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Lyr Req: The Ploughboy

DigiTrad:
THE PLOUGHBOY


Related threads:
Lyr Req: Follow the Ploo (Gaberlunzie) (6)
Lyr Req: Follow the Plough (8)
Lyr Add: The Ploughman's Song (12)
Lyr Req:Damned Idle Fellows That Follow the Plough (15)
Lyr Req: Jolly Plough Boys (16)
Lyr Add: The Plough-Boy (John O'Keefe) (9)


timuns@aol.com 08 Feb 97 - 05:51 PM
walkerje 04 Mar 97 - 02:30 AM
Martin Ryan 04 Mar 97 - 05:30 AM
Sandy 05 Mar 97 - 01:56 AM
Martin Ryan 05 Mar 97 - 04:54 AM
Sandy 06 Mar 97 - 03:41 AM
Martin Ryan 06 Mar 97 - 03:58 AM
Murray 24 Mar 97 - 04:20 AM
Les Blank 24 Mar 97 - 09:57 AM
murphy@globalbiz.net 24 Mar 97 - 09:33 PM
75074.1501@compuserve.com 18 May 97 - 09:34 AM
Barry Finn 21 May 97 - 12:13 AM
Hutch 04 Jun 97 - 07:29 AM
Alan of Australia 06 Jun 97 - 01:53 AM
MMario 03 Nov 00 - 04:44 PM
MMario 04 Nov 00 - 09:58 AM
Greyeyes 04 Nov 00 - 10:57 AM
MartinRyan 04 Nov 00 - 05:14 PM
Greyeyes 04 Nov 00 - 05:51 PM
Snuffy 04 Nov 00 - 06:08 PM
Snuffy 04 Nov 00 - 06:53 PM
MMario 04 Nov 00 - 06:57 PM
Greyeyes 04 Nov 00 - 07:06 PM
Malcolm Douglas 04 Nov 00 - 09:52 PM
JTT 05 Nov 00 - 01:32 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 05 Nov 00 - 02:36 PM
Keith A of Hertford 30 Jul 01 - 02:26 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 30 Jul 01 - 03:00 PM
nutty 30 Jul 01 - 03:50 PM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 30 Jul 01 - 07:36 PM
Snuffy 30 Jul 01 - 09:05 PM
pavane 31 Jul 01 - 03:12 AM
GUEST,Mike Cahill 31 Jul 01 - 03:22 AM
Joe Offer 05 Sep 02 - 06:32 PM
My guru always said 06 Sep 02 - 01:13 PM
Steve Gardham 29 Nov 15 - 03:13 PM
Jim Dixon 30 Nov 15 - 09:12 PM
Steve Gardham 09 Sep 17 - 02:46 PM
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Subject: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: timuns@aol.com
Date: 08 Feb 97 - 05:51 PM

I would greatly appreciate any help in finding the full words and tune to a folksong probably called "The Ploughboy". I've only ever heard it once,on "Radio 3",the BBC classical station in the UK,about a year ago. I've searched through books in libraries and Web sites to no avail. I even wrote to the BBC but being so long after they had no ideas. It is *not* the one about joining the IRA!

The gist of the song is the career aspirations of a,yes ,ploughboy. It goes something like this:

Key:F; 4/4 ."C4" is middle C

1. I(C5) am(A4) a(C5) lit-(A4) -tle(C5) plouuuugh(D4) boy(C4)

2. Who(F4) whis-(E4) -tles(G4) o'er(Bb4) the(A4) leee-(A4) -eea(G4)

3. blah-blah blah-blah blah blaaaah blah (same tune as line1)

4. a(F4) great(E4) man (G4) I(Bb4) shall(E4) be(F4).

There are quite a few verses. All suggestions welcome Thanks,Tim Tim Unsworth,Trowbridge,Wiltshire,UK 8 Feb '97


See also this thread on Jolly Plough Boys


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: walkerje
Date: 04 Mar 97 - 02:30 AM

Sounds a lot like an old Irish rebel song called "The Merry Ploughboy" about a young farmer who runs off in 1918 to join the IRA and kick the British out of Ireland. Let me know if you want all the lyrics. It's probably a derivation of an older song, as most of the early rebel songs were.

Jeff Walker


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 04 Mar 97 - 05:30 AM

There is indeed an earlier song on which Dominic Behan seems to have based "Off to Dublin in the Green" (See DT). The questioin is - can I find the wretched thing?

Regards


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Sandy
Date: 05 Mar 97 - 01:56 AM

I can't help you with lyrics, but ou might get some new leads at the Fiddler's Companion:

http://celtic.stanford.edu/tunes/fc/

Search the index using ploughboy and plowboy. You might back up and search the Tune index too.


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 05 Mar 97 - 04:54 AM

Ok Tim The song I was thinking of was recorded by the Watersons on "A Yorkshire Garland" and reissued on CD "Early Days" a couple of years ago. Its called "The Ploughboy" and is essentiallya recruiting song for the British Army. The IRA one is basically an adaptation of it.Looking at your few words (the chords mean nothing to me!), it doesn't look like the same song.

Any more clues?

Regards


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE PLOUGHBOY / THE WARWICKSHIRE R.H.A.
From: Sandy
Date: 06 Mar 97 - 03:41 AM

I don't think this is the right song... but I got this at:
http://www.anglia.ac.uk/~operag/music/songs.html

THE PLOUGHBOY / THE WARWICKSHIRE R.H.A.

I am a jolly ploughboy and I'm ploughing up the fields all day,
'Til a silly little thought came into my head I thought I'd be away,
For I'm tired of the dear old country life since the day that I was born,
So I've been and joined the army and I'm off tomorrow morn.

I'll leave behind my pick and spade and I'll leave behind my plough,
I'll leave behind my old grey mare I shall not need her now,
And no more will I go harvesting or gathering the golden corn,
For I've been and joined the army and I'm off tomorrow morn.

Well there's one thing that I'll leave behind and that's my Nelly dear,
And I've promised I'll be true to her whether I be far or near,
And if ever I return again I'll let you all see me,
For we're going to do the churchyard walk and a sergeant's wife she'll be.

CHO: (The Ploughboy)
And hurrah for the scarlet and the green,
Helmets glistening in the sun,
And the bayonets flash like lightening to,
The beating of the military drum.
And there's a flag in dear old England,
Floating proudly in the sky,
And the watchword of our soldiers is,
"We'll conquer or we'll die."

CHO: (The Warwickshire R.H.A.)
And hurrah for the Horse Artillery,
See the spurs how they glitter in the sun,
And the horses gallop like lightening,
With an fifteen-pounder gun,
And when we get to France my boys,
The Kaiser he will say,
Ach Ach Mien Gott what a jolly fine lot,
Are the Warwickshire R.H.A.

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 11-Jul-02.


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 06 Mar 97 - 03:58 AM

Lovely! The Watersons version sounds earlier, with less specific refreces and a diferent regiment. A song for all units, obviously!

Regards


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Murray
Date: 24 Mar 97 - 04:20 AM

The fragment quoted sounds rather like a song arranged by Benjamin Britten, called "The Ploughboy" methinks, tune (in sol-fa) s/ m s d m l,-s, d/ t, r f m m r s/ m s d m l,- s, d/ t,r f t, d ---etc. It's actually a stage song from the very early 1800s or before, and talks about the grand ambitions of the singer, now lowly footman, but once a simple ploughboy, who whistled o'er the lea. Is that it? Where you'll get it is another question, but maybe I've given you a clue. _ Cheers M.


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Les Blank
Date: 24 Mar 97 - 09:57 AM

Murray: Can you tell me what sol-fa is? I've never heard of it, but seriously need some method to communicate melodies sans aural and staff notations.

Thanks for your help,

Les Blank


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE PLOUGHBOY
From: murphy@globalbiz.net
Date: 24 Mar 97 - 09:33 PM

There was a rich farmer's daughter in Sligo County
Sweet hearts she had many of the highest degree
She rode in fine splendor and was free from all care
'Til her father's own ploughboy her heart did ensnare

One day as she walking her father's domain
Young Willie the ploughboy was ploughing the main
He whistled so sweetly, caused the woods to resound
While the birds on the bramble were silent around

She eased off her walking and lay under a shade
While on Willie the ploughboy the whole time she gazed
What won her completely was he sung a fine song
Just to cheer up his horses as they ploughed along

She called on her ploughboy for to rest for a while
But he just waved back with a cheer and a smile
Her cheek bloomed likes roses as to him he did say
You have fair won me heart, love here alone we will stay

Give over your ploughing and come along with me
Give over your ploughing and we'll plough the deep sea
We'll sail to America and happy we will be
We'll say farewell to old Ireland and Sligo County.

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 11-Jul-02.


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: 75074.1501@compuserve.com
Date: 18 May 97 - 09:34 AM

Hello Tim, I am actually looking for the lyrics of this song, too, but at the same time I am lucky enough to be in possession of a CD of B.Britten's folk songs arrangements where the song titled "The plough boy" is included. It is a recording featuring Benjamin Britten and Peter Pears. It was published under the DECCA's "LONDON" label in 1990. Hope this is of some help to you.

Best regards

Robert


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Barry Finn
Date: 21 May 97 - 12:13 AM

"I once was a plough boy but a soldier I am now I courted pretty Molly a milkmaid I .... I courted pretty Molly I delighted in her charms There's many the long night thatI rolled in her arms

Chorus; With me rant full tora laddie fol di die do".

Would this a ploughboy fitting the discription.


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Hutch
Date: 04 Jun 97 - 07:29 AM

I know of two songs about farmboys.

The first is the Jolly Ploughboy:

Come all you jolly plough boys and listen to me, I'll sing in the praise of the plough, For if we don't labour how shall we buy bread, Work, sing and be merry with all. (this is actually a corruption of two version I had sung as a boy, but it gives the idea) Tune in 3 time:- s/ddr/tdr/tdl/s-s/drm/smd/r-m/smr/mfs/ mrd/s-s/drs/frt/d-

The second is one that I can't actually remember but it is somewhere in my unctalogued 78 collecttion, on a 1920ish Zonophone disc called the Merry Farmboy.


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 06 Jun 97 - 01:53 AM

To Les,

I think we should start a thread on sol-fa notation, it may be the best way to communicate tunes via these threads. I have seen it many times on old manuscripts and sometimes attached to words only. It is based on Doh-re-me to give the notes of the scale and includes some time values as well i.e. crotchets quavers etc.

I have been able to work out some of the rules by looking the notation for tunes I know, but does anyone know all the rules?

Cheers,

Alan


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: MMario
Date: 03 Nov 00 - 04:44 PM

John_in_brisbane has sent me the gif for THE MERRY PLOUGHBOY - shall transcribe it shortly. More words then in the DT.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE MERRY PLOUGHBOY (John J. Blockley)
From: MMario
Date: 04 Nov 00 - 09:58 AM

THE MERRY PLOUGHBOY
(John J. Blockley 1870's (?))

O I once was a mer-ry plough-boy
I was a-ploughing of the fields all day
Till a ve-ry fun-ny thought came to me
that I should roam a-way
for I'm sick and tired of coun-try life
since the day that I was born
So I've been and joined the R. H. A.
And I'm off to-mor-row morn.

chorus: hur-rah for the scar-let and the blue
hel-mets glit-tring in the sun
and the hor-ses gal-lop
like light-ning with a fif-teen pound-er gun
And no more will I go har-vest-ing
or gath-er-ing the gol-den corn
For I've been and took the shill-ing
and I'm off to-mor-row morn.


Well I've laid aside my pick and spade
And I've lad aside my plough
And I've laid aside my two-tined fork,
I shall not want it now
For there's little sport in England
up in the yorkshire dales so high
And beneath the kings own standard, aye
we'll conquer or we'll die

But there's on thing I must tell you
of the girl I leave behind
And I hope she will prove true to me
and I'll prove true in kind
And when I do return again
a sergeant's wife she'll be
with three gold stripes across my arm
in the Royal Horse Artillery


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Greyeyes
Date: 04 Nov 00 - 10:57 AM

I remember singing the Britten ploughboy song when I was a choirboy of 11-13 yrs or so (mid 1970's). It has no connection with the IRA song. I can only remember the line "You forget the little ploughboy who whistles o'er the lea" (repeated) and I'm musically illiterate so short of singing it can't communicate the tune (click for lyrics).

This is a good example of what is being discussed in the English traditions thread, sorry to creep. The poster has asked for information about an English folk song, specifically stating it is NOT the IRA ploughboy song, and received a succession of posts about, guess what, the IRA ploughboy song. It is not a criminal offence to admit to knowing English songs, or to discuss things other than Irish music (which I love).


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: MartinRyan
Date: 04 Nov 00 - 05:14 PM

In fairness, Greyeyes, a large part of the thread was spent in pinning down the ENGLISH antecedent of the IRA version!

Regards


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Greyeyes
Date: 04 Nov 00 - 05:51 PM

My post sounds really snappy, I'm quite embarassed. I'd just posted to the English tradition thread and must have been feeling unusually patriotic. God knows why, my surname is Gahan and I'm more than half Irish.


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Subject: Tune Add: THE PLOUGHBOY
From: Snuffy
Date: 04 Nov 00 - 06:08 PM

Here's the tune for "The Ploughboy", as requested at the top of the thread. It is the one with "whistles o'er the lea" in, and was recorded by Pears with piano accompaniment by Britten. This version comes from Michael Raven's "One Thousand English Country Dance Tunes", self-published, 1984. Raven gives the format as AAB, and I think it would probably end on an A section also.

X: 168
T:THE PLOUGHBOY
M:2/4
L:1/16
B:One Thousand English Country Dance Tunes, ed. Michael Raven
K:C
:gf|
e2g2 c2e2|A4 G2c2|Bcde f2e2|e4 d2gf|
e2g2 c2e2|A4 G2c2|Bcde f2B2|c6 :|
K:G
g2|
f2f2 f2f2|g2G2 G2g2|f2f2 f2f2|g4 G2g2|
f2f2 f2f2|g2d2 e2B2|c2A2 d2F2|G6 ||

I'll post a couple of East Anglian versions of the Merry Ploughboy later

Wassail! V


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Subject: Lyr Add: SCARLET AND THE BLUE / JOLLY PLOUGHBOY
From: Snuffy
Date: 04 Nov 00 - 06:53 PM

THE SCARLET AND THE BLUE (1)

I stood beside the old grey mare,
And I stood beside my plough,
And I've laid aside my two-tine fork
'Cause I shall not want it now.
No more to work in the harvest field,
And gather in the golden corn.
I've been and joined the army
And I'm off tomorrow morn.

Then hurrah for the scarlet and the blue
See the helmets glitter in the sun.
And the bayonets flash like lighting
To the beating of the old militia drum
There's a flag in dear old Ireland
Pointing upwards to the sky.
And the watchword of our soldier is
"To conquer or to die".


"The scarlet and the blue is just the blue trousers and the scarlet tunic they used to have, didn't they?"
Collected 1983 from Roy Last at Stonham, Suffolk.

THE SCARLET AND THE BLUE (2) (JOLLY PLOUGHBOY)

I once was a merry ploughboy. I was ploughing in the fields one day,
When an idea came and struck me and I said I'd run away.
For I'm sick and tired of the country life and the place where I was born,
So I'm going to take the good King's shilling and I'm off tomorrow morn.

So Hurrah for the scarlet and the blue,
See the flags that waving in the sky,
And the watchword of our soldiers are,
We'll have Home Rule or die.


I stood beside my old grey mare, I stood beside my plough
No more would I go ploughing the fields, to reap or to sow
No more would I go harvesting that beautiful golden corn,
I've been and took the good King's shilling and I'm off tomorrow morn.

So hurrah for the scarlet and the blue,
See the helmets that glitter in the sun
And the bayonets shine like lighting
To the beating of the old militia drum
There's a flag in dear old Ireland
Waving proudly in the sky.
And the watchword of our soldiers are,
We'll have Home Rule or die.


Collected 1982 from Gordon Syrett (b 1887) at Mendlesham Green, Suffolk.

Wassail! V


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: MMario
Date: 04 Nov 00 - 06:57 PM

thanks snuff!


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Greyeyes
Date: 04 Nov 00 - 07:06 PM

Furthermore, I've just noticed the date at the top of this thread, and am now even more even embarassed.


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 04 Nov 00 - 09:52 PM

Don't be.  The first reply was from someone who hadn't bothered to read even one post!


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: JTT
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 01:32 PM

The IRA rather than RHA version of The Merry Ploughboy has much the same kind of pattern, but it's "I'm off to Dublin in the green, in the green, where the helmets glisten in the sun, where the rifles clash and the cannons flash to the rattle of a Thompson gun", or words to that effect. Old grey mare etc are standard issue, notwithstanding whichever army you choose to volunteer to.

Then there's another Merry Ploughboy which starts:

The lark in the morning, she rises from her nest
And she goes home in the evening with the dew all on her breast.
And like a merry ploughboy she whistles and she sings
She goes home in the evening with the dew all on her wings.


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 02:36 PM

Do a Forum search for the thread 'The Ploughboy Revisited', Sept, 1997, for the one collected by Benjamin Britten. You'll find out there who wrote it and who composed its tune.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE SCARLET AND THE BLUE (John J Blockley
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 30 Jul 01 - 02:26 PM

According to Roy Palmer in his book The Rambling Soldier, this is the original version, written in the 1870s. Odd that the Irish parody is in the DT but none of the English versions.

THE SCARLET AND THE BLUE
(John J Blockley)

Once I was a merry ploughboy going to plough the fields all day,
Till something came across my mind: I'd like to run away,
For I was tired of country life and the places I had seen,
So I came to be a soldier for Her Majesty the Queen.

Chorus: Hurrah for the Scarlet and the Blue and the helmets a-glittering in the sun
And the bay'nets flash like lightning to the beating of the old bass drum.
Hurrah for dear old England and her flag that's waving 'gainst the sky,
When the Captain of the Reg'ment says, We'll conquer or we'll die.

So I threw aside my old white slop and I threw aside my hoe,
I threw aside my old white slop no more to reap or mow.
No more I'll work in the harvest fields or go to reap the corn,
For I've been and took the shilling, boys, and I'm off tomorrow morn.

Ch.

I'm going to leave my mother, I am going far from her,
I know that she will miss me, for I'm her darling boy.
And if ever I return again I'll let them all see me,
With a star and medals on my breast a soldier brave I'll be.


K.A.


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Jul 01 - 03:00 PM

The RHA and The Scarlet and the Blue should be put in DT as well as the lark-ploughboy one JTT mentioned in his post. The IRA one gets more attention.


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: nutty
Date: 30 Jul 01 - 03:50 PM

It's taken a long time but I think this is what was required

THE PLOUGHBOY


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Jul 01 - 07:36 PM

Thanks, Nutty. The "Lark" Ploughboy has a beautiful tune. JTT posted a somewhat different verse, but his song is related to the one you brought up. There are probably more ploughboys out there.


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Snuffy
Date: 30 Jul 01 - 09:05 PM

THE PLOUGHBOY (THE WARWICKSHIRE R.H.A.) in the DT database


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: pavane
Date: 31 Jul 01 - 03:12 AM

Recorded by 'Oak' on (I think) 'Welcome to our fair'. I have it at home somewhere.


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: GUEST,Mike Cahill
Date: 31 Jul 01 - 03:22 AM

I know the tune as the curly headed ploughboy


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Sep 02 - 06:32 PM

Here's The Ploughboy in the Digital Tradition. I understand we have a number of related songs, but I'm not sure which are related and which are not. Here's a list - which ones fit with "The Ploughboy"?


  • The Ploughboy
    Come all you jolly ploughboys, come listen to my lays, And join with me in chorus, I'll sing the ploughboy's praise;
  • The Ploughboy (2) - deleted, don't know why - probably a duplicate
  • The Jolly Ploughboy
    Jack, the jolly ploughboy, was ploughing up his land; His horses lie beneath the shady tree.
  • The Ploughman (3)
    The ploughman he's a bonnie lad, His mind is ever true, jo;
  • The Ploughman (2)
    The ploughman he's a bonny lad, And does his work at leisure,
  • The Jolly Ploughboy (2)
    Come, all you jolly ploughboys, and help me to sing; I will sing in the praise of you all.
  • The Ploughboy (Warwickshire RHA)
    I am a jolly ploughboy and I'm ploughing up the fields all day, 'Til a silly little thought came into my head I thought I'd be away,
  • The Merry Ploughboy
    I am a merry ploughboy, I plough the fields all day,


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Subject: RE: The Ploughboy-anyone know it?
From: My guru always said
Date: 06 Sep 02 - 01:13 PM

Another Ploughboy Song


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ploughboy
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 29 Nov 15 - 03:13 PM

Joe, do you still want all of these ploughboys sorting out into Roud numbers or is it already done?

By the way there appears to be no evidence for the John Blockley connection, or the oft asserted performances by Harrigan and Hart who were as American as apple pie. The whole thing was started by guess who? A.L.L. and repeated without further research by the likes of Roy Palmer. It all looks very authoritative in their books and sleeve notes but without any apparent foundation.


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Subject: Lyr Add: 'A flaxen-headed cow-boy, as simple as...
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Nov 15 - 09:12 PM

This sounds like a version of the song OP originally wanted:

From The New Vocal Enchantress ([London]: C. Stalker, 1791), page 69:

S O N G
Sung by Mr. Blanchard, in the Comic Opera of the Farmer.

A flaxen-headed cow-boy, as simple as may be,
And next a merry plough-boy, I whistled o'er the lea:
But now a saucy footman, I strut in worsted lace,
And soon I'll be a butler, and wag my jolly face.

When steward I'm promoted, I'll snip a tradesman's bill,
My master's coffers empty, my pockets for to fill:
When lolling in my chariot, so great a man I'll be,
You'll forget the little plough-boy, that whistled o'er the lea.

I'll buy votes at elections, but when I've made the pelf,
I'll stand poll for the parliament, and then vote in myself:
Whatever's good for—me, sir, I never will oppose;
When all my ayes are sold off, why then I'll sell my noes.

I'll bawl, harangue, and paragraph, with speeches charm the ear,
And when I'm tir'd on my legs, then I'll sit down a peer.
In court or city honour, so great a man I'll be,
You'll forget the little plough-boy, that whistled o'er the lea.


[A similar song was posted here.]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Ploughboy
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 09 Sep 17 - 02:46 PM

To the best of my knowledge and not for want of searching, the origins of this song have still not come to light. Most versions have been collected since 1950, i.e., during the current revival but can easily be backdated at least to WWI when the song was claimed to have been popular among horse artillery regiments. An Essex fragment purported to date back to c1906 is in the Roud Index and general concensus on a possible date is c1880. I'm pretty certain it was never issued as a Music Hall song sheet as I have been searching religiously since the 1970s and have a pretty large Music Hall collection myself. The song titled 'Scarlet & Blue' from WWI is a different song and the similar song by Harrigan & Hart The Blue & the Grey is a Civil War song. It doesn't warrant a mention in Winstock's 'Songs & Music of the Redcoats, 1642-1902' and doesn't appear in any of the WWI song books either official or collected from the men.

So.....where do we go from here?


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