wave around her grave
And round the laurels planted.
May flowers sweet grow at the feet
Of the one who was undaunted.

Note: I rearranged the order in the last two verses to make it sound more logical a progression to me.

Another really good one is "Lowlands"--the one that starts off:

I dreamed a dream the other night,
Lowlands, lowlands away my Joe,
I dreamed I saw my own true love,
Lowlands Away.

^^^
--- Line breaks
added ---
-- PA --


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Barry
Date: 15 Dec 97 - 07:45 PM

In the DT see the riotious "For The Love Of Willy" & the more romantic ending "Canadee-i-o". Barry


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Bruce O.
Date: 15 Dec 97 - 08:42 PM

Petra, Do you have what is said to be the original "Granuaile" (Grainne Mhaol, or Ni Mhaille) from Hardiman's 'Irish Minstrelsy'? I'd love to see it, and will in turn post no less than 5 variants of the tune ranging from 1786 to 1859, which I've already coded in ABC.


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 16 Dec 97 - 08:48 AM

Judy - thanks for suggesting Lady Leroy. I've been meaning to buy an Oisian CD, do you know which one this song is on?

Petra and Bruce - A version of Grace O'Malley is in the DT database in english and gaelic as AN DO/RD FIANNA. However, there's no tune for it so it would great if Bruce could post one or two.

Moira - Thanks for the Female Ramblin Sailor. Do you know which Ian Rob CD it's on?

Barry - Yes, I found "For The Love Of Willy" and Canadee-i-o". Great Stuff. Do you know where I could find the tune for "For the Love of Willy"?


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Wolfgang Hell
Date: 16 Dec 97 - 09:46 AM

Found something during another search: Female Warrior Ballads , some of them obviously about life at sea ("Female Captain" and many others). I haven't found out yet whether this is more than just a list of titles. (Of course, if you need at the end of the book/essay (?) something under "curiosa" there are always the many Mermaid ballads)
Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Wolfgang
Date: 16 Dec 97 - 09:53 AM

some more information here Wolfgang


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Subject: Tune Add: GRANUWAIL - GRANA UILE - GRAINNE MHAOL^^
From: Bruce O.
Date: 16 Dec 97 - 10:41 AM

Susan-Marie, Thanks, I couldn't find it in DT.

The song there looks like it might be the original. There were others in the 19th century, sometimes to other tunes.

The last are obviously insrumental versions. I can't cope with all of Bunting's ornamentation of X5 below in ABC, so that part is ommitted here. The 2nd strain, which seems to be simply a variation of the first, is also omitted.

X:1
T:GRANUWAIL
N:Hime's 'New Selection.. Irish Airs', c 1800
N:probably pirated from Cook's selection, c 1793-5.
Q:90
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:G dorian
(B/2c/2)|d>ed cAd|G>AG G2 A/2B/2|cAB cAG|\
F>GF F2(d/2e/2)|fed cAc|de^fg2(a/2g/2)|\
fed cAd|G>AG G2 (d/2e/2)|fed cAc|de^fg2(a/2g/2)|\
fed cAd|G>AGG2:|]

X:2
T:GRANA UILE
N:One Hundred Irish Airs, 2nd Series. P. M. Haverty Co.
N:New York, n.d. (copyright 1859)
Q:90
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:Gm
B/2c/2|d>ed cA d|G>GG G2(A/2B/2)|c>Af (cAG)|\
F>FF F2d|gag fdc|dgg g2(b/2g/2)|(fd)d (cA)A|\
G2GG2|]

X:3
T:GRAINNE MHAOL
N:Dublin Monthly Magazine, May, 1842
N:Via Zimmermann's 'Songs of Irish Rebellion', 1967
Q:90
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:Gm
B/2c/2|d3/2 e/2 d/2 d/2 c A d|G2GG2A/2B/2|\
c3/2A/2 fc AG|F2FF2d|g a g f d c|d g g g g a/2 g/2|\
gd d c A2|G2GG2G|d3/2e/2 d c A d|G2GG2A/2B/2||
c3/2 A/2 f c A A/2 G/2|F2FF2d|g3/2 a/2 g f/2d3/2 c|\
d g g g2 b/2g/2|fd d c A A|G2GG2|]

X:4
T:GRANUWEAL
N:Henry Beck flute MS, 1786
L:1/8
M:3/8
K:G dorian
B/2c/2|def|d/2c/2B/2A/2G/2^F/2|G2G|G2A/2B/2|cAf|cAG|G2G|F2e|\
fff|ggg|af/2g/2a/2f/2|g2a|fef|d/2c/2B/2A/2G/2^F/2|G2G|G2::\
((3 d/2e/2f/2)|^GdB|gab|G2G|A2((3c/2d/2e/2)|fcA|fga|F2F|F2e|\
fff|ggg|af/2g/2a/2f/2|g2a|fef|d/2c/2B/2A/2G/2^F/2|G2G|G2|]

X:5
T:Granu Weal
N:from Bunting's 3rd collection, 1840
N:almost same is O'Neill' Music of Ireland, #546
Q:90
M:6/8
K:Gm
.A|(.d.=e.f) (d/2c/2)(B/2A/2)(G/2^F/2|(.G2.G.G2) (A3/4B/4)|\
(.c.A.f) (d/2c/2)(B/2A/2)(G/2E/2)|(.F2.F.F2)(d/2=e/2)|
(.f.=e.f) (d/2c/2)(B/2A/2)(G/2^F/2)|(Gg) (.g .g) (g/2b/2)(a/2g/2))|{fg}(.f.=e.f) (d/2c/2)(B/2A/2)(G/2^F/2)|\
(.G.G.G) .G2:|]

^^


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 16 Dec 97 - 01:16 PM

Wolfgang, thanks for the link to the Female Warrior Ballads list of titles. The only one they currently have words and music to is Female Rambling Sailor, but I think there will be more available in the future. I'm curious to see "The Female Press Gang" and some of the others! As for mermaid songs, I do intend to include one. I'm putting together these songs for a set at a local coffehouse.

Bruce, thanks for the melodies. Now, over to the ABC homepage for translation...


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Petra A. Cosgrove
Date: 16 Dec 97 - 03:37 PM

Bruce- ::drool, drool:: thank you.. the lyrics i found were here on the data base, but Susan Marie already said that one..

Okay.. I'm being kicked off the machine.. for some people people working on finals get annoyed when you're just surfing and there are no more computers in the labs.. :)

(can't figure out why...) petra a.c.


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Subject: Lyr Add: OLD GRANNAU WEAL^^
From: Bruce O.
Date: 16 Dec 97 - 06:12 PM

Notes and errata on the tune "Granuaile", and another 18th century "Granuaile" song.

x1: Cook's Selection should be Cooke's Selection, a book in the British Library which contains "Granuaile", but which I have not seen.
X4: The Henry Beck MS is in the library of Congress.
X5: Although Bunting's key signature is Gm all E's are natural, so it, too, is really G dorian.

There are two fouled up versions of the tune in the Complete Petrie Collection. "Poor old Granua Weal", #790, starts ok and ends ok, but is in 4/4 time and rather fouled up between the ends. "Graine Mael", #1455, is in F, but should be Fm or F dorian.

I discovered that one has to be carefull with ABC's if you want to display them in HTML. I had used left and right angle brackets in my original notation of X3, only to find that an HTML browser hides a left angle bracket followed by a right angle bracket, and everything in between. It took me a couple of minutes to figure out why about half of my tune had disappeared.

Other 18th century songs to the tune.

Commodore Gale, Tune - Granny wale. [Granuaile] I posted the song previously on a thread of Guys Songs.

"Grania Meuel" is cited as the tune for a two verse song in 'Songs in Jack the Gyant Queller', Dublin, 1749, from Henry Brooke's suppressed Irish ballad opera of 1748. The song there fits the tune given above (Hime's, X:1).

Granau Wale/Weal is (Mother) Ireland in a song which I think is probably American, although set in Dublin and London. "Old Granau" here complains to several English statesmen about the hard times the English are giving to her sons in America. The song mentions events in America from the Boston tea party up to, but not including the Declaration of Independence. The song was printed in the very rare 'The Green Mountain Songster' of 1823, with the first nine verses reprinted in the Vermont folk song collection, 'The New Green Mountain Songster', (by Flanders, Ballard, Brown and Barry) 1939, reprinted 1966. For this song the title is "Old Granny Wales." A later copy, with several corruptions, is printed from the Stevens-Douglas manuscript (c 1841-56) of western New York in 'A Pioneer Songster', (by Harold Thompson and Edith Cutting) p. 85, 1958. In the latter the song is entitled "Old Grannau Weal." Neither copy contains a tune direction, nor do any of the editors suggest one, but the song fits our tune here quite well. I suspect the song was actually written in America by an Irish American: the writer does not seen to know the names of any real streets in Dublin or London, and even after the date of this song Irishmen were being executed for treason for less provocative acts against the English.

Is this the first Irish-American song?

[From 'A Pioneer Songster', 1958, with some corrections from 'The New Green Mountain Songster', 1939 and 1966]

OLD GRANNAU WEAL

Old Grannau she arose in the morning so soon
She put on her petticoat apron and gown
Saying very bad news last night came to me
They are wronging my children thats over the main [sea]
Old Grannau [mounted her gelding] in rage
And straight way for Dublin it was her first stage
And as she was prancing it was up Dublin street
She with lord Cornwall [Conner] had a chance for to meet

He says noble Grannau come tell me in haste
Have you any good news from the East or the West
O bad news says Grannau that makes me complain
They are wronging my children thats over the main

That news is to true lord Cornwall [Conner] he said
They will bring them to slavery soon I'm afraid
Theres lord North and Cranville [Granville] and infamous Bute [No North in
That brought on the tea act that[s] now in dispute [New Gn. Mtn. text]

(Old Grannau set out with her grand equipage) [Pioneer
[The weather being wet and her sorrows increas'd] [New Gn. Mtn.
And straight way for london it was her first [next] stage
And as she was prancing it was up london street
Twas there with Lord Granville and Bute she did meet

You are three [two] villains as I understand
Who are wronging my children in yon foreign land
And it is reported and told as a fact
You are the three [two] villains that made the tea act

(You are wrongly informed says these gentlemen) (Pioneer
[They say noble granny you're wrongly informed] [New Gn. Mtn
(To yield to your slavery we never intend) (Pioneer
[To enslave America we never intend] [New Gn. Mtn
That land is our kings we solmnly say
And we will make laws and your sons must obey

You are three [two] arrant liars says old Grannau in haste
Tis very well known from the east to the west
My children they ventured their lives o'er the flood
And purchased that land with the price of their blood

They said noble Grannau do'nt give such a vent
We'll cool your sons courage and make them repent
With our great ships of war and our men in the field
We'll cool your sons courage and make them to yield

I would not have you think for to frighten my sons
At Lexington battle they made your men run
They are men of experience in every degree
The[y]'ll turn your proud ships with a hell-a-ma-lee

O says noble Grannau give me leave for to tell
Of a battle that was fought it was nigh Bunker hill
Where twelve hundred Britons lay dead on the field
And five hundred more have since died of their wounds [rhyme lost]

O Grannau do'nt tell us about bunker hill
For in that battle we gained the field
You once had warren but now he is slain [Joseph Warren, killed at
You have no more Warren's now over the main [battle of Bunker Hill

Well well says old grannau though Warren is dead
A Washington lives and our armies he'll lead
We'll handle your troops as polite as you please
And pay them their trouble for crossing the seas

We cannot deny but your Washington's brave
Then only think of what armies we have
We'll send over bigsby old Derby and Graves
Your sons must submit or we'll make them our slaves

Well Well says old Grannau go on with your cause
Our sons will never submit to your laws
And when they've beat you and drove your troops home
My sons will be free and make laws of their own

Too late will you see your desperate crimes
And mourn and lament to the end of your times
That ever you sent your troops o'er the flood
To spill my dear innocent childrens blood

I have a millions of sons in america born
To yield to your slavery they hold it in scorn
They are men of experience in every degree
They never will yield to your bloody tea Act [rhyme lost]

Sing wobaroo bob-a-roo says old Grannau weal
The fox is in the trap he's caught by the tail
They are men of experience and never will fail
Sucess to our sons say old Grannau Weal.

Hell-a-ma-lee in verse 10 and wobaroo bob-a-roo in the last verse are probably corrupt Gaelic expressions rather than nonsense expressions. One lost Gaelic tune of the middle of the 18th century was entitled "Suba roo roo."

^^


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHEN I WAS A FAIR MAID (T Ni Dhomhnaill^^
From: Dale Rose
Date: 16 Dec 97 - 06:38 PM

What about When I Was A Fair Maid by Triona Ni Dhomhnaill? It is on an album entitled Triona that I think is available both on Gael Linn and Green Linnet. It is similar in theme and words to Soldier Maid in the data base.

WHEN I WAS A FAIR MAID
as sung by Triona Ni Dhomhnaill, 1975.

When I was a fair maid about seventeen
I listed in the navy for to serve the queen,
I listed in the navy a sailor lad to stand
For to hear the cannons rattling and the music so grand.

Well, the officer that listed me was a tall and handsome man,
He said you'll make a sailor, so come along my man,
My waist being tall and slender, my fingers long and thin,
And the very soon they learned me I soon exceeded them.

Well, they sent me to bed and they sent me to bunk,
To lie with a sailor I never was afraid,
But taking off my blue coat sure it often made me smile
For to think I was a sailor and a maiden all the while.

Well they sent me up to London for to guard the Tower,
And I'm sure I might be there 'till my very dying hour,
But a lady fell in love with me, I told her I was a maid,
O she went unto the Captain and my secret she betrayed.

Well the Captain he came up to me and he asked if this was so,
Oh I dare not, I dare not, I dare not say no.
It's a pity we should lose you, such a sailor lad you made,
It's a pity we should lose you such a handsome young maid.

So it's fare thee well Captain, you've been so kind to me,
And likewise my shipmates I'm sorry to part with thee.
But if ever the navy needs a lad, a sailor I'll remain,
I'll put out my hat and feathers and I'll run the riggin' again.

At the end of each verse, repeat pretty much in this fashion: And the music so grand, and the music so grand, for to hear the cannons rattling and the music so grand.

Note too, that this "fair maid" more than holds her own when it comes to duties on the ship, rather than just beating the drum as in the other song. ^^


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Petra A. Cosgrove
Date: 16 Dec 97 - 10:50 PM

Dale- How interesting.. I thought that that was a traditional tune- going to have to go back to my Dad's Steeleye collection (he's got a few more years of collecting folk tunes than I do) and see what it's listed as. Because they do a tune very very similar to that entitled ::thinks:: female drummer boy.. forget which album it's on though.. .

Petra


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 17 Dec 97 - 10:11 AM

Dale - Thanks for "When I was a Fair Maid". I like the fact that she joins the navy for the music, rather than the usual search for Willy-Oh.

Petra - Let me know if you find it on Steeleye, and whether they list the source as traditional. I suppose Triona could have taken the Female Drummer Boy or Soldier Maid and written her own seafaring version.


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Jon W.
Date: 17 Dec 97 - 10:20 AM

I'll bet "Fair Maid" is traditional - Triona does write a few songs but I believe she sticks pretty solidly to traditional sources - especially back in 1975.


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Dale Rose
Date: 17 Dec 97 - 10:36 AM

I have the Green Linnet version, and the notes are not completely helpful, but better than none at all. It does not credit Triona herself in anyway for the words, though that does not mean than she did not adapt them, of course. Her sources for some of the songs on the album are given, but this is not one of them.

Complete notes:
This is a fine, humorous version of the well known and widely sung "Female Drummer". The most striking feature here is that our brave maiden inclines to "run the rigging" instead of "beating upon the rub a dub". By all accounts, the high seas of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries must have been swarming with sailor lasses. She shows great spirit and resolves that if the navy ever needs her she'll "run the rigging" again. "Britannia and Women's Liberation rule the waves."!


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Moira Cameron
Date: 17 Dec 97 - 01:41 PM

Susan-Marie:

The Female Rambling Sailor is on Ian Robb's "Rose and Crown" album.


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Rebecca H
Date: 17 Dec 97 - 10:00 PM

The song entitled When I was a Fair Maid is sung by The Rude Girls on one of their albums. On there it is called Running the Rigging and it says it is traditional. They sing another female sailor song, but I'll have to go look it up.


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Petra A. Cosgrove
Date: 17 Dec 97 - 10:09 PM

Okay then.. So I'm not loosing my mind.. Susan, I won't be able to check until the 19th (earliest) since unfortunately my father's Steeleye is all in NJ, and I'm at school in CO.. and unfortunately, I'm certain that female drummer boy is not on of the ones that I have on CD out here.. I have it copied onto a tape.. ::SIGHS:: However, it looks like I was right (WOW!! What a concept.. wonder if that would count towards any of my history finals??? )

Petra


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: harpgirl
Date: 18 Dec 97 - 12:01 AM

Sally Rogers sings "When I was a Fair Maid" on her album The Unclaimed Pint and attributes it to a Triona n'Domnhaill recording. Apologies in advance for what will probably be a triple posting...


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 18 Dec 97 - 01:56 AM

G'day,
Steeleye Span recorded "Female Drummer" on the album "Please to See the King". They acknowledged "A Yorkshire girl via Percy Grainger, Bert Lloyd and the Watersons" as the source. I suppose that makes it traditional.

Cheers,
Alan


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Petra A. Cosgrove
Date: 18 Dec 97 - 05:38 PM

Thanks Alan.. Saves me having to go hunting though the CDs to find it.. :)

petra


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 18 Dec 97 - 07:15 PM

I thought that the Maid On The Shore was a mermaid.

There is If I Was A Blackbird, although the lady in question sings about wanting to follow her true love to sea.

There is Three Fishers, as sung by Stan Rogers on For The Family, although the women aren't out on the boats.

Banks of Newfoundland mentions a lady on board who tears up her flannel petticoats to make mittens for the sailors. This is the version sung by Chris Foster. (There is another completely different song by the same name.)

The Flower of Serving Men has nothing to do with the sea, but it is a fine song about a woman impersonating a man. Considering its sad and bloody beginning, it's odd that it ends with a joke.


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 22 Dec 97 - 08:36 AM

I've never been able to picture the Maid on the Shore as a mermaid because I would think a mermaid would stick to the sea. I think of her as a female land pirate, using herself as a decoy the way other land pirates would use lanterns to lure ships onto rocky coasts. I know there's a better term for that than "land pirate" but I can't remember it.

I do plan on using If I Was a Blackbird, I think it's one of the prettiest "my love left me for the sea" songs.

Thanks for all the great suggestions, everyone. The coffee house is in March, I'll let you know how all the songs went over.


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Earl
Date: 22 Dec 97 - 08:56 AM

I beleive "land pirates" were called mooncussers because the plan didn't work when the moon was bright.


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Jon W.
Date: 22 Dec 97 - 12:29 PM

The Maid on the Shore also had some magical powers, to be able to sing all the seamen to sleep. Right?


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Barry
Date: 22 Dec 97 - 04:37 PM

Mooncussers were those on shore who would set up false lights, on moonless nights or durning storms, to lure ships to the shore & then reap the landfall. The term I think you're looking for, instead of Land Pirate would be Land Shark. The maid on the shore, as I've been told, is a caster of spells, a witch, she magically (sometimes with an instrument) lulls the full crew to sleep. Susan-Marie, sorry I don't know how to write the music or where you'd find For The Love Of Willy, a friend of mine does it. Barry


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Moira Cameron
Date: 23 Dec 97 - 02:32 PM

The Maid on the Shore--I've seen several versions of this one written down. Of course, each version had it's own interpretation. In some she is clearly a supernatural being; in others she is simply a very smart young woman. I sing it with the latter interpretation. Why do we have to consider as having magical powers in order for her to outsmart a ship full of sailors and a captain?


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Bert
Date: 23 Dec 97 - 03:10 PM

Moira,
I thought that ALL women had magical powers. I know my wife does.
Bert.


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: harpgirl
Date: 07 Mar 00 - 08:57 AM

...I would like to refresh this thread for my father, who has now become a Mudcatter whose name is "The Navigator"...harpgirl


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Grab
Date: 08 Mar 00 - 08:15 AM

Re Susan-Marie, they're often known just as 'wreckers'.

Grab.


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Wavestar
Date: 08 Mar 00 - 11:24 AM

I feel as if I'm coming in late here, but I am almost certain that there is a version of "For the Love of Willy-O" on one of the February Tapes, by Gordon Bok and Friends... I know you're looking for traditional songs, but I always thought "The Ways of Man" (in the DT) was a wonderful woman's song about the sea, if a bit depressing. I know I should be thinking of some others, but am not... -J


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: harpgirl
Date: 01 Jul 00 - 06:10 PM

refried


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Chanteyranger
Date: 02 Jul 00 - 05:58 AM

Seattle chantey singer David Lovine recorded a song called "Bridget McCaughan The Bonnie Lass"(not sure if I have the spelling of her name right) about a crew member on a sailing ship. She not only takes an active role, she is, by all accounts in this song, a top-notch sailor. The words were written by David Lovine, set to the melody of a traditonal chantey. The album's called "Pierhead Jump."


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: karen k
Date: 02 Jul 00 - 06:43 AM

Chantyranger,

I knew someone once who knew David Lovine and sang a couple of his songs but David didn't have anything recorded then. I've since lost track of that person who knew him. I liked the songs of David's that I heard. Do you know how to get a copy of his recording? I'd appreciate knowing. Thanks in advance.

k


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: GUEST,shlenny from Bloomington
Date: 02 Jul 00 - 07:05 AM

Another song that you might interested is Jack-a-roe (in the database). Not an uncommon song, but relevant I bellieve to your goal.


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Subject: Lyr Add: A BRAVE WOMAN ^^
From: GUEST,Bill Scotland
Date: 02 Jul 00 - 01:58 PM

This song is about the North East of Scotland and the traditional role of the fisherman's wife. How the fishermen's braveness is more than matched by the courage of the women. The women used to carry the men to and from their boats so as the men didn't get their feet wet.

A BRAVE WOMAN

Feel the tide carress the bow
The saat stings in yer een
Feel the wind across yer face
As the land is left aleen
Wi nae si much as a backward glance
And ivvery boat's the same
It taks a brave man ti gang ti sea
A brave woman ti bide at hame

A fisherman aboord a boat
Fan he's sailing on the sea
Can ging for days in gales and storms
Athoot a wink o' sleep
But his wife'll tak him on her back
And cairry him fae far he came
It taks a brave man ti gang ti sea
A brave woman ti bide at hame

Chorus

Brocht up ti the fishing wye
Nae thocht o' naething else
Feed yer man and yer bairnies first
Afore ye feed yersel

Bait the sma lines through the nicht
Shielin mussels ivvery day
Wash his feet and shave his face
Sleep wi him and pray
For God ti save him fae the sea
And her fae anither bairn
It taks a brave man ti gang ti sea
A brave woman ti bide at hame

See the sail boats runnin hame
Afore November's gales
See the weemen on the beach
Fillin their mussel pails
Ivvery year a boat gings doon
A wife and mither is left again
It taks a brave man ti gang ti sea
A brave woman ti bide at hame

Chorus

See the aal wife starin oot
Pullin tee her shawl
Thinkin back ti her younger days
Afore the purse and trawl
A picter o' her fower young loons
Stares back fae a silver frame
It taks a brave man ti gang ti sea
A brave woman ti bide at hame

Chorus
Chorus

Cheers

Bill

^^
--- Line breaks
added ---
-- PA --


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Chanteyranger
Date: 02 Jul 00 - 07:30 PM

Karen K -

David Lovine moved to Germany last year and I don't have his current contact info. I do have an extra copy of "Pierhead Jump" and would be glad to send it to you as a freebie. If you'd like, go to my personal messages and leave me your snail mail address and I'll send it along.

chanteyranger


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: karen k
Date: 02 Jul 00 - 08:23 PM

Chanteyranger,

Thank you for your kind offer. Have sent you a personal message.

karen


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: IanC
Date: 03 Jul 00 - 08:36 AM

For a real horror, I like singing this one (in DT):

THE BANKS OF GREEN WILLOW (2)

Cheers!IanC


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: IanC
Date: 03 Jul 00 - 08:49 AM

re: Banks of Green Willow.

Sorry!

Now I've looked at it, it's only a fragmentary version of the one I sing. Perhaps the other version in DT will be more complete. If not, I'll post the whole works.

Cheers!IanC


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: A Wandering Minstrel
Date: 03 Jul 00 - 09:03 AM

I know its modern but don't forget "Polly on the Shore"


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Chanteyranger
Date: 03 Jul 00 - 12:38 PM

A song about a parrot, eh? -:


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: Melani
Date: 03 Jul 00 - 03:31 PM

For a really funny one, try "How to Gain A Husband", by Annie Lore, recored on "The Grey Cocked Hat". It's pretty old and might be hard to find. "Jackaroe" IS in the data base, two different versions. It's also called "Jack Monroe", but that one's NOT in the data base(at least I couldn't find it just now).Recorded by Teresa Morgan on "Victory Sings At Sea".


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Subject: RE: Women & the Sea
From: harpgirl
Date: 08 Oct 01 - 02:07 PM

refresh for Kathryn of "Women Outlaw" thread.


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