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Discussion - Frank Crumit (1889-1943)

DigiTrad:
THE GAY CABALLERO


Related threads:
Lyr Req: Cross-Word Mamma You Puzzle Me (Crumit) (2)
Lyr Req: What Kind of a Noise Annoys an Oyster (23)
Lyr Req: Song of the Prune (Frank Crumit) (21)
Frank Crummit? / Frank Crumit (79)
Lyr Req: The Gay Caballero (Frank Crumit, L Klein) (36)
Lyr Req: The Parlor Is a Pleasant Place...(Crumit) (6)
Lyr Req: Tale of the Ticker (Frank Crumit) (6)


The Fooles Troupe 12 Sep 03 - 03:25 AM
s&r 12 Sep 03 - 04:11 AM
M.Ted 12 Sep 03 - 02:08 PM
The Fooles Troupe 13 Sep 03 - 01:48 AM
Liz the Squeak 13 Sep 03 - 02:18 AM
Sandy Mc Lean 13 Sep 03 - 09:37 AM
Herga Kitty 13 Sep 03 - 01:24 PM
GUEST,pdq 13 Sep 03 - 05:00 PM
The Fooles Troupe 14 Sep 03 - 04:10 AM
GUEST,pdq 14 Sep 03 - 12:45 PM
GutBucketeer 14 Sep 03 - 10:16 PM
Liz the Squeak 15 Sep 03 - 08:25 AM
The Fooles Troupe 15 Sep 03 - 10:28 AM
Joan from Wigan 16 Sep 03 - 02:52 AM
Joan from Wigan 16 Sep 03 - 09:51 AM
GUEST,Harry (F.C. Admirer - England) 31 Jul 06 - 05:58 AM
The Sandman 31 Jul 06 - 05:02 PM
Compton 01 Aug 06 - 03:08 PM
Joe Offer 01 Aug 06 - 09:03 PM
GUEST,fan of frank 20 Sep 06 - 12:30 AM
GUEST,not heard that one ? 20 Mar 07 - 11:57 AM
GUEST,Ian G Baildon England 26 Mar 10 - 05:03 PM
MGM·Lion 27 Mar 10 - 11:47 AM
GUEST 21 Jul 10 - 12:05 PM
mousethief 21 Jul 10 - 12:15 PM
Arkie 21 Jul 10 - 01:24 PM
Liz the Squeak 22 Jul 10 - 07:19 AM
The Sandman 22 Jul 10 - 07:57 AM
Will Fly 22 Jul 10 - 08:25 AM
GUEST 28 Jul 10 - 08:51 AM
Arkie 28 Jul 10 - 02:15 PM
The Sandman 28 Jul 10 - 02:22 PM
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McGrath of Harlow 11 Aug 10 - 11:29 AM
Sandy Mc Lean 12 Aug 10 - 09:37 AM
GUEST,Golf-Jack 18 Jul 12 - 04:26 AM
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Subject: Discussion - Frank Crummit
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 12 Sep 03 - 03:25 AM

There's only a few DT threads on Frank Crumit, mostly in passing, but I have been told he was very prolific.

Robin


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crummit
From: s&r
Date: 12 Sep 03 - 04:11 AM

there's quite a lot in Google on Frank Crumit (one m)


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crummit
From: M.Ted
Date: 12 Sep 03 - 02:08 PM

He was, in his way, the archetype for the folksinger/songwriter--he did a mix of traditional, old songs, and novelty stuff, with simple accompaniment, often just guitar or uke--a lot of people draw from him without knowing it--


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crummit
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 13 Sep 03 - 01:48 AM

I have heard some of his stuff by an avid fan - some is quirk/clever - like good modern folk stuff

One "m" eh, could be why stuff has been so hard to find...

Robin


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crummit
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 13 Sep 03 - 02:18 AM

Try looking for DT threads about 'no matter how young a prune may be' or 'mountain greenery', two of his better known songs.

LTS


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crummit
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 13 Sep 03 - 09:37 AM

"Abdul Abulbl Amir" and "The Pig " are two of his best.


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crummit
From: Herga Kitty
Date: 13 Sep 03 - 01:24 PM

And Sorcha has just posted the words to "A noise annoys an oyster!" on a separate thread.

Plus there are the various (Prohibition and post-Prohibition) versions of the Prune Song....

Kitty


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crummit
From: GUEST,pdq
Date: 13 Sep 03 - 05:00 PM

Hope it is OK to do this. It's not too long. Coppied without permission:





FRANK CRUMIT RETURNS

Original 1920-1938 Recordings

Six decades after his death, close to eighty years since some of these recordings were new, Frank Crumit is still one of the best-remembered names from the early days of radio, as well as Broadway and records. Request programmes are still asked for the songs about "Abdul Abulbul Amir", the terrible golfer, or the pig with good taste; listeners with long memories often call for the one about the fortune hidden in the arm chair, or the monologue about the Three Trees. Here are twenty more of Frank Crumit's best.

Crumit was born 26th September, 1889 in Jackson, Ohio, the son of a banker. He attended Culver Military Academy and the University of Ohio, distinguishing himself in football and baseball, and composing Ohio State University's Buckeye Battle Cry. Turning to engineering after his graduation in 1910, Frank soon found himself drawn towards show business: as part of a vaudeville act "The 3 Comedians", as a single act "The One-Man Glee Club", then as a singer with Paul Biese's dance band in Chicago and New York. Like his contemporaries Cliff Edwards and Wendell Hall, Crumit was attracted to the ukulele, which formed the perfect accompaniment to his warm, charming voice. By 1918 he had reached Broadway, with roles in Betty Be Good and the Greenwich Village Follies.

In 1921, Frank was engaged to contribute songs and to perform in Tangerine, which starred an established performer, Julia Sanderson. Born Julia Sackett in 1887, she had appeared in stock companies from age 13, joined a Broadway chorus three years later, and enjoyed starring roles through the 1910s in The Sunshine Girl and The Girl from Utah. She had also been married twice before, but Sanderson and Crumit were a magic combination. After Tangerine, they worked together whenever possible; finally, in 1927, Frank Crumit and Julia Sanderson married and retired from show business, Frank emerging only to make some of his best records.

When the Crumits went back to work in 1929, it was in radio. The Blackstone Plantation was heard Tuesday nights on CBS, sponsored by Blackstone Cigars; in 1930 it moved to NBC, where it stayed three years. A Sunday afternoon series for Bond Bread followed, from 1933 to 1936, succeeded by the immensely popular Battle of the Sexes beginning in 1938 and The Crumit and Sanderson Quiz in 1942. Known as the "Singing Sweethearts", the Crumits were among radio's most popular stars, often travelling daily from their home in Springfield, Massachusetts to the studios in New York to present a variety show in the morning and a quiz game in the evening. Somehow in 1935, Frank found time to be elected President of the Lambs Club, such was his esteem among his fellow performers.

As a recording artist, Frank Crumit paid his first visit to a studio late in 1919. Over the next four years he recorded more than a hundred sides for Columbia and Little Wonder, usually singing the standard novelty songs of the day. Late in 1923, Crumit moved over to Victor, where he stayed ten years and enjoyed his biggest successes. But by 1934 even best-selling artists were having trouble in the record stores, and Frank's last two years' of Victor sessions were issued only in England, when they were issued at all. The newly-formed Decca label enticed Crumit to re-record some of his biggest hits and a few new titles, but even this slowed down to a trickle in 1935. A few more sides followed in 1938, and in 1941 Frank and Julia recorded some nostalgic memories. But they were never far from a radio microphone, up until Frank's sudden death on 7th September, 1943, just short of his 54th birthday. Julia continued on the air for another year, then spent the next three decades in retirement. She died on 27th January, 1975.

The previous Crumit collection on Naxos Nostalgia ('A Gay Caballero', 8.120502) included some of Frank's best-remembered recordings, made between 1925 and 1935. This volume covers a longer period, beginning in 1920 and ending in 1938, and also allows us to hear the charming Julia Sanderson in one of their few recorded duets, Would You Like To Take A Walk. One record from the earliest years is included, the 1920 novelty song Palesteena, showing Frank in his musical comedy style, with a full orchestra, something not often present in the later recordings. Another song of Broadway origin is the rarely heard My Lady, which Frank co-wrote with Ben Jerome, and which was interpolated into the musical Queen High when Crumit joined the cast of the touring company in 1927.

Among other favourites are the first of three sequels Frank recorded to the Abdul-Ivan saga, another song dedicated to the ever-valiant amateurs of the golf links, and the monologue The Three Trees. Like its companion "No News" in the previous volume, this was a re-recording of a popular sketch from the phonograph's early years, in this case originally the work of Tom McNaughton, who'd featured it in the 1910 stage show The Spring Maid. Popular 1920s tunes are here as well, such as Ukulele Lady and Sonya. And more traditional and folk tunes are here, such as Little Brown Jug, Riding Down from Bangor, and what may be Crumit's rarest record, Gum Tree Canoe. Granny's Old Arm Chair is another variation on the story that has been filmed several times (Keep Your Seats Please, Love Thy Neighbour, The Twelve Chairs), Jack is Every Inch a Sailor is a variant on one of the most popular Newfoundland folk songs, and Pretty Little Dear explores both sides of romance with its interpolation of "I Had But Fifty Cents".

In the 1930s, Frank Crumit's repertoire was based less on folk and rural favourites, and included the popular do-it-yourself Rhymes, borrowed from English bandleader Jack Hylton. The Pig Got Up and Slowly Walked Away was popularized by another British band, led by American-born Bert Ambrose and imported to the States by Rudy Vallee, but it's actually by American songwriter Benjamin Hapgood Burt, and Crumit recorded it first. Down By the Railroad Track, The Dashing Marine and I Can't Stand Sittin' in a Cell are three more typical examples of the kind of song only Frank Crumit could bring us. He had no equals then, and he remains irreplaceable.

David Lennick, 2002


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crummit
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 14 Sep 03 - 04:10 AM

That's great, pdg,

can you give us the title and label of the CD please?

Robin
(I should really get the title of this thread corrected...)


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crummit
From: GUEST,pdq
Date: 14 Sep 03 - 12:45 PM

I know of this man mainly from two 78's I found years ago, one has "Jack Was Every Inch a Sailor". His material is clever and often humerous and his singing is typical of vaudeville, with good diction and vocal projection.

Apparently there are two CD's, VOL. 1 & 2:
"The previous Crumit collection on Naxos Nostalgia ('A Gay Caballero', 8.120502) included some of Frank's best-remembered recordings, made between 1925 and 1935."

8.120620  CRUMIT, Frank: Vol. 2


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Subject: Lyr/Chords Add: TALE OF A TICKER (O'Brian/Crumit)
From: GutBucketeer
Date: 14 Sep 03 - 10:16 PM

One of my favorite Frank Crumit songs is "A Tale of A Ticker". It is still pretty relevant today. Here are the words and chords from the "Frank Crumit's Book Of Favorite Songs".


A Tale Of A Ticker
(Frank O'Brian, Frank Crumit)
From Frank Crumit's Book of Favorite Songs

Verse 1:
G          Am          G
This little pig went to mar-ket,
                   D7       G
Where they buy and sell the stocks,
C                   G
This little pig came home a-gain,
         A7             D7
With his sys-tem full of shocks.
G            Am          G
I don't un-der-stand their language,
                D7         G
Don't know what it's all a-bout,
      A7                D          D7
For a bull buys up and a bear sells down
      A7               D7
and a broker sells you out;
    A7          Adim A7               Adim A7 D7
And here is the song    they sing the whole day long.

Refrain:
    G                  Gm      G
Oh! the markets not so good to-day,
    Am                  D7
Your stocks look kind of sick,
   G    Gm   G                Gm G
In fact they all dropped down a point
    D7               G
each time the tickers tick;
      G                Gm      G
We'll have to have more mar-gin now,
      Am       Cm    D7
There isn't any doubt,
       G               
So you beter dash with a load of cash,
         D7               G Gdim D
Or we'll have to sell you out.

Verse 2:
    G
The stock exchange is a funny place,
Its the stragest place in town,
The seats cost half a million cash,
But the brokers won't sit down.
There's the broker the bull and bear,
It's queer but its not a joke,
For you get the bull till your bank-roll's bare
and your broker says you're broke,
And here is the song they sing the whole day long.

Refrain:

Verse 3:
    G
The market simply goes to prove,
That we still have lo-co weeds,
For the bull buys what he doesn't want,
And the bear sells what he needs,
I bought an el-e-va-tor stock,
and thought that I did well,
And the little bears all ran downstairs
and rang the basement bell,
And here is the song they sing the whole day long.

There is a pickup quarter note "The" in verse 2 and 3 that isn't in verse 1



JAB


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 15 Sep 03 - 08:25 AM

There is a CD around called 'Mountain Greenery - the songs of Frank Crumit' but I'm afraid our copy has vanished so I can't give you a bar code or catalogue number yet.

LTS


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 15 Sep 03 - 10:28 AM

Link to the chords
WHAT KIND OF A NOISE ANNOYS AN OYSTER?
Lyr Req: A noise annoys an Oyster
by Crumit & Curtis as sung by Frank Crumit.
from Frank Crumit's songbook:
"Frank Crumit's Book of Favorite Songs"


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: Joan from Wigan
Date: 16 Sep 03 - 02:52 AM

I picked up the Frank Crumit CD "The Song of the Prune" some time ago on Wigan market. The track listing is as follows:

The Song Of The Prune
Jack Is Every Inch A Sailor
I'm Bettin' The Roll On Roamer
Donald The Dub
Abdul Abulbul Amir
And Then He Took Up Golf
Around The Corner
Sissy
Grandfather's Clock
Would You Like To Take A Walk
The Old Apple Tree
I Can't Stand Sittin' In A Cell
Sunday In The Park
The Girl With The Paint On Her Face
The Return Of Abdul Abulbul Amir
A Gay Caballero
Get Away Old Man Get Away
Crazy Words Crazy Tune
Ukelele Lady
Thanks For The Buggy Ride
The Girl Friend
The Bride's Lament
Mountain Greenery
Billy Boy

The CD catalogue No. is SWNCD 018, and the sleeve notes invite you to send for a free catalogue from: Soundsrite Music Wholesale, The Old Dairy, Charles Street, Droylsden, Manchester M43 6HD, tel. 0161 370 6908. Don't know if they've any other Frank Crumit CDs available, and also don't know whether they only deal with dealers, but it may be worthwhile contacting them for further details.

I also picked up another album of his on cassette tape from the same stall, but can't lay my hands on it at the moment.

I'd be interested in buying the songbook if it's available anywhere. Any further info on that?


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: Joan from Wigan
Date: 16 Sep 03 - 09:51 AM

I've found the cassette. The title is "Around The Corner", and the track listing is:

Connie's Got Connections In Connecticut
A Gay Caballero
Sissy
Would You Like To Take A Walk?
Abdul Abulbul Amir
The Old Apple Tree
Down In De Cane Break
I Can't Stand Sittin' In A Cell
Josephine
Nettie Is The Nit-Wit Of The Networks
The Girl With The Paint On Her Face
The King Of Borneo
Sunday In The Park
I'm Bettin' The Roll On Roamer
Grandfather's Clock
And Then He Took Up Golf
One Little Raindrop
Around The Corner

The catalogue no. is MCHD 174, and it's apparently also available on CD, catalogue no. CDHD 174. The record company is Conifer Records Ltd, Horton Road, West Drayton, Middlesex UB7 8JL, and the collection is part of their "Happy Days" Series.


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: GUEST,Harry (F.C. Admirer - England)
Date: 31 Jul 06 - 05:58 AM

I was born in 1934 and grew up in a home full of music - both light and serious.    We had an HMV wind-up portable gramaphone and quite a few Crumit records.   My favourite was always 'Thanks for the Buggy Ride'.
During my two years' military service I played both guitar and uke' in concert parties and 'Buggy Ride' was always popular. Even now - when my audiences tend to be geriatric or family - it is always well received.   However, I'm sure there are more words than i can remember; can anybody help? I also see references to My Grandfather's Clock, surely this predates F.C.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE MAN WHO SELLS INSURANCE (Frank Crumit
From: The Sandman
Date: 31 Jul 06 - 05:02 PM

I recorded THERE'S NO ONE WITH ENDURANCE LIKE THE MAN WHO SELLS INSURANCE, on my LP Cheating the Tide.

I used to be as happy as a squirrel in a tree,
Till a man who sold insurance made a nervous wreck of me.
He followed me persistently, and if I'm put away,
That man who sold insurance made me what I am today.

CHORUS: For there's no one with endurance
Like the man who sells insurance.
He's everybody's best friend.
He's sweeter than molasses,
And when he puts on his glasses,
He gets us all in the end.

One day at Coney island when I went in for a swim,
A man swam up beside me who was no one else but him.
Says he to me, "I'm glad to see you love the ocean wave,
But our twenty-year endowment is the only way to save."

One day I saw him coming so I quickly climbed a tree,
But George Insurance saw me too and climbed up after me.
Says he to me up in the tree, "I'm fond of nature too,
But our twenty-year endowment is the only thing for you."

I even spent a night in jail in my desire to hide,
But in the morning George Insurance waited just outside.
He followed me persistently, and if I'm put away,
That bird who sold insurance made me what I am today.

I believe the Ocean Wave used to be an insurance company. I recorded this on GVR 227, Greenwich Village Recordings.


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: Compton
Date: 01 Aug 06 - 03:08 PM

I know Bob Davenport thought he was the Dogs!


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE MAN WHO SELLS INSURANCE (Frank Crumit
From: Joe Offer
Date: 01 Aug 06 - 09:03 PM

For comparison, here's a version posted from another thread:
    Thread #10274 Message #90479

    Posted By: Roger the zimmer

    15-Apr-99 - 03:52 AM

    Thread Name: Granny has left me just her old arm chair (Crumit)

    Subject: ADD: The Man Who Sells Insurance ^^

    Here you are, Catspaw: we information professionals never like to give up!

    THE MAN WHO SELLS INSURANCE
    (as recorded by Frank Crumit 1935)

    I used to be as happy as a squirrel in a tree,
    Till a man who sold insurance made a nervous wreck of me.
    He followed me persistently, and if I'm put away,
    That bird who sold insurance made me what I am today.

    CHORUS: (last 3 lines change)
    For there's no-one with endurance
    Like the man who sells insurance.
    He's everybody's best friend.
    He will follow you and fret you,
    But remember he will get you,
    For he gets us all in the end.

    In spite of every way I tried to leave him in the lurch,
    He chased me in the subway and he followed me to church.
    I even spent a night in jail in my desire to hide,
    But in the morning George Insurance was waiting just outside.

    CHORUS: ... he'll be sweeter than molasses,
    But when he puts on his glasses,
    Well, he gets us all in the end.

    One day at Coney Island when I went in for a swim,
    A man swam up beside me who was no-one else but him.
    Said he to me, "I'm glad to see you love the ocean wave,
    But our 20-year endowment is the only way to save."

    CHORUS: ... he's always bright and snappy,
    And no wonder that he's happy,
    For he gets us all in the end.

    One day I saw him coming so I quickly climbed a tree,
    But George Insurance saw me too and climbed up after me.
    Said he to me up in the tree: "I'm fond of nature too,
    But our 20-year endowment is the policy for you."

    CHORUS: ... and the harder that you make it,
    Believe me he can take it,
    For he gets us all in the end.


    Credit must be shared by my old friend Alan who taped this off his family 78 disk many years ago for me and to my wife who located it. ("If I'd known what you were looking for I could have told you last night where it was")

    I'm glad I can contribute something at last other than bad jokes, to make up for what I've learned from other 'Catters.
    Roger


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Subject: RE: Discussion & songs - Frank Crumit
From: GUEST,fan of frank
Date: 20 Sep 06 - 12:30 AM

Has anyone heard of a recording from Crumit entitled, "No New"?
Thanks for any help you can offer


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: GUEST,not heard that one ?
Date: 20 Mar 07 - 11:57 AM

I have a few rare old 1920's Crummit but nothing fits that description.


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: GUEST,Ian G Baildon England
Date: 26 Mar 10 - 05:03 PM

Hi all Crumit Fans

re the NO NEW item poated 20 Sept 2006
It is NO NEWS,or what killed the dog. CD A Gay Caballero
Naxos #8.120502

It tells of the butler explaining there is no news whilst Man of the House was on Holiday -though the dog died-the house burnt down,the stable burnt down-the horses dead the mans mother died-his wife ran off with the gardener-other than that- There aint no news Sir
!

I began studying Frank Crumit back in 1989 recuperating after an illness Its now 2010 and Im still interested in his music and Julia Sanderson.
That Book of Music not seen in England.

Back in Sept 2009 Radio WFMU in New Jersey Archived my Broadcast about Franks life and Music (14 Acoustic 78s used for this All played on a 1920s Phono.)
Have a listen leave a comment on my Page there if liked.
Thanks


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 27 Mar 10 - 11:47 AM

I also see references to My Grandfather's Clock, surely this predates F.C. Guest Harry 31 Jul 06 ===

Yes indeed ~ by Henry Clay Work, who also wrote The Year Of Jubilo [Kingdom Coming], Marching Thru Georgia, The Ship That Never Returned,&c.


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: GUEST
Date: 21 Jul 10 - 12:05 PM

Hey this is awesome guys. I'm 22 years old and love frank crumit can anyone help me out I'm looking for some old vinyl?


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: mousethief
Date: 21 Jul 10 - 12:15 PM

Best place I've found for old vinyl is GEMM.


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: Arkie
Date: 21 Jul 10 - 01:24 PM

Just in case someone has not heard Frank Crumit.

The Prune Song


The Pig Song


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 22 Jul 10 - 07:19 AM

Can I just point out - be careful where you play/perform the music of Frank... partcularly 'The Year of Jubilo' aka 'Kingdom Coming and the Year of Jubilo' and 'Mountain Greenery'....They are what they are - songs from a different age entirely and both could be construed as terribly racist and sexist in the right (or wrong) company. They use archaic terms and actions that would no way pass muster with anyone of any sensitivity nowadays. I cringe inwardly and fast forward whenever one of them pops up on my MP3 player in the car, particularly in the culturally mixed area I live in because even though they contain words I would never use in those contexts, they could still earn me the displeasure of certain militant groups. I suppose I could take them off my MP3 and delete them from the computer but I happen to think that they are an important part of the musical and cultural history of the US. 'The Year of Jubilo' celebrates the abolition of slavery in the language of the slaves at that time (1863ish) and any revision to a politically acceptable alternative, to me, just sounds wrong. 'Mountain Greenery is plain, downright sexist. Together, they're a great example of how racism and sexism was not only acceptable but apparently normal behaviour less than 100 years ago. Plus they're great tunes.

LTS


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: The Sandman
Date: 22 Jul 10 - 07:57 AM

his songs are witty, a more modern similiar performer was The Singing Postman
lts has agood point
however The Prune AND THE Insurance Song are witty without being offensive.


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: Will Fly
Date: 22 Jul 10 - 08:25 AM

Interestingly, the Holy Modal Rounders did 'The Year Of Jubilo' and condensed its theme into just two verses - without the archaic language, but using the term "darkies". I think theirs is a great version - not as historically interesting as the original, but certainly immense fun musically.

There's a parallel between this song and 'Lili Marlene' - both songs written from the viewpoint of one set of protagonists in a "war" - and both songs popular with both opposing sides.


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: GUEST
Date: 28 Jul 10 - 08:51 AM

Hi does anyone have any copies of music sheets for the song "sittin on top of the world"?

I would really appreciate it..


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: Arkie
Date: 28 Jul 10 - 02:15 PM

The tune to Kingdom Coming ranks among my favorites. J.E. Mainer recorded a version, called New Kingdom Coming, that updates the language a bit referring to captain and feller and replacing yankees with revenuers. I suppose the words could be tweaked a bit more to make it more acceptable with modern audiences. I don't question, at all, that there is a place and time for historically accurate songs. However, sometimes there are songs that are so good that they warrant lyric changes to make them more acceptable to wider audiences. I, personally, enjoy the humor and spirit of the Mainer version. The Sons of the Pioneers also recorded the piece with the original Henry Clay Work lyrics.


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: The Sandman
Date: 28 Jul 10 - 02:22 PM

guest
if you go to my website www.dickmiles.com and buy one of my cds, you can hear Sittin on top of the world played on a concertina, it is a standard three chord progression g c d7.


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Aug 10 - 10:54 AM

Good Soldier,

Thanks mate appreciate it. Do you know by any chance how that would go on an acoustic guitar? It's not the same chords is it?


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: The Sandman
Date: 10 Aug 10 - 01:01 PM

i have e mailed you with chords in d major, plus bass run on g chord
d g a7.


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 11 Aug 10 - 11:29 AM

" Abdul Abulbul Amir"   and " The Pig"   are two of his best. (Sandy Mc Lean - PM Date: 13 Sep 03 - 09:37 AM)

A bit late to put in a correction, but Abdul Abulbul Amir was one of Percy French's songs, written back in 1877.


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 12 Aug 10 - 09:37 AM

Thanks McGrath! It was never my intention to suggest that Crumit wrote "Abdul", at least the original, but when I look back on the thread I must agree that is indeed inferred. Percy French wrote some fantastic stuff and deserves the credit! Crumit's recording of the song is what was meant!
             Sandy


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: GUEST,Golf-Jack
Date: 18 Jul 12 - 04:26 AM

Hi there.
Found this thread because my attention was drawn to Frank Crumit lately and his song "...and then he took up golf". Does anybody have the lyrics, would love to have them for the next (golf) competition I am planning ;-)

Thanks,
Golf-Jack


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: Arkie
Date: 18 Jul 12 - 01:50 PM

Have you checked youtube. No lyrics posted but you can listen. There appears to be several videos.

Crumit


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit
From: GUEST,kendall
Date: 18 Jul 12 - 02:07 PM

You learn something every day. I thought the original Abdul a bul bul amir was written by Percy French.

Marshall Dodge (Bert & I) used to do "No News" as a dialog.


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Subject: RE: Discussion - Frank Crumit (1889-1943)
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 18 Jul 12 - 06:34 PM

Donald The Dub is another one on a golof theme:
Donald The Dub


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