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Origin: Ballad of Seth Davy / Whiskey on a Sunday

DigiTrad:
WHISKEY ON A SUNDAY or COME DAY, GO DAY


Related threads:
Seth Davey (24)
Chord Req: Whiskey On A Sunday (32)
Lyr Req: Whiskey on a Sunday (45)
Seth Davy info please (30)
Lyr Add: Whisky on a Sunday (19)


GUEST,Rich 13 Nov 08 - 03:34 PM
GUEST,machree01 13 Nov 08 - 06:18 AM
GUEST,Jake 12 Nov 08 - 05:41 PM
SINSULL 12 Nov 08 - 03:30 PM
Mr Happy 12 Nov 08 - 07:55 AM
John MacKenzie 12 Nov 08 - 07:12 AM
Manitas_at_home 12 Nov 08 - 06:50 AM
Bernard 12 Nov 08 - 06:37 AM
Mr Happy 12 Nov 08 - 04:41 AM
Mr Happy 12 Nov 08 - 04:38 AM
Arkie 11 Nov 08 - 10:50 PM
breezy 11 Nov 08 - 04:18 PM
GUEST,manda 11 Nov 08 - 04:03 PM
Hrothgar 09 Feb 02 - 04:51 AM
Raggytash 09 Feb 02 - 03:27 AM
Joan from Wigan 09 Feb 02 - 03:14 AM
Joan from Wigan 09 Feb 02 - 03:03 AM
Barry Finn 08 Feb 02 - 08:17 PM
Joan from Wigan 08 Feb 02 - 03:32 PM
MMario 08 Feb 02 - 03:23 PM
Raggytash 08 Feb 02 - 03:03 PM
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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: GUEST,Rich
Date: 13 Nov 08 - 03:34 PM

For info, from www.fsc.org


Whisky on a Sunday, AKA Come Day, Go Day, AKA Seth Davy was written in the 1960s by Glyn Hughes. Hughes was born in Liverpool in 1932 and died there in 1972. During his brief life he had many occupations: journalist, short-story writer, bookseller's assistant, musician in a circus, film extra, hotel liftman and song writer, to mention only a few. The song is about a well-known Jamaican street entertainer in Liverpool in the 1890s/1900s and has been recorded by among others The Dubliners, The Irish Rovers and Rolf Harris.

Gerry Jones, Liverpool singer, says:
"Seth Davy was a real person, he really existed, and he died a couple of years into the 20th century. There was a street and a pub, both called Bevington Bush just north of Liverpool City Centre, and Seth Davy did do a busking act outside.
"In his book Liverpool: Our City - Our Heritage, Freddie O'Connor tells us that in 1760, half a mile from Marybone (St Patrick's Cross) along Bevington Bush Road was a hamlet named Bevington Bush which had an inn called simply the Bush, which became a favourite haunt for folk to travel out into the country, to the Bevy Inn, as it became fondly known. With the opening of Scotland Road, the ancient Bevington Bush Road became a minor road amidst the massive slum district that would soon engulf it. As the district was built up it also lost its original name.
"Please do not be taken in by any Irish versions of this song, or any reference to "Bebbington". Bebington is "over the water" - not in Liverpool at all. I know the truth for a fact because, when I was a brand-new teacher in the Dingle in 1963, our old lollypop man told me that he had actually seen Seth Davy doing his stuff. So I have spoken to a first-hand witness.
"I have heard that Seth Davy's own singing was a non-too-wonderful monotone, and not the pleasant melody that was written about him in the 60s folk boom."


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: GUEST,machree01
Date: 13 Nov 08 - 06:18 AM

I have a Danny Doyle album, called "Whiskey On A Sunday" {1968} the song remained at No. 1 in the Irish charts for 10 weeks.


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: GUEST,Jake
Date: 12 Nov 08 - 05:41 PM

The Houghton Weavers did a terrific version of this song. It's sang beautifully and the melody is lovely.


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: SINSULL
Date: 12 Nov 08 - 03:30 PM

Mr. Happy, if a song is good, it doesn't matter when it was written. Share it.


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: Mr Happy
Date: 12 Nov 08 - 07:55 AM

Its a little disappointing to find that many've the songs I'd thought old & traditional were actually composed in the 1960s & 70s


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 12 Nov 08 - 07:12 AM

Jig Dolls.

JM


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: Manitas_at_home
Date: 12 Nov 08 - 06:50 AM

...and not Glyn Hughes as credited in the first couple of postings then?


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: Bernard
Date: 12 Nov 08 - 06:37 AM

According to this site the writer was Glyn Hughes...


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: Mr Happy
Date: 12 Nov 08 - 04:41 AM

ps

not the kind with strings.

The dolls were wooden with jointed limbs, had a stick in their backs, & the puppeteer sat on the stave & banged it with a fist, so that the dolls danced a sort've tapdance!


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: Mr Happy
Date: 12 Nov 08 - 04:38 AM

Jackie & Bridie used to do this song & had dolls dancing on a wooden stave as accompaniment


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: Arkie
Date: 11 Nov 08 - 10:50 PM

The lyrics above indicate that the dolls were puppets worked by strings. My recollection of the song referred to the dancing dolls mentioned above which are also called Limberjims here in the Arkansas Ozarks.


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: breezy
Date: 11 Nov 08 - 04:18 PM

nobody has mentioned the Spinners, till now, who may be able throw further light on the subject.

Any Spinners out there?


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: GUEST,manda
Date: 11 Nov 08 - 04:03 PM

The song was written in liverpool - but changed to suit the irish


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: Hrothgar
Date: 09 Feb 02 - 04:51 AM

I know the dolls as "nimblejacks."


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: Raggytash
Date: 09 Feb 02 - 03:27 AM

A dancing doll is a wooden manikin pivoted at the shoulders, hips and knees, held by a thin rod about 18 inched long drilled into it's back. It is made to dance by placing it on a 4 x 24 inch thin plank which is then drummed with the fingers causing the doll to "dance" The second verse in the version I know goes "his tired old drummed a wooden beam, and the puppets dolls they danced the gear, a far better show than you ever did see, at the Pavvy on New Brighton Pier. This again would indicate the Liverpool connnection


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: Joan from Wigan
Date: 09 Feb 02 - 03:14 AM

Out of curiosity, I've just been looking on the web for Beggars Bush and Bevington Bush. The former is apparently in Dublin, while Bevington Bush was/is in Liverpool: "the name of a thickly wooded valley between Bevington Hill and Everton Hill. An inn on Bevington Hill was called 'The Bush'." The area has not been 'thickly wooded' for many many years, but the area fits. As the version of the song quoted in the DT is that sung by the Irish Rovers, perhaps they changed the location to suited their Irish origins?

Joan


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: Joan from Wigan
Date: 09 Feb 02 - 03:03 AM

There are two previous threads:
Seth Davy info please and
Whisky on a Sunday.

The version I know is the same as that quoted by roopoo in the first of the above links, and is the one sung by most if not all of my fellow Liverpudlians.

Joan (originally from Liverpool)


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: Barry Finn
Date: 08 Feb 02 - 08:17 PM

I think there was quite a nice thread on this some time ago. Good luck, Barry


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHISKEY ON A SUNDAY (Glyn Hughes)
From: Joan from Wigan
Date: 08 Feb 02 - 03:32 PM

WHISKEY ON A SUNDAY
(Glyn Hughes)

He sits in the corner of old Beggar's Bush
On top of an old packing crate
He has three wooden dolls that can dance and can sing
And he croons with a smile on his face

CHORUS
Come day go day
Wish in my heart it were Sunday
Drinking buttermilk through the week
Whiskey on a Sunday

His tired old hands tug away at the strings
And the puppets dance up and down
A far better show than you ever would see
In the fanciest theatre in town

And sad to relate that old Seth Davy died
In nineteen-oh-four
The three wooden dolls in the dustbin were laid
His song will be heard nevermore

But some stormy night when you're passing that way
And the wind's blowing up from the sea
You'll still hear the song of old Seth Davy
As he croons to his dancing dolls three


I don't know if this is the original version or not - I remember from years ago a singer telling us that Seth Davy actually died in 1902, and I always sing that date in the version I do (which isn't the above, by the way). This version is from a website which gives lots of information about Dancing Dolls.

Joan


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Subject: RE: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: MMario
Date: 08 Feb 02 - 03:23 PM

Whiskey on a sunday is attributed to Glyn Hughes in the DT


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Subject: Who Wrote The Ballad of Seth Davy
From: Raggytash
Date: 08 Feb 02 - 03:03 PM

I would like to find who wrote the Ballad of Seth Davy and definitive words if possibly

    He sat on the corner of Bevington Bush
    astride of an old packing case
    and the dolls at the end of his plank went dancing
    as he crooned with a smile on his face

    Come day go day
    wish in me heart for Sunday
    drinking butter milk all the week
    whisky on a Sunday


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