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Spanish Influence in West Ireland

John in Brisbane 27 Apr 98 - 08:44 PM
Bruce O. 27 Apr 98 - 09:55 PM
Dave Brennan 27 Apr 98 - 10:03 PM
aldus 28 Apr 98 - 09:37 AM
Tim O'K 28 Apr 98 - 10:13 AM
Jon W. 28 Apr 98 - 01:21 PM
28 Apr 98 - 01:44 PM
Bruce O. 28 Apr 98 - 01:55 PM
Bruce O. 28 Apr 98 - 02:06 PM
Alice 28 Apr 98 - 03:50 PM
Alice 28 Apr 98 - 03:57 PM
AndyG 29 Apr 98 - 07:48 AM
29 Apr 98 - 07:57 AM
GUEST,Thomas 23 Feb 09 - 04:34 PM
John on the Sunset Coast 23 Feb 09 - 06:40 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 23 Feb 09 - 07:57 PM
John on the Sunset Coast 23 Feb 09 - 08:16 PM
Jack Campin 23 Feb 09 - 08:45 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 23 Feb 09 - 09:10 PM
GUEST,MV 24 Feb 09 - 09:40 AM
Betsy 24 Feb 09 - 10:00 AM
GUEST,Peter Laban 24 Feb 09 - 10:04 AM
GUEST,MV 24 Feb 09 - 10:52 AM
GUEST,Learaí na Láibe 24 Feb 09 - 11:37 AM
GUEST,Jim Martin 24 Feb 09 - 11:28 PM
John on the Sunset Coast 24 Feb 09 - 11:46 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 25 Feb 09 - 12:02 AM
katlaughing 25 Feb 09 - 12:04 AM
John on the Sunset Coast 25 Feb 09 - 12:07 AM
MartinRyan 25 Feb 09 - 04:25 AM
Thompson 25 Feb 09 - 05:30 AM
Betsy 25 Feb 09 - 10:59 AM
GUEST,Nor 07 Mar 09 - 12:09 AM
Les in Chorlton 07 Mar 09 - 04:22 AM
Jack Campin 07 Mar 09 - 05:58 AM
MartinRyan 07 Mar 09 - 02:13 PM
Jack Campin 07 Mar 09 - 07:48 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 07 Mar 09 - 08:15 PM
Gulliver 08 Mar 09 - 05:03 AM
Jim Carroll 08 Mar 09 - 04:13 PM
ard mhacha 08 Mar 09 - 04:42 PM
MartinRyan 08 Mar 09 - 04:48 PM
Jack Campin 08 Mar 09 - 09:54 PM
open mike 08 Mar 09 - 10:12 PM
ard mhacha 09 Mar 09 - 05:35 AM
GUEST,Eamonn Shanahan 26 Apr 09 - 12:29 PM
GUEST 26 Apr 09 - 12:47 PM
MartinRyan 26 Apr 09 - 03:02 PM
Little Robyn 26 Apr 09 - 03:37 PM
MartinRyan 26 Apr 09 - 03:40 PM
Jack Campin 26 Apr 09 - 05:39 PM
MartinRyan 26 Apr 09 - 05:43 PM
GUEST,Eamonn Shanahan 26 Apr 09 - 10:54 PM
GUEST,mayomick 27 Apr 09 - 11:25 AM
Les in Chorlton 27 Apr 09 - 12:28 PM
Tim Leaning 27 Apr 09 - 02:00 PM
GUEST,YOU ARE ALL OF DESECENDANTS OF SPANISH ORIGI 16 Nov 09 - 08:58 PM
GUEST 16 Nov 09 - 09:15 PM
Clontarf83 17 Nov 09 - 12:10 AM
Lonesome EJ 17 Nov 09 - 12:10 PM
Jack Campin 17 Nov 09 - 12:36 PM
Lonesome EJ 17 Nov 09 - 12:41 PM
Les in Chorlton 17 Nov 09 - 12:52 PM
GUEST,Guest 17 Nov 09 - 01:24 PM
Les in Chorlton 17 Nov 09 - 01:41 PM
Gulliver 17 Nov 09 - 06:40 PM
Lonesome EJ 17 Nov 09 - 11:41 PM
Les in Chorlton 18 Nov 09 - 05:17 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 18 Nov 09 - 05:27 AM
Smedley 18 Nov 09 - 05:30 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 18 Nov 09 - 05:35 AM
Black belt caterpillar wrestler 18 Nov 09 - 07:28 AM
Lonesome EJ 18 Nov 09 - 12:19 PM
mg 18 Nov 09 - 12:36 PM
Jack Campin 18 Nov 09 - 01:48 PM
Lonesome EJ 18 Nov 09 - 01:50 PM
GUEST,Thompson 18 Nov 09 - 02:01 PM
Les in Chorlton 20 Nov 09 - 01:53 PM
Jack Campin 20 Nov 09 - 02:05 PM
Les in Chorlton 20 Nov 09 - 02:08 PM
Lonesome EJ 20 Nov 09 - 02:55 PM
GUEST,Johnny Spanish 04 Dec 09 - 07:07 AM
GUEST,Get over it. YOU are Hispanic! 04 Dec 09 - 05:21 PM
GUEST,Johnny Spanish 04 Dec 09 - 08:49 PM
Jeri 04 Dec 09 - 09:16 PM
GUEST,Johnny Spanish 04 Dec 09 - 10:27 PM
GUEST,Commonality in people and history. Commonali 05 Dec 09 - 12:34 AM
michaelr 05 Dec 09 - 02:06 AM
Lonesome EJ 05 Dec 09 - 02:37 AM
GUEST,Johnny Spanish 05 Dec 09 - 03:57 AM
Les in Chorlton 05 Dec 09 - 04:39 AM
GUEST,You are the same 05 Dec 09 - 10:32 AM
Les in Chorlton 05 Dec 09 - 10:43 AM
GUEST,People are people! 05 Dec 09 - 10:59 AM
Joe Offer 05 Dec 09 - 03:32 PM
ard mhacha 06 Dec 09 - 08:49 AM
ard mhacha 10 Dec 09 - 05:16 AM
Les in Chorlton 10 Dec 09 - 12:13 PM
Les in Chorlton 10 Dec 09 - 12:14 PM
GUEST,Newcomer 11 Dec 09 - 11:01 PM
GUEST,ANON 13 Dec 09 - 05:50 PM
OG1 14 Dec 09 - 11:13 AM
GUEST,Johnny Spanish 14 Dec 09 - 07:12 PM
GUEST,The Black O' Sullivans 27 Dec 09 - 06:36 PM
GUEST,Guest - Ibero-Celt 07 Dec 10 - 01:59 AM
Les in Chorlton 07 Dec 10 - 11:27 AM
GUEST,daniel.carlos1 06 Feb 11 - 05:54 PM
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Subject: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 27 Apr 98 - 08:44 PM

From the Spancil Hill thread I am reminded that during the times of the Spanish Armada there was a degree of procreation between the Spanish and locals from the West coast of Ireland. I don;t know the real speelling but my family came from Abbeydawney, somewhere near Tralee. The presence of olive skin and dark eyes in a few members of my otherwise Irish family has prompted some of my parents' generation to refer to the earlier Spanish genes.

Apart from Spanish Lady is there any other mention of this in song?

Regards John


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Bruce O.
Date: 27 Apr 98 - 09:55 PM

"The Spanish Lady" is in my broadside index. There's also one on a Spanish Gentleman and a few others on Spanish women, and tunes "The Spanish Gypises" and "The Spanish Pavan", but I can't see any connection of any to Ireland. The question was asked on the Irish music thread a few months ago if the 'black Irish' were descended from Spaniards. The ovewhelming answer was that there's nothing known to be descended from Spaniards in Ireland. But later someone decided that the name of a pier (or something like that) in Dublin was Spanish or Italian.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Dave Brennan
Date: 27 Apr 98 - 10:03 PM

Abbeydorney in Gaelic is Mainister O dTorna. There's a Spanish Point outside of Milltown Malbay in County Clare. I'm not sure but I think in Gaelic it would be Rinn na Spainneach. There's a lot of Irish songs that invoke Spain. Did you have any in particular in mind?


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: aldus
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 09:37 AM

This Spanish Armada myth is just that... a myth. Very few Spaniards came ashore, certainly not enough of them to account for the dark hair and brown eyes of many Irish. Nice story, but it just ain't so.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Tim O'K
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 10:13 AM

I believe more than twenty ships from the Spanish Armada wrecked off the western coast of Ireland on their return trip in a series of storms. If you've seen that coast, you'll understand why the chance of survival of a sailor in a shipwreck, in a storm, on that coast, was virtually nil, let alone enough for a viable gene pool. The genes producing the dark hair and eyes certainly came from the usual sources, traders, immigrants, misc travelors, and of course sailors doing what sailors usually do in port.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Jon W.
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 01:21 PM

Hold on, I thought that the Celts and Picts were dark haired, dark eyed folks and that the red hair, fair skin, and blue eyed Irish came from the Vikings doing what Vikings did (as it was once expressed in a humor magazine: rape, plunder, pillage, rape, burn, rape, rob, steal, rape, rape, and rape).


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From:
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 01:44 PM

There is certainly a lot of Norse blood in Ireland, but from what I remember of my Irish history, the Celts who "settled" (read invaded and killed every inhabitent) Ireland supposedly came from Northern Spain after the tin mines there in Castille played out. Those Celts did have red hair and blue eyes and freckles and you can still see those same characteristics in their decendents today in that part of Espana. There were lots of Celtic tribes around the continent at that time, however, but I don't know if any were darker or if they were part of that initial settlement. This is all from my admittedly sketchy memory, so if anyone has more accurate info, I'd love to hear it.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Bruce O.
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 01:55 PM

What time was this? But what is Spanish here? Moors and Vandals (and Romans earlier) also occupied much of that country at a much earlier date than Spanish Armada days. I don't hink there were any Celts left in continental Europe in 1492 when Ferdinand and Isabella kicked out the last of the Moors. Dan Mulligan gave some history of Celtic migrations to Ireland (B.C.) on a thread 'Celtic Music'.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Bruce O.
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 02:06 PM

I forgot that Hanibal's brother, Hamilcar?, occupied Spain too, so we may have Carthagians (Phoenicians/ Palestinians) mixed in a little, too if we go back far enough.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Alice
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 03:50 PM

For what it is worth (don't know how accurate this is) I found this in old letters of my great-aunt Alice Flynn, who was born in Leitrim in 1872. "I am reading a history of the Irish race. So far I have got to the Militian race. My father was very proud he belonged to that race. They are black haired. Where Irish have married Danes, their hair is light colored."

Alice, in Montana


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Alice
Date: 28 Apr 98 - 03:57 PM

Didn't intend that to be a reference to the Spanish or the coast, just another comment on the hair-color.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: AndyG
Date: 29 Apr 98 - 07:48 AM

HISTORICAL:
Briefly, most of the Spaniards who came ashore in Ireland following the defeat of the Armada did so as a result of shipwreck.

Many of these survivors were murdered at the point they came ashore by the resident Irish, for plunder, some however remained alive.

Almost all the Spaniards still alive in Ireland following the wrecks on the coast were rounded up, as quickly as possible, by the English forces. They were put to death, as they posed a serious threat to English rule being:
A) Catholic (as were the native Irish) and
B) a potent military force if they were allowed to recover their strength. (Ireland never having been 100% subdued by its neighbour)

The number of individual Spaniards who are known to have returned to Spain from Ireland can be "counted on the fingers of one hand".

OPINION:
From the above I infer that the number of Spaniards left alive in Ireland by 1590 (2 years later) would be insufficient to have a lasting, statistically noticable, effect on the Celtic-Irish gene pool.

Personally I'd attribute the occasional appearance of "Spanish" features to wanderers such as Romany/Gypsy/Tinker groups who move through Europe, and constantly re-appear, and thus refresh their genetic legacy, rather than rely on a 400 year (12-16 generation) "throwback" argument to explain the fairly common occurence of this "Spanishness".

AndyG


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From:
Date: 29 Apr 98 - 07:57 AM

Are these the folks sometimes referred to as The Black Irish?


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Thomas
Date: 23 Feb 09 - 04:34 PM

Thanks for the info of the spanish ifluince


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: John on the Sunset Coast
Date: 23 Feb 09 - 06:40 PM

"Are these the folks sometimes referred to as The Black Irish?"

I had heard this story long ago, and it came to mind when I saw the flamenco dance in the TV broadcast of the original Riverdance. Is that why it was included?

In the Netherlands, the word for furniture is Mueblen, a cognate of the Spanish word Muebles? For a time the Low Countries were under the direct control of Spain. Coincidence that a Germanic language uses Spanish words?


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 23 Feb 09 - 07:57 PM

Furniture in German is Möbel.
In English, moble is an obsolete word for movable goods, and was spelt mueble or moeble in the 14th-16 c., it is related to the Spanish mueble and Scottish meuble (mobylle, etc.). OED
I don't know when mueblen came to the Netherlands, but more likely it came from Germany. Scotland had many Dutch workmen and artisans in the 15th-16th c, and adopted some of their styles in building and furnishings so perhaps they picked up the word from the Dutch.

However, how all this came about, I dunno; I would be guessing.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: John on the Sunset Coast
Date: 23 Feb 09 - 08:16 PM

Thank you, Q. I have an OED Compact...4 pages per page + magnifier; I shouda looked it up m'self.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Jack Campin
Date: 23 Feb 09 - 08:45 PM

The words all came from Latin "mobilis", "movable", used as a legal term to describe property you could pick up and move, unlike land or a house. Roman law got all over Europe.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 23 Feb 09 - 09:10 PM

Jack, that seems logical.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,MV
Date: 24 Feb 09 - 09:40 AM

I think the Armada connection is a myth I've heard of people of British ancestry being described as probably having Spanish ancestors from the time of the Armada because of their dark features. There was migration to these isles from France and Spain going way back. According to folklore the Gaels came to Ireland from Spain in ancient times. Both Britain and Ireland had many different waves of settlement over thousands of years. This explains why we have a variety of appearances.

MV


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Betsy
Date: 24 Feb 09 - 10:00 AM

I think a contributory factor may have been Irishmen bringing back lady friends during the conflicts between Philip the King of Spain and the
Catholic church.
There are wuite a few songs about the Irish songs recalling such enlistments - "Fare thee well Enniskillen" , the "Dirty King of Spain" for example.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Peter Laban
Date: 24 Feb 09 - 10:04 AM

The men and women stranded when the Armada tried to round Ireland were mostly rounded up and hanged.

The Spanish Arch in Galway is supposed t oremind us of traffic between the city of the tribes and Spain, and the Spanish-Galway type ofcourse.

But all that aside, recent genetic research has found the 'Irish gene' has come from North Spain. Settlers from there came to Ireland and pretty much stayed put after arrival, to the extend that a tv documentary recently had dna of a child found buried in a wedge tomb in the Burren some years ago compared to children presently in the local school. They were directly related.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,MV
Date: 24 Feb 09 - 10:52 AM

I think I remember seeing a DNA programme saying there were significant DNA markers in Ireland, Wales and South West England to suggest that a lot of people there had ancestors who migrated from South West France and Spain. If you look at a map of the sea route it makes sense for those people to have settled in Ireland and Western Britain.

MV


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Learaí na Láibe
Date: 24 Feb 09 - 11:37 AM

I've been using the internet for nearly ten years and it suprises me how often this modern mythof the 'Black Irish' being descended from survivors of the Spanish Armada keeps coming back again and again.

There is no credible evidence whatsoever for any significent number of survivors staying and intermarrying.

One simple point, we have historical surnames in Ireland from Scandinavia, France, Britain and Flanders etc. but none from Spain or Portugal.

But why let facts get in the way of this legend so popular with our Irish-American cousins.

We have all kind of hair colous and skin tones in Ireland from dusky Mediterranian to flaxen blond Germanic.

And by the way ony a small minority have red hair. I don't know the exact percentage but doubtless a little Googling might turn the figure up.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Jim Martin
Date: 24 Feb 09 - 11:28 PM

Learai na Laibe - How do you explain the DNA evidence then?


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: John on the Sunset Coast
Date: 24 Feb 09 - 11:46 PM

Guest,Leara

Is it possible that there are no Spanish surnames because, the 'few' Spaniards perhaps had out-of-wedlock relations with the local damsels, which resulted in some births?

This happened in Jewish communities in ancient, and perhaps not so ancient, times, when they were conquered, pillage and the other thing.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 25 Feb 09 - 12:02 AM

What is a 'Spanish' name? Mostly we think of Castilian names when the subject comes up. Much of northern and eastern Spain had different languages.

What percentage of inhabitants of northern Spain were not dark-haired? Many.
And Catalans have all possible hair colors except flaxen.

The Armada story based on 'dark hair' is nonsense and based on ignorance of Spain's diversity.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: katlaughing
Date: 25 Feb 09 - 12:04 AM

Doing a google search, I found this entertaining and informative take on the question at The Straight Dope.

And, just to stir the pot a bit more, here's something from a site, dated 2003, concerning Spanish surnames which originated in Ireland, according to the author, from HERE (that's a cached page):

I am aware of the theory that the mythical Milesian Invasion of Ireland was in fact a folk memory of actual prehistoric immigrations from Spain but I was referring to Irish names that entered into Spanish from the 16th century onwards. A certain Cathal O'Neill of Tyrone is recorded in the histories of the Spanish army as Carlos Onel di Tirone, for example. Names such as Kennedy (an epithet of a son of Brian Boroimhe) can be shown to have originated in Ireland and not from Spain or any other Celtic region. There may well be many names in Irish that derive from prehistoric or Iron Age Celtiberian origins but it would be difficult to prove any such derivation given the antiquity of the names involved. Many Celtic and therefore, Gaelic names share a common Celtic origin, (such as Lugh, Lleu, Lugos) and it would be difficult to pinpoint a geographical origin for any particular name. My particular interest is in the names of Irish mercenaries who joined the Spanish (and French) Army after the Tudor plantation of Ireland.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: John on the Sunset Coast
Date: 25 Feb 09 - 12:07 AM

Hey, I just commented on an anecdote I heard in the dim past. I don't know if it's nonsense or not, but just saying it is doesn't make it so.
Give me some cites or sites.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: MartinRyan
Date: 25 Feb 09 - 04:25 AM

IIRC the DNA evidence referred to much earlier migrations via/from Northern Spain. There is no evidence, as far as I know, of any specific impact of the few survivors of the Armada. Some of the tales relocate from place to place along the West coast - bit like the tail of the Hartlepool monkey!

Regards
p.s. On a musical note, anybody recognise the Spanish connection to the "Falaingín Muimhneach" (Munster Cloak) tune?


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Thompson
Date: 25 Feb 09 - 05:30 AM

Spanish ships have sailed up and Irish ships have sailed down the European coast for millennia - it would be pretty odd if the occasional liaison hadn't happened.

In my childhood, Spanish 'lifers' had the choice of serving their time in jail or in the fishing fleet. When the weather was threatening, these boats used to dock in Kilronan in the Aran Islands, and probably also in Galway Harbour.

There was certainly a healthy trade in alcohol - poitín swapped for Spanish brandy, with the Revenue men knowing nothing about either.

Spanish names; my mother used to theorise that Hernon was derived from Hernandez.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Betsy
Date: 25 Feb 09 - 10:59 AM

I suppose he turn out to be Irish an'all - the new guy in the White House - Mr O'Bama no less .


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Nor
Date: 07 Mar 09 - 12:09 AM

Have been to Spain, and sorry to say Galway in no way represents anything remotely Spanish- including the people.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 07 Mar 09 - 04:22 AM

Apart from the Indo-European language?


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Jack Campin
Date: 07 Mar 09 - 05:58 AM

On a musical note, anybody recognise the Spanish connection to the "FalaingÌn Muimhneach" (Munster Cloak) tune?

Well-known urban legend - it's a variant of the 17th century Scottish Border song "Bannocks of bear meal" (aka "Tho for Seven Long Years" or "A lad and a lass lay in a killogie"), nothing whatever to do with Spain.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: MartinRyan
Date: 07 Mar 09 - 02:13 PM

Hi Jack

So where (or whence, I suppose) did the Spaniards pick it up? 'Cos they certainly have it! Granados' Jota (Rondalla Aragonesa)

Regards


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Jack Campin
Date: 07 Mar 09 - 07:48 PM

Similar opening phrase, but from there on it is WAY more different from either "The Munster Cloak" or "Bannocks of bear meal" than either is from the other. It doesn't have a hint of the verse/chorus structure the British Isles tunes have.

I'd put the resemblance of the Spanish tune to the others down to fluke - a fairly natural riff that could have been reinvented anywhere that had the same sort of tonal vocabulary. (In Scottish music alone, you get the same sort of rising sequence in "Hey tuti tati", aka "Scots Wha Hae"). Once people got the idea of building a tune over a bass line (around 1600), you got very similar tunes reinvented all over Europe. Compare "La Folia de Espana" with the "Lament for the Bishop of Argyll" in the Macfarlan MS - no reason I know of to think there's a genetic relationship.

There was substantial sea trade between Scotland and Spain as far back as 1500 - Francisco Ayala commented on having encountered Scottish salted herrings at home. Fishermen were always an international community, and the Basques (next door to Aragon) got all over the north Atlantic. But we don't have any musical trace of this.

There is also a rather obvious historical connection between England and Aragon around 1500, but I doubt royal marriages ever did a lot to transmit folk tunes.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 07 Mar 09 - 08:15 PM

Those Basque fishermen were all over the place. Some possibility that they were fishing off the Grand Banks before Columbus got to the West Indies. Records show that they were there at the beginning of the 1500s.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Gulliver
Date: 08 Mar 09 - 05:03 AM

Last year some dna tests were done on people from the west of Ireland who were dark-skinned, as part of a TV documentary. The results showed that their ancestors could not have come to Ireland in the last few centuries. But the documentary did show that the Irish could trace their ancestry back to what is now the Basque region of Spain, from where they gradually migrated along the Atlantic coastline to Ireland about nine thousand years ago. Don


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 08 Mar 09 - 04:13 PM

I bow to the superior knowledge of those who have the facts of this question, but the folklore of Spanish influence is certainly still strong around here (West Clare).
About a mile from here on the shore there is a spot referred to as 'The Yellow Men's Graves' where. it is claimed there are bodies of six Spanish sailors who swam ashore from the sinking ships of the Armada and were massacred by the locals for their belongings.
Apropos of nothing at all; in 1988, as part of the 400th anniversary celebrations there were several commemorative events held, including a very detailed and academic lecture which was attended by the King of Spain.
Two-and-a-half hours into the lecture the voice of one of our local schoolteachers was heard from the back of the hall loudly complaining, "Jesus; ten minutes to closing time and the ******* haven't left ******* Spain yet".
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: ard mhacha
Date: 08 Mar 09 - 04:42 PM

Not again, this discussion has been flogged to death on this Site, [as were the poor Spanish survivors who struggled ashore on the west coast].
While I was in the US I was pestered to explain the black Irish, I could only point to Cromwell`s deportations of Irish slaves to the West Indies.
If only Obama had been around at the time, now here is the true black Irish, well some nuts in Clare are flogging his Irish ancestry.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: MartinRyan
Date: 08 Mar 09 - 04:48 PM

Offaly, Offaly, awefully, awfully......

Regards


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Jack Campin
Date: 08 Mar 09 - 09:54 PM

Here's what happened to the Armada survivors in the northern isles of Scotland:

Fair Isle and the Westray Dons


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: open mike
Date: 08 Mar 09 - 10:12 PM

there is definately Celtic culture on the spanish peninsula.
Esp/. in Asturias where there is a Celtic band called LLan de Cubel

www.llandecubel.com/ , en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Llan_de_cubel
http://www.folkworld.de/2/llan.html


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: ard mhacha
Date: 09 Mar 09 - 05:35 AM

Right you are Martin, bloody awful.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Eamonn Shanahan
Date: 26 Apr 09 - 12:29 PM

The Latin word for Ireland is Hibernia which derives from Iberia, the origin of the largest group of Celts who came from the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal). Those people were known as the Milesians and they came to Ireland roughly 2,000 years ago. Ireland was known as "Hibernia" for at least 1,000 years before the Spanish Armada came.

The Spanish Armada have absolutely nothing to do with the dark haired Irish.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST
Date: 26 Apr 09 - 12:47 PM

The Irish people are mostly descended from Dan and came to Ireland at various times, under various names, as they migrated by different routes and arrived at different times, having picked up new names along the way. One of those names makes their identity more obvious than the others and that name is the Tuatha de Danaan - the Tribe of Dan; who was the fifth of Jacob/Israel's twelve sons. Jacob/Israel's twelve sons fathered the twelve tribes of Israel.

Prior to the De Danaans were the Nemidhians (Sons of Heaven) who came from Carthage which was a Phoenician Danite settlement or Sanctuary (Nemidh), in what is now Tunisia. The Phoenician sailors of ancient history were mostly Israelites from the tribes of Dan; Gad and Simeon. Phoenicia was a region not a country, just as Europe is a region and not a country.

After the Tuatha de Danaans came to Ireland, there were, at various times, further immigrations of Danites under the name Milesians (sons of Mil, who was a Danite warrior, from which the name milesian later came to mean warrior) and of course later still as Dan-ish Vikings and Norsemen.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: MartinRyan
Date: 26 Apr 09 - 03:02 PM

God be with the Christian Brothers, who taught me all that (nonsense) when I was a child. As I read it, I can actually see, in my minds eye, the colour of the cover on the little booklet they used, and the two-column layout. Wonderful!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Little Robyn
Date: 26 Apr 09 - 03:37 PM

About 35 years back I learned a tune called "Spanish Cloak".
More recently I've heard it on recordings and it has other names including "The Munster Cloak".
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: MartinRyan
Date: 26 Apr 09 - 03:40 PM

Little Robyn

Yes - thats the Munster Cloak/Falaingín Muimhneach tune mentioned earlier.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Jack Campin
Date: 26 Apr 09 - 05:39 PM

I guess that after the end of the Bronze Age they all became the Steely Dans?

Their national instrument was the Dan Moi, right?


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: MartinRyan
Date: 26 Apr 09 - 05:43 PM

Never heard that term before, Jack - but I have heard a few of them in Ireland, alright!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Eamonn Shanahan
Date: 26 Apr 09 - 10:54 PM

"One simple point, we have historical surnames in Ireland from Scandinavia, France, Britain and Flanders etc. but none from Spain or Portugal."

Current Irish naming convention came into being during the reign of Brian Boru roughly 1,000 years ago. Names such as "Mc", Mac, or "O" all mean "son of". The last wave of the Danites came 1,000 years earlier and were related to the Halstadt Celts from France, Belgium and Germany. They were also realted to The DANes or the "ScanDANavians" you mentioned. See a pattern?


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,mayomick
Date: 27 Apr 09 - 11:25 AM

I remember reading somewhere that the small dark-haired Irish were descendants of the pre-celts . The celts themselves were tall and light-skinned and constituted an aristocracy over the old inhabitants of the country .   It made sense to me reading it at the time , but there does seem something suggestive of nineteen-thirties master race theories about the notion .
IMO ,there should be one of those online acronyms for the phrase "I remember reading somewhere" - IRRS .There could be a variation for those inclined to verbosity , ISTRRS :I seem to remember reading somewhere.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 27 Apr 09 - 12:28 PM

IRRS could easily be:

I have no evidence whatsoever but it sort Of appeals to my dim brain

IHNEWBISOATMDB

l IN c WITH CLEARLY NOTHING BETTER TO DO


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Tim Leaning
Date: 27 Apr 09 - 02:00 PM

Sorry misunderstood thread title.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,YOU ARE ALL OF DESECENDANTS OF SPANISH ORIGI
Date: 16 Nov 09 - 08:58 PM

THE TRUTH IS THAT THE WORLD IS A SMALLER PLACE THAN MOST PEOPLE THINK, ESPECIALLY AS IT RELATES TO EUROPE. PEOPLE IN EUROPE ARE MORE CLOSELY RELATED TO EACH OTHER THAN THEIR GOVERNMENTS WOULD LIKE THEM TO BELIEVE.

IT IS OBVIOUS THAT THE ORIGINAL INHABITANTS FROM WHALES, IRELAND AND THE BRITISH ISLES ARE PREDOMINANTLY OF SPANISH DESCENT.

PEOPLE HAVE BEEN INTERMIXING FOR MILLENIA; IT IS JUST NOT PRACTICAL FOR THE HOLDERS OF POWER TO LET PEOPLE KNOW WE ARE NOT AS DIFFERENT FROM EACH OTHER AS THE MEDIA CLAIMS WE ARE.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Nov 09 - 09:15 PM

"IT IS OBVIOUS THAT THE ORIGINAL INHABITANTS FROM WHALES, IRELAND AND THE BRITISH ISLES ARE PREDOMINANTLY OF SPANISH DESCENT."


Ha - I guess they're descended from sperm whales.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Clontarf83
Date: 17 Nov 09 - 12:10 AM

I was told by someone somewhere that the origin of the Claddagh ring was a ring sent by the King of Spain to indicate his permission for a Spaniard to marry a local (Galway) girl.

Looks like this is another piece of blarney....


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 17 Nov 09 - 12:10 PM

Hibernia has nothing to do with Iberia. It's derived from the latin word for Winter.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Jack Campin
Date: 17 Nov 09 - 12:36 PM

PEOPLE HAVE BEEN INTERMIXING FOR MILLENIA

humans don't interbreed with species that type in capitals.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 17 Nov 09 - 12:41 PM

Capitalists?


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 17 Nov 09 - 12:52 PM

What a priceless f*cking thread
L in C


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Guest
Date: 17 Nov 09 - 01:24 PM

This may be another myth - but I recall reading somewhere that Moorish pirates were wont to regularly raid and pillage and rape, etc. the west coast of Ireland during the Middle Ages. Perhaps this is a source of the black Irish?


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 17 Nov 09 - 01:41 PM

No, no stop it and leave now

L in C


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Gulliver
Date: 17 Nov 09 - 06:40 PM

Hibernia has nothing to do with Iberia. It's derived from the latin word for Winter.

Hibernia is not from the Latin from Winter, it's taken from the Greek name for Ireland: Iverna.

Don


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 17 Nov 09 - 11:41 PM

The Greek name for Ireland was Ierne. The Romans of Caesar's time often referred to it as Scoti, and there is some debate as to whether the term Hibernia was applied to Iceland or Ireland by the Romans. At any rate, the Latin word for winter is certainly hiberna. It is also known that Strabo and Julius Caesar and other writers, who place Ierne and Hibernia geographically north of Britain, considered it a cold country, and that the historian Claudian referred to it as icy.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 05:17 AM

Well, contrary to all expectations, that seems to have solved all mysteries concerning Spain and Ireland. init

L in C


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 05:27 AM

Despite such beautiful scenery, if I was to visit Ireland these days, I'd be more keen on a folk-club than a golf-club...

Poem 12 of 230: GOLF AT KILLARNEY

At Killarney Golf and Fishing Club,
    There's two great courses to be found;
Built on Ireland's fine Ring of Kerry,
    Both are really worth a round.

From the local social Youth Hostel,
    I hitched (doing as Irish do);
Then paid to play both the courses,
    But missed five holes - Hostel curfew.

The fairways were lush and nicely groomed,
    And the course views the best I've seen;                        
With walks beside the lakes and mountains,
    I'm proud to say to there I've been.

From a href="http://blogs.myspace.com/walkaboutsverse">http://blogs.myspace.com/walkaboutsverse (e-book)
Or http://walkaboutsverse.sitegoz.com (e-scroll)
(C) David Franks 2003


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Smedley
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 05:30 AM

Not much about Spanish influence there......

(My caddy was a lovely fella
He made a tasty pan of paella............???)


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 05:35 AM

I enjoyed paella - when I was in Spain; and when in Rome...


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Black belt caterpillar wrestler
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 07:28 AM

We've got all these folk songs about the naughty misdeeds of sailors in foreign ports and you think we need an "official" connection between Spain and Ireland?


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 12:19 PM

There are several interesting sites regarding the derivation of the name Hibernia and Irish history in general.

This is a very interesting site that spends a lot of time on the history and myths of ancient Ireland.

This is a very scholarly study of the ancient world's knowledge of Ireland, its cloudy reputation as the Western Edge of the World, the various names given it, and the possibility of confusion as to the related geographies of Iceland, Ireland, and Scotland.

What seems clear after a small bit of investigation, is that the origin of the word Hibernia is not clear at all. Theories range from the latin word for winter (as I stated), the Greek allusion to Iverna (as Don stated), some relationship to the Ibernia River in Spain (as Eamonn Shanahan stated), a possible connection to a King or tribe named Eber, and so on. I do think the Roman term has a lot to do with a name for Ireland that sounded to them like "the land of winter", or Hibernia. It was probably a convenient and rather humorous way of dismissing the island as a place they didn't want to deal with.
I certainly don't believe that there was any significant Spanish influence in West Ireland resulting from contact with survivors of the Armada. Were there Celts from the Iberian Peninsula who found their way to Ireland and had a racial and cultural impact? That seems much more likely.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: mg
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 12:36 PM

Haven't there been DNA studies? What do they say? And you can tell if the Spanish/Moorish influence came from the male line, as in sailors etc., or female, as in perhaps indigenous.

Someone referred to the men of Dunquin as aboriginal in an old book for what that is worth.

My father always said we were Black Irish..at least he was..I don't look a bit even Irish...and I thought it was from the Garvey line who were from Dingle area...but I saw pictures of my ggm with two daughters and they looked totally Spanish..but we thought she was from the middle of Ireland somewhere..but just last week found her obitiuary and it said she was from County Kerry...


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Jack Campin
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 01:48 PM

Were there Celts from the Iberian Peninsula who found their way to Ireland and had a racial and cultural impact? That seems much more likely.

Why should Spanish arrivals have been Celtic? The major seafaring group in northern Spain is the Basques.

There is good reason to believe there were no such arrivals. There are a lot of loanwords in Irish for maritime terms - but they're all from Norse. Any people that travelled hundreds of miles by sea to get to Ireland would have brought some words with them. And there are no Spanish, Iberian Celtic or Basque seafaring words in Irish.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 01:50 PM

Interesting point about the maritime terms. So your theory, Jack?


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Thompson
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 02:01 PM

Incidentally, The Spanish Lady is a song about a Dublin prostitute. Nothing to do with the west.

Why did I see the title of this thread as 'Spanish Influenza in West Ireland'?


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 01:53 PM

What Jack Campin said and why was my joke about vasectomy removed?

L in C
    No messages of yours have been deleted, Les. Maybe it just didn't "take."
    -Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Jack Campin
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 02:05 PM

If somebody removed all trace of the Basques from Ireland that would have been a vascectomy.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 02:08 PM

Stop me, stop me .................

Perhaps a Basquectomy?

See I should have been stopped

L in C


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 02:55 PM

If somebody removed all trace of the Basques from Ireland that would have been a vascectomy.

Wouldn't that be like putting all your Basques in one exit?


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Johnny Spanish
Date: 04 Dec 09 - 07:07 AM

LOL, you guys are funny

I have often wondered about this as well because I'm hispanic, and I have cousins and friends who are very fair and often have freckles and light eyes...it makes me scratch my head when the rest of us are kind of swarthy

and then every once and a while I meet folks that are kind of swarthy and I ask them if they're hispanic and they swear to me that they're 100% Irish.

I dunno, I think somewhere along the line somebody might have "crossed a fence" or two ^^


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Get over it. YOU are Hispanic!
Date: 04 Dec 09 - 05:21 PM

Whales, Sperm Whales, Wales, Welch, Irish, Scottish, Celtic, Galic, Gaul, British, Brittany, Swarthy, Freckles, Red hair, Blonde hair, Black hair, Brown eyes, Blue eyes, Hazel eyes, Green eyes, Gray eyes, Spanish, Hispanic, Latin,...

Oh, that's right! I almost forgot, ...Goths, Visigoths, Germanic, Vandals, Andalusians, Aryans, Persians, Bagpipes -the true origins of the beloved Bagpipes- etc., etc., ...

If you've seen one Euro you've seen them all. You can tell you guys apart?


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Johnny Spanish
Date: 04 Dec 09 - 08:49 PM

Wow, I think I just witnessed somebody going insane...creepy

Oh an BTW when you say "you guys" I guess you mean all Hispanics and that all us Hispanics are the same. Sigh, ignorance goes hand in hand with stereotypes. Yes, I know the difference, and just because you can't tell doesn't mean that there isn't one.

The proximity of Spain to Ireland, though, does not require a leap of imagination.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Jeri
Date: 04 Dec 09 - 09:16 PM

You are the one who used the phrase 'you guys'. To whom were you referring?


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Johnny Spanish
Date: 04 Dec 09 - 10:27 PM

When I said "you guys were funny" I meant the people in the forum, some were actually posting good humor and jokes so I don't think the term "funny" should have been taken as offensive.

I think there is some equivocation here, I'm sorry I ever posted ><


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Commonality in people and history. Commonali
Date: 05 Dec 09 - 12:34 AM

Roman influences: Brittania, Londinium, Aque Sulis,...

Hispanic born Roman Emperors: Trajan, Hadrian, Hadrian's wall,...

The Spanish Empire: Germany, Netherlands, Luxembourg, Belgium, Italy, France, Africa, Asia, Oceania, Habsburgs, Bourbons, Charles I, Phillip II...

Hence: Mobilis, Mueble, Mueblen, Möbel, Movable...


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: michaelr
Date: 05 Dec 09 - 02:06 AM

No worries Johnny -- some folks here are hyper-sensitive and smell trolls under every bridge. Don't let that bother you.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 05 Dec 09 - 02:37 AM

Hey Johnny, I posted that Basque pun 2 weeks ago and got not a single remark, even though I thought it was pure genius. Instead this thread sank like a stove-in Armada galleon off Great Blasket. I'm glad somebody saw fit to say "you guys are funny".


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Johnny Spanish
Date: 05 Dec 09 - 03:57 AM

Lololol, yeah between the Basquectomy jokes and yours I was expecting a more lighthearted response. Whatever, I don't offend too easy ^^


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 05 Dec 09 - 04:39 AM

Have I missed the point here:

"Whales, Sperm Whales, Wales, Welch, Irish, Scottish, Celtic, Galic, Gaul, British, Brittany, Swarthy, Freckles, Red hair, Blonde hair, Black hair, Brown eyes, Blue eyes, Hazel eyes, Green eyes, Gray eyes, Spanish, Hispanic, Latin,...

Oh, that's right! I almost forgot, ...Goths, Visigoths, Germanic, Vandals, Andalusians, Aryans, Persians, Bagpipes -the true origins of the beloved Bagpipes- etc., etc., ...

If you've seen one Euro you've seen them all. You can tell you guys apart? "

I read this as something like Europe is and for a long time has been a melting pot that doesn't entirely melt?

No, maybe not

L in C


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,You are the same
Date: 05 Dec 09 - 10:32 AM

That was the point of:

"Whales, Sperm Whales, Wales, Welch, Irish, Scottish, Celtic, Galic, Gaul, British, Brittany, Swarthy, Freckles, Red hair, Blonde hair, Black hair, Brown eyes, Blue eyes, Hazel eyes, Green eyes, Gray eyes, Spanish, Hispanic, Latin,...

Oh, that's right! I almost forgot, ...Goths, Visigoths, Germanic, Vandals, Andalusians, Aryans, Persians, Bagpipes -the true origins of the beloved Bagpipes- etc., etc., ...

If you've seen one Euro you've seen them all. You can tell you guys apart? "

Every one is the same. People just like to look for nuances in each other to use as an excuse to divide and conquer (i.e. those god damn muslim "terrorists" that live on top of our oil!).


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 05 Dec 09 - 10:43 AM

Got it. Exlnt

L in C


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,People are people!
Date: 05 Dec 09 - 10:59 AM

That was the point of:

"Whales, Sperm Whales, Wales, Welch, Irish, Scottish, Celtic, Galic, Gaul, British, Brittany, Swarthy, Freckles, Red hair, Blonde hair, Black hair, Brown eyes, Blue eyes, Hazel eyes, Green eyes, Gray eyes, Spanish, Hispanic, Latin,...

Oh, that's right! I almost forgot, ...Goths, Visigoths, Germanic, Vandals, Andalusians, Aryans, Persians, Bagpipes -the true origins of the beloved Bagpipes- etc., etc., ...

If you've seen one Euro you've seen them all. You can tell you guys apart? "

Every one is the same. People just like to look for nuances in each other to use as an excuse to divide and conquer (i.e. those god damn muslim "terrorists" that live on top of our oil!).

Oh that's right, except for those "nice" -European- muslims -without oil- from Bosnia and Herzegovina.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Dec 09 - 03:32 PM

There are a lot of strange names in the "from" boxes in many messages in this thread. Allow me to advise you or our posting policy:
    Please remember to use one consistent name when you post. If you post under a variety of names, you risk having all your posts deleted.
Some messages have been deleted for violation of this rule. I'll let the others go to this point, but that's it. No more manipulation of identities. Use one name, and one name only.
Thank you.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: ard mhacha
Date: 06 Dec 09 - 08:49 AM

And to finish, Hibernian is a less than ordinary football team in the Scottish league.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: ard mhacha
Date: 10 Dec 09 - 05:16 AM

Not forgetting President Obama and Mohamed Ali.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 10 Dec 09 - 12:13 PM

Yes


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 10 Dec 09 - 12:14 PM

One hundred times yes!

L in C


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Newcomer
Date: 11 Dec 09 - 11:01 PM

Yes,

I've noticed the complexion on Sean Connery, Colin Farrell, Catherine Zeta-Jones, etc. Have you guys seen the complexion of world famous athletes, such as:

Spain: Pau Gasol (professional basketball player)

Spain: Feliciano Lopez, Juan Carlos Ferrero (professional tennis players)

USA: Jeff Garcia (professional american football player)

Cuba: Luis Gonzalez (professional baseball player)


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,ANON
Date: 13 Dec 09 - 05:50 PM

Oh no, Armada, gypsies and biblical mythic tribes all rolled into one. Does no one ever think that there were lots of people living there,say, five thousand years ago? Building tombs and standing stones etc/ And where would these people have come from? The western seaboard,starting in SPAIN. being so remote in the west, the phenotype is preserved best there but DNA shows Ireland and indedd all of Britain can trace its roots to ancient Iberia!


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: OG1
Date: 14 Dec 09 - 11:13 AM

I agree with your conclusion. People just have a hard time accepting the obvious. They have been raised to be Nationalistic and to believe that the Garden of Eden originated in their backyard.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Johnny Spanish
Date: 14 Dec 09 - 07:12 PM

I certainly learned alot from reading all the comments and then going back and doing some research

The whole thing about the shipwrecked Spanish sailors I didnt even know about until recently, but it seems to be nothing more than just an old wive's tale

And I completely failed to realize how much the Vikings influenced ancient Ireland, I must read more into this.

I guess the final conclusion is that the same pre-celtic peoples that lived in Spain also lived throughout the British isles and as far as western Europe. If any significant Spanish migration to Ireland ever occurred, it probably happened near the last Ice Age and by then ships weren't even needed, people probably walked ^^

Of course, the whole issue of whether or not they were Spanish means nothing as it was before national origins and other arbitrary distinctions

would, um, most people...agree???


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,The Black O' Sullivans
Date: 27 Dec 09 - 06:36 PM

Folks,
My family here on Beare island, have always been known as the
[blacks] just because we are mostly black-haired or dark red with swarthy complexions, to distinguish us from other families in the area with the same surname; of which there are many.
My daughter-in-law is from Galicia in northern Spain.I've holidayed there on numerous occasions and most of the people in the that area, especially around the big alumina plant look like me and mine.
It has nothing to do with the Spanish Armada and all to do with the healthy trade that built up along the western sea-board between us and northern Spain
Relations between England and Spain were rarely cordial so a dog-leg across Biscay and up the west coast of Ireland was normal. My great grandfather and grand-father both done the Camino de Santiago.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,Guest - Ibero-Celt
Date: 07 Dec 10 - 01:59 AM

Lewis Topographical Directory of County Kerry --- " In the western part of County Kerry the houses were built after the Spanish fashion, with stone balconies in front; as there was a great communication with the Spaniards and Portuguese, who visited the coast annually in considerable numbers to fish for cod, which circumstance also accounts for the names given to some of the towns. The mountainous parts are chiefly inhabited by herdsmen, who feed and clothe themselves from their own lands, consuming but little of the produce of other places: their habitations are low smoky huts covered with coarse thatch. In some parts the women have a becoming dress, consisting of a jacket of cloth, with loose sleeves, made to fit close round the neck and bosom, and fastened in front with a row of buttons; this is considered to be a relic of the Spanish costume.
They marry at a very early age. The peasants are generally well- proportioned, with swarthy complexions, dark eyes and long black hair, exhibiting, in the opinion of some, strong traces of their Spanish origin. They are a frank, honest race, of very independent spirit, acute in understanding, and friendly and hospitable to strangers."
I have seen other references to fine stone buildings in some of the southwestern ports that housed Spanish merchants, and local sailors that spoke fluent Spanish and regularly sailed to Spain for trade, and there were many Irish mercenaries in the Spanish armies. In 1600 a Spanish force of 2,000 men landed in Cork, intent on starting an uprising against Elizabeth's English administration, and they remained under siege for several months in a local castle. There had been regular trade between Spain and Ireland over 400 to 500 years.


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 07 Dec 10 - 11:27 AM

Most of Europe traded with most of Europe fpr a very long time didn't?

L in C#


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Subject: RE: Spanish Influence in West Ireland
From: GUEST,daniel.carlos1
Date: 06 Feb 11 - 05:54 PM

I love your site and have been trying to trace my family history for years, My fathers family came from strokestown co roscommon and I am going over to see my aunt celebrate her 100th birthday in 2 weeks time,I am nearly 60 and for years was told the romantic version of the spanish armada,About 15 years ago I noticed more carlos headstones in strokestown cemetery and was informed they were not related to our side of the family.I have read quite a few books on the armada and many of the ships did have irish and spanish pilots which suggests trading had been going on for many years, By the way all my family were dark haired and dark skined.If you google clann carlos you will find a very interesting site, thanks


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