Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafebrownie

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)

DigiTrad:
THE FARMER'S BOY
THE FARMER'S BOY (2)
THE REST OF THE DAY
THE REST OF THE DAY'S YOUR OWN


Related threads:
Lyr Req: farmers boy (15)
Req: please help with finding a song-Farmers Boy (4)
Lyr Add: The Rest of the Day's Your Own (8)
Lyr Req: The Rest of the Day's Your Own (8)
Tune Req: The Farmer's Boy (8)
Lyr Req: The Farmer's Boy (9)


GUEST,skippy 23 Nov 02 - 03:35 PM
greg stephens 23 Nov 02 - 04:17 PM
Joe Offer 23 Nov 02 - 04:51 PM
masato sakurai 23 Nov 02 - 04:54 PM
Malcolm Douglas 23 Nov 02 - 05:06 PM
GUEST,Skippy 23 Nov 02 - 05:20 PM
greg stephens 23 Nov 02 - 05:26 PM
masato sakurai 23 Nov 02 - 06:58 PM
GUEST,Q 23 Nov 02 - 11:00 PM
Richie 23 Nov 02 - 11:21 PM
Malcolm Douglas 23 Nov 02 - 11:30 PM
Richie 24 Nov 02 - 12:09 AM
Richie 24 Nov 02 - 12:14 AM
GUEST,Q 24 Nov 02 - 01:41 AM
IanC 24 Nov 02 - 01:57 PM
greg stephens 24 Nov 02 - 02:59 PM
GUEST,Q 24 Nov 02 - 03:00 PM
Mr Happy 27 Nov 02 - 06:17 AM
masato sakurai 27 Nov 02 - 07:23 AM
masato sakurai 27 Nov 02 - 07:41 AM
Dave Bryant 28 Nov 02 - 05:53 AM
greg stephens 28 Nov 02 - 10:41 AM
Emma B 28 Nov 02 - 02:14 PM
greg stephens 28 Nov 02 - 02:18 PM
GUEST 16 Jan 07 - 05:17 AM
GUEST,Gadaffi 16 Jan 07 - 07:22 AM
GUEST,Barrie Roberts 16 Jan 07 - 11:05 AM
GUEST,Terry McDonald 16 Jan 07 - 11:25 AM
GUEST,Terry McDonald 16 Jan 07 - 11:45 AM
IanC 16 Jan 07 - 11:52 AM
greg stephens 16 Jan 07 - 12:37 PM
GUEST 16 Jan 07 - 03:53 PM
Bonecruncher 16 Jan 07 - 10:36 PM
GUEST,Julie Summers 14 Nov 08 - 06:21 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:




Subject: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: GUEST,skippy
Date: 23 Nov 02 - 03:35 PM

Has anyone out there any gen re the origin of The Farmer's Boy?
All I know to date is that it was collected in 1907 by Josephine Norville and published in Ballads and Songs.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: greg stephens
Date: 23 Nov 02 - 04:17 PM

Now I cant give you chapter and verse on this but I used to live on a boat and spend time in Little Leigh, Cheshire, and the story is that a guy wrote the song about an incident at a farm there. It's a good deal older than 1907 I would have thought. Hope someone can provide the facts on this.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 23 Nov 02 - 04:51 PM

I think the "Ballads and Songs" is the book edited by Belden of songs collected by the Missouri Folklore Society. I can't remember the exact title of the book, and I curse everyboy who has it because I haven't.
-Joe Offer-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: masato sakurai
Date: 23 Nov 02 - 04:54 PM

From The Traditional Ballad Index:

Farmer's Boy, The [Laws Q30]

DESCRIPTION: A lost boy comes seeking a home, or at least shelter for a night, saying that he can perform all farm tasks. The farmer's wife and daughter convince the farmer to take him in. He serves so well that he marries the farmer's daughter and becomes his heir
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1845 (Journal from the Elizabeth); a possibly-related broadside is said to date from before 1689
KEYWORDS: farming work marriage
FOUND IN: US(MA,MW,NE,Ro,SE,So) Canada(Mar,Ont) Britain(Scotland(Aber),England(North,South))
REFERENCES (14 citations):
Laws Q30, "The Farmer's Boy"
Belden, pp. 272-273, "A Farmer's Boy" (1 text)
Randolph 118, "The Farmer's Boy" (1 text, 1 tune)
Randolph/Cohen, pp. 111-113, "The Farmer's Boy" (1 text, 1 tune -- Randolph's 118)
BrownIII 88, "The Farmer's Boy" (1 text plus mention of 3 more)
Warner 37, "The Farmer's Boy" (1 text, 1 tune)
Flanders/Brown, pp. 118-119, "The Farmer's Boy" (1 text)
GreigDuncan5 960, "The Farmer's Boy" (6 texts, 4 tunes)
Kennedy 247, "The Farmer's Boy" (1 text, 1 tune)
LPound-ABS, 28, pp. 69-71, "The Farmer's Boy" (1 text)
Creighton/Senior, p. 158, "The Farmer's Boy" (1 text, 1 tune)
Huntington-Whalemen, pp. 216-218, "A Farmer's Boy" (1 text, 1 tune)
cf. Gardner/Chickering, p. 479, "The Farmer's Boy" (source notes only)
DT 538, FARMRBOY FARMRBO2

Roud #408
RECORDINGS:
O. J. Abbott, "The Farmer's Boy" (on Abbott1)
Warde Ford, "The Farmer's Boy" (AFS 4215 A2, 1939; in AMMEM/Cowell)
Tony Wales, "To Be a Farmer's Boy" (on TWales1)

BROADSIDES:
Bodleian, Harding B 11(1152), "Farmer's Boy" ("The sun went down beyond yon hills"), J. Catnach (London), 1813-1838; also Harding B 26(186), Firth b.26(333), Harding B 11(3663), Firth c.26(199), Harding B 36(27), Harding B 18(164), 2806 c.8(292), Firth b.26(370), Harding B 11(551), "[The] Farmer's Boy"
LOCSheet, sm1847 420620, "The Farmer's Boy," Oliver Ditson (Boston), 1847 (tune)
LOCSinging, as200930, "The Farmer's Boy," H. De Marsan (New York), 1861-1864; also as103730, as103740, "The Farmer's Boy"
Murray, Mu23-y1:045, "The Farmer's Boy," James Lindsay (Glasgow), 19C

CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "The Soldier's Poor Little Boy" [Laws Q28] (plot)
cf. "The Fisherman's Boy" [Laws Q29] (plot)
cf. "The Fisherman's Girl" (plot)
cf. "The Poor Smuggler's Boy" (plot)
cf. "The Hobo from the T & P Line" (plot)
cf. "Peter Amberley" [Laws C27] (tune)
NOTES: Broadside LOCSinging as200930: H. De Marsan dating per Studying Nineteenth-Century Popular Song by Paul Charosh in American Music, Winter 1997, Vol 15.4, Table 1, available at FindArticles site. - BS
Last updated in version 2.5
File: LQ30

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Bibliography
Go to the Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2011 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.
~Masato


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 23 Nov 02 - 05:06 PM

To be more specific, the book would be H. M. Belden's Ballads and Songs Collected by the Missouri Folk-Lore Society (1955). The song is number 408 in the Roud Folk Song index, and Laws number Q30. It's of English origin, of unknown authorship, and very common; I sometimes think that the few collectors who don't report finding it just thought "Oh, no, not that one again", and didn't bother mentioning it! It has also circulated quite widely in songbooks since the 1850s (and on broadsides for a bit longer), which would in part account for the fact that it varies so little.

The entry at The Traditional Ballad Index takes it back as far as 1845, when it appeared in the log of the ship Elizabeth out of New Bedford (Gale Huntington, Songs the Whaleman Sang, 1964). Farmer's Boy, The [Laws Q30]

You can see a text from Robert Bell's Ancient Poems, Ballads, and Songs of the Peasantry of England (a revision of James Dixon's 1846 book of the same name) at:

The Farmer's Boy

The editors considered it likely to be a product of the earlier part of the 18th century, but opinion nowadays would tend to place it later; perhaps in the early 19th. Broadside catalogues take the date back to around 1832, beyond which point there don't seem to be any references to it; it may not be much older than that.There are a number of broadside examples (probably all 19th century) at Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads; these are to be found under the titles of The Farmer's Boy and (perhaps its earlier name) The Lucky Farmer's Boy. There are also some later Irish editions, titled The Farmer's Lucky Boy; and a slight re-write, The Lucky Factory Boy.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: GUEST,Skippy
Date: 23 Nov 02 - 05:20 PM

Thank you all so much for such an indepth response.
Regards Skippy.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: greg stephens
Date: 23 Nov 02 - 05:26 PM

Well there doesnt seem to be anything about Little Leigh in that lot, but I'm sure something will surface somewhere. Used to be a great pub there, the Holly Bush, part of a farmhouse. the pub's still there, but it's been "improved".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: masato sakurai
Date: 23 Nov 02 - 06:58 PM

THE FARMER'S BOY in the DT is from H.M. Belden, ed., Ballads and Songs Collected by the Missouri Folk-Lore Society (University of Missouri Press, 1940, 1955, pp. 272-273; text only), with this note: "'A Farmer's Boy.' Contributed by Miss Josephine Norville of Chillicothe, Livingston County, in 1907, with the note that she got it 'last summer in Kenosha, Wisconsin. It was sung at an "Old Folks' Concert" by Mr. Fred Perkins, who says that his father and grandfather both used to sing it."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 23 Nov 02 - 11:00 PM

Sung in the Wolf Coll: Farmer's Boy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: THE FARMER'S BOY
From: Richie
Date: 23 Nov 02 - 11:21 PM

Lyr Add: THE FARMER'S BOY
From American Song Sheets, Series 2, Volume 1; No date given

The sun had gone down behind you hill,
And o'er yon dreary moor,
When, weary and lame, a boy there came
Up to a Farmer's door,--
Saying, can you tell me, if any there be,
Can give to me employ,
For to plough, for to mow, for to reap, for to sow,
For to be a farmer's boy.

My father is dead, my mother is left
With her five children small,
And what is worse for mother still.
I'm the eldest of them all,
Though small I am, I fear no work,
If you will give me employ.

If you cannot me employ, one favor yet I ask
That is to shelter me this one night
From the cold winter's blast,
At the break of day,
I will trudge away,
Elsewhere to seek employ.

The farmer says, we will try the lad.
No further let him seek,
Oh, yes, dear father, his daughter cried,
While the tears rolled down her cheek,
For him that can labor it is hard to want,
Or elsewhere to seek employ.

At length of years this boy grew up,
This good old farmer died,
He left the boy the farm he had,
And his daughter for his bride.
The boy that was, is a farmer now,
And he oft times thinks with joy,
On the happy, happy day, he came that way,
For to be a Farmer's Boy.

Notes: Early broadside from 1800's (American Memory) An additional note suggests: Obtain by all means the companion to this Song, the "Song of the Farmer."

-Richie


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 23 Nov 02 - 11:30 PM

On my side of the world, when we say "1800s", we mean "the first decade of the 19th century"; do you mean that, or just "some time during the whole of the 19th century"?

It's quite an important distinction! The text you quote is the usual one, give or take a few details; it varies very little wherever it's found.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: Richie
Date: 24 Nov 02 - 12:09 AM

Malcolm-

My Post was from: Nineteenth Century Song Sheets;

The 1800's are 1800-1899 or the Nineteenth Century (some people actually don't know the Nineteenth Century is from 1800-1899). Therefore the 1800's might be clearer. In the US, corruption of the language is the norm.

-Richie


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: SONG OF THE FARMER
From: Richie
Date: 24 Nov 02 - 12:14 AM

Lyr. Add: SONG Of The FARMER
From: Nineteenth American Song Sheets

I have cattle that feed in the valley,
And herds that graze on the hill,
And I pride in the fruits of my labor,
For I'm lord of the land that I till,
I have plow'd the rough hill and the meadow,
Till feeble with age and with toil,
And I know before long that another
Shall reap the new fruits of the soil

For the son that hath toil'd for me ever,
And faithfully stood by my side,
Hath a hand that shall gather the harvest,
When his feeble old father hath died.
And the daughter so kind to her mother,
Shall share with him all I possess,
For I feel that they love me as father,
And welcome my tender caress.

There's my faithful, my trusting companion,
My kind-hearted, dear loving wife,
I have toil'd for her comfort with pleasure,
For such was the pride of my life.
And still in my manhood I love her,
For her kind and affectionate care,
And all that the earth can afford me,
With her I most willingly share.

Notes: Companion song to THE FARMER'S BOY

-Richie


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 24 Nov 02 - 01:41 AM

The Marsan broadside at American Memory is roughly 1830-1860, if comparisons of the border with Marsan broadsides at the Bodelian on which they have given a range of dates are worth anything. The Bodleian has the same broadside under Harding B 18(164) and noted as ca. 1860. Marsan broadsides seemingly sold widely.
It could have been taken from the 1847 sheet music at American Memory (very similar verses) by Edward L. White (item 20 of 500) and published in Boston or more likely, some other version such as the earlier one (below) at the Bodleian printed by Catnach.

At the Bodleian Library, Harding B 36(8) printed by Catnach is given a date range of 1813-1838, but no images are given of this sheet with 18 songs. Another copy of the same, Harding B 40(23a), also shows no images. A third Catnach copy with just two songs, Harding B 11 (1152) has pretty much the same material as the Marsan copy, and is also dated between 1813 and 1838. Malcolm mentions an 1832 average date for broadsides which would be in the same range.
The Catnach printing is very close to the Marsan broadside at the American Memory. website and quoted by Richie, above, and needn't be repeated here.

Broadsides under the "Lucky Farmer's Boy" are very similar. Harding B 11(2262) and Johnson Ballads 905, dated between 1819 and 1844, were published by Pitts in London (again, similar age). There are variations in verses two and four (other differences very minor:

2. My father is dead, and my mother is left
With five children great and small,
And what is worse for my mother still,
I'm the biggest of them all:
But, though little, I work hard as a Turk
If I could get employ,
For to plow and sow, reap and mow,
And be a farmer's boy.

4. The farmer's wife, cry'd try the lad,
Let him no further seek,
Yes do, dear father, the daughter cry'd,
While tears etc.

5. When the farmer's boy he grew (to a) man
(blank space before man)

Malcolm, never heard your interpretation of 1800s over here. This could be confusing, as you say!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: IanC
Date: 24 Nov 02 - 01:57 PM

Q

1800s like 1810s 1820s etc. is the decade here. If you wanted to refer to 1800-1899 you would always say the 19th Century.

:-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: greg stephens
Date: 24 Nov 02 - 02:59 PM

Well I'm the same side of the Atlantic as malcolm D but I say 1800's for 19th century. and education being what it is nowadays, I dont think many people realise any more what 19th century means, as it recedes into the past. the further ahead or behind youre looking at, the more people are vague.How many people would instantly figure that 24th century means 2300s.Or that 9th century means 800s. I think this is a linguistic change which will soon become universal.
I dont believe I'm familiar with malolm's usage. If someone says to me "in the 500's" I would always assume they meant between 5 and 600.   
But I'm still hoping somebody will find something about Little Leigh for this song, I'm sure I havent made it up.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 24 Nov 02 - 03:00 PM

1810s (or 1810's), 1820s, is perfectly clear, but 1800s covers the entire century for Americans and Canadians.
People not used to thinking in time terms often click (in their minds) on 1800-1899 if you say 18th century, then re-think ("Oh, how silly of me!").
This is one that was missed in the language threads.

Department of strange associations. This song reminded me of the country tear-jerker- "You picked a fine time to leave me, Lucille. Six hungry children and a crop in the field."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: THE PHARMACIST (Sid Kipper - parody)
From: Mr Happy
Date: 27 Nov 02 - 06:17 AM

here's another variation:

The Pharmacist (Farmers Boy) Sid Kipper

The sun had set behind the hill across the dreary moor
When sickly and lame a boy there came up to a doctor's door
Can you tell me where e'er there be one who can me assist
To cure my ills, prescribe me pills and be a pharmacist
And be a pharmacist

My fathers dead, my mother too and I'm not too well myself
So I'd be glad if you could spare some medicine from your shelf
If I can stop inside your shop out of the fog and mist
I'll work all day to earn my pay and be a pharmacist
And be a pharmacist

The doctor's wife said cure the lad, he seems so pale and sick
Yes father do, cried his daughter dear, these pills should do the trick
Don't make him go out in the snow, I really must insist
But let him stay and earn his pay and be a pharmacist
And be a pharmacist

The man that was a boy is now assistant in the shop
But as pharmacist's assistant he was not prepared to stop
And often he'd look at the poisons book and find there in the list
That there's many a potion to aid his notion to be a pharmacist
To be a pharmacist

So it was not surprising when the poor old couple died
Which left the boy the business and the daughter for his bride
A knowing gleam in his eye was seen as bride and bridegroom kissed
Blast me! He say, now that's the way to be a pharmacist
And be a pharmacist

cheers,

mr h


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: THE FARMER'S BOY
From: masato sakurai
Date: 27 Nov 02 - 07:23 AM

George Townshend's version with notes (from HERE).

The Farmer's Boy   (Roud 408 / Laws Q30)

The sun was set behind yon hill, across yon dreary moor,
When weary and lame, a boy there came up to a farmer's door,
"Can you tell me if any th' be, that will give me employ,
For to plough, to sow, to reap and mow, and t' be a farmer's boy,
And t' be a farmer's boy."

"If you will [will not] me employ, one favour I would ask,
Will you shelter me 'til break of day from this cold winter's blast.
And at break of day, I'll trudge away, elsewhere to seek employ ... "

The farmer's wife cries "Try the lad, let him no further seek"
"Oh yes, dear Father" the daughter cries, as the tears roll down his [her] cheek,
"For for those that will work, it's hard to want, and to wander for employ ...
Don't turn him away, but let him stay, and be a farmer's ... "

In length of time, he grew a man - this good old farmer died,
He left the lad the farm he had and his daughter for his bride,
Now the lad that was - the farmer he is, and he ofttimes smiles with joy,
On that lucky, lucky day that he came that way, for to be a farmer's ...

One of the most popular of collected songs in England (Roud has 153 instances), probably dating from about the 1820s … and it is one of the songs sung by the Boggins prior to the Hood game on January 6th at Haxey, Lincs. It was very common on 19th century broadsides and songsters, and also collected quite regularly in USA and Canada, but not much, apparently, in Scotland. It was once fairly popular in Irish songbooks and ballad sheets, but is seldom sung there now. The known texts vary very little - maybe due to a popular 78 from the 1930s. The tune is apparently Ye Sons of Albion - which dates from the Napoleonic Wars and the earliest record of the song so far is The Lucky Farmer's Boy in the 1832 Catnach catalogue. There 17 sound recordings, only two of which are from Sussex - and the other one is from F H 'Gabriel' Figg, of George's birthplace in East Chiltington.

In mid-Cheshire there is a tradition that the original 'farmer's boy' of the song was the Reverend Thomas Smith, to whose memory there is a tablet in the Baptist Chapel at Little Leigh, near Northwich. He is said to have come to the village 'weary and lame', looking for work. He called at Heath House Farm, was given a job, and in time married the farmer's daughter - just as the song relates. Later he became a Baptist minister and he is buried in the graveyard of the Chapel.

~Masato


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: masato sakurai
Date: 27 Nov 02 - 07:41 AM

From folk trax:

FARMER'S BOY, THE - "The sun went down behind yon hill" - LAWS #Q- 30 ABBB 1957 pp287-8 - ROUD#408 - BSs "The Lucky FB" BS by Thomas FORD of Chesterfield 1830s (Palmer Reprint 2001) p7 also "Lucky Factory Boy" (parody) incl BG 2:#12/ 2:#48/ 2:#104/ 2:#177/ 4:#273/ 5:#78/ 8:#179/ 9:#52 - BELL SP 1857 p118 - Parody: "The Dairy Maid" (sung by Jimmy McBeath) - GREIG-DUNCAN 5 1995 #960 pp72-6 (6var 5v/m none like Togo Crawford's tune - one like Bob Scarce's "Three Butchers") - LONG DIOW 1886 pp148-9 (w/o) - KIDSON TT 1891 pp63-6 Mrs Holt/ Mr Holgate, Leeds (1v/m)/ Charles Lolley 1v/m/ p 174 Arles Wardill, Goathland, Yorksh 1v/m (notes on song) - BROADWOOD ECS 1893 pp120-1 nn, Enborne, Berksh & pp134-5 Samuel Willett, Cuckfield, Sussex - BARRETT EFS 1891 standard tune to words of "Ye Sons of Albion" - BARING GOULD Ms #180 (5v) from Robert Hard, Devon - GRAINGER #244 Edgar Hydon, Barrow Haven, Lincolnsh 1906/ #317 Wm Newman, Stanton, Gloucestersh 1907/ #355 Mr Tandy, Winchcombe, Gloucestersh 1908 - WILLIAMS #565 (w/o) - KIDSON GEF 1926 pp100-1 nn, Driffield, Yorksh - BALDRY RSC 1939 pp71-2 Norfolk (w/o) - PENGUIN 1959 p118-9 - O SHAUGHNESSEY LLL pp6-7 J R K Turner, Boston, Lincolnsh - KENNEDY FSBI 1975 p555 Togo & Burns Crawford 1954 - ANDREWS SOD 1979 Michael Blann Ms Upper Beeding Sussex - PALMER EBECS 1980 #18 pp42-3 Philip Donnellan: Arthur Lane, Corvedale, Shropsh 1974 - GARDHAM ERS 1982 p16 Peter Wickings, Hedon, Yorksh 1971 - Lore & Language 3:9 1983 pp46- 64 J Blunt: Sam Newman, Adderbury Oxfordsh 1909 (w/o)/ Discussion: "The Farmworker and The Farmer's Boy" --- FLANDERS- BROWN Vermont 1932 p118 (w/o) - BELDEN Mo 1940 p272 - RANDOLPH OFS 1946 1 pp425-7 Mrs Lilian Short Mo 1940 - CREIGHTON TSNS 1950 p158 - HUBBARD BSFU 1961 pp1978-9 Mrs Susie Barlow 1948/ James Jepson, Utah 1947 (w/o) - HUNTINGTON SWS 1964 pp216-8 Ship's Log 1847 (w/o) - JAFL vol 51 p38 & 52 p37 - WARNER TAFS 1984 pp117-9 Steve Wadsworth, NY 1969 -- John STRACHAN #158 rec on Dictaphone cylinder Fyvie, Aberdeensh by James M Carpenter 1929-35 - Stone Quarrymen, Portland, Dorset 1937: RPL 1707/ 1939: RPL 2266 - John ROWLANDS (with ch) rec by Alan Lomax, Treorchy, S Wales 1951: FOLKTRAX 055 (sung in Welsh) - Fred JORDAN rec by PK, Diddlebury, Shropshire 1952: FOLKTRAX 130/ rec by Mike Yates & Bill Leader, Shropsh: TOPIC 12-T-150 1966 - Barrow-on-Humber Plough Jags with Luke STANLEY (melodeon) rec by Peter Kennedy 23/3/53: RPL 19028/ FOLKTRAX 105 - Togo & Burns CRAWFORD rec by PK, Mossdale, Kirkcudbrightsh 20/7/54 (not usual tune): RPL 21488/ FOLKTRAX 023/ 262 - Chagford MERRYMAKERS Band, rec by PK, Devon 1954 (instrum only): FOLKTRAX 086 - Tony WALES (with gtr) 7"RTR-0089 dub from FOLKWAYS FG-3515 1957 - Howard PRITCHETT rec by Peter Duddridge, Banbury, Oxon 1962: SAYDISC SDL-300 1979 cassette with FARMER GILES - F H "Gabriel" FIGG rec by Joy Hyman, West Chiltington, Sussex 4/7/65: RPL LP 29821 - John REILLY (tinker) rec by Tom Munnelly (not usual tune) - Loxton PICKARD (tune on accordion) rec by PK, Boscastle, Cornwall, 1975: FOLKTRAX 096- Cyril POACHER rec by Ginette Dunn, Grove Farm, Blaxhall, Suffolk 1974: MT-CD-303 - Billy BENNINGTON (h-dulc instr) rec by Jim COUZA Barford, Norfolk 20/7/82 CASS-0871 - YETTIES RPL Radio 2 1/11/89: CASS 90-0569/ Radio 2 8/8/90 "War" CASS-60-1033 - Margaret O REILLY (unacc) Co Cavan rec RTE "Long Note" prog June 1988 CASS-0894


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: Dave Bryant
Date: 28 Nov 02 - 05:53 AM

I seem to remember that in "English County Songs", Lucy Broadwood writes that she found the song in nearly every county, so it definitely got around. I'll have to look up which county she eventually listed it under.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: greg stephens
Date: 28 Nov 02 - 10:41 AM

I knew someone would come up with the Little Leigh information eventually, and of course who else would it be but MASATO.The man!!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: Emma B
Date: 28 Nov 02 - 02:14 PM

Just got back from Madrid so first evening on Mudcat for several days. A few years ago I was told by the woman who had purchased the old vicarge in the Little Leigh area that the song had originally been written by the curate in residence there, but she was vague about the date and suggested 'early Victorian' She had never actually heard of the song but had been given the information as an "interesting fact" by the vendors. I've been trying to verify the story ever since with no success! Thanks for bringing it up Greg.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: greg stephens
Date: 28 Nov 02 - 02:18 PM

Now all we need is Malcolm Douglas to tell us the story is rubbish and the thread will be complete!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Jan 07 - 05:17 AM

You may also want to check up on the Royal Hampshire Regiment (WInchester, UK - now the Princess of Walres Regiment). The Farmers Boy has been their unofficial marching song since long before the Great War.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: GUEST,Gadaffi
Date: 16 Jan 07 - 07:22 AM

I refer you to that excellent article 'And They Calls I Buttercup Joe' published in the 2006 Folk Music Journal which states:

"The provenance of 'Farmer's Boy' is generally unknown, but appears to be the work of Suffolk poet Robert Bloomfield (1766-1823), although Rod Stradling suggests that the tune is 'Ye Sons of Albion' which dates back to the Napoleonic Wars ..."

This information was found in "Sussex Songs, No. 9 – The Farmer's Boy', Sussex County Magazine, 4 (1930), 988–89. The same article gives a version of the song by Albert Handley of Hastings, who 'has also written some additional verses'."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: GUEST,Barrie Roberts
Date: 16 Jan 07 - 11:05 AM

I've no weiosh to confuse your enquiries about this song, but it should be noted that for many years BBC Radio played an orchestral version of the tune as the morning introducyion to the West of England Home Service!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: GUEST,Terry McDonald
Date: 16 Jan 07 - 11:25 AM

According to a friend who managed (whilst doing his national service) to serve in both the Dorset and the Hampshire regiments, 'To be a Farmer's Boy' was the official regimental march of the Devonshire Regiment. My friend was in Germany with the Dorsets when they were merged with the Devons. Because he had only a few months left to serve, and the new Devon and Dorsets were being sent to Cyprus, he was transferred to the Hampshires and says that he was never aware of To be a Farmer's Boy being played or marched to!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: GUEST,Terry McDonald
Date: 16 Jan 07 - 11:45 AM

Aaaargh! Just had a phone call from the aforementioned friend and he tells me that, according to a pretty authoritative website, the Hampshires had three official marches........two were Scottish and one was Irish, so they adopted (unofficially) the Farmer's Boy as a 'lead in' to these 'foreign' ones! With the Devons, though, it was an official march tune.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: IanC
Date: 16 Jan 07 - 11:52 AM

I'm sorry to deny people a provenance but, though Robert Bloomfield did write a poem called "The Farmer's Boy", it was nothing whatsoever to do with the song.

Here it is for you to look at in full.

:-)
Ian


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: greg stephens
Date: 16 Jan 07 - 12:37 PM

So, as far as I can see, the bloke in Little Leigh iks still favourite for the authorship.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Jan 07 - 03:53 PM

Did anyone ever hear Reverend Kenneth Loveless sing this one ? A joy !


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: Bonecruncher
Date: 16 Jan 07 - 10:36 PM

As a matter of interest in my family history, near Winchester, is a Jesse Sillence, employed as a boy by my ancestor Frederick Blundell, a farmer, who in 1842 married Ann, youngest daughter of Frederick, after Frederick had died.
Jesse served a term of one month in prison at Winchester for "having permitted a horse, which had fallen into a ditch, to remain unattended for four hours".
So the story could easily have connections with Hampshire.
Colyn.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Farmer's Boy (the)
From: GUEST,Julie Summers
Date: 14 Nov 08 - 06:21 PM

I have a copy of a newspaper article from 1932 about a man called william neal, the article states he is the great grandson of the man who the song "the farmers boy" is written about - this would be john neal of bignor in sussex.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 18 August 2:27 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.