Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafebrownie

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Origins: The Parting Glass

DigiTrad:
FAREWELL
PARTING GLASS


Related threads:
English Goodnight & joy be with you all? (5)
Lyr Req: The Parting Glass - full version? (4)
The Parting Glass, About what? (72)
Film rendition of 'The Parting Glass' (20)
Tune Req: The 'Other' 'Parting Glass' (29)
Lyr Add: Parting Glass (alternate verses) (1)
Lyr Req: The Parting Glass (4) (closed)
Lyr Req: 'The Parting Glass' in Irish Language? (6)
Lyr Req: tasteless Parting Glass parody (7)


GUEST,Mr Miserable 05 Aug 01 - 03:48 AM
GUEST,bob jr 05 Aug 01 - 03:51 AM
Noreen 05 Aug 01 - 06:46 AM
Big Tim 05 Aug 01 - 09:52 AM
SeanM 05 Aug 01 - 10:45 AM
John Routledge 05 Aug 01 - 11:21 AM
Indy Lass 05 Aug 01 - 11:41 AM
GUEST,Adolfo 05 Aug 01 - 04:41 PM
GUEST, - Paul from Hull 05 Aug 01 - 04:50 PM
GUEST 05 Aug 01 - 06:06 PM
GUEST,Annraoi 05 Aug 01 - 10:52 PM
Jeep man 05 Aug 01 - 11:15 PM
forty two 06 Aug 01 - 08:09 AM
Les from Hull 06 Aug 01 - 01:48 PM
MAG 06 Aug 01 - 03:34 PM
MMario 06 Aug 01 - 03:37 PM
Nigel Parsons 11 Jan 04 - 08:21 PM
Nigel Parsons 11 Jan 04 - 08:35 PM
Nigel Parsons 11 Jan 04 - 08:39 PM
paddymac 11 Jan 04 - 09:25 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Jan 04 - 10:26 PM
Big Mick 11 Jan 04 - 10:35 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Jan 04 - 10:37 PM
Amos 11 Jan 04 - 10:50 PM
Malcolm Douglas 11 Jan 04 - 10:54 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Jan 04 - 10:58 PM
Dave Hanson 12 Jan 04 - 06:56 AM
GUEST,eoin o'buadhaigh 12 Jan 04 - 07:59 AM
JennyO 12 Jan 04 - 09:01 AM
Uncle_DaveO 12 Jan 04 - 10:09 AM
GUEST,Den at work 12 Jan 04 - 10:13 AM
GUEST,rob 12 Jan 04 - 10:35 AM
Big Mick 12 Jan 04 - 10:46 AM
PoppaGator 12 Jan 04 - 01:22 PM
michaelr 12 Jan 04 - 01:58 PM
PoppaGator 12 Jan 04 - 02:48 PM
Tinker 12 Jan 04 - 02:57 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 12 Jan 04 - 03:04 PM
cobber 12 Jan 04 - 10:14 PM
Joe_F 13 Jan 04 - 07:05 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Jan 04 - 07:52 PM
Malcolm Douglas 15 Jan 04 - 06:53 AM
Tattie Bogle 15 Jan 04 - 08:28 PM
Malcolm Douglas 23 Jan 04 - 06:24 PM
Lancashire Lad 24 Jan 04 - 09:03 AM
GUEST,JTT 24 Jan 04 - 06:14 PM
GUEST,Ewan McVicar 25 Jan 04 - 07:18 AM
PoppaGator 29 Jan 04 - 03:19 AM
oggie 06 Oct 06 - 11:59 AM
McGrath of Harlow 06 Oct 06 - 05:40 PM
GUEST,P 03 Aug 07 - 07:02 PM
Acme 03 Aug 07 - 07:53 PM
Nigel Parsons 03 Aug 07 - 08:13 PM
Joe Offer 17 Jan 11 - 03:02 AM
Joe Offer 17 Jan 11 - 03:12 AM
Georgiansilver 17 Jan 11 - 05:25 AM
Lighter 17 Jan 11 - 09:40 AM
Fred McCormick 17 Jan 11 - 09:47 AM
Micca 17 Jan 11 - 11:35 AM
GUEST,Hilary 17 Jan 11 - 12:12 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Jan 11 - 01:09 PM
Chris_S 17 Jan 11 - 02:49 PM
mayomick 17 Jan 11 - 03:12 PM
RTim 17 Jan 11 - 03:42 PM
stallion 18 Jan 11 - 01:54 PM
RTim 18 Jan 11 - 01:59 PM
MartinRyan 20 Oct 14 - 02:15 PM
mayomick 21 Oct 14 - 01:13 PM
EBarnacle 08 Jan 16 - 10:40 AM
Good Soldier Schweik 24 Feb 16 - 12:44 PM
FreddyHeadey 24 Feb 16 - 08:33 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:








Subject: Parting Glass
From: GUEST,Mr Miserable
Date: 05 Aug 01 - 03:48 AM

Can anyone give me a couple of CD sources for GOOD recorded versions of Parting Glass? Thanks


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: GUEST,bob jr
Date: 05 Aug 01 - 03:51 AM

there is a terrific live version of this song performed by a group called the dubliners


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Noreen
Date: 05 Aug 01 - 06:46 AM

Mr Miserable, put parting glass in the Digitrad and Forum Search box at the top of the main forum page. You will get a page of links to threads where this song (or these songs; there are at least two versions) has been discussed.

CD sources are bound to have been mentioned- people tend to post their favourite version when a song's discussed.

That will make you cheer up, I hope... :0)

Noreen


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Big Tim
Date: 05 Aug 01 - 09:52 AM

How's about Dylan's "Restless Farewell", that's quite a good version!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: SeanM
Date: 05 Aug 01 - 10:45 AM

I'd also add, define your version of "good". It's a common enough song to have recieved many different treatments. Personally, I'm only really familiar with about 3 versions - Clancy/Makem, and the Poxy Boggards (local CA band). Clancy/Makem is normally single vocalist with light acoustic guitar. Boggards do it as a fairly lush harmony number, slightly faster than the average Clancy/Makem recording.

But of course, if you don't LIKE the Clancy/Makem recordings, then that's another matter entirely.

M


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: John Routledge
Date: 05 Aug 01 - 11:21 AM

The solo song group ( 14 of us) sang it Folkworks Durham Summer School last week. 14 unaccompanid singers sounded great.

Sorry No CD :0) Yet! John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Indy Lass
Date: 05 Aug 01 - 11:41 AM

There's a version from Steeleye Span sung by Gay Woods on the "Horkstow Grange" CD, but my personal favorite is by the Voice Squad on the "Good People All" CD. They do wonderful harmonies.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: GUEST,Adolfo
Date: 05 Aug 01 - 04:41 PM

I quite agree with Indie. My favourite version is the one by The Voice Squad (almost everything they do becomes immediately my favourite version of anything). But let me remind of you of another one by Robin Williams in Songs of Love and Parting. I like it a lot too.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: GUEST, - Paul from Hull
Date: 05 Aug 01 - 04:50 PM

Ahah, yes thats the album...(..er...CD) been trying to think of it....a truly SUPERB version indeed


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Aug 01 - 06:06 PM

See SeanM's comments regarding "good". A CD reference for the Clancy Brothers And Tommy Makem (Liam sings it) is "Come Fill Up Your Glass With Us" - TRADITION TCD 1067.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: GUEST,Annraoi
Date: 05 Aug 01 - 10:52 PM

And then, of course, there is the old song "Sweet Cootehill Town". any offers of lyrics?
Annraoi


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Jeep man
Date: 05 Aug 01 - 11:15 PM

COLCANNON. They have a web site. Unfortunately, I don't have it . Jeep


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: forty two
Date: 06 Aug 01 - 08:09 AM

A really good recordeing is Cathal McConnell and Len Graham on a CD from, I thinke, early 90s or late 80s called Live in Pittsburgh. Well worth having for all the other stuff too


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Les from Hull
Date: 06 Aug 01 - 01:48 PM

Voice Squad! VOICE SQUAD!!

I've heard quite a few excellent versions of this song but none comes anywhere near the Voice Squad's version mentioned above. The harmonies are amazing and the rest of the CD is really worth having.

Les


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: MAG
Date: 06 Aug 01 - 03:34 PM

I'd have to go with Voice Squad on this one. I'm a sucker for the pretty harmonies every time.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: MMario
Date: 06 Aug 01 - 03:37 PM

If I am remembering correctly - the best rendition I have heard in th last few years (other then live amongst friends) is one that was played on MudCat radio.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 11 Jan 04 - 08:21 PM

O.k. looking here for information.

The version of this in the DT is close enough to what I used to hear at my local, that it is probably accurate. But... although I cannot recall who used to sing it, there were a couple of small variations (as I remember it) that seem to make sense.
I have searched (googled) but cannot find a version that matches my recollection.
Can someone please put my mind at rest as to whether the DT version is the 'standard' (& I'm suffering from memory distortion), or if the version I recall is a valid (recognised) variant.

DT Version
Of all the money that e'er I spent
I've spent it in good company
And all the harm that ever I did
Alas it was to none but me
And all I've done for want of wit
To memory now I can't recall
So fill to me the parting glass
Good night and joy be with you all

If I had money enough to spend
And leisure to sit awhile
There is a fair maid in the town
That sorely has my heart beguiled
Her rosy cheeks and ruby lips
I own she has my heart enthralled
So fill to me the parting glass
Good night and joy be with you all

Oh, all the comrades that e'er I had
They're sorry for my going away
And all the sweethearts that e'er I had
They'd wish me one more day to stay
But since it falls unto my lot
That I should rise and you should not
I'll gently rise and softly call
Good night and joy be with you all

The variations I recall are for all 3 verses.

V1. L3 "It was, alas, to none but me" (change of word order)
V1. L4 "and all I've said, for want of wit"

V2. L2 "And leisure for to sit awhile" (fits scansion)
V2. L3 "There is a fair maid in this town"
V2. L4 "That sorely does my heart beguile" (better rhyme)
V2. L6 "I own she has my heart in thrall" (better rhyme)

V3. L3 "And all the sweethearts that e'er I kissed"
V3. L4 "Would wish me one more night to stay" (avoids awkward late rhyme in line)



Cheers


Nigel


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 11 Jan 04 - 08:35 PM

I note the Sinead O'Connor lyrics give V2 as

"If I had money enough to spend,
and leisure time to sit awhile.
There is a fair maid in this town,
that sorely has my heart beguiled.
Her rosy cheeks and ruby lips,
I own, she has my heart in thrall;
Then fill to me the parting glass,
Good night and joy be with you all."

This does correct the scansion for line 2, but using "time" rather than the "for" that I remember

Nigel


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 11 Jan 04 - 08:39 PM

Similarly, a web page for lyrics by Shane MacGowan uses the variation I quote for V2 L6

Nigel


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: paddymac
Date: 11 Jan 04 - 09:25 PM

A few years ago the there was a nice film called "Waking Ned Devine." I don''t know who performed it, but there was a simply incredible version of "The Parting Glass" while the credits rolled at the end.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Jan 04 - 10:26 PM

Several copies of "The Parting Glass" in the Bodleian Collection (ca. 1850-1899). Standard?? No such thing unless one finds the original.

O'Connor's verse 2 is verse 3 in the Bodleian copies.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Big Mick
Date: 11 Jan 04 - 10:35 PM

This is the last song that a member of my band wanted sang as he died. It will never be the same for me. We dedicated our CD to him, and our version is on it.

Mick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Jan 04 - 10:37 PM

Most versions lack the chorus in the Bodleian copies.
At Cantaria, listen to Monalee Kendall sing the first two verses at: Parting Glass

The Cantaria lyrics lack the last verse, "When I am drinking far away..."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Amos
Date: 11 Jan 04 - 10:50 PM

Note the probable lyric is not "fill me to the parting glass", as shown in the Cantaria link, but "Fill to me the parting glass".

A


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 11 Jan 04 - 10:54 PM

I wouldn't pay too much attention to what Shane or Sinead sing, really. They probably don't know very much about the song (Scottish, though taken up in Ireland more recently). "Cantaria" aren't very reliable, either; they tend to invent bizarre explanations for things they don't understand.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: THE PARTING GLASS (from Bodleian)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Jan 04 - 10:58 PM

Contemplator also has only three verses: Parting Glass

From The Bodelian Library broadside ballads, 2806 c.15(13):

An admired Song called
THE PARTING GLASS.
Air:—Over the hills to my Nanny, O.

All the money that ere I had, I spent it in good company,
And all the harm that ere I done, alas! it was to none but me,
And all I have done for want of sense, to my memory now I can't recall,
So fill for me the parting glass—good night and joy be with you all.

CHORUS: Be with you all—be with you all—Good night and joy be with you all;
So fill for me the parting glass—good night and joy be with you all.

Then all the comrades that ever I had are sorry for my going away,
And all the sweethearts that ever I had would wish me one day more to stay
But since it came unto my lot that I should rise and you should not,
I gently rose all with a smile, good night and joy be with you all.

If I had money enough to spend and I leisure time to sit a while,
There is a girl in this very town, I own she has my heart beguiled.
Her rosy cheeks and ruby lips, in truth she has my heart in twa,
Then fill for us the parting glass—good night and joy be with you all.

When I am drinking far away, and none but strangers round me there
How my poor heart will surely break then thinking of my lovely dear.
Oh! my poor heart will surely break when I am bousing far awa,
From you my dear so far awa, so far awa, so far awa.

Nugent and Co., Printers. 35 New-row West, Dublin


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 12 Jan 04 - 06:56 AM

Yah boo sucks, the DUBLINERS is the best recording.
eric


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: GUEST,eoin o'buadhaigh
Date: 12 Jan 04 - 07:59 AM

Sorry, but my vote has to be with 'The Voice Squad',pity they only brought out two albums.(though I have them on tape singing much more than they ever recorded) An even bigger pity they broke up. It was a treat to listen to them each Christmas at The Folk Museum in Hollywood, Co Down. Aaaaaahhhhh!! those were the days. Yes, my vote has to be the version by The Voice Squad.
            eoin


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: THE PARTING GLASS (from Judy Pinder)
From: JennyO
Date: 12 Jan 04 - 09:01 AM

The version which I know and love, and many Oz catters would agree with me, is sung by our own Judy Pinder. On her CD, "Foreign Shore" it was dedicated to the late Dave Alexander, who died in 1997. It has also been included on a recent double CD of session songs, produced by Miguel Heatwole, called "The People Have Songs".

The notes on this CD, and the lyrics, as she sings them, are here:

THE PARTING GLASS
traditional Irish
sung by Judy Pinder
"This is an 'American wake' song to farewell emigrants. Since anyone leaving Ireland in the 19th century was highly unlikely to return home again, their family and friends would hold a wake for them before they left." For many years at the Glengarry Castle the session would only finish if Judy, or someone else, would sing this song.

Of all the money that e'er I spent
I spent it in good company
And of all the harm that e'er I've done
I swear 'twas done to none but me
And all I've done for want of wit
To memory now I can't recall
So fill to me the parting glass
Good night, and joy be to you all

If I had money enough to spend
And leisure time to sit awhile
There is a fair maid in this town
And she surely has my heart beguiled
Her rosy cheeks and ruby lips
I own she has my heart in thrall
So fill to me the parting glass
Good night, and joy be to you all

Of all the friends that e'er I had
They were sorry for my going away
And of all the sweethearts e'er I had
They would wish me one more day to stay
But since it falls unto my lot
That I should rise and you should not
Then I'd gently rise and softly call
Good night, and joy be to you all


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 12 Jan 04 - 10:09 AM

I'm surprised that no-one has mentioned that there's a great version of The Parting Glass sung by (somebody) on one of the Mudcat Blue Plate Special CDs.

Dave Oesterreich


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: GUEST,Den at work
Date: 12 Jan 04 - 10:13 AM

I think the version done by Mudcatter Seamus Kennedy is very well done.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: GUEST,rob
Date: 12 Jan 04 - 10:35 AM

my vote has to be with Taggart and Wright Their voices are superb .Brilliant! I hear it might be on their next CD out soon.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Big Mick
Date: 12 Jan 04 - 10:46 AM

Thanks for the plug, Uncle Dave. I had forgotten that we had contributed that to the Blue Plate Special CD's.

Mick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: PoppaGator
Date: 12 Jan 04 - 01:22 PM

I heard this lovely song (well, just the first verse) in an obscure but excellent movie my wife rented this past weekend. Yesterday (Sunday), I wrote a "Lyr Req" based on the opening two lines, but lost connection before I could post it. I'm very glad to find this thread, coincidentally enough, the very next morning.

The movie, which I recommend highly (despite a *very* few moments that were a bit saccharine for my taste), is entitled "Evelyn." It was shot on location in Ireland, financed at least partly by Hollywood, but seems not to have been released in the US, only on the other side of the pond.

Very impressive cast: Pierce Brosnan, Aiden Quinn, Stephen Rea, and (perhaps in his final role?) Alan Bates. Plus which, the little girl playing the title role was at least as good as any of 'em. Brosnan did a particularly nice job; it was a revelation to see the suave Mr 007 in the role of a working-class regular guy.

The (true) story is set in Dublin in 1953/54 and concerns a single father whose three children are taken from him by the state and placed in Catholic orphanages, and his efforts to get them back. His eventual victory marked the first time that any law in Ireland was overthrown by the Supreme Court as unconstitutional. Evelyn was the one daughter, eldest of three kids, who was called upon to testify and thus played an important role in the whole legal drama. Also, in real life, the adult Evelyn played an important part in bringing her family's story to the screen and thus to the rest of us.

Now available on DVD, even here in New Orleans where it never appeared on a theatre screen. The DVD "extras" include the interesting story of how the film came to be made.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: michaelr
Date: 12 Jan 04 - 01:58 PM

"Evelyn" was indeed released in the US, but, like all good films, did not draw enough of a public to last more than a week or two in theaters.

Cheers,
Michael


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: PoppaGator
Date: 12 Jan 04 - 02:48 PM

Michael,

A brief release in the US usually means the film was available only in "selected cities" -- sometimes just NY and LA, sometimes the 10 or 20 largest markets, but never New Orleans.

It is fairly common to hear about a notable "indy" film, like a Sundance winner, etc., and then never have it released in a theater here. We'll know about such a film, and know we have to wait for the videotape or DVD. But "Evelyn" was something neither of us had ever even heard of. Peggy grabbed it off the shelf on a whim, only because it was set in Ireland.

Back to the song: when I heard it in the film, it was vaguely familiar, and I figured it was something I "should" already have known better than I do. I was willing to risk chastisement at my ignorance by posting a "Lyr Req" here without even knowing the title, because I was sure such a thread would reveal alternate versions, history, controversy, etc.

Turns out I didn't have to post the request, someone beat me to it. I wouldn't have known the title on my own, but recognized "Parting Glass" as part of the final line of the one verse I heard in the movie. I figured "that's got to be it," and it was.

Had I just looked up the lyrics on my own, and had I never seen this thread, I would never have heard of Voice Squad -- that alone promises to be worth the price of admisison...

Pops


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Tinker
Date: 12 Jan 04 - 02:57 PM

Actually Poppa Gator your thread did survive the connection loss.

http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=65954

Your thread may have prompted bringing this one back up to continue discussion, and that has added some new information. Joe's been doing a great job of linking existing threads to the top of the DT, so that they can be added to just like this.

Thanks for the info on Evelyn I'll definately add it to my list.

Tinker


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: GOOD NIGHT, AND GOD BE WITH YOU ALL
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 12 Jan 04 - 03:04 PM

The original Scottish song is lacking in the DT.
Scottish versions are available in Olson: Scarce Songs 2 Index

Olson gives this one from a broadside ca. 1770:

Lyr. Add: GOOD NIGHT, AND GOD BE WITH YOU ALL:
or, The Neighbor's Farewell to his Friends.

Now come is my departing time,
And here I may no longer stay,
There is no kind comrade of mine
But will desire I was away.
But if that time will me permit,
Which from your Company doth call,
And me inforceth for to flit,
Good Night, and God be with you all.

For here I grant some time I spent
In loving kind good Company;
For all offences I repent,
And wisheth now forgiven to be;
What I have done, for want of wit,
To Memory I'll not recall:
I hope you are my Friends as yet
Good Night, and God be with you all.

Complementing I never lov'd,
Nor talkative much for to be,
And of speeches a multitude
Becomes no man of quality;
From Faith, Love, Peace and Unity,
I wish none of us ever fall;
God grant us all prosperity:
Good Night, and God be with you all.

I wish that I might longer stay,
To enjoy your Society;
Yhe Lord to bless you night and day,
And still be in your Company.
To vice, nor to inequity,
God grant none of you ever fall,
God's blessing keep you both and me!
Good Night and God be with you all.

The Friends Reply

Most loving friend, God be thy guide,
And never leave thy Company,
And all things needful thee provide,
And give thee all prosperity;
We rather had thy Company,
If thou woulds't have stayed us among;
We wish you much felicity:
God grant that nothing doe thee wrong.

From Herd's "Scots Songs" (also copied from Olson)

O this is my departing time!
For here nae langer maun I stay;
There's not a friend or foe of mine
But wishes that I were away.

What I hae done for lack o' wit,
I never can recal!
I hope you're a' my friends as yet:
Good-night and joy be wi' you a'

Olson also gives the Irish version.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: cobber
Date: 12 Jan 04 - 10:14 PM

I posted this on another thread today, but I'll repeat it as there seem to be two similar things going on here.
There is a book called "The Gay Galliard" that I remember reading a long time ago. In it the song is the favourite of Mary Queen of Scots lover. I can't remember the author except that she was a Scottish historian working in the 1940s who novelised her research. What does stick in my memory is that she printed the words under the title Johnny Armstrong's Goodnight. As there is another song with this title, I wonder whether she was confused, which seems unlikely for a very competent historian or whether this was indeed once, the title of this song. Has anyone any ideas?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: THE PARTING GLASS (Scots versions)
From: Joe_F
Date: 13 Jan 04 - 07:05 PM

I love the malice of "Alas", and the paradise of "To memory now I can't recall". %^)

The following stanza is attributed to Robert Burns on a page of an unidentified book that someone copied for me some years ago:

This night is my departing night,
For here na langer must I stay;
There's neither friend nor foe o' mine
But wishes, wishes me away.
What I have done thro' lack of wit,
I never, never can recall;
I hope ye're a' my friends as yet,
Goodnight, and joy be wi' you a'.

But it's not in my anthology either under "The Parting Glass" or under its first line, tho it may be buried somewhere in all those pages under another name.

The same page gives the following version by Sir Alexander Boswell:

Goodnight, and joy be wi' ye a',
Your harmless mirth has cheered my heart;
May life's fell blasts out-o'er ye blaw!
In sorrow may ye never part!
My spirit lives, but strength is gone,
The mountain-fires now blaze in vain;
Remember, sons, the deeds I've done,
And in your deeds I'll live again!

When on yon muir our gallant clan
Frae boasting foes their banners tore,
Who show'd himsel' a better man
Or fiercer wav'd the red claymore?
But when in peace -- then mark me there,
When thro' the glen the wanderer came,
I gave him of our hardy fare,
I gave him here a welcome hame.

The auld will speak, the young maun hear,
Be canty, but be good and leal;
Your ain ills ay ha'e heart to bear,
Another's ay ha'e heart to feel;
So, ere I set, I'll see you shine,
I'll see you triumph ere I fa';
My parting breath shall boast you mine,
Goodnight, and joy be wi' you a'.

Quite a different picture!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Jan 04 - 07:52 PM

The ballad "Johnie Armstrong, Child no. 169, has nothing to do with "Parting Glass."
Bronson, "The Singing Tradition of Child's Popular Ballads," says the first record of a tune was called "Good night and God be with you." What this was, we don't know. "An earlier tune "Ihonne Ermistrangis dance," mentioned in The Complaynt of Scotland, 1549," (Bronson) is unknown now. Present tunes are all 19th c. Scottish.
I think your author (Tuchman? sp.) was just telling a good story, putting two and two together and getting eleven.

Malcolm Douglas would have the best information; pm him.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Tune Add: GOOD NIGHT AND GOD BE WITH YOU
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 15 Jan 04 - 06:53 AM

Bronson prints a transcription of Good Night and God be With You in his Traditional Tunes of the Child Ballads, III, No. 169:9 (appendix A), p. 143. It is quoted from Dauney, Ancient Scottish Melodies, 1838, no. 16, p. 222 (originally Skene MS., no. 109). There doesn't seem any reason to think that there is any relation to Johnie Armstrong except insofar as the tunes to which it is generally sung are related to this one, but Bronson isn't actually very clear about this.

Here is the tune.

X:1
T:Good Night and God be With You
B:Bronson, Traditional Tunes of the Child Ballads, III, No. 169:9 (appendix A), p. 143.
N:Quoted from Dauney, Ancient Scottish Melodies, 1838, no. 16, p. 222 (originally Skene MS., no. 109)
L:1/8
Q:1/4=100
M:C
K:G
[D2d2] B2 A2 d2|[B,2B2] B2 b2 a2|[D2f2] a2 baba|
bafe [D2f2] d2||[D3d3] B A2 d2|BABd b2 a2|
[D2f2] (3aba (3fef (3aba|[D4f4] d4|edef g2 B2|
dBde f2 d2|edef gfga|b2 e2 e2 fg|
[A2a2] g2 f2 e2|d3 e f2 d2|[E2e2] B2 d2 A2|
G4 B4|edef g2 B2|dBde f2 d2|
edef gfga|b2 e2 E2 fg|agfe defd|
agfe f2 [D2d2]|[E2e2] f2 afef|[D4d4] B4|]


It seems most likely that Margaret Irwin just misunderstood the relationship; or, so to speak, "presumed upon it". Here, for comparison, is Good Night and Joy be wi' ye a' as it appeared in Gow's Repository if the Dance Music of Scotland, II, c.1802, p. 76, with the comment "This Tune is played at the Conclusion of every convivial Dancing meeting throughout Scotland."

X:2
T:Good Night and Joy be wi' ye a'
B:Gow's Repository if the Dance Music of Scotland, II, c.1802, p. 76
N:The Gows comment: "This Tune is played at the Conclusion of every convivial Dancing meeting throughout Scotland."
L:1/8
Q:1/4=100
M:4/4
K:C
"Slowish"
ed|c2 ~c2 G3 c|A2 A2 a3 g|(eg)ag egag|e2 c2 c2:|
z e|{e}dcde {e}d2 cA|GAcd {cd}e2 dc|~dcde ~fefg|{fg}a2 d2 d3 e|
f3/2e/fg {fe}a2gf|edef {ef}g2 fe|(de)fa (g/e3/2)d3/2e/|c2[A2E2C2][A4E4C4]|]


See also the late Bruce Olson's website: http://users.erols.com/olsonw/SONGTXT2.HTM#GDNIGHT


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 15 Jan 04 - 08:28 PM

I seem to have heard 2 completely different tunes to the same words.
I first heard the "Irish" version sung by Cathal o'Connell on a "Boys of the Lough" album.
I've no idea where the other tune came from, but heard it in Sidmouth, sung by John Barden (John, I know you're a Mudcatter, are you out there somewhere?)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 23 Jan 04 - 06:24 PM

The putative connection with the Armstrongs also figures, it seems, in Scott's Minstrelsy (I really must get my own copy). Looking in Christies's Traditional Ballad Airs just now —for something completely different— I came upon the set he gives of Gude Nicht, an' Joy be wi' Ye a', in that case with Lady Nairne's lyric, which I don't think we've had here yet. Christie (II 298-9) quotes Peter Buchan (Gleanings of Scarce Old Ballads —presumably— II 127):

"All that I have as yet been able to discover in print of this very old song, were eight lines, which have been quoted by Burns [ see above ], and many others since. Even the indefatigable Sir Walter Scott could discover no more for all his researches, and these he has given in the Minstrelsy of the Border, vol I, p 283. He conceives the lines to have been composed by one of the Armstrongs, executed for the murder of Sir John Carmichael of Edrom, warden of the middle marches: but I am inclined to think they have been written on another occasion, long prior to the time of Carmichael's death, which happened on the 16th of June 1600. The eight lines, alluded to, have long been current, and the air, to which they are sung, popular in Scotland. It gives me, then, particular pleasure to be able to lay this much admired relic, so often sought after in vain by the learned, in a complete state, before the lovers of ancient song."

Christie then quotes the text given by Buchan, which is much as that posted by Q: see above. Evidently there has been some confusion between this "last goodnight" and the —so far as we can tell— completely different Armstrong's Last Goodnight, dating back quite some time. It's likely enough, I'd think, that Margaret Irwin relied on Scott there, and thought he meant that the two were the same song.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: Lancashire Lad
Date: 24 Jan 04 - 09:03 AM

There is also a great version by Jon Rennard


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 24 Jan 04 - 06:14 PM

Funny enough, I always *assumed* this was Scottish, then re-assumed that I'd been wrong because it was sung so often in Ireland; I'd love to hear Scottish versions.

Incidentally, the story behind the movie Gator references was best - and I think first - told by the superb essayist Hubert Butler, who was later basically sent to coventry for his revelation of the bigotry of his time and place. A fine writer and a brave man.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: GUEST,Ewan McVicar
Date: 25 Jan 04 - 07:18 AM

Many thanks for the information on versions given in this thread. Cheers my heart.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Parting Glass
From: PoppaGator
Date: 29 Jan 04 - 03:19 AM

Hubert Butler, eh, JTT? I'll have to check it out.

The story of "Evelyn" is not only true but also very significant as history, so it's not surprising that it would already be well documented.

The "extra feature" story-behind-the-film DVD piece tells us how the real-live Evelyn, as an adult, was shopping her story at a filmmakers/screenwriters event because she felt that her *father's* story had never been adequately told.

Now, perhaps she was most concerned about reaching the larger public available via film, as compared to the smaller numbers of book readers. But I had the impression that previous histories told the story more from the point of view of the eminent lawyers and judges, the journalists, etc.

The film was centered around the regular-guy working-class father who dedicated himself to taking his children back from the church/state. Part of what he managed to do was to convince a team of legal hotshots to take his case pro bono. I haven't read the Butler piece, but I can easily imagine that the story could be, and probably has been, presented as the triumph of these dedicated and idealistic officers of the court, with less focus on the poor housepainter who brought them their test case.

Of course, this idea I've been given, that this relatively new film tells the "human" or family side of the story as never before, was preented to me by . . . the film's own screenwriter, producrs, etc. So we have to take what they say with a grain of salt. It is quite plausible to me, though.

Please pardon thread creep.

Pops


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: oggie
Date: 06 Oct 06 - 11:59 AM

I've heard a version sung by Eleanor Shanley and Ronnie Drew where he sings basically the DT version and she sings three alternative verses. Does anyone know/have the words to her verses?

Thank you

oggie


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 06 Oct 06 - 05:40 PM

I've always had the feeling that it may have started off as a "Last Good Night" song, a song of someone who is due to be executed in the morning - and the words of that Scottish predecessor version seem to tie in with that. Especially that first couplet -

O this is my departing time! For here nae langer maun I stay:
There's no a friend or fae o' mine, but wishes that I were awa.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: GUEST,P
Date: 03 Aug 07 - 07:02 PM

Becky Bishops version is very unique. She has a voice that grows on you, cutting and somewhat gritty.

http://www.beckybishop.net/music.html


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: Acme
Date: 03 Aug 07 - 07:53 PM

There's a beautiful version of the song on Paddy Graber's CD released a few years ago. Stewart Hendrickson was involved with that one. You can search for it and some discussion here at Mudcat.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 03 Aug 07 - 08:13 PM

As the thread has surfaced again, I thought I'd put in the version as I remember it. I've already quoted the DT version, and annotated changes, but it makes sense to show the song as a complete item. I repeat that this is not an identifiable version (or variation) merely as I remember it. But, I list above some of the reasons I think it may be an improvement on the DT version.

THE PARTING GLASS

Of all the money that e'er I spent
I've spent it in good company
And all the harm that ever I did
It was, alas, to none but me
And all I've said for want of wit
To memory now I can't recall
So fill to me the parting glass
Good night and joy be with you all

If I had money enough to spend
And leisure for to sit awhile
There is a fair maid in this town
That sorely does my heart beguile
Her rosy cheeks and ruby lips
I own she has my heart in thrall
So fill to me the parting glass
Good night and joy be with you all

Oh, all the comrades that e'er I had
They're sorry for my going away
And all the sweethearts that e'er I kissed
Would wish me one more night to stay
But since it falls unto my lot
That I should rise, and you should not
I'll gently rise and softly call
Good night and joy be with you all


CHEERS
Nigel


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: ADD Version: The Parting Glass (Clancy)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 03:02 AM

I like my songs clean and simple, and one of the least-complicated versions is the one sung so often by the Clancy Brothers:

THE PARTING GLASS

Oh, all the money that e'er I spent,
I spent it in good company,
And all the harm that e'er I've done,
Alas, it was to none but me.
And all I've done for want of wit
To memory now I can't recall,
So fill to me the parting glass,
Good night and joy be with you all.

Oh, all the comrades that e'er I had,
Are sorry for my going away,
And all the sweethearts that e'er I had
Would wish me one more day to stay.
But since it falls unto my lot
That I should rise and you should not,
I'll gently rise and softly call,
"Good night, and joy be with you all."

Source: The Irish Songbook, by the Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem (1979, Oak Publications), pp 182-183.


Here's the Traditional Ballad Index entry on this song:

    Parting Glass, The

    DESCRIPTION: The singer has done some ills and foolish things, but never with ill purpose and only to himself. He misses his girl. He would spend money on good company if he had it. Conclusion: "So fill to me the parting glass, Goodnight and joy be with you all."
    AUTHOR: unknown
    EARLIEST DATE: before 1900 (broadside, Bodleian 2806 c.15(114))
    KEYWORDS: drink farewell nonballad
    FOUND IN: Ireland Canada(Newf) Britain(Scotland(Aber))
    REFERENCES (6 citations):
    GreigDuncan8 1531, "The Parting Glass" (2 texts, 2 tunes)
    SHenry H769, p. 65, "The Parting Glass" (1 text, 1 tune)
    OLochlainn 69, "The Parting Glass" (1 text, 1 tune)
    Peacock, pp. 573-574, "The Parting Glass" (1 text, 1 tune)
    DT, PARTGLAS*
    ADDITIONAL: Bell/O Conchubhair, Traditional Songs of the North of Ireland, pp. 82-83, "The Parting Glass" (1 text, 1 tune)

    Roud #3004
    RECORDINGS:
    The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem, "The Parting Glass" (on IRClancyMakem01)
    BROADSIDES:
    Bodleian, 2806 c.15(114), "The Parting Glass," J.F. Nugent & Co. (Dublin) , 1850-1899; also Harding B 26(498), Harding B 26(499), 2806 c.15(13), Harding B 19(89), "The Parting Glass"
    CROSS-REFERENCES:
    cf. "Over the Hills to My Nanny, O" (tune, per broadsides Bodleian 2806 c.15(114), Bodleian 2806 c.15(13), Bodleian Harding B 19(89))
    ALTERNATE TITLES:
    Good Nicht an' Joy Be Wi' You A'
    NOTES: This song is lyric enough that it can import elements from almost anywhere; the Sam Henry version, for instance, starts with a verse best known from "The Barnyards o' Delgaty" ("I can drink and no be drunk..."), and also includes a bit of "My Dearest Dear." I suspect there are versions which elaborate on the girl the singer can't have. - RBW
    An argument could easily be made that "Guid Nicht an' Joy Be Wi' You A'" and "The Parting Glass" are the same song. Two verses often show up in both songs: "All the money e'er I had, I spent it in good company, And all the harm that e'er I did, I hope excused I will be, And what I've done for want of wit, to my memory I cann't recall, So fill us up a parting glass -- good night and joy be with you all," and "If I had money for to spend, And leisure time to set a while, There is a fair maid in this town, that surely has me heart beguile: Her rosy cheeks - and her ruby lips I own she has my heart enthrall'd; Then fill to me the parting glass, Good night - and joy be with you all." The difference is in the remaining verses. "The Parting Glass" is concerned with a lover missed; "Guid Night, and Joy Be With You all" is about leaving a party, or emigrating, or dying, and leaving good friends behind.
    Description from Peacock's version: She hopes he won't go far away. He intends to leave her "when and where all stormy winds blow." She dreams he has been "pressed ... gone on board ... to serve his royal majesty." - BS
    Last updated in version 2.5
    File: HHH769

    Go to the Ballad Search form
    Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
    Go to the Bibiography
    Go to the Discography

    The Ballad Index Copyright 2010 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.



Roud Index Search


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: Joe Offer
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 03:12 AM

Somebody named Jürgen Kloss did a lot of research this song. Take a look at what he's done: (click).

Nice job, Jürgen!

-Joe Offer-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 05:25 AM

paddymac mentioned the version used in the film 'Waking Ned'... that was by The High Kings who use it as a finale for all their live shows........ take a look at how their show ends.. watch till the end.... amazing!!!!
High Kings... The Parting Glass.

Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: Lighter
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 09:40 AM

He's also examined "The Buffalo Skinners," "Mary of the Wild Moor," "The Water is Wide," and "Lady Franklin's Lament."

Looks like splendid work. If anybody thinks song histories are easy to research and write, they should guess again!

I hope you're reading this, Jurgen.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: Fred McCormick
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 09:47 AM

Easily the best version is the one which Len Graham and Joe Holmes recorded for the Topic LP After Dawning. It has long been deleted by Topic and I don't know where you would get a copy nowadays. However Len says he is planning to issue Joe's entire recorded repertoire on CD. So perhaps that little gem will be included.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: Micca
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 11:35 AM

For sheer beauty of tone and simplicity of presentation,I don't think the rendition given at the Late Night Extra at the 2009 Getaway by Elizabeth LaPrelle could be beaten, it was perfect!!,and would bring a tear to a glass eye.
I hope fervently that she will record it SOON!!!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: GUEST,Hilary
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 12:12 PM

Loreena McKennitt sings "The Parting Glass," on The Wind that Shakes the Barley.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 01:09 PM

The link to the history of "The Parting Glass," by Jurgen Kloss, linked above by Joe Offer, is important especially for the lyrics and music, some complete and some partial, of similar songs and of variants of the song itself.
The list of references, indicating those that are online, is particularly useful.

Thanks, Joe, for linking this website; his other articles are all worth reading.
'Home' for the site


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: Chris_S
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 02:49 PM

Another vote for the Voice Squad but Cara Dillon comes close on the excellent Hill Of Thieves album.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: mayomick
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 03:12 PM

And now the end is near
it's time to face the final curtain
my friend........
oops


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: RTim
Date: 17 Jan 11 - 03:42 PM

The Parting Glass.
- as by Len Graham on his recording - 'In Full Flight' (2008)

A man may drink and not be drunk
A man may fight and not be slain
A man may court a pretty girl
And perhaps be welcome back again.
But as it has so ordered been
Be a time to rise and a time to fall.
So fill to me the parting glass
Goodnight and joy be with you all.

If I had the money for to spend
I would spend it in good company
I, and all the harm that I have done
I hope itÕs pardoned I will be.
What I have done for want if (?in?) *
To memory I can't recall
So fill to me the parting glass
Goodnight and joy be with you all.

My dearest dear the time draws near
When here on longer I can stay
There's none the comrade I leave behind
But is griev'ed that I am going away
But as it has so ordered be
What is once past can't be recalled
So fill to me the parting glass
Goodnight and joy be with you all.

* very unclear on recording.
---------------------------------
Tim Radford


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: stallion
Date: 18 Jan 11 - 01:54 PM

Tim, can't get it to scan, I break out into Barnyards of Delgaty!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: RTim
Date: 18 Jan 11 - 01:59 PM

Stallion (Pete)
These Irish are damn clever!!!!!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: MartinRyan
Date: 20 Oct 14 - 02:15 PM

You can now hear The Voice Squad (with a little help from a guy called Frank Harte!) singing The Parting Glass in an archive recording at The Góilín Song Project.

Click here

Regards


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: mayomick
Date: 21 Oct 14 - 01:13 PM

I like the Sinatra version (shhh don't tell Q or MGM )

And now the end is near....


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: EBarnacle
Date: 08 Jan 16 - 10:40 AM

There was a presentation about the Easter Rebellion on PBS last night, promoting the DVD's of a current play now being presented on both sides of the Pond. The Parting Glass was the closing piece.

That High Kings link above is very good.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: Good Soldier Schweik
Date: 24 Feb 16 - 12:44 PM

same tune as just as the tide is flowing.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: The Parting Glass
From: FreddyHeadey
Date: 24 Feb 16 - 08:33 PM

MartinRyan - 20 Oct 14 -

Great. Something about the Voice Squad/ Frank Harte track that sent a shiver through me.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 26 March 1:15 PM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.