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Lyr Req/Add: The Rumour (recitation)

DigiTrad:
DECK OF CARDS
JIM
RINDERCELLA
STORY OF PETEY, THE SNAKE
THE PEE LITTLE THRIGS


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Megan L 17 Jun 04 - 05:27 PM
Joe Offer 17 Jun 04 - 06:05 PM
Megan L 17 Jun 04 - 06:25 PM
Megan L 18 Jun 04 - 05:06 PM
Megan L 18 Jun 04 - 05:09 PM
Jim Dixon 21 Jun 04 - 11:30 PM
Jim Dixon 23 Jun 04 - 10:50 AM
Megan L 03 Jul 04 - 04:32 PM
GUEST,WouteraTranslations@planet.nl 28 Dec 04 - 07:21 AM
Megan L 10 Jan 05 - 02:37 PM
GUEST 10 Jan 05 - 03:17 PM
Strupag 10 Jan 05 - 05:37 PM
GUEST 10 Jan 05 - 09:00 PM
GUEST,Woutera (translations) 20 May 05 - 10:00 AM
GUEST 14 May 12 - 06:40 AM
Jim Dixon 22 Apr 14 - 04:24 PM
GUEST 01 Jul 14 - 12:01 AM
GUEST,# 01 Jul 14 - 06:28 PM
GUEST,JA 07 Dec 14 - 06:36 AM
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Subject: Lyr Req: The rumour
From: Megan L
Date: 17 Jun 04 - 05:27 PM

Digitrad still giving me error message so can anyone help with the words of "the rumour" I know andy stewart did it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The rumour
From: Joe Offer
Date: 17 Jun 04 - 06:05 PM

I found it's on a CD called Andy Stewart's Scotland, niot to be confused with Andy M. Stewart, I think. Know any of the song, so you can give us part to start on?
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The rumour
From: Megan L
Date: 17 Jun 04 - 06:25 PM

Thats the problem joe I keep thinking i have smoe words then its gone.

just remember it went through a lot of towns in scotland.

Perhaps

They (something) it in Lieth
It got more refined as it passed down princess street


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The rumour
From: Megan L
Date: 18 Jun 04 - 05:06 PM

Got a bit closer there is a recording of it on a site about George Duffis who wrote it but my machine cant play it


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The rumour
From: Megan L
Date: 18 Jun 04 - 05:09 PM

will try the clicky incase someone else can hear it The Rumour


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The rumour
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 21 Jun 04 - 11:30 PM

THE RUMOUR is a comic recitation or poem, not a song.

The page that Megan L linked contains a video performance by George Duffus that I was able to view and hear, but I am reluctant to try to transcribe it due to the dialect. I hope someone more familiar with Scots will try it.

THE RUMOUR is also on the following Andy Stewart albums (definitely not Andy M. Stewart):

Andy Stewart's Scotland

The Best of Andy Stewart (cassette).

Donald, Where's Yer Troosers?

Scotland: The Singers & the Songs


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The rumour
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 23 Jun 04 - 10:50 AM

OK, since nobody else seems interested, I decided to have a go. Naturally, my transcription is full of holes. Maybe my attempt will inspire someone else to do better.

To view the video, open this file with RealPlayer: http://www.duffus.com/George1.rm

THE RUMOUR

There are lots of things for spreading, too numerous to name.
There's fire, manure, then, of course, there's fame.
But the thing that spreads the quickest, I'm sure you will agree,
Is the spoken word of rumour. Listen, and you'll see.
Now the rumour that I speak of was started by a man
In Inverness. He whispered it in behind his hand:
Here, Wullie, have you heard the ... it's really dreadful stuff.
I heard it when I was ... so it must be right enough
Now Wullie was quite upset when he heard what it must have been
He ... his brother George who lived in Aberdeen
Is that a fact? ... It's give me quite a shock
... cousin Jock.
Instead he telt his ... a bus conductor's lass.
She ...
... just keep it to yoursel'."
Of course, he kept it just like her, and he couldn't wait to tell.
...
... tell a fisherman ...
... I mean,
He couldna wait to tell ... Dundee
... a willna tell, I promise on my life
Of course, he took it sacred and the story entered Fife.
Now here, sir, ...
...
Now mair and mair and more and more the story spread aroun'
Till they spelt it out in capitals in Edinburgh toun
They shouted it in ... and then grew more discreet,
For the story passed ... into Crimson Street.
... on the Glasgow train the very selfsame day,
So if you come frae Glasgow, you'll have heard that, by the way
That's not where it went, for the story was then passed
To a steamer sailing westward toward Ireland and Belfast.
... said, "That really is a shame."
But they didn't like the rumour, so they sent it back again
... headin' northward to ... Kintyre
But this time it was spreading freely ...
...
Once again by way of water the story passed to ...
But they didn't spread it further and the reason is because
By the time they'd paid the toll bridge, they'd forgotten what it was.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The rumour
From: Megan L
Date: 03 Jul 04 - 04:32 PM

ah Jim your a darling so you are thank you


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE RUMOUR
From: GUEST,WouteraTranslations@planet.nl
Date: 28 Dec 04 - 07:21 AM

Hi, everyone. I'm interested in this piece as well. It seems I've got a slightly different version on my 30-year-old tape (Dad's Inheritance) when I compare it to Jim's efforts. Anyway, I hope it helps, although I am not sure about some things yet, either. I just love the way he changes his accent along with the travels of the rumour.

Now when it comes to spreading, there are many things to name:
There's butter, and there's fire, and then, of course, there's fame.
But the thing that spreads the quickest, it's the fastest, you'll agree,
Is the spoken word of rumour. Just listen and you'll see.

Now the rumour I would speak of here was started by a man
In Inverness who whispered it from in behind his hand.
"Did you hear what I heard, Willy? Man, that's awful. Yes, that's right.
You'd never have believed it. Man, it gave me such a fright!"

Now poor Willy was quite upset when he heard that this had been,
So he straightway phone his brother George who lives in Aberdeen.
"Oh dearie me", says Georgie. "Man, that's half a fatal shock.
I'll have to tell your cousin Ralph and next to me the broch."

But instead he told his sister Jean, a bus conductor's lass.
She told Styn Hive in Laurencekirk in Delche town she passed.
"Well that's fatal. I don't know why, I just will keep it to myself."
And they did keep it just like her and could not wait to tell...

Until she reached old Forfar Town where once were nothing loth.
She telled it to a fisherman who telled it to her broth.
"By to wow", was their reaction and perhaps just "dearie me".
And they could not wait to tell the tale for to get into Dundee.

"Well I never am no sailor, wart no never in my whole life,
But I crossed the water and of course the story spread to Fife."
It was told in every meeting place and spread for there and there.
Though there was some cautiousness at first, they soon said, "Tell us more".

So more and more and more and more the rumour flew around,
Till they spelt it out in capitals in Edinburghy town.
They shouted that in Leith, but oh, the tone grew more discreet
As it passed up these walking along the length of Prince's Street.

There somebody took it on a train to Glasgow and that's how
A few of there you'll probably have heard the rumour now.
Not that that's where it all finished, for it carried on and passed
By a steamer going westward to Old Ireland and Belfast.

"Is that the truth", the Irish said. They thought it was a shame.
No, they didn't like the rumour so they sent it home again.
On a distant roar came the north wind over Irshel and Kintyre
Where it spread the sea quite freely like the heather was on fire.

Oban, Mull, Tobermory, Mallaig and Kyle, and that is why,
Once again, by way of water the rumour came to Skye.
But they couldn't tell it further; and the reason is because,
By the time it reached the islands, they'd forgotten what it was!


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE RUMOUR
From: Megan L
Date: 10 Jan 05 - 02:37 PM

Brilliant couple of changes.

Finally managed to get my sound working again

THE RUMOUR

There are lots of things for spreading, too numerous to name.
There’s fire, manure, then, of course, there’s fame.
But the thing that spreads the quickest, I’m sure you will agree,
Is the spoken word of rumour. Listen, and you’ll see.
Now the rumour that I speak of was started by a man
In Inverness. He whispered it in behind his hand:
“Here, Wullie, have you heard the CRACK? It’s really dreadful stuff.
I heard it when I was GUTTERED so it must be right enough.”
Now Wullie was quite upset when he heard what it must have been.
He QUICKLY PHONED his brother George who lived in Aberdeen.
“Is that a fact? IS THAT A FACT? It’s give me quite a shock.
NEXT TIME I AM IN PETERHIED, AH’LL TELL MA cousin Jock.”
Instead he telt his BIDIE IN a bus conductor’s lass.
She TELT STANEHIVE AND FETTERCAIRN AND ILKA TOON SHE PASSED.
“WEEL, THAT’S WHIT I HEARD, ONYWEY. Just keep it to yoursel’.”
Of course, THEY kept it just like her, and he couldn’t wait to tell.
AT LAST IT REACHED AULD FORFAR AND THE LASS WIS NAETHIN LOTH.
SHE TELT IT TAE A fisherman WHA TELT IT TAE ARBROATH.
“JIR BYE AWA” WIS THEIR REACTION, OR MAYBE “DEARIE ME!”
He couldna wait to tell, SO IT GAED INTAE Dundee.
“AWA TAE HELL! WELL, AH’LL NO tell, I promise on my life.”
Of course, he took it SOUTHWARD and the story entered Fife.
“Now here, sir, THAT’S RIDICULOUS! THAT YOU COULD HAE PICKED ME AFF THE FLAIR.
IN FACT, I CAN’T BELIEVE IT. YE’D BATTER TELL ME MAIR.”
Now mair and mair and more and more the story spread aroun’
Till they spelt it out in capitals in Edinburgh toun.
They shouted it in LEITH and then grew more discreet,
For the story passed UP OLD LEITH WALK AND into PRINCESS Street.
SOMEBODY TOOK IT OAN THE GLESKA TRAIN the very selfsame day,
So if you come frae Glasgow, you’ll have heard IT, by the way.
That’s not where it FINISHED, for the story was then passed
To a steamer sailing westward to OLD Ireland and Belfast.
“WHAT ABOUT YE NOW?” THE IRISH said. “That really is a shame.”
But they didn’t like the rumour, so they sent it back again.
STRANNRAR AN headin’ northward to AYR AN OLD Kintyre
But this time it was spreading freely LIKE THE HEATHER THAT’S ON FIRE.
OBAN, MULL AND TOBERMORY, MALLAIG, KYLE AND THAT IS WHY
Once again by way of water the story passed to SKYE.
But they didn’t spread it further and the reason is because
By the time they’d paid the toll bridge, they’d forgotten what it was.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The rumour
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Jan 05 - 03:17 PM

The whole point of this recitation is to be able to do it with all the different dialects of the areas mentioned!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The rumour
From: Strupag
Date: 10 Jan 05 - 05:37 PM

Absolutely right Guest,
As the point of the story is that the rumour gets passed on around Scotland, each place has a totally different accent.
The Skill in the performance is to get each accent right to suit each
geographical part of the poem. It's a skill that both George Duthas and the late Andy Stewart had. I wouldn't dare try it but I'd love to hear someone outwith Scotland to have a go

Andy


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The rumour
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Jan 05 - 09:00 PM

Nah, definitely not! That's George Duffus bye the way!


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Subject: RE: Req/Add: The Rumour (recitation)
From: GUEST,Woutera (translations)
Date: 20 May 05 - 10:00 AM

Hello everyone, I have "my" version digitally now. If anyone wants a copy, just send me an e-mail. Address: wouteratranslations@planet.nl

have a good weekend!
WW


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: The Rumour (recitation)
From: GUEST
Date: 14 May 12 - 06:40 AM

The fifer's expression is Sha'hoor ser!popular in Kirkcaldy.
Cheers
Ian.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE RUMOUR (from Andy Stewart)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 22 Apr 14 - 04:24 PM

I believe this is the real original Andy Stewart in this YouTube video. I'll take responsibility for this transcription, although I picked up bits and pieces on the Internet. There could be a few errors.


THE RUMOUR
As recorded by Andy Stewart on "Andy Stewart's Scotland"

Now when it comes to spreading, there are many things to name:
There's butter, and there's fire, and then, of course, there's fame.

But the thing that spreads the quickest—it's the fastest, you'll agree—
Is the spoken word of rumour; just listen and you'll see.

Now the rumour I would speak of here was started by a man
In Inverness, who whispered it from in behind his hand.

"Did you hear what I heard, Willy? Mon, that's awful; yes, that's right.
Ye'd never have believed it, mon; it gave me such a fright!"

Now puir Willy was quite upset when he heard that this had been,
So he straightway phoned his brother George who lived in Aberdeen.

"Oh, dearie me!" says Geordie. "Man, that's half a fatal shock.
I'll hae te tell your cousin Rab when next I'm in Arbroath."

But instead he told his sister Jean, a bus conductress lass.
She told Stonehaven, Lawrencekirk, and ilka toun she'd pass.

"Well that's fit I heard, onyway; aye, just tha keep it to yersel'."
And they did keep it, just like her, and couldna wait to tell.

Until she reached old Forfar toun where, once more, nothing loath,
She told it to a fisherman who told it to Arbroath.

"By Geowah", was their reaction and perhaps just "dearie me",
And they couldna wait to tell the tale for they gaed and told Dundee.

"Well I never! I'll no' say a word! No, never in my life!"
But they crossed the water and, of course, the story spread to Fife.

It was told in every meeting place, and spread frae door to door.
Though they listened cautiously at first, they soon said, "Tell us more".

So more and more and mair and mair the rumour flew aroun',
Till they spelt it oot in capitals in Edinburgh town.

They shouted it in Leith, but, oh! the tone grew more discreet
As it passed up Leith Walk and along the length of Princes Street.

There somebody took it on a train to Glasgow and that's how
If you live there you'll probably have heard the rumour now.

Not that that's where it all finished, for it carried on and passed
By a steamer going westward to old Ireland and Belfast.

"Is that the truth?" the Irish said; they thought it was a shame.
No, they didn't like the rumour so they sent it home again.

To Stranraer it came, then northwards over Ayrshire and Kintyre
Where it spread, they say, quite freely, like the heather was on fire.

Oban, Mull and Tobermory, Mallaig, Kyle, and that is why,
Once again, by way of water the rumour came to Skye.

But they couldn't tell it further; and the reason is because,
By the time it reached the islands, they'd forgotten what it was!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: The Rumour (recitation)
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Jul 14 - 12:01 AM

I'm pretty sure, in the version I listened to, he actually said:

"Oh, dearie me!" says Geordie. "Man, that's afa; fit a shock.
I'll hae te tell your cousin Rab when next I'm in Arbroath."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: The Rumour (recitation)
From: GUEST,#
Date: 01 Jul 14 - 06:28 PM

http://www.andystewart.info/songwriting/index.shtml

Near the bottom of the page. Andy Stewart doing it there, also.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: The Rumour (recitation)
From: GUEST,JA
Date: 07 Dec 14 - 06:36 AM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k9bioqXyblU

This is my transcription, I've tried to type with the local dialect (and coming from central Scotland and having lived in many areas, I'm reasonably tuned in to dialects)

THE RUMOUR

Now when it comes to spreading, there are many things to name,
There's butter, there's fire, and then of course there's fame,
But the thing that spreads the quickest, it's the fastest you'll agree,
It's the spoken word of rumour, just listen and you'll see,
Now the rumour I will speak of here, was started by a man in INVERNESS,
Who whispered it from behind his hand
Did you hear what I heard, Wullie, man that's awful, yes that's right
You'd never have believed it, man, it gave me such a fright,
Poor Wullie was quite upset when he heard that this had been,
So he straightway phoned his brother George,
Who lived in ABERDEEN,
Oh dearie me said Geordie, man thats affa, whit a shock,
I'll hae tae tell yer cousin Rab, when next I'm in the Broch,
But instead he told his sister Jean, the bus conductress lass,
She told Ste'en Hive in LAURENCEKIRK, and in unco toon she passed,
Well thats whit I heard onnyway, Aye just that, keep it tae yersel,
And they did keep it just like her, And couldn't wait to tell,
Until she reached old FORFAR-toon, where once more nothing loathe,
She told it to a fisherman, who told it to ARBROATH,
Why ch-awa was their reaction, their hauf, just dearaye me,
And they couldnae wait to tell the tale when they gaed into DUNDEE,
Well eh never, eh'll nae say a word man, never in meh life,
But they crossed the water and of course the story's spread to FIFE,
It was told at every meetin place, and spread fae door to door,
They listened cautiously at first but soon said give us more,
So more and more and mair and mair the rumour flee'd around
And started oot in capitals in EDINBURGH toon,
They shouted it in LEITH,
But oh the tone grew more discrete,
As it pessed up Leith walk and along the length of Princes Street,
There somebody took it on a train tae GLASGOW,
And that's how, If you live there you'll probably have heard the rumour now,
Not that that's where it finished for it carried on and passed,
By a steamer going westward to Norn Ireland and BELFAST,
Is that the truth, the Irish said, I tot it was a shame,
They didn't like the rumour, so they sent it home again,
Tae STRANRAER it came, northwards over AYRSHIRE and KINTYRE,
Where it spread, they say, quite freely, like the heather was on fire,
Over MULL and TOBERMORY, MALLAIG and that is why,
Once again by way of watter, the rumour came to SKYE,
But they couldn't tell it further, and the reason is because,
By the time it reached the island, they'd forgotten what it was!


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