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Lyr Add: Hynd Horn

DigiTrad:
HIND HORN
HIND HORN (2)
HIND HORN (3)
THREE SISTERS


Related threads:
Hind Horn - A Sea Song? (26)
Lyr Req: Tony Rose's Hind Horn (11)


GUEST,.gargoyle 19 Apr 03 - 08:20 PM
masato sakurai 19 Apr 03 - 08:54 PM
GUEST,gudo conti 12 Dec 04 - 04:57 AM
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Subject: Lyr Add: HYND HORN
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 19 Apr 03 - 08:20 PM

Most curious that this Ballad is not in the database. It is mentioned by Murray 23 June 1999, in a previous thread (http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4169#88951)but its not YET a Digatal Tradition. A dear friend who was a janitor at a high school rescued me this volumne from a half dozen trash cans full of books that were being thrown away for "being too old" and not supporting the new "standards based curriculum."

Sincerely,
Gargoyle

This one, number 35, is right before HYND ETIN which IS in the DT.

The Oxford Book of Ballads
Chosen and Edited by Arthur Quiller-Couch
Oxford At the Clarendon Press 1910, Book II, #35, p. 142-145

(Dedication at the front of the book)

TO

THE ONE SURVIVOR

OF THREE MEN

TO WHOM ALL LOVERS OF THE BALLAD

OWE MOST IN THESE TIMES

FRANCIS JAMES CHILD

FREDERICK JAMES FURNIVALL

AND

JOHN WESLEY HALES

HYAND HORN

I

HYND Horn's bound, love, and Hynd Horn's free,
With a hey lillelu and a how lo lan;
Where was ye born, or in what countrie?
And the birk and the broom blows bonnie.
II

'In good greenwood, there I was born,
And all my forbears me beforn.
III

'O seven long years I served the King,
And as for wages I never gat nane;
IV

'But ae sight o' his ae daughter.
And that was thro' an auger-bore.'
V

Seven long years he served the King,
And it's a' for the sake of his daughter Jean.
VI

The King an angry man was he;
He sent young Hynd Horn to the sea.
VII

He's gi'en his luve a silver wand
Wi' seven silver laverocks sittin' thereon.
VIII

She's gi'en to him a gay gold ring
Wi' seven bright diamonds set therein.
IX

'As lang's these diamonds keep their hue,
Ye'll know I am a lover true:
X

'But when the ring turns pale and wan,
Ye may ken that I love anither man.'
XI

He hoist up sails and awa' sail'd he
Till that he came to a foreign countrie.
XII

One day as he look'd his ring upon,
He saw the diamonds pale and wan.
XIII

He's left the seas and he's come to the land,
And the first that he met was an auld beggar man.
XIV

'What news, what news? thou auld beggar man,
For it's seven years sin I've seen land.'
XV

'No news,' said the beggar, 'no news at a',
But there is a wedding in the King's ha'.
XVI

'But there is a wedding in the King's ha'
That has halden these forty days and twa.'
XVII

'Cast off, cast off thy auld beggar weed,
And I'll gi'e thee my gude grey steed:
XVIII

'And lend to me your wig o' hair
To cover mine, because it is fair.'
XIX

'My begging weed is na for thee,
Your riding steed is na for me.'
XX

But part by right and part by wrang
Hynd Horn has changed wi' the beggar man.
XXI

The auld beggar man was bound for to ride,
But young Hynd Horn was bound for the bride.
XXII

When he came to the King's gate,
He sought a drink for Hynd Horn's sake.
XXIII

The bride came trippin' down the stair,
Wi' the scales o' red gowd in her hair;
XXIV

Wi' a cup o' the red wine in her hand,
And that she gae to the auld beggar man.
XXV

Out o' the cup he drank the wine,
And into the cup he dropt the ring.
XXVI

'O got ye this by sea or land?
Or got ye it of a dead man's hand?'
XXVII

'I got it na by sea nor land,
But I got it, madam, of your own hand.
XXVIII

'O, I'll cast off my gowns o' brown,
And beg with you frae town to town.
XXIX

'O, I'll cast off my gowns o' red,
And I'll beg wi' you to win my bread.
XXX

'O I'll take the scales o' gowd frae my hair,
And I'll follow you for evermair.'
XXXI

She has cast awa' the brown and the red,
And she's follow'd him to beg her bread.
XXXII

She has ta'en the scales o' gowd frae her hair
And she's follow'd him for evermair.
XXXIII

But atween the kitchen and the ha'
He has let his cloutie cloak down fa'.
XXXIV

And the red gowd shinèd over him a',
With a hey lillelu, and a how lo lan;
And the bride frae the bridegroom was stown awa',
And the birk and the broom blows bonnie


laverock} larks
weed} clothes

Sincerely,
Gargoyle


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: HYND HORN
From: masato sakurai
Date: 19 Apr 03 - 08:54 PM

Three versions are in the DT.

HIND HORN

HIND HORN (2)

HIND HORN (3)

The version in The Oxford Book of Ballads (Chosen and Edited by Arthur Quiller-Couch) is #17-G in Child's English and Scottish Popular Ballads, which is from Kinloch's Ancient Scottish Ballads.

~Masato


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: HYND HORN
From: GUEST,gudo conti
Date: 12 Dec 04 - 04:57 AM


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