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Lyr Req: Siul a Ruin

DigiTrad:
BUTTERMILK HILL
I'LL SELL MY HAT, I'LL SELL MY COAT
SHULE AGRA or JOHNNY HAS GONE FOR A SOLDIER
SHULE AROON
SHULE AROON 1


Related threads:
Chords Req: Johnny Has Gone for a Soldier (16)
Shool, shool, shool la rue (29)
Gone the rainbow PP&M translation (13)
Chord Req: Siuil a Ruin Chords and sheet ... (33)
traditional tunes in Irish gaeilge (32)
Meaning: I'll dye my petticoat (47)
Lyr/Chords Req: Johnny has gone for a soldier (7)
Help: Siul a Ruin (36)
Help: Suil A Ruin, correct spelling? (18)
Lyr Req: Shule Aroon (23)
Help: Shule Aroon: sell my rock, rod, reel (59)
Dilemma with 'Siul A Ruin' (24)
(origins) Origins: Johnny Has Gone for a Soldier (15)
Lyr Req: Johnny Has Gone for a Soldier (44)
Lyr Req: Johnny Has Gone for a Soldier (10)
Shule Aroon / Shule Agra / Buttermilk Hill: Scots? (6)
Lyr Req: Johnnie Has Gone for a Soldier (10)
Lyr Add: Mickey's Gone for a Larborer (5)
Lyr Req: Suil A Ruin (6) (closed)
Siul A Run (5) (closed)


In Mudcat MIDIs:
Johnnie's Gone for a Soldier (Shule Agra)
shule agra (Johnnie's gone for a soldier) (faster version)
Siuil a ruin


GUEST 04 Mar 12 - 05:08 PM
MartinRyan 04 Mar 12 - 04:30 PM
MartinRyan 02 Mar 12 - 11:19 AM
Felipa 02 Mar 12 - 08:05 AM
MartinRyan 01 Mar 12 - 04:38 AM
MartinRyan 01 Mar 12 - 04:04 AM
MartinRyan 01 Mar 12 - 03:22 AM
GUEST,Philippa 29 Feb 12 - 06:53 PM
MartinRyan 01 Dec 11 - 06:19 AM
GUEST,Philippa 01 Dec 11 - 06:05 AM
MartinRyan 30 May 11 - 03:46 PM
MartinRyan 30 May 11 - 06:54 AM
GUEST 25 Oct 09 - 01:32 PM
maple_leaf_boy 14 Jul 09 - 08:33 PM
maple_leaf_boy 14 Jul 09 - 08:33 PM
Steve Gardham 08 Aug 08 - 01:28 PM
Suffet 07 Aug 08 - 10:13 PM
Willa 16 Jul 07 - 02:46 PM
GUEST,Celtic girl 15 Jul 07 - 09:22 PM
Genie 18 Oct 06 - 05:35 AM
GUEST 05 Aug 06 - 04:56 PM
Willa 12 Aug 05 - 03:02 PM
Le Scaramouche 12 Aug 05 - 02:44 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 12 Aug 05 - 02:39 PM
Le Scaramouche 12 Aug 05 - 02:17 PM
GUEST,DB 12 Aug 05 - 11:04 AM
Le Scaramouche 11 Aug 05 - 10:37 PM
Malcolm Douglas 11 Aug 05 - 09:59 PM
GUEST,MsBubbely@aol.com 11 Aug 05 - 08:29 PM
Jim Dixon 30 Aug 04 - 10:04 AM
GUEST,dublinsbest@hotmail.com 29 Aug 04 - 07:07 AM
GUEST 28 Jul 04 - 01:00 PM
GUEST,Fionnghaile Nic Chroice 19 Jul 04 - 04:15 PM
GUEST 09 Apr 04 - 06:27 PM
Noreen 04 Apr 04 - 04:22 PM
GUEST 03 Apr 04 - 04:24 PM
GUEST 03 Apr 04 - 03:31 PM
Jim Dixon 25 Jan 04 - 01:59 AM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 05 Dec 03 - 05:11 PM
GUEST,Philippa 05 Dec 03 - 05:08 PM
GUEST, Could someone please translate the chorus? 05 Dec 03 - 11:53 AM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 21 Nov 03 - 08:06 AM
GUEST,Alessandra 21 Nov 03 - 07:41 AM
Felipa 12 Apr 03 - 01:54 PM
Peter T. 12 Apr 03 - 11:00 AM
Jim McLean 12 Apr 03 - 09:48 AM
Jim McLean 12 Apr 03 - 09:26 AM
Felipa 12 Apr 03 - 07:03 AM
dick greenhaus 16 Jan 03 - 11:03 AM
GUEST,Q 15 Jan 03 - 06:15 PM
GUEST,Q 15 Jan 03 - 05:25 PM
GUEST,Q 15 Jan 03 - 03:07 PM
Bruce O. 22 Sep 99 - 04:24 PM
Allan C. 21 Sep 99 - 07:00 PM
Philippa 21 Sep 99 - 06:48 PM
ghamburg@vom.com 12 Sep 99 - 11:05 PM
Philippa 12 Sep 99 - 09:59 AM
11 Sep 99 - 10:13 AM
alison 11 Sep 99 - 12:53 AM
radriano 10 Sep 99 - 02:50 PM
alison 10 Sep 99 - 03:08 AM
Philippa 18 May 99 - 05:02 AM
Francy 10 Apr 99 - 12:17 PM
Bruce O. 09 Apr 99 - 02:15 PM
Bruce O. 24 Mar 99 - 12:44 PM
Art Thieme 23 Feb 99 - 11:16 AM
alison 23 Feb 99 - 02:58 AM
alison 23 Feb 99 - 02:46 AM
Bruce O. 23 Feb 99 - 02:27 AM
the Doppelganger 22 Feb 99 - 03:13 PM
Philippa 22 Feb 99 - 12:12 PM
Philippa 09 Dec 98 - 03:04 PM
mm 09 Dec 98 - 02:04 PM
Martin Ryan. 09 Dec 98 - 04:21 AM
Áine 08 Dec 98 - 06:08 PM
Bruce O. 08 Dec 98 - 06:01 PM
Áine 08 Dec 98 - 05:39 PM
Philippa 08 Dec 98 - 04:36 PM
Philippa 08 Dec 98 - 12:02 PM
Martin Ryan. 08 Dec 98 - 11:04 AM
Johannes Grob 08 Dec 98 - 10:35 AM
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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Siul a Ruin
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Mar 12 - 05:08 PM

I'm wondering about that red-dyed petticoat. Just as, you know, a fashion choice, it doesn't make sense to buy dye when you've sold everything else for your soldier-boy. ;)

I haven't done my research (sorry!) but I'd expect normally expect it to be a badge of prostitution - both as advertising and because many cities/cultures required all prostitutes to wear some kind of clear token, like red shoes or a yellow hat or whatever, both to mark their shame and to help the guys find the pros without accidentally waylaying honest women by mistake.

And prostitution would shame and horrify one's parents more than begging would.

Or am I wrong and it's just a way to fill out a rhyming line?

--Nonie


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Siul a Ruin
From: MartinRyan
Date: 04 Mar 12 - 04:30 PM

refresh


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Siul a Ruin
From: MartinRyan
Date: 02 Mar 12 - 11:19 AM

Here's the Gaeilge version in Clandillon:
------------------------------------------

A bhuachaillín aobhínn alainn óg
Ba leathan do chroí, ba dheas do phóg
Mo léangan mise leat féin go deo
Is go dté tú a mhúirnín slán

chorus:
Siúl,Siúl,Siúl a ghrá
Níl leigheas ar fáil ach leigheas an bháis
Ó d'fhag tú mise is bocht mo chás
Is go dté tú a mhúirnín slán


Is minic do bhréag sé mé ar a ghlúin
Ag cur a scéal dom féin in iúl
Ach chaill mé é agusé mo rún
Is go dté tú a mhúirnín slán

Do shníomh mé líon is díol mé é
Is dhíol mé dhó mo thúirnín féin
'S cheannaigh mé claidheamh do ghrá mo chléibh
Is go dté tú a mhúirnín slán

Ach, chuireadh ar Rí Shéamais ruaig
Is d'imigh na géanna leis ar luais
Is d'imigh mo bhuachaill leo, mo nuar
Ó go dté tú a mhúirnín slán

Do shuí mé síos ar thulaigh mhóir
Ag dearcadh ar a loing fé sheól
D'iompóinn muileann le gach deór
Is go dté tú a mhúirnín slán

-----------------------------------------------

I've roughly modernised the spelling on-the-fly.

Regards

Ref.:
"Londubh an Chairn"
being
Songs of the Irish Gaels
in staff and sol-da
With English Metrical Translations

Edited by
Maighread ni Annagain agus Seamus de Chlanndiolúin
(1927)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Siul a Ruin
From: Felipa
Date: 02 Mar 12 - 08:05 AM

Chubby Parker doesn't have verses related to Siúl a rúin
I can't make out the nonsense third line of his chorus, it's not what Art Thieme sings about finding a pretty bobolink. Maybe someone with better ears or better headphones could transcribe the chorus for Mudcat
enjoyable listening at http://www.archive.org/details/ChubbyParker-01-20

and can anyone find us the tune to this Missouri version of Siúl a rúin/ shule aroon with nonsense chorus?:
@displaysong.cfm?SongID=5315?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Siul a Ruin
From: MartinRyan
Date: 01 Mar 12 - 04:38 AM

A quick glance at the five verse GAELIC set in Clandillon (Hyde's set as described in the note) suggests that Philippa's version from Risteard MacGabhann (1998) is a subset of Hyde, with minor changes. I'll transcribe it all .... eventually (tá sé sa sean-chló!).

Regards

p.s. Of course, now we need to find out where Clandillon's ENGLISH words came from! The note appears to refer to the tune?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Siul a Ruin
From: MartinRyan
Date: 01 Mar 12 - 04:04 AM

OK. Here is the text in Clandillon/Hannagan's book, including the note:

----------------------------------------------
SIUBHAL A GHRADH.
(SHULE A GRÁ.)
I
Oh bouchal mine, my heart you charm,
Your love was kind, your kiss was warm,
I'd wish to shield thee from all harm
Iss go day thoo avourneen slawn !*

Shule, Shule Shule a ghra,
Only death can heal my woe,
Since the boy of my heart from me did go,
Iss go day thoo avourneen dawn.


II.
' Twas often he'd court me on his knee,
And tales of love he'd tell to me,
But now my love is o'er the sea,
Iss go day thoo avourneen dawn.

Shule, Shule, etc.

III.
I'd sell my rock, I'd sell my reel,
I'd sell my only spinning wheel,
To buy my love a sword of steel
Iss go day thoo avourneenn dawn.

Shule, Shule, etc.

IV.
King James was routed in the fray
The " wild-geese" went with him away,
My boy went too, that dreary day
Iss go day thoo avourneen dawn.

Shine, Shule, etc.

* Iss go day, etc. : May you go, my love, in safety
! Shule a ghra: Come, beloved.

NOTE:
This Waterford version of Siubhal a Ghradh has never been published. It was usually sung in English to "I wish I were on yonder Hill". I have sung it repeatedly using Dr. Hyde's Gaelic words, to which it is here set. This version is major. Two minor variants have been published. Both in the lah mode. My mother used to sing this air to the English Words.

M ni A (Mairead ní Annagain)

------------------------------------------
Looking back at the thread, the GAELIC version in Clandillon appears to be the "Hyde version" referred to earlier. I'll follow that up also ...... eventually!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Siul a Ruin
From: MartinRyan
Date: 01 Mar 12 - 03:22 AM

Philippa

Apologies for the delay! The book is now precariously perched on my desk, open at the correct page - I'll transcribe or scan it later today. I promise! ;>)>

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Siul a Ruin
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 29 Feb 12 - 06:53 PM

reminder to Martin Ryan re Clandillon query

also question for Art Thieme: is the Chubby Parker version recognisably related to Siúl a Rúin or is it only your adaptation with verses from Buttermilk Hill (or Butternut Hill)that is similar to the Irish song?
I haven't heard the Parker song yet. The versions I know of Siúl A Ghrá, Siúl a Rúin and Buttermilk Hill/Johnny has gone for a Soldier all have fairly similar albeit not identical airs.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Siul a Ruin
From: MartinRyan
Date: 01 Dec 11 - 06:19 AM

Hi Philippa

I'll dig out Clandillon's book (Hmmmm.... Wonder if it's online at this stage?) and transcribe his verses.

Not sure where I picked up the info about Hyde's involvement - I'll try to check back.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Siul a Ruin
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 01 Dec 11 - 06:05 AM

did you get any more info re Hyde, Martin? And I'd like to see the additional two verses from Clandillon (or from Hyde)

People are saying there is no proof that the song was sung in Ireland before the 19th century and that it may refer to the Napoleonic wars rather than the Wild Geese. Well, in Irish the song does refer to "d'imigh na géanna", the geese are gone. Admittedly a song may refer to something that happened well before the song was composed (whether we are talking about Wild Geese from Ireland or Buttermilk Hill and the American Revolution). From what I read on this discussion thread, the 19th century broadsides show that by then the song was widely disseminated in English language version in the British Isles. So it may have been sung in Irish for some time previously.

Buttermilk Hill was indeed the site of a battle in the American War of Independence according to this article about Early Pocantico History

My owm theory is that the song was brought to America by immigrants both before AND after the Irish famine, and disseminated from more than one immigrant source.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: MartinRyan
Date: 30 May 11 - 03:46 PM

In fact, it appears that what happened in Ireland is that the poet A P Graves published a collated version of the existing macaronic song, towards the end of the 19th C. The collector, poet and folklorist Douglas Hyde then produced a (loose) metrical translation into Irish - which became independently popular.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: MartinRyan
Date: 30 May 11 - 06:54 AM

Philippa's version consists of three verses from the five given in Clandillon's Songs of the Irish Gaels, rendered in modern irish spelling and script and with some small changes of angle i.e. use of second person where the other uses third etc.

The notes in the text are slightly confusing but imply that these are "Dr. Douglas Hyde's Gaelic words" i.e. that Hyde collected this set. I'll check later.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Oct 09 - 01:32 PM

Click here for an interesting article on one version of this song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: maple_leaf_boy
Date: 14 Jul 09 - 08:33 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMROre57y18&feature=related


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: maple_leaf_boy
Date: 14 Jul 09 - 08:33 PM

I was hoping to add this, but I see it's here. I found a nice version
of this song. The singer has a soft voice, and is playing the harp.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 08 Aug 08 - 01:28 PM

I've had a quick flick through this thread and nobody yet appears to have noted that at least 3 of the regular stanzas appeared on various Scottish broadsides of the 18thc century.
Rock and reel
Dye petticoats
Sad I sit on yonders hill
and should perhaps be considered as commonplaces/floaters. I f I remember rightly the last one is a commonplace even in Child ballads.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: Suffet
Date: 07 Aug 08 - 10:13 PM

Greetings:

I just added a new anti-war song to my SoundClick music page. It gave it the poetic, symbolic title of Bring Our Soldiers Home, and I set it to the tune of Siúil a Rún, sometimes phonetically transliterated from the Gaelic as Shul Aroon. When you go to my SoundClick music page, it will be the first one at the top. You are welcome to listen to it on-line or download it for free. Here's a clickable link.

I drafted the song back in December. Joel Landy added the final verse, and Anne Price helped polish everything up. The three of us are therefore sharing the credit equally. Here are the words:

BRING OUR SOLDIERS HOME
Tune: Siúil a Rún (traditional)
New words: Steve Suffet, Joel Landy, and Anne Price ©2008

[Begin on chorus]
Home, home, bring our soldiers home.
When you stand for peace, you never stand alone.
Home, home, bring our soldiers home.
Let's bring our soldiers home,
From the army.

We shall not sit with tear drops in our eyes,
We shall not listen to their vicious lies,
We shall stand for peace, and we shall organize,
To bring our soldiers home,
From the army. [Repeat chorus]

We shall not bathe ourselves in bitter tears,
We shall not lose ourselves in darkest fears,
We shall stand up proud and fight the profiteers,
Let's bring our soldiers home,
From the army. [Repeat chorus]

We shall not lose when we are all as one,
And say forever that the war is done,
We shall save our every daughter and save our every son,
Let's bring our soldiers home,
From the army. [Repeat chorus twice]


With a little good luck, Bring Our Soldiers Home will soon be just a historic artifact. Let's hope so.

--- Steve


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: Willa
Date: 16 Jul 07 - 02:46 PM

Celtic girl
see post from Philippa re chorus, Dec 03 (it's a long thread!)
Two extra verses I have:
I wish, I wish, I wish in vain.
Wish I had my heart again -
in vain,I think, I'd not complain
Is go dté tú mo mhúirnín slán

I sold my rock, sold my reel
Sold my only spinning wheel.
Now he's dead upon the field.
Is go dté tú mo mhúirnín slán


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST,Celtic girl
Date: 15 Jul 07 - 09:22 PM

Here are the lyrics as I have them. This version either omits verses or others have been added later. As best as I can guess, the chorus (roughly translated into English) is "I wish, I wish, I wish in vain. I wish I had my heart again and vainly think I'd not complain". I read also that "Is go dté tú mo mhúirnín slán" means "And may you go safely my darling".


I wish I were on yonder hill
'Tis there I'd sit and cry my fill
'Til every tear would turn a mill
Is go dté tú mo mhúirnín slán

Chorus:
Siúil, siúil, siúil a rún
Siúil go sochair agus siúil go ciúin
Siúil go doras agus éalaigh liom
Is go dté tú mo mhúirnín slán

I'll sell my rock, I'll sell my reel
I'll sell my only spinning wheel
To buy my love a sword of steel         
Is go dté tú mo mhúirnín slán

Chorus

I'll dye my petticoats, I'll dye them red
And 'round the world I'll beg my bread
Until my parents shall wish me dead         
Is go dté tú mo mhúirnín slán

But now my love has gone to France
To try his fortune to advance
If he e'er comes back, 'tis but a chance         
Is go dté tú mo mhúirnín slán


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Subject: Suil a Ruin / Shool Aroon / Shule Agra
From: Genie
Date: 18 Oct 06 - 05:35 AM

I'm wondering how the seeming nonsensical words used by PP& M (e.g., "shule a rack shack, shule a bobba coon") evolved from the original Gaelic words to Suil a Ruin or Suil Agra.    I can see how "suil" became "shool" of course, but there seem to be some missing links between the Gaelic versions posted here and the versions by PP&M, Chubby Parker, etc., that seem to use nonsense syllables in the chorus.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Gra
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Aug 06 - 04:56 PM


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: Willa
Date: 12 Aug 05 - 03:02 PM

Guest DB This link looks interesting http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/cronin.htm (Blickifier isn't working for me)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: Le Scaramouche
Date: 12 Aug 05 - 02:44 PM

It bugs me when people immediately assume that because her love has gone to France to seek his fortune he's with the Wild Geese.
Given the earliest date published, it's far more logical that he's a soldier fighting against Napoleon and company. Look at soldier songs from the same period, they use similar phrases.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 12 Aug 05 - 02:39 PM

The Napoleonic Wars, as Le Scaramouche says, seems to be the logical origin of the lyrics. The first known printing, as noted by the late Bruce O near the beginning of this thread, is 1825.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: Le Scaramouche
Date: 12 Aug 05 - 02:17 PM

Is it on the Voice of the People perchance?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST,DB
Date: 12 Aug 05 - 11:04 AM

I've looked through all of the threads on this song (I have to say, not terribly rigorously) and am amazed to find only one mention, of what I think to be, one of the greatest recordings of this song ever made: that of Elizabeth Cronin, of Macroom. Co. Cork, Ireland. This was made, in the early 1950s, by either Alan Lomax or Peter Kennedy (unfortunately, I've lost the notes to the record). The record is: The Folk Songs of Britain, Vol. 1: Songs of Courtship (Topic 12T157, 1968 - formerly issued by Caedmon Records, New York, 1961).
Mrs Cronin was very old when this recording was made, and the microphone had to be held very close to her lips, but her rendition of the song is beautiful and has haunted me for years.
I think that the recordings of Elizabeth Cronin may have been re-issued more recently than 1968, on CD (in Ireland?), but I don't have the details to hand.
If anyone has mentioned Mrs Cronin earlier, please accept my apologies and ignore this posting. On the other hand it may prompt someone to seek out the recordings of a truly great traditional singer and be inspired by them.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: Le Scaramouche
Date: 11 Aug 05 - 10:37 PM

The Robert Louis Stevenson quotes mean little as the master of Ballantrae is from 1888. Well after the song became popular.
My own feelings are that it's a lovely, sentimental song written about the Napoleonics Wars. Going to France to seek one's fortune MAY be about the Wild Geese, but there are dozens of other, more likely possibilities. The Napoleonic Wars especially, as they were the most recent and vivid ones in people's imagination. Had been going on for generations. No need for historical convolutions like the Wild Geese, Jacobites or the Revolutionary War when the obvious stares you in the face.
Before anyone starts on about ordinary soldiers not carrying swords, take it as a bit of poetic licence.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 11 Aug 05 - 09:59 PM

See the extensive list of links (top of the page) to other discussions here on the same subject. It's unlikely that there is anything new to add unless you can go back a century and more.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST,MsBubbely@aol.com
Date: 11 Aug 05 - 08:29 PM

The version I learned in grade school should probably predate PP&M, but I am not sure. It would have been somewhere in the vicinity of 1960-1963.
Here I sit on Buttermilk Hill.
-------------- and cry my fill.
-----------------------------
Johnny's gone for a soldier.

Oh, my baby oh, my love,
Gone the rainbow gone the dove.
Your father was my only love.
Johnny's gone for a soldier.

Shool, shool shool aroon.
Shool a rack shack,
shool a bobba coo.
-------------------
Johnny's gone for a soldier.

There are some lines I can't remember and the rest is the recollection in my 50's of words I may have misinterpreted at 11 or 12. The word Buttermilk is what I remember, but may have been corrupted by later hearing the PP&M version. Does anyone esle remember this or any thing similar?


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Subject: Lyr Add: JOHNNY IS GONE FOR A SOLDIER
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Aug 04 - 10:04 AM

Mrs. Murphy: I've checked The Lester S. Levy Collection of Sheet Music and The Library of Congress American Memory Collection – usually the best sources for sheet music – but I've found only lyrics, not notes.

However, since I did find one version apparently not posted here before, I might as well post it for posterity:

Copied from http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/amss:@field(DOCID+@lit(as201910)) :

JOHNNY IS GONE FOR A SOLDIER

I'll trace these gardens o'er and o'er,
Meditate on each sweet flower,
Thinking of each happy hour.
Oh, Johnny is gone for a soldier.

CHORUS: Shool, Shool, Shool, agrah!
Time can only ease my woe,
Since the lad of my heart from me did go.
Oh, Johnny is gone for a soldier.

Some say my love is gone to France,
There his fortune to advance,
And if I find him, it's but a chance.
Oh, Johnny is gone for a soldier.

I'll sell my frock. I'll sell my wheel.
I'll by my love a sword of steel,
So in the battle he may reel.
Oh, Johnny is gone for a soldier.

I wish I was on yonder hill.
It's there I'd sit and cry my fill,
So every tear may turn a mill.
Oh, Johnny is gone for a soldier.

I'll dye my dress. I'll dye it red.
All over the world I'll beg my bread,
So my parents may think me dead.
Oh, Johnny is gone for a soldier.


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Subject: sheet music for Suil a Ruin version in lord of td
From: GUEST,dublinsbest@hotmail.com
Date: 29 Aug 04 - 07:07 AM

I am planning my will and such, and would like to have a recording of me singing suil a ruin played at my funeral, but cannot find any sheet music for it. if you know where i can find this, i would be very grateful for your help.
thank you,
Mrs. Murphy


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST
Date: 28 Jul 04 - 01:00 PM


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST,Fionnghaile Nic Chroice
Date: 19 Jul 04 - 04:15 PM

Dia duit gach cailin agus buachaill,
Sin an darna lesh go mach gus go mhaill me mall na deireadh leitir, Suil a Ruin de Clannad go blasta agus Maire go iontach maith,
Slan anois,
Fionnghaile


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST
Date: 09 Apr 04 - 06:27 PM

I'm sorry Noreen. No hard feelings at all whatsoever and thank you for the polite correction.(=! I got the composed chorus on a site which listed it as the translation & although I realized that the Irish text wouldn't translate perfectly in that manner, I figured it would work to make sure people didn't think I was singing gibberish for the chorus.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: Noreen
Date: 04 Apr 04 - 04:22 PM

GUEST, what you have there is not a translation of the chorus, but is a composed chorus based on the translation (provided above by Philippa).


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Subject: RE: tune wanted: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST
Date: 03 Apr 04 - 04:24 PM

for "some form of the tune", listen to the Mudcat midis, links at the top of the page (assuming they are working)


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST
Date: 03 Apr 04 - 03:31 PM

hmm,
I have a translation of the chorus as;
Come, come, come, O love
Quickly come to me, softly move;
Come to the door, and away we'll flee,
And safe for aye may my darling be.

This would mean that at the end of every verse the last line of the chorus is sung-or at least in the versions I know of. Does anyone have sheet music or at least some form of the tune of Siuil a Run? I have all the versions of lyrics I'll ever need, but I haven't been able to find any sheet music with the tune on it for voice. Any help on finding an Irish songbook with Siuil a Run in it would be wonderful. My email is skydragon54@earthlink.net


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Subject: Lyr Add: JOHNNY IS GONE FOR A SOLDIER
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 25 Jan 04 - 01:59 AM

Copied from The Library of Congress American Memory Collection:
(H. De Marsan, Publisher, No. 54 Chatham Street, N. Y. [no date])

JOHNNY IS GONE FOR A SOLDIER

I'll trace these gardens o'er and o'er,
Meditate on each sweet flower,
Thinking of each happy hour.
Oh, Johnny is gone for a soldier.

CHORUS: Shool, shool, shool, agrah!
Time can only ease my woe,
Since the lad of my heart from me did go.
Oh, Johnny is gone for a soldier.

Some say my love is gone to France,
There his fortune to advance,
And if I find him it's but a chance,
Oh, Johnny is gone for a soldier. CHORUS

I'll sell my frock. I'll sell my wheel.
I'll buy my love a sword of steel,
So in the battle he may reel,
Oh, Johnny is gone for a soldier. CHORUS

I wish I was on yonder hill.
It's there I'd sit and cry my fill,
So every tear my turn a mill,
Oh, Johnny is gone for a soldier. CHORUS

I'll dye my dress. I'll dye it red.
All over the world I'll beg my bread,
So my parents may think me dead.
Oh, Johnny is gone for a soldier. CHORUS


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 05 Dec 03 - 05:11 PM

Philippa

Either the elves have been at work merging threads again or I'm away with the fairies!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 05 Dec 03 - 05:08 PM

walk quietly my love, walk to the door and come away with me, and may you go safely, my love.

Alessandra, see 8 Dec 98 message #2 from Philippa, above

Martin said "I think there's a translation on another thread" ; maybe but there's one here!


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST, Could someone please translate the chorus?
Date: 05 Dec 03 - 11:53 AM

"Siúl,Siúl,Siúl, a rúin
Siúl go socair agus siúl go ciúin
Siúl go doras
Agus ealaigh liom
Is go dté tú mo mhúirnín slán..."

That would be awesome If somone could translate that for me!

You can e-mail me at AingealNaMara@mac.com
-Kate Doherty


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 21 Nov 03 - 08:06 AM

I think there's a translation on another thread, but here's a quick version:

Walk, walk, walk my love
there is no cure but death
Since you left, my lot is sad
May you go safely, my love.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST,Alessandra
Date: 21 Nov 03 - 07:41 AM

Hello everybody. I'm writing from Italy and hope you will excuse me if I make some mistake in writing here.

I've just known this wonderful song and... could anyone tell me what's the meaning of these verses (and the correct spelling, if possible)?

chorus: Siúl,Siúl,Siúl a ghrá
Níl leigheas ar fáil ach leigheas an bháis
Ó d'fhag tú mise is bocht mo chás
Is go dté tú mo mhúirnín slán

Many thanks


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Subject: RE: Siúl a Rúin
From: Felipa
Date: 12 Apr 03 - 01:54 PM

excellent, míle buíochas - mòran taing - 1000 thank-yous to Jim


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: Peter T.
Date: 12 Apr 03 - 11:00 AM

What a pleasant thing to read some Stevenson (what a weird novel that was!). yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: Jim McLean
Date: 12 Apr 03 - 09:48 AM

......From that hour, at least, began the siege of Mrs. Henry; a thing so deftly carried on that I scarce know if she was aware of it herself, and that her husband must look on in silence. The first parallel was opened (as was made to appear) by accident. The talk fell, as it did often, on the exiles in France; so it glided to the matter of their songs.   
"There is one," says the Master, "if you are curious in these matters, that has always seemed to me very moving. The poetry is harsh; and yet, perhaps because of my situation, it has always found the way to my heart. It is supposed to be sung, I should tell you, by an exile's sweetheart; and represents perhaps, not so much the truth of what she is thinking, as the truth of what he hopes of her, poor soul! in these far lands." And here the Master sighed, "I protest it is a pathetic sight when a score of rough Irish, all common sentinels, get to this song; and you may see, by their falling tears, how it strikes home to them. It goes thus, father," says he, very adroitly taking my lord for his listener, "and if I cannot get to the end of it, you must think it is a common case with us exiles." And thereupon he struck up the same air as I had heard the Colonel whistle; but now to words, rustic indeed, yet most pathetically setting forth a poor girl's aspirations for an exiled lover; of which one verse indeed (or something like it) still sticks by me:—         O, I will dye my petticoat red,
With my dear boy I'll beg my bread,
Though all my friends should wish me dead,
For Willie among the rushes, O!

He sang it well, even as a song; but he did better yet a performer. I have heard famous actors, when there was not a dry eye in the Edinburgh theatre; a great wonder to behold; but no more wonderful than how the Master played upon that little ballad, and on those who heard him, like an instrument, and seemed now upon the point of failing, and now to conquer his distress, so that words and music seemed to pour out of his own heart and his own past, and to be aimed directly at Mrs. Henry.
Jim McLean


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: Jim McLean
Date: 12 Apr 03 - 09:26 AM

From 'persecutions endured by Mr Henry.....The Master of Ballantrae'.
He cocked his hat at me, as if I had been to blame for this partiality; then changed again into his usual swaggering civility, shook me by the hand, and set off down to the boat, with the money under his arms, and whistling as he went the pathetic air of shule aroon. It was the first time I had heard that tune; I was to hear it again, words and all, as you shall learn, but I remember how that little stave of it ran in my head after the freetraders had bade him "Wheesht, in the deil's name," and the grating of the oars had taken its place, and I stood and watched the dawn creeping on the sea, and the boat drawing away, and the lugger lying with her foresail backed awaiting it.
Jim McLean


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Subject: Lyr Add: Shuile Agra
From: Felipa
Date: 12 Apr 03 - 07:03 AM

The following is published in Seán McMahon,The Poolbeg Book of Irish Ballads. Dublin: Poolbeg, 1991. The second verse is similar to the Irish language verse "Is minic a bhréag tú mé ar do ghlúin, ..."
Seán's a man I don't meet everyday, but he doesn't live far from me, so maybe someday I'll question him about the source of this version. The words are very similar to a broadside version, Shula Agrah,published by Haly (19th century), which Bruce O. contributed to Mudcat 22 Sept 1999.

McMahon's notes:
"Eighteenth-century ballad associated with service in Europrean armies with residual Irish in the title and the first and last lines of the refrain. There are many versions since it is easily adaptable to particular places - the Brandon Hill named here is often changed. The title means literally, "Walk, love." and the almost buried [ie, corrupted] Irish of the last lines means, "May my darling travel safely."

SHUILE AGRA [note, stress the second syllable in Agra]
Anonymous

As I roved through my new garden bowers,
To gaze upon the fast fading flowers,
And think upon the happiest hours
That fled in the Summer's bloom.

chorus
Shuile, shuile, shuile agra,
Time alone can ease my woe;
Since the lad of my heart from me did go
Gotheen mavourneen slaun.

'Tis often I sat on my true-lover's knee
And many a fond story he told me.
He told me things that ne'er should be.
Gotheen mavourneen slaun.

I'll sell my rock, I'll sell my reel,
When flax is spun I'll sell my wheel,
To buy my love a sword of steel,
Gotheen mavourneen slaun.

I'll dye my petticoat, I'll die it red
And round the world I'll beg my bread,
That all my friends should wish me dead.
Gotheen mavourneen slaun.

I wish I were on Brandon Hill
'Tis there I'll sit and cry my fill,
That every tear would turn a mill
Gotheen mavourneen slaun.

No more am I that blooming maid
That used to rove the valley shade,
My youth and bloom are all decayed,
Gotheen mavourneen slaun.

Shuile, shuile, shuile agra,
Time alone can ease my woe;
Since the lad of my heart from me did go
Gotheen mavourneen slaun.

-----
I saw a 1995 message in IrTrad-L from Breandán Dalton in which he tells of Siúl a Rúin being sung in Scotland: "It was first made popular in Scotland during the Jacobite rebellion by Irish kerns fighting for Charles, and it gets a namecheck in [Robert Louis Stevenson's] novel 'The master of Ballintrae'."

Bruce O. also gives a Scottish version in this thread
Can anyone verify & quote The Master of Ballantrae citation?


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 16 Jan 03 - 11:03 AM

This song may hold the record for most-mutilated Gaelic.

A version collected in Wisconson goes (similar to what Art posted)

I'll sell my hat and sell my coat
To buy my wife a little boat
And down the river we will float
Come bibble in the lush-eye-lor-rie.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 15 Jan 03 - 06:15 PM

Yikes! I duplicated BruceO's post. Sound asleep I guess. Please remove the one that is a duplicate, but leave the "parridy."


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 15 Jan 03 - 05:25 PM

Lyr. Add: SHULEAGRA, Most Admire'd Parridy on

There is none but the powers above,
Can tell how I esteem my love,
He was as mild just as the dove,
Cuththeethuvorneen slawn,

Chorus:
Gone, gone, he is gone agrah,
My heart for him is greiveing sore,
Since he has left the Irish-shore
Oh cuththeethuvorneen slawn,

am an heires and is my joy, (?) (sic!)
With truth I love my blackhair'd boy,
his absence does me sore anoy,
Cuththeethuvorneen slawn,

To beg for him I'd feel no shame
But now on Rusia's crimson plains,
I fear my darling he lies slain,
Oh cuththeethuvorneen slawn

Its stormy winds now keeps me heare,
Or eis I would pursue my dear,
But after him I will shure'y steer,
Oh cuththeethuvorneen slawn,

Its true indeed here I must stay,
Until I see the harvest day,
When fragant flowers the will be gay,
Oh cuththeethuvorneen slawn,

No roaring billows then I'd fear,
For him I'd sail of far and near,
Dead or alive I love my dear,
Oh cuththeethuvorneen slawn,

I see no fault in all my dear,
He was noble virtues mild and fair,
For him I's shed a many a tear,
Oh cuthhtheethuvorneen slawn,

I'll (?) never will deny my dear,
found him constant as the dove,
Come send him back you powers above,
Oh cuththeethuvorneen slawn,

There may have been more- thank the "powers above" that it is lost. Spellings not changed.
Bodleian, Ballads Catalogue, Harding B26(497), printed by P. Brereton, Dublin, ca. 1867.
The reference to "Rusia" suggests the 1850s and the Crimean War.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 15 Jan 03 - 03:07 PM

Adding another version, printed in Cork, that might have made it to North America before the Civil War. Similar to other posted versions, but some differences.

Lyr. Add: SHULE AGRAH

Oft I roved my garden bowers;
To gaze upon fast fading flowers,
And think upon past happy hours,
That's fled like summer's bloom

    Shul, Shule, Shule agrah,
Time can never end my woe,
Since the lad of my heart did go,
    Gudhe tough, gudhe, tough, slaun

No more am I that blooming maid,
That used to rove the valley's shade;
My youth, my bloom, are both decayed
And every charm is gone
    Shuld, shule, shule, etc.

His eyes were black, his coat was blue,
His hair was fair, his heart was true,
I wish in my heart I was with you
Gudhe tough, gude lough, slaun (sic!)
    Shule, Shule, Shule, etc.

The time can only ease my woe
Since the lad of my heart from me did go
Uska dhe, uska dhe, mavourneen slaun,
I'll sell my rack, I'll sell my reel
When my flax is out I'll sell my wheel,
To buy my love a sword and shield,
    Gudhe tough, gudhe tough, etc.

I wish I was in younder hill,
It's there I'd sit and cry my fill,
That every tear would turn a mill
Gudhe tough, gudhe tough slaun,
    Shule, shule, shule, etc.

Oh I sat on my love's knee
Many a fond story he told to me
He said many things that ne'er will be
    Gudhe tough, Gudhe tough, etc.

I'll dye my petticoat, I'ss dye it red,
That round the world I may beg my bread,
And then my parents would wish me dead
Gudhe tough, Gudhe tough slaun
    Shule, shule, shule, etc.

Time can only ease my woe
Since the lad of my heart from me did go
    Uske dhe, uske dhe, mavourneen slaun.

Bodleian Collection, Harding B26(602), 18--, printer Haly, Cork.
Note: spelling left as printed.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SHULA AGRAH
From: Bruce O.
Date: 22 Sep 99 - 04:24 PM

Here's a poorly printed and unusual broadside version. I think the printer, Haly, was mostly active in the 2nd quarter of the 19th century.]

                 Shula Agrah

Oft I roved my garden bowers;
    To gaze upon fast fading flowers,
And think upon past happy hours,
    That's fled like summer's bloom.
         Shul, Shule, Shule Arah
Time can only ease my woe
Since the lad of my heart did go
    Gudhe, Tough, guidhe tough slaun

No more am I that blooming maid
That used to rove the valley's shade
My youth, my bloom, are both decayed
    And every charm is gone
        Shuld, Shule, Shule, etc.

For now he's gone to other climes
To seek one more pleasing to his mind
But ah, the maid he left behind
    Shall love him best of all
        Shule, Shule, Shule etc

His eyes were black, his coat was blue
His hair was fair, his heart was true,
I wish in my heart I was with you
    Gudhe tough, gudhe tough slaun
        Shule, shuel, shule, etc

Time can only ease may woe
Since the lad of my heart from me did go
    Uska dhe, uske dhe, mavourneen slaun
I'll sell my rack, I'll sell my reel
When my flax is out I'll sell my wheel
    Gudhe tough, gudhe tough &c

I wish I was in younder hill
It's there I'd sit and cry my fill,
That every tear would turn a mill
    Gudhe tough, gudhe tough slaun
        Shule, Shule, Shule, &c,

Oft I sat on my love's knee
Many a fond story he told me
He said many things that ne'r will be
    Gudhe tough, gudhe tough, &c,

I'll dye my petticoat, I'll dye it red
That round the world I may be my bread
And then my parents would wish me dead
        Shule, shule, shule etc.

Time can only ease my woe
Since the lad of my heart from me did go
    Uske dhe, uska dhe, mavourneen slaun

    Haly, Printer, Cork

It would be nice to have some documentary evidence that some form of the song was earlier than the 19th century, but I haven't seen any yet.


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Subject: Butternut vs. Buttermilk
From: Allan C.
Date: 21 Sep 99 - 07:00 PM

I wonder when it stopped being Butternut and changed to Buttermilk? I haven't seen any reference to Buttermilk Hill outside of the PP&M version. Has anyone else?


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Subject: Siúl a Rúin &Butternut Hill
From: Philippa
Date: 21 Sep 99 - 06:48 PM

The first American version I heard of Siúl a Rúin was called Buttermilk Hill. In John & Alan Lomax, "Folk Song:USA", 'Johnny has gone for a soldier' commences with the lines, 'Sad I sit on Butternut Hill'
I quote from the Lomax notes, which place the version in the American Revolutionary War:"Although Joyce, the Irish collector, identifies 'Shule Aroon' with the period between 1691 and 1745, when the Irish enlisted and fought with the armies of the French, its truly exquisite Irish melody has carried it into every quarter of America. Chanteymen on the clippers sung it at the capstan, lumberjacks had their version for the deacon seat, sodbusters made it over into a play-party tune, Negro children used it as a game song, and an old lady from Waco, Texas, sent it to us as a Cherokee Indian song, believing that her garbled Gaelic refrain was Cherokee. Our present version comes from John Allison, whose family have for generations lived on the west bank of the Hudson near Butternut Hill. One of the Allison family marched with Washington's army and heard the men singing this, the most haunting of American soldier's songs."


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Subject: RE: notation and Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: ghamburg@vom.com
Date: 12 Sep 99 - 11:05 PM

To The person who asked me for the notation to Siuil a ruin I have the GIF please send me your E-Mail address again. Greg


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Siúl a Rúin, Shule aroon, etc
From: Philippa
Date: 12 Sep 99 - 09:59 AM

lots of links This is probably the most comprehensive thread. But there are at least half a dozen others, with various titles and spellings. If you haven't had enough with this thread, the above link should get you to another thread where you'll find lilnks to the other threads and DT versions of the lyrics.

By the way, if you write súil instead of siúl, you are writing the Irish word for 'eye' not for 'walk' and it would be pronounced more like "sool" than like "shool". The S only takes an sh pronounciation before the letters i and e.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From:
Date: 11 Sep 99 - 10:13 AM

Thanks, Alison! Slainte!-O'Laurie


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: alison
Date: 11 Sep 99 - 12:53 AM

I can't work ABC... so I can't help... but if you follow the instructions under the red writing you can get a MIDI but seeing as you've sent me an email... I'm sending you a GIF of the tune...

slaine

alison


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: radriano
Date: 10 Sep 99 - 02:50 PM

Alison:

In your reply to this thread you posted the melody for Suil a Ruin in ABC, a format I'm pretty familiar with, yet I couldn't get the music to print out. I think the problem is the note length setting but I'm not sure.

Since this is somewhat out of Mudcat territory you can e-mail me at: radriano@consrv.ca.gov

I'd appreciate any help you can give me on this.

Regards,
radriano


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: alison
Date: 10 Sep 99 - 03:08 AM

Refreshed for O'Laurie....

here's the chorus sort of phonetically...

Shule, shule, shule aroon. Shule go sook here agus shule go cuin, Shule go doras agus ay-layg lamb Is go jay to mavourneen slawn.

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Siúl a Rúin
From: Philippa
Date: 18 May 99 - 05:02 AM

The title should read "siúl" (to walk or travel) not "súil" (an eye)
I'm glad to see that the appearance of the Irish language lyrics (8 Dec 98) with their accent marks has been restored - for the time being at least (I didn't use HTML for the transcription)


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: Francy
Date: 10 Apr 99 - 12:17 PM

Ronnie Gilbert did a fine version.


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Subject: Lyr Add: PUTNAM'S HILL
From: Bruce O.
Date: 09 Apr 99 - 02:15 PM

Here's a rather distinctive version of "Putnam's Hill", text D, from Mary Eddy's 'Ballads and Song from Ohio', 1939:

My true love has gone to France,
Seeking his fortune to advance,
An if he returns it will be but a chance,
Suck-a-gill to a way-yan slon-yan.

Shul-e, shul-e, shul-a make a rule,
And a shula in grass, and a shula cook-a you,
And a grass in a won, oh dill, oh la done,
Suck-a-gill to a wan-yan slon-yan.

My old daddy was very cross,
He neither allowed me a cow or a hoss,
Be it for the beter, or for the wuss,
Suck-a-gill to a way-yan slon-yan.

My old mother was a very fine man,
She used to ride the darby ram,
He sent her whizzin' down the hill,
And if she ain't got up, she lays there still.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SHULE AROON
From: Bruce O.
Date: 24 Mar 99 - 12:44 PM

[From Charles Gavin Duffy, 'The Ballad Poetry of Ireland', (1845) here from the 1869 edition, p. 121.]

SHULE AROON
A Brigade Ballad

[The date of this ballad is not positively known, but it appears to be
early in the eighteenth century, when the flower of the Catholic youth
of Ireland were drawn away to recruit the ranks of the Brigade. The
inexpressible tenderness of the air, and the deep feeling and simplicity
of the words, have made the ballad a popular favourite, not withstanding
its meagreness and poverty.]

I would I were on yonder hill,
'Tis there I'd sit and cry my fill,
And every tear would turn a mill
Is go de tu mo murnin slan.
    Shuke, shule, shule aroon,
    Shule go succir, agus shule go cuin,
    Shule go den durrus augus eligh glum,
    Is go de tu mo murnin slan.

I'll sell my rock, I'll sell my reel,
I'll sell my only spinnning wheel,
To buy for my love a sword of steel,
Is go de tu mo murnin slan.
[Chorus]

I'll dye my petticoats, I'll dye them red,
And round the world I'll beg my bread,
Until my parents shall wish me dead,
Is go de tu mo murnin slan.
[Chorus]

I wish, I wish, I wish in vain,
I wish I had my heart again,
And vainly think I'd not complain,
Is go de tu mo murnin slan.
[Chorus]

But now my love has gone to France,
To try his fortune to advance;
If he e'er come back 'tis but a chance,
Is go de tu mo murnin slan.
[Chorus]

Above is the suggestion that the song was connected to the 'Wild Geese', but with no evidence for it. Last Saturday night I met up with Joe Hickerson, formerly head of the Folklore Archive at the Library of Congress. Not only did he not know of any 18th centrury broadside version of the song at the Library of Congress, he was skeptical that it was sung in the U.S. prior to the Civil War.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: Art Thieme
Date: 23 Feb 99 - 11:16 AM

Chubby Parker did a great version on a 78 rpm record. He was on the WLS Barndance out of Chicago. In his early life he was a merchant seaman and went all over the world. I did this song on my Folk Legacy LP (still available on cassette. C-105 ON THE WILDERNESS ROAD)

Come and listen to my song
It's awful pretty and it won't take long,
I sung it all the way from here to Hong Kong,
Come-a-bibble-ala-doo-shi-do-ree.

Chorus) Shoo-ri, shoo-ri, shoo-ri roo,
Sugar racka, surgar racka, shoo-ri-roo,
When I saw my little bobolink,
Come-a-bibble-al-doo-shi-do-ree.

I'm gonna buy me an old gray hoss,
The Alleghenies I will cross,
Gonna find the true love that I lost,
Come-a-bibble-ala-doo-shi-do-ree.

I was down on a South Sea isle,
Where the folks/ladies all greet you with a smile,
I wrote back home, "Well, I think I'll stay a while."
Come-a-bibble-ala-doo-shi-do-ree.

I've sailed the sea and I've trod the shore,
Where Englishmen never went before,
And I'll never shun wild women anymore,
Come-a-bibble...

Dad went out in a Ford machine,
Dropped a match in the gasoline,
Went so high he's never been seen,
Come-a-bibble...

Man came from monkey Darwin said,
Where women came from I never read,
But I know where some are goin' when they're dead,
Come-a-bibble-ala-doo...

Here I sit on Buttermilk Hill,
Here I sit & cry m' fill,
Every tear would turn a mill,
Come-a-bibble...

My true love has gone to France,
There her fortune to advance,
When she gets home we're gonna have a little dance,
Come-a-bibble-ala-doo-shi-do-ree.

Art Thieme


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Subject: Chords Add: I WISH I WERE ON YONDER HILL
From: alison
Date: 23 Feb 99 - 02:58 AM

Hi,

and here are the guitar chords (words taken from the database)Guitar chords in front of the words they fall on....

I Dm wish I C were on Bb yon C der Dm hill
'Tis there I'd F sit and Bb cry my C fill,
And Dm ev'ry F tear would Bb turn C a Dm mill,
Iss guh day thoo a C voorneen Dm slawn.

cho: Dm Shule, C shule, Dm shule aroon
Shule go F succir agus, Bb shule go C kewn;
Dm Shule go dheen F durrus oggus Bb ayC lig Bb lume,
Iss guh Dm day thoo C avorneen Dm slawn. *

Slainte

alison


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Subject: Tune Add: SIÚL, A RÚIN
From: alison
Date: 23 Feb 99 - 02:46 AM

Hi,

The tune in the database seems to be the one Peter Paul and Mary used...... here's a different one.

MIDI file: SIUILMUD.MID

Timebase: 480

Name: Siuil a Ruin
TimeSig: 3/4 24 8
Key: F
Tempo: 100 (600000 microsec/crotchet)
Start
0960 1 65 106 0238 0 65 106 0002 1 67 094 0238 0 67 094 0002 1 69 108 0718 0 69 108 0002 1 67 110 0238 0 67 110 0002 1 65 093 0238 0 65 093 0002 1 69 096 0238 0 69 096 0002 1 67 106 0958 0 67 106 0002 1 60 093 0478 0 60 093 0002 1 62 105 0958 0 62 105 0002 1 62 098 0238 0 62 098 0002 1 60 085 0238 0 60 085 0002 1 62 095 0914 0 62 095 0015 1 62 097 0252 1 64 096 0024 0 62 097 0207 0 64 096 0028 1 65 106 0958 0 65 106 0002 1 62 097 0478 0 62 097 0002 1 72 096 0958 0 72 096 0002 1 69 097 0478 0 69 097 0002 1 67 104 0238 0 67 104 0002 1 65 102 0718 0 65 102 0002 1 58 083 0478 0 58 083 0002 1 60 097 0958 0 60 097 0002 1 60 100 0478 0 60 100 0002 1 62 100 0958 0 62 100 0002 1 62 106 0238 0 62 106 0002 1 64 100 0238 0 64 100 0002 1 65 102 0958 0 65 102 0002 1 67 101 0238 0 67 101 0002 1 65 100 0238 0 65 100 0002 1 62 104 0958 0 62 104 0002 1 62 104 0238 0 62 104 0002 1 60 093 0238 0 60 093 0002 1 62 108 0958 0 62 108 0002 1 65 098 0238 0 65 098 0002 1 67 100 0238 0 67 100 0002 1 69 110 0718 0 69 110 0002 1 67 095 0238 0 67 095 0002 1 65 092 0238 0 65 092 0002 1 69 096 0238 0 69 096 0002 1 67 102 0718 0 67 102 0002 1 65 101 0238 0 65 101 0002 1 62 096 0221 1 60 093 0024 0 62 096 0235 0 60 093 0000 1 62 094 2878 0 62 094 0002 1 69 117 1438 0 69 117 0002 1 67 106 0718 0 67 106 0002 1 65 097 0238 0 65 097 0002 1 62 102 0238 0 62 102 0002 1 60 093 0238 0 60 093 0002 1 62 100 0958 0 62 100 0002 1 62 108 0196 1 60 083 0049 0 62 108 0208 0 60 083 0027 1 62 097 1418 0 62 097 0028 1 65 108 0914 0 65 108 0040 1 62 089 0424 1 72 097 0056 0 62 089 0182 0 72 097 0039 1 72 106 0739 1 69 105 0023 0 72 106 0215 0 69 105 0002 1 69 114 0238 0 69 114 0002 1 67 113 0238 0 67 113 0002 1 65 099 0718 0 65 099 0002 1 58 092 0478 0 58 092 0002 1 60 095 1438 0 60 095 0002 1 62 102 0952 0 62 102 0015 1 62 097 0227 1 64 096 0011 0 62 097 0220 0 64 096 0015 1 65 089 0238 0 65 089 0002 1 67 097 0718 0 67 097 0002 1 65 100 0238 0 65 100 0002 1 65 097 0238 0 65 097 0002 1 62 094 0958 0 62 094 0002 1 62 100 0238 0 62 100 0002 1 60 093 0238 0 60 093 0002 1 62 102 0958 0 62 102 0002 1 65 093 0238 0 65 093 0002 1 67 098 0238 0 67 098 0002 1 69 104 0718 0 69 104 0002 1 67 097 0238 0 67 097 0002 1 65 101 0238 0 65 101 0002 1 69 090 0238 0 69 090 0002 1 67 107 0718 0 67 107 0002 1 65 102 0238 0 65 102 0002 1 62 104 0238 0 62 104 0002 1 60 092 0238 0 60 092 0002 1 62 099 2413 0 62 099
End

This program is worth the effort of learning it.

To download the March 10 MIDItext 98 software and get instructions on how to use it click here

ABC format:

X:1
T:Siuil a Ruin
M:3/4
Q:1/4=100
K:F
F5G|A3GFA|G4C2|D4DC|D15/4D5/4E|F4D2|c4A2|
GF3B,2|C4C2|D4DE|F4GF|D4DC|D4FG|A3GFA|G3FDC|
D6|-D6|A6|-A6|G6|-G3FDC|D4D3/4C5/4|D6|F4D7/4c/4|
-cc3AA|GF3B,2|C6|D4DE|FG3FF|D4DC|D4FG|A3GFA|
G3FDC|D6|-D6||

Slainte

alison


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Subject: Lyr/Tune Add: SHULE AGRAH or JOHNNY HAS GONE...
From: Bruce O.
Date: 23 Feb 99 - 02:27 AM

Shule Agrah, or Johnny has gone for a soldier.
[Howe's 'Songs of Ireland', 1864.]

Oh Johnny dear has gone away,
He has gone across to Bombay,
Oh my heart is sad and weary today,
Since Johnny has gone for a soldier.
[Cho:] Shule, shule, shule Agra!
Time can only ease my woe,
Since the lad of my heart from me did go;
Oh, Johnny has gone for a soldier.

Some say my love is gone to France,
There his fortune to advance,
And if I find him, its but a chance,
Oh, Johnny has gone for a soldier.
Shule, shule, &c.

I'll sell my flax, I'll sell my wheel,
I'll buy my love a sword of steel,
So in the battle he may reel,
Oh, Johnny has gone for a soldier.
Shule, shule, &c.

I wish I were on yonder hill,
It's there I'd sit and cry my fill,
So every tear may turn a mill,-
Oh, Johnny has gone for a soldier.
Shule, shule, &c.

I'll dye my dress, I'll dye it red,
And through the streets I'll beg my bread,
Oh, how I wish that I was dead,
Since Johnny has gone for a soldier.
Shule, &c.

The 'D' under the asterisk has been corrected from an eighth note.

X:1
T:Shule Agrah, or Johnny has gone for a soldier.
S:Howe's 'Songs of Ireland', 1864
Q:60
L:1/4
M:C
K:Dm
A|f3/2f/e3/2e/|d(d3/4c/4)AA/ A/|c3/2A/ (c/d/) (f/e/)|\
(c3/2A/)GF/ G/|A3/2G/ (F/G/) (A/B/)|(c3/4d/4) (c/ A/ f3/2e/|\
(d3/4e/4) d/ c/ (A3/4G/4) A/ c/|d2"*"D z|\
"Chorus"f2e2|d (d3/4c/4)A2|cB/A/fe|cc/A/GF/ G/|\
AA/ G/FG|d3/2e/f(a3/4g/4)|f/ f/ e3/4 e/4a^c|d2D|]

Following is a traditional version from a Mrs. MacNamara in 'The Journal of the Irish Folk Song Society', XII, p. 27 (1914?, I forgot to copy the date, but this can't be more than a year off.)

I'll sell my rock, I'll sell my reel,
When the flax is spun, I'll sell my wheel,
I'll buy my love a suit of green--
'S go dteidh tu a mhuirnin slan.

I'll dye my petticoat, I'll dye it red;
And round the world I'll beg my bread,
For all my parents wish me dead--
So go dtheidh tu a mhuirnin slan.

I wish I were on yonder hill;
'Tis there I'd sit and cry my fill,
Till every tear would turn a mill--
So go dtheidh tu a mhuirnin slan.

It's often I sat on my true love's knee,
And many the false story he told to me!
He told me things that never could be--
So go dtheidh tu a mhuirnin slan.

I wish I were on the top of a wall--
The top of a castle would be higher than all--
I'd view the hurl and I'd spy the ball,
And I'd know my true love among them all.

Following this, on the same page, is given "Si/ubhail a Ghraidh", a translation into Gaelic by Dr. Douglas Hyde of a composite version of "Shule Aroon" said to have been put together by A. P. Graves. It consist of seven verses and chorus. Part of it is given above by Phillipa. I do not know when Grave's or Hyde's versions appeared, but Graves' publications commenced in 1873, and Hyde's in 1888. [O'Donahue, 'The Poets of Ireland']

Fragment from Perthshire, Scotland, in 'A Ballad Book', by C. K. Sharpe, 1824 (without music).

I went to the mill, but the miller was gone
I sat me down and cried ohone!
To think of the days that are past and gone,
Of Dickie Macphalion that's slain.
Shoo, shoo shoolaroon
To think on the days that are past and gone,
Of Dickie Macphalion that's slain.

I sold my rock, I sold my reel,
And sae hae I my spinning wheel
And 'a to buy a cap of steel
For Dickie Macphalion that's slain.
Shule Aroon, Shule Agra

I'll believe that bit about the wild geese origin for "Shule Aroon" and the revolutionary war "Johnny has gone for a soldier" when I see some real evidence for it.


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Subject: RE: S£il a R£in / Buttermilk Hilk
From: the Doppelganger
Date: 22 Feb 99 - 03:13 PM

rich r
RE: Songs of the Revolutionary War
15-Feb-99
"Buttermilk Hill" aka "Johnny Has Gone For A Soldier" is derived from the Irish song "Shule Aroon" (and several other titles and spellings). Shule Aroon came out of the 1688 Irish rebellion against England that was broken by the English King William of Orange. According to the treaty of Limerick in 1691, Irish rebels could take an oath of allegiance to England or leave Ireland for exile. A majority of the leaders chose exile, many joining the French army to fight against the British, hoping one day to return victorious to Ireland. One of the early verses in Shule Aroon reflected this situation:

Now my love has gone to France
To try his fortune to advance
If he e'er comes back, 'tis but a chance...

Many of the young Irish men who stayed behind were drafted into the British army. Some were shipped to North America to fight in the French and Indian War in the 1700's. They brought the song with them and adapted it to fit the battles there. Other colonist picked up the plaintive tune and the words became more anglicized as a farewell song for soldiers off to fight for independence in America. The Gaelic refrain became a set of nonsense syllables or disappeared entirely. The song was definitely common during the American Revolution, but has had surges of popularity at other times of national struggle, notably during the American Civil War.
Some sources for other Revolutionary era songs, check your area libraries:
The Early American Songbook by Lee Vinson (1974 Prentice-Hall)
The Ballad of America by John Anthony Scott (1966 Bantam Books, reprinted 1983 Southern Illiinois Univ. Press)
Songs of Independence by Irwin Silber (1973 Stackpole Books)
Music for Patriots, Politicians, and Presidents by Vera Brodsky Lawrence (1975 MacMillan Publishing)
rich r


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: Philippa
Date: 22 Feb 99 - 12:12 PM

I came back here through a link from a new enquiry about this song. This thread contains Irish Gaelic lyrics which used to appear with accent marks. As with other forum contributions containing diacritical marks, the accented letters have mutated since the recent overhual of the Mudcat computer system.
  (a/) has become a German letter
‚ (e/) has become T
¡ (i/) appears as an f
¢ (o/) is now an equal sign
£ (u/) appears as a dot


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: Philippa
Date: 09 Dec 98 - 03:04 PM

the above message is superfluous as you'll get those verses if you look up 'Shule aroon' as the first respondent suggested. Of course, now you have some without bothering to search the DT.

If my memory is correct, the Buttermilk Hill version is supposed to refer to a battle in Pennsylvania? If that version does date from the American War of Independence rather than from the Civil War, I don't think Illinois would figure. Well, if we keep the thread going, maybe someone will come up with more concrete information.

bye for now.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: mm
Date: 09 Dec 98 - 02:04 PM

A few other verses are things like:

"And now my love has gone to France
to try his fortune for to advance
and if he come back tis but a chance
is go dteann tu, a mhuirnin, slan

(chorus) Siuil, siuil 7rl

I'll dye my petticoat a burning red
and round the world I'll earn my bread
Until my parents shall wish me dead
is go teann...

(If you put in "And now my love has gone to France" in the Search the Digital Tradition box on top right of this page, you might find all the words)


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: Martin Ryan.
Date: 09 Dec 98 - 04:21 AM

Bruce

Hardly unmistakable but... Sparling (1890 or so) quotes Charles Gavin Duffy (mid-19thC) as believing it was probalby relatively contemporary with the WIld Geese incident.
To me, the problem with the War of Independence dating of the American version is that it predates the mass migration of people who would be likely to carry it. It just doesn't sound like the sort of song the Ulster-Scots would have brought with them - apart from the other obvious problem. I look forward to being contradicted by the LOC!.

Regards

p.s. I'll have a look for Horncastle in the Irish Traditional Music Archive when I get a chance.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: Áine
Date: 08 Dec 98 - 06:08 PM

Dear Bruce,

I believe that if you contact the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. they can provide the pre-1800 source you are looking for. Don't forget, at the time of the Revolutionary War, there were very few 'printed' books in the Colonies. However, I do believe that the LoC has a manuscript with this song written on it, and it has also been referenced in modern-day books on the Revolutionary Period as being quoted from letters written between couples separated by the War. - Áine


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Subject: Lyr/Tune Add: SHULE ARUN (I WISH I WERE ON YONDER
From: Bruce O.
Date: 08 Dec 98 - 06:01 PM

Where is there a copy of the song or an unmistakeable reference to it before 1800? Can anyone tell me when the Irish first published a text of "Shule Aroon"? An Irish tune seems to be first found in the 9th issue of Stevenson and Moore's 'A Selection of Irish Melodies' (1825), with a very slightly different copy in the 10th issue (1834).

X:1
T:Air - I wish I were on yonder hill
S:Stevenson & Moore's 'Irish Melodies', #9, 1825
Q:60
L:1/4
M:C
K:Am
E/|ccB3/2B/|AA/G/E3/2E/|G3/2E/ G/A/ c3/4B/4|\
{A/}G3/2E/DC/D/|E3/2D/ C3/4D/4 E/F/|\
G3/4A/4 G/E/{E/}c3/2B/|A3/4B/4 A/G/ E3/4D/4 E/G/|\
A3/4^G/A2|c2B2|A3/2G/E3/2G/|G3/2E/ G/A/ c/B/|\
{A/}G3/2E/Dz/D/|E3/2D/ C3/4D/4 E/F/|G3/4A/4 G/E/c3/2B/|\
A3/4B/4 A/G/ E3/4D/4 E/G/|A3/2^G/{G/}A3/2|]

The earliest reference I've seen to a text is one in Horncastle's 'Music of Ireland', 1844, which I have not seen, although I have the tune from it. There are several versions of our song in JFSS, and the chorus of Horncastle's version is quoted in JFSS #10, 1907, as follows:

Shule, shule, shule aroon,
Shule go succir agus, shule go cuin,
Shule go teir an durrus angus eligh glum,
Is go de movourneen slan.

X:2
T:Shule Arun (Song- I wish I were on yonder hill)
S:Hornecastle's 'Music of Ireland', 1844
Q:60
L:1/4
M:C
K:Cm
B|eedd|c3/2B/G3/2E/|B3/2G/ B/c/ e/d/|c/BG/FE/F/|\
G/A/ G/F/ E/F/ G/A/|B/c/ B/G/ ee/d/|c3/4d/4 c/B/ G/F/ G/=B/|\
c2z2|e2d2|c3/2B/Gz|B3/2G/ B/c/ e/d/|c/BG/FE/F/|\
G3/4A/ G/F/ E/F/ G/A/|B/c/ B/G/ee/d/|c3/4d/4 c/B/ G/F/ G/=B/|\
c2z|]

The Scottish fragment "Dicky Macphalion" of 1823 (on my website) is the earliest version of the song that seems to be known at present.

"Johnny is gone for a soldier" (without music) is on the Levy sheet music site, box 192, item #19. I know nothing about the Baltimore publisher, so can't hazard a guess at the date of publication of it, except it is most likely to be after 1850. I can't see anything in the song that would point to any American hand in this version.

Here is a rather variant version found earlier this year by Jack Campin of Newtongrange, Lothian, in a manuscript of Lady John Scott, which is probably of the 1840's. The tune was poorly noted, and the copy below is Jack Campin's attempt at restoration.

I wish I were on yonder hill
Tis there I'd sit and mourn my fill
Till every tear should turn a mill
Escadil mavourneen shaun

Since my love ceased [to] woo
I have roamed the whole world through
To heal the heart he broke in two
Escadil mavourneen shaun

I tracked his footsteps on the moor
I watched his shadow from the door
I prayed as I shall pray no more
Escadil mavourneen shaun

My wheel is stopped I'll set it by
My tears within my eyes are dry
I'll close their watery lids and die
Escadil mavourneen shaun

The first of the two versions in JFSS #10 also has the absent lover as a false lover who deserted the singer of the song, like in Lady John Scott's version above.

X:3
T:The haircut [edited by Jack Campin]
S:NLS MS.839, Lady John Scott
M:2/4
L:1/8
K:Bmin
F|B>cd>c|BFF>G|A>Fd>c|BEE F/E/|D>CB,D|FB d Hf/>e/|d>Bd>c|B3z|\
d>dd>c|B>FFz|A>Dd>B|E2E F/E/|D>CB,D|FB Hd Hf/>e/|d>Bd>c|B3|]


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: Áine
Date: 08 Dec 98 - 05:39 PM

Phillipa, a chara,

Your reference to the anglicized 'Shule Aroon' being sung during an American war is close. It was originally popularized during the American Revolutionary War (and it was also sung during the 'War Between The States' as that particular conflict is referred to here in the South). Buttermilk Hill is located in Jackson County in the State of Illinois. Many veterans of the Revolution are buried there and it is a much revered and visited place.

Thank you so much for giving us the words in Irish. You're a wonder and a gem gan praghas! -- Áine


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Subject: Lyr Add: SIÚIL, A GHRÁ
From: Philippa
Date: 08 Dec 98 - 04:36 PM

A bhuachaillín aoibhinn álainn ó
Ba leathan do chroí a's ba dheas do phóg,
Mo léan gan mise leat féin go deo
A's go dté tú , a mhuirnín, slán

curfa(chorus)-
Siúil, Siúil, Siúil, a ghrá
Níl leigheas le fáil ach leigheas an bháis
Ó d'fhag tú mé, is bocht mo chás,
A's go dté tú , a mhuirnín, slán

Is minic a bhréag tú mé ar do ghlúin,
Ag cur do scéil dom féin in iúl
Ach chaill mé thú 's tú mo rún,
A's go dté tú, a mhuirn ín, slán

Ach cuireadh ar Rí Séamas ruaig
A's d'imigh na géanna leis ar luas
A's d'imigh mo bhuachaill leo, monuar,
A's go dté tú , a mhuirnín, slán

O gentle beautiful youth,
Broad was your heart and sweet your kiss,
Alas that I am not with you forever,
And may you go, my love, safely.

Chorus: walk, walk, walk, oh love'
There's no cure to be had but the cure of death,
Since you left me, wretched is my plight,
And may you go, my love, safely.

Often you beguiled me on your knee
Telling me of your life (literally: story)
But I lost you and you are my love,
And may you go, my love, safely.

But King James was routed,
And the geese* went with him at speed,
And my lad went with them, alas,
And may you go, my love, safely.

· the 'wild Geese', the Irishmen who were forced to leave Ireland and find employment in the armies of Europe after the failure of the Jacobite cause.

This version is from Risteard MacGabhann of Derry, though I don't know if he's the author of the translation and note or if they come from a book. Some of what I gave before are acceptible alternatives, but there's also a bit of error, so use this version.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SIÚL, A RÚIN
From: Philippa
Date: 08 Dec 98 - 12:02 PM

as Martin says, you'll get two versions in the DT under Shule Aroon, also one under the title "Buttermilk Hill". I think Buttermilk Hill comes from the American Civil War and the progenitor from late 17th century (the Irish language version mentions the defeat of King James and the flight of the 'wild geese'to mainland Europe- related to the English language lyrics in early versions of the song: 'Now my love has gone to France') Irish spelling of Shule Aroon, phoneticised in the DT:

Siúl,Siúl,Siúl, a rúin
Siúl go socair agus siúl go ciúin
Siúl go* doras
Agus ealaigh liom
Is go dté tú mo mhúirnín slán

[*or 'go dtí an' or 'dhan'-take your choice/ DT database gives 'dheen' - closest to 'go dtí an']

An Irish language version with the same basic story and a similar air goes (as well as I can remember it):

chorus: Siúl,Siúl,Siúl a ghrá
Níl leigheas ar fáil ach leigheas an bháis
Ó d'fhag tú mise is bocht mo chás
Is go dté tú mo mhúirnín slán

A bhuachaillín aobhínn alainn ó
Is lán do chroí 'us is deas do phóg
Ma fagfaidh tú mise, ní bheidh mé beo [?]
Is go dté tú mo mhúirnín slán

Is minic a bhréag tú mé ar do ghlúin
Ag cur do scéal dom féin in iúl
Ach d'fhag tú mise, is tú mo rún
Is go dté tú mo mhúirnín slán

Ach, chuireadh ar Rí Shéamais ruaig
Is d'imigh na géanna leis ar luais
D'imigh mo stóirín, 'sé cúis mo bhróin
Ó go dté tú mo mhúirnín slán


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Subject: RE: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: Martin Ryan.
Date: 08 Dec 98 - 11:04 AM


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Subject: Lyrics: Suil a Ruin
From: Johannes Grob
Date: 08 Dec 98 - 10:35 AM

Hello,

I am looking for the lyrics of "Suil a Ruin" everywhere but cannot find them.
If you have them, would you please mail them to me?
My email-adress is: Johannes.Grob@FH-Fulda.de

Thank you.

Johannes Grob

    Note the Traditional Ballad Index entry on this song (pasted below)
    -Joe Offer-

Shule Agra (Shool Aroo[n], Buttermilk Hill, Johnny's Gone for a Soldier)

DESCRIPTION: The girl laments for her love, sent (to France) as a soldier. She says she will cry till "every tear would turn a mill." She will sell her spinning wheel to arm him. She will dye her clothes red and "round the world... beg for bread" till he returns
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1892
KEYWORDS: loneliness separation foreignlanguage
FOUND IN: US(Ap,MA,MW,SE,So) Britain(England,Scotland) Ireland
REFERENCES (12 citations):
Belden, pp. 281-282, "Shule Aroon" (1 text)
Randolph 107, "Shule, Shule" (3 texts, 1 tune, though "A" is mixed with "Ease that Trouble in the Mind" or "The Swapping Boy" or some such, "B" is a nonsense fragment, and "C" is largely floating material); also probably the "A" fragment of 455, "When I Get on Yonder Hill" (2 texts)
Eddy 40, "Putnam's Hill" (3 texts plus a fragment, 2 tunes)
BrownII 127, "Shule Aroon" (1 fragment, so short that it might just be nonsense though it is probably this song)
Hudson 130, pp. 275-276, "Shule Aron" (1 text, short and even more damaged than usual, to which is prefixed the rhyme "Snail, snail, come out of your hole, Or else I'll beat you as black as a coal.")
Scott-BoA, pp. 32-35, "Siubhal a Gradh (Come, My Love, Johnny Has Gone for a Soldier" (2 texts, 2 tunes)
Lomax-FSUSA 35, "Johnny Has Gone far a Soldier" (1 text, 1 tune)
Lomax-FSNA 20, "Johnny Has Gone for a Soldier" (1 text, 1 tune)
Lomax-ABFS, pp. 298-299, "Shoo, Shoo, Shoo-lye" (1 text, 1 tune)
BBI, ZN199 "As from Newcastle I did pass" (listed as "Traditional? Ancestor of Scots 'Dicky Macphalion' and Irish 'Shule Aroon'")
Silber-FSWB, p. 280, "Buttermilk Hill" (1 text)
DT, SHULARN1* (SHULARN2*) SHULARN3 SHULARN4

Roud #911
RECORDINGS:
Pearl Jacobs Borusky, "I'll Sell My Hat, I'll Sell My Coat" (AFS, 1940; on LC55)
Elizabeth Cronin, "Shule Aroon" (on FSB1)
Chubby Parker, "Bib-A-Lollie-Boo" (Gennett 6077/Silvertone 5012, 1927) (Conqueror 7891, 1931)
Pete Seeger, "Johnny Has Gone for a Soldier" (on PeteSeeger31)
Art Thieme, "Bibble-a-la-doo" (on Thieme04)
CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "Song of the Pinewoods" (floating lyrics)
Notes: In its earliest forms this song seems to have been simply a girl's lament for her departed lover. In many American versions (Randolph's 107 A and C, Eddy's D) we find unrelated stanzas about the girl's "very cross" father.
Scott (following Joyce) theorizes that the song arises out of the Glorious Revolution of 1688. The Irish supported James II, and were defeated at the Boyne. William III, who defeated James, offered forgiveness to the rebels who would swear loyalty to him, but many preferred exile. The only evidence for this theory, at least in English versions, seems to be the lines "But now my love has gone to France, To try his fortune to advance...."
It's hard to tell how much of this song was originally Gaelic. Although there are Gaelic choruses (e.g. from Barry, in JAFL XXII 15; Connie Dover's modern recording is as close to this as makes no difference), I've never heard a truly traditional Gaelic verse, and even the chorus is usually only a mangled imitation of Gaelic. (Of course, it doesn't help that Gaelic spelling is far from standardized.) - RBW
The Thieme recording retains only the tune, chorus and two verses of "Shule Agra"; otherwise, it's humorous floaters. - PJS
File: R107

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And the entry from folktrax.org:
    SHULE AGRA/ AROON - "I would I were on yonders hill" - My truelove has gone from me - a thousand miles across the sea" - Ch: ends "Godethu, mavourneen slann"(= "That you ma go safely, my darling") - ROUD#911 - STANFORD: Irish Melodies - BURNE SFL 1883 (gypsies) - GRAVES Irish Song Book - HORNCASTLE Music of Ireland 1844 - GREIG-DUNCAN 6 1995 #1107 pp87-89 (3var 4v/2m) - MOFFAT Minstrelsy of Ireland - KIDSON TT 1891 - PETRIE 1902 - JOYCE OIFMS 1909 pp236-7 Limerick "Shule Aroon" - JFSS 2:9 1906 pp253-4 Kidson: A Mooney, Liverpool 1v/m "Johnny has gone for a soldier" - JFSS 3:10 1907 pp26-31 Lucy Broadwood: Bridget Geary, Cappoquin, Waterford 1906/ Hampsh c1893 (notes) ("The Rose is red the grass is green") - JFSS 5:19 1915 pp180-1 Gilchrist: Mrs Bowker, Sunderland Point, Lancash 1909 1v/m "Shule shule" - ROCHE 1 #29 p15 (Dm) 4/4 (m/o) "I wish I were on yonder hill" - KIDSON EPS 1929 - KERR MM 1 #59 p41 (Am) m/o - HUGILL 1961 p347 1v only - ZIMMERMAN IPSB 1966 p32 Note about Wild Geese "S Aroon" - SEDLEY 1967 p121 collated Graves & Kidson "Johnny has gone for a soldier" - CROININ 2000 #139 pp209211 "Siuil a ruin" -- see HE-BACK SHE-BACK - WHIP JAMBOREE --- RANDOLPH OFS 1946 1 pp400-402 Mrs May Kennedy McCord, Mo 1940/ Mrs Sylvia Hill, Thayer, Mo 1940 (w/o) "Shule Shule" - CREIGHTON MFS 1961 p131 Peter Brigley, NS 1951 "I dyed my petticoat red" - SILVERMAN SOI 1991 no source given -- Cecilia COSTELLO rec by PK, Birmingham 11/8/51: 098/ rec by Marie Slocombe 30/11/51: RPL 17033/ LEADER LEE-4054 1975/ Birmingham & Midland Folk Centre: Radio 2 "Folkweave" 1979: CASS-0413 - Elizabeth CRONIN rec by Alan Lomax, Macroom, Co Cork 1951: RPL 21535/ CAEDMON TC-1142/ TOPIC 12-T-157/ 160 & 518/ FOUR COURTS CD-1 #22 "Shule Aroon" - Frank "Wings" CAMPBELL rec by PK, Forkhill, Co Armagh 15/7/52: 7"RTR-0549/ RPL 18486 talk bef & aft/ 165 - Robert CINNAMOND rec by PK & Sean O Boyle, Belfast July 1955: RPL LP 24842/ 159 "Shule Gradh" - Louis KILLEN (with guitar)" rec by PK, London 8/11/57 Version from mother RTR-0063 - Dominic BEHAN: DOBELL F-LEUT/4 1962 - O BOYLE Family: CEOLTA GAEL OSS-2 1971 on d/cass 0938-C60 "A stor, a stor, a ghra" - Clare CLAYTON, rec by Geoff Biggs, Hassocks, Sussex April 1961: FOLKTRAX 147 --- Ronnie GILBERT: VANGUARD SRL-7624 1965 - Pamela WARRICK-SMITH GREENHAYS GR-90721 1990 CASS-0798 - Anita BEST & Pamela MORGAN with accomp: AMBER MUSIC (Newfoundland) ACD 9008 "Suil a Gra" (from John Joe English of Branch, St Mary's Bay)


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Mudcat time: 23 July 8:47 PM EDT

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