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Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong

DigiTrad:
DAN DOO
GENTLE FAIR JENNY
RISSELTY-ROSSELTY
THE DAUGHTER OF PEGGY. O
THE WIFE WRAPT IN WETHER'S SKIN
WEE COOPER OF FIFE


Related threads:
Lyr Req: jennifer, jenny, rosemary? (9)
Nigity Nagity...or something like that (22)
Lyr Req: Nickety, nackety, noo, noo, noo (63)
Lyr Req: Ickety, pickety, packety, poo (1)
Lyr Req: Gentle Fair Jenny (15)
Lyr Req: The Cooper of Fife (6)
Need original song 'Risselty-Rosselty (4)


GUEST 06 Jul 05 - 01:51 AM
Peace 06 Jul 05 - 02:27 AM
Joe Offer 06 Jul 05 - 03:41 AM
Uncle_DaveO 06 Jul 05 - 01:16 PM
akenaton 06 Jul 05 - 05:21 PM
open mike 03 Jul 07 - 09:13 PM
Desdemona 03 Jul 07 - 09:37 PM
SINSULL 03 Jul 07 - 10:11 PM
GUEST,chris_frisbee 25 Sep 11 - 07:43 AM
John MacKenzie 25 Sep 11 - 11:37 AM
John MacKenzie 25 Sep 11 - 11:39 AM
Joe_F 25 Sep 11 - 05:37 PM
Jim Dixon 30 Sep 11 - 09:14 AM
Jim Dixon 30 Sep 11 - 09:47 AM
GUEST,999 30 Sep 11 - 10:04 AM
Jim Dixon 30 Sep 11 - 10:21 AM
Jim Dixon 30 Sep 11 - 12:12 PM
Jim Dixon 05 Oct 11 - 07:54 AM
GUEST,SteveG 05 Oct 11 - 04:43 PM
Jim Dixon 05 Oct 11 - 11:57 PM
GUEST,SteveG 06 Oct 11 - 04:35 PM
Richie 20 May 13 - 11:12 AM
davidkiddnet 03 Feb 17 - 09:28 PM
Georgiansilver 04 Feb 17 - 05:59 AM
Georgiansilver 04 Feb 17 - 06:01 AM
Steve Gardham 04 Feb 17 - 05:14 PM
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Subject: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong
From: GUEST
Date: 06 Jul 05 - 01:51 AM

Searching for the lyrics to the Nick Nack Song....lyrics include "nickety nackety now now now etc.

I came across the song on "What The Crow Told Me" CD...song recored by Ridgel's Fountain Citians.

would be great to get these lyrics for a gig!



thanks

RA


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong
From: Peace
Date: 06 Jul 05 - 02:27 AM

Here.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackS
From: Joe Offer
Date: 06 Jul 05 - 03:41 AM

The trouble with those Yazoo collections like The Story That the Crow Told Me is that the CD's don't have lyrics or background notes. The recordings are wonderful, but often hard to understand. The Digital Tradition version closest to the song in the recording is Risselty Rosselty - but note that there are several related songs in the crosslinks at the top of this thread. "Peace" linked to a version at the Max Hunter Collection - note that Max Hunter has three versions.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackS
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 06 Jul 05 - 01:16 PM

As Pete Seeger sang it, the substantive parts of the song were pretty much as in the link given above.

But his chorus was:
verse line
Nickety, nackety, now now now
verse line
Risselty, rosselty, hey bombossity
Nickety, nackety, rustico-quality
Willaby, wallaby now now now!

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong
From: akenaton
Date: 06 Jul 05 - 05:21 PM

Surely from "The wee coupar o' Fife"

"There was a wee coupar wha lived in Fife,
nickety nackety noo noo noo.
And he had gotten a gentle wife,
Hi willie wallacky,ho shawn dougal ah,
Rain caw rashety roo roo roo.

The song describes how the coupars wife was so high born that she would do no work about the house.
Because of the lady's high station, the coupar felt that he could not beat her for being lazy, but hit on the cunning plan of laying a sheepskin on his wifes back and beating that.

All good Scottish misogyny.

I think I remember a few verses for all you misogynists...Ake


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Subject: Lyr Add: NICKETY, NACKETY
From: open mike
Date: 03 Jul 07 - 09:13 PM

yes, misogyny aside, it should always be followed or preceded by
the song about the husband and wife who traded jobs and she could
plow more rows in a day than he could do in three...Eqinoxial
(see Equinoxial and Phoebe or Equinoctial
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=48507#729185)


I got this from a 78 rpm record on the
old family homestead in the 1960's

NICKETY, NACKETY

I married my wife in the month of June,
Nickety, nackety, now, now, now;
I courted her home by the light of the moon,
Nickety, nackety, hey-eee dum dafferty
willaby wallaby rustical quality,
Nickety nackety now, now, now.

She combs her hair just once a year,
Nickety, nackety, now, now, now;
And every time it brings a tear,
Nickety, nackety, hey-eee dum dafferty
willaby wallaby rustical quality,
Nickety nackety now, now, now.

She weighs in a lump about 300 pounds
Nickety, nackety, now, now, now.
When she sits in a chair the thing breaks down
Nickety, nackety, hey-eee dum dafferty
willaby wallaby rustical quality,
Nickety nackety now, now, now.

She churns the butter in her daddy's old boot,
Nickety nackety now, now, now.
And for a dash she uses her foot
Nickety, nackety, hey-eee dum dafferty
willaby wallaby rustical quality,
Nickety nackety now, now, now.

She washes the pigs in the kitchen sink,
Nickety, nackety, now, now, now;
She makes the black ones all turn pink,
Nickety, nackety, hey-eee dum dafferty
willaby wallaby rustical quality,
Nickety nackety now, now, now.

The saddle and bridle lie on the shelf,
Nickety, nackety, now, now, now;
If you want any more you can sing it yourself,
Nickety, nackety, hey-eee dum dafferty
willaby wallaby rustical quality,
Nickety nackety now, now, now.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong
From: Desdemona
Date: 03 Jul 07 - 09:37 PM

Jim Kweskin did a fine version on his album "Swing On A Star," the cassette of which my children practically wore out. I had all but forgotten that it was the song Suzanne Pleshette has the children singing during the school scene in "The Birds," until I saw it again at a Hitchcock revival last year...nothing renders ANY song as creepy as having kids sing it in a horror movie!

~D


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong
From: SINSULL
Date: 03 Jul 07 - 10:11 PM

The ditty sung by the little school children just before the crows attacked in "The Birds".


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE WEE COOPER O FIFE
From: GUEST,chris_frisbee
Date: 25 Sep 11 - 07:43 AM

THE WEE COOPER O FIFE
Traditional

There was a wee Cooper wha lived in Fife
Nickety, Nackety, noo, noo, noo,
And he had gotten a gentle wife,
Hey Willy Wallacky, hey John Dougal,
Alane, quo' Rushety, roo, roo, roo.

She wadna bake, nor she wadna brew,
Nickety, Nackety, noo, noo, noo,
For the spoiling o' her comely hue,
Hey Willy Wallacky, hey John Dougal,
Alane, quo' Rushety, roo, roo, roo.

She wadna card, nor she wadna spin,
Nickety, Nackety, noo, noo, noo,
For the shamin' o' her gentle kin,
Hey Willy Wallacky, hey John Dougal,
Alane, quo' Rushety, roo, roo, roo.

She wadna wash, nor she wadna wring,
Nickety, Nackety, noo, noo, noo,
For the spoiling o' her gowden ring,
Hey Willy Wallacky, hey John Dougal,
Alane, quo' Rushety, roo, roo, roo.

The Cooper has gane to his woo' pack,
Nickety, Nackety, noo, noo, noo,
And he's laid a sheep's skin on his wife's back,
Hey Willy Wallacky, hey John Dougal,
Alane, quo' Rushety, roo, roo, roo.

"It's I'll no thrash ye for your gentle kin",
Nickety, Nackety, noo, noo, noo,
"But I will skelp my ain sheep's skin",
Hey Willy Wallacky, hey John Dougal,
Alane, quo' Rushety, roo, roo, roo.

"Oh I will bake and I will brew",
Nickety, Nackety, noo, noo, noo,
"And nae mair think o' my comely hue",
Hey Willy Wallacky, hey John Dougal,
Alane, quo' Rushety, roo, roo, roo.

"Oh I will card, and I will spin",
Nickety, Nackety, noo, noo, noo,
"And nae mair think o' my gentle kin",
Hey Willy Wallacky, hey John Dougal,
Alane, quo' Rushety, roo, roo, roo.

"Oh I will wash, and I will wring",
Nickety, Nackety, noo, noo, noo,
"And nae mair think o' my gowden ring",
Hey Willy Wallacky, hey John Dougal,
Alane, quo' Rushety, roo, roo, roo.

A' ye wha ha'e gotten a gentle wife,
Nickety, Nackety, noo, noo, noo,
Send ye for the wee Cooper o' Fife,
Hey Willy Wallacky, hey John Dougal,
Alane, quo' Rushety, roo, roo, roo.

Footnote: A song I first learnt in primary school in Aberdeenshire, not realising that in a year or two I would find myself 'in exile' in the Kingdom of Fife. The Wee Cooper wouldn't get away with wife-beating nowadays! This boisterous song appeared regularly in 'The Scottish Student's Song Book'.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 25 Sep 11 - 11:37 AM

Wife Wrapped in Wether's Skin
There's also a version I learned form the singing of Hedy West, which starts.
A little old man lived away out west
Dan do dan do
A little old man lived away out west
Clash to my klingo
A little old man lived away out west
He had him a wife she was none of the best
Splatter me latter me lingo.

It's the same story again.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 25 Sep 11 - 11:39 AM

Here it is , god bless You Tube


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong
From: Joe_F
Date: 25 Sep 11 - 05:37 PM

Mention of the Scottish Student's Song Book recalls the following takeoff from the University of St. Andrews Students' Union Song Book (1958):

There once was a student in college in Fife,
    Nickety nackety noo noo noo,
That lived a very exemplary life,
    Hey Willie Wallacky, ho John Dougal, the Keys and the Central and whisky-o.

He wadna smoke and he wadna drink,
And on bonnie bejantines never did think.

He went down at last wi' and honours degree,
That's something that few of us ever will see.

But he's deid noo and buried despite a' his merit,
Whit use is a chiel wha's lackin' in spirit?

The (Cross) Keys and the Central were pubs in St Andrews. A bejantine was a female first-year student.


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Subject: Lyr Req: I BOUGHT ME A WIFE (trad American)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Sep 11 - 09:14 AM

From American Ballads and Songs by Louise Pound (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1922), page 236:


I BOUGHT ME A WIFE

I bought me a wife the tenth of June,
    Nickety nackety, now, now, now,
I brought her home by the light of the moon.
    High, willy, wally, and Jenny bang,
    Doodle, sandy go restego, now, now, now.

I bought two cows; they both were good.
I told her to milk whichever she would.

For want of a churn she used the old man's boot.
For want of a dasher she used his foot.

She made some cheese and hung it on a pin.
The grease ran out and the dirt sucked in.

The old book lies on the shelf.
If you want any more you can sing it yourself.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MARRIED ME A WIFE (from Lomax)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Sep 11 - 09:47 AM

From Our Singing Country: Folk Songs and Ballads by John A. Lomax and Alan Lomax (New York: The Macmillan Company, 1941), page 131:


MARRIED ME A WIFE

e'. No. 648. Acc. on guitar and sung by Gant family, Austin, Texas, 1936.

Married me a wife in the month of June.
    Rissolty, rassolty, row, row, row.
I carried her home in a silver spoon.
    Hey, gee-wallity, nickety-nollity, rest of your quality,
    Nickety, nackety, now, now, now.

2. She combed her hair but once a week.
She says that combs are all too cheap.

3. She sweeps the floor but once a year.
She says that brooms are all too dear.

4. She churns her milk in the old man's boot.
For the sake of a dasher she uses her foot.

5. The butter is made of old grizzly gray.
The milk takes legs and walks away.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong
From: GUEST,999
Date: 30 Sep 11 - 10:04 AM

A frog goes into a bank and approaches the teller. He can see from his
name plate that the teller's name is Paddy Whack. So he says, "Mr.
Whack, I'd like to get a loan to buy a boat and go on holiday."

Paddy Whack looks at the frog in disbelief and asks how much he wants
to borrow. The frog says £30,000. The teller asks his name and the
frog says his name is Kermit Jagger and that it's OK, he knows the
bank manager.

Paddy explains that £30,000 is a substantial amount of money and that
he would need to secure some collateral against the loan and asks if
he has anything he can use as collateral. The frog says, "Sure. I have
this," and produces a tiny pink elephant, about half an inch tall,
bright pink and perfectly formed.

Very confused, Paddy explains that he'll have to consult with the
manager and disappears into a back office. He finds the manager and
says, "There's a frog called Kermit Jagger out there who claims to
know you and wants to borrow 30 grand. And he wants to use this as
collateral." He holds up the tiny pink elephant "I mean, what the heck
is this?"

The bank manager replies, "It's a knick knack, Paddy Whack, give the
frog a loan, his old man's a Rolling Stone."


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Subject: Lyr Add: NICKETY NACKETY (trad Virginia)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Sep 11 - 10:21 AM

From American Folk Tales and Songs by Richard Chase (New York: New American Library of World Literature, Inc., 1956), page 122:


NICKETY NACKETY

This tune is from Horton Barker, blind singer in Virginia. The text comes from many sources. This is known also as "The Wee Cooper of Fife," and "The Wife Wrapt in the Wether Skin."

1. I married my wife in the month of June.
    Nickety, nackety, now, now, now!
I escorted her home by the light of the moon.
    Nickety, nackety, nay down thackety!
    Willity, wallity, rustico quality!
    Nickety, nackety, now, now, now!

2. One day when I came in from the plow,
Says, "Oh, my good wife, is my dinner ready now?"

3. "There's a little piece of cornbread on the shelf.
If you want any more you can bake it yourself."

4. Oh, I went out behind the barn
And I cut me a hickory as long as my arm.

5. Then I went out to my sheep pen,
And I grabbed me up an old sheep skin.

6. I laid that skin all around her back,
And with that stick I went whickety-whack!

7. "I'll tell my mother; I'll tell all my kin
How you hit me with a hickory limb."

8. "You can tell your mother; you can tell all your kin.
I was only tanning my old sheep skin."

9. Next day when I came in from the plow,
Says, "Oh, my good wife, is my dinner ready now?"

10. She flew around and the board was spread,
And, "Yes, my dear husband," was all she said.


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Subject: Lyr Add: NICKETY NACKETY NOW (from Lotus Dickey)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Sep 11 - 12:12 PM

From The Lotus Dickey Songbook edited by Nancy Cassell McEntire, Grey Larsen, and Janne Henshaw (Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, 2005), page 198:


93. NICKETY NACKETY NOW

Lotus's brother Cyprian liked to sing this song. This is transcribed from one of many late-night sessions at Cyprian's house. Here Cyprian sings the lead and Lotus plays the guitar. The song may have Scottish antecedents: The song "The Wee Cooper o' Fife" has the same nonsense refrain line of "Nickety nackety noo noo noo," and a similar description of an uncooperative or unattractive wife. Cyprian had sheet music for this song, but he also mentioned learning it from a musical friend and neighbor, Own Stout.

Canadian folklorist Edith Fowke linked this song to "The Wife Wrapt in Wether's Skin," which is No. 277 in Francis James Child's famous work, The English and Scottish Popular Ballads. Here the uncooperative wife is beaten into submission. North American versions of this song are more silly than violent. Fowke collected a text from Manitoba which contained these lines: "She baked a pie and called it mince / Nickety nackety now now now/ I've never known such misery since" (Canadian Journal for Traditional Music, 1975).


1. I married my wife in the month of June.
    Nickety nackety now, now, now.
And I courted her home by the light of the moon.
    Nickety nackety, hey John Dackerty,
    Willety wallety, russiko quality,
    Nickety nackety now, now, now.

2. So me and the woman got ready to start.
I said, "Old woman, get into the cart."

3. When we went in the house, she stepped on a cat.
Her feet flew up and down she sat.

4. She weighs in a lump about three hundred pound.
When she sits in a chair the thing breaks down.


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Subject: Lyr Add: NICK NACK SONG (New Lost City Ramblers)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 05 Oct 11 - 07:54 AM

My transcription from the recording on Spotify:


NICK NACK SONG
As sung by the New Lost City Ramblers on "The New Lost City Ramblers, Volume 5" (1963).

[I have omitted the patter between verses.]

I married me a wife on the eighth of June,
    To risselty-risselty row, row, row.
I took her home by the light of the moon,
    To risselty-risselty, rustico-quality,
    Hickety-hackety, old John Dobbison,
    Nickety-nackety now, now, now.

I sent her out to milk the old cow.
She set right down; she milked the old sow.

She churned our butter in dad's old boot,
And for her dasher she used her foot.

She swept her floor but once a year,
And for her broom she used a chair.

She keeps her shoes on the pantry shelf.
If you want any more you can sing it yourself.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong
From: GUEST,SteveG
Date: 05 Oct 11 - 04:43 PM

There are 2 distinct songs being put forward here. Admittedly they have become confused in some American versions and share tunes and refrains there. In Britain where they both originated they have very separate origins and evolution as initially broadside pieces, both quite early, 17th century at least if my memory serves me correctly.

The wife wrapt in wether skin is usually easy to identify by the wife-beating motif.

The Slattern Wife doesn't have this motif and is just a humorous catalogue of the wife's misdeeds, mostly concerning her neglect of the house, cows, and making of butter and cheese. The best known surviving version this side of the pond is probably 'Willy went to Westerdale'


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Subject: Lyr Add: ROBIN-A-THRUSH (from Broadwood)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 05 Oct 11 - 11:57 PM

From English County Songs,: Words and Music edited by Lucy Etheldred Broadwood and John Alexander Fuller-Maitland (London: Leadenhall Press, 1893), page 92:


ROBIN-A-THRUSH

1. Robin he married a wife in the West
    Moppety, moppety, mono.
And she turned out to be none of the best,
    With a high jig jiggety, tops and petticoats,
    Robin-a-Thrush cries mono.

2. When she rises she gets up in haste
And flies to the cupboard before she is laced.

3. She milks her cows but once a week,
And that's what makes her butter so sweet.

4. When she churns she churns in a boot,
And instead of a cruddle she puts in her foot.

5. She puts her cheese upon the shelf
And leaves it to turn till it turns of itself.

6. It turned of itself and fell on the floor,
Got up on its feet and ran out of the door.

7. It ran till it came to Wakefield Cross,
And she followed after upon a white horse.

8. This song was made for gentlemen.
If you want any more you must sing it again.

(Words and tune from A. H. Frere, Esq.; sung by a nurse towards the end of 18th century.)
For other variants, see The Besom Maker and Miss Mason's Nursery Rhymes and Country Songs.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong
From: GUEST,SteveG
Date: 06 Oct 11 - 04:35 PM

Hi Jim
Yes, this Broadwood text is definitely the 'Slattern Wife' song as opposed to 'Wife wrapt in wether's skin'


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong
From: Richie
Date: 20 May 13 - 11:12 AM

Hi,

Steve you mentioned the Slattern Wife, I assume that is the Bronson F types which he includes under 277 but probably should be an appendix.

An example would be "Robin-a- Thrush" and in the US the "Nickety, Nackety" songs. What's the earliest version of Slattern Wife songs?
Is there a broadside?

How about in the US? I know Chubby Parker's 1927 recording was important. Also Pound has a version "I Married a Wife" published in 1922.

Are there other early US versions?

Richie


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong
From: davidkiddnet
Date: 03 Feb 17 - 09:28 PM

Chubby Parker, "Nickety Nackety Now Now Now" (Gennett 6077/Champion 15247 [as Smilin' Tubby Johnson]/Silvertone 5011, 1927; Supertone 9189, 1928) (Conqueror 7889, 1931)

Ridgel's Fountain Citians, "The Nick Nack Song" (Vocalion 5455, 1930; on CrowTold01)

Pete Seeger, "Risselty-Rosselty" (on PeteSeeger02, PeteSeegerCD01) (on PeteSeeger12)

see
Fresno state Edu


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 04 Feb 17 - 05:59 AM

Sung by Burl Ives... great memories for me.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 04 Feb 17 - 06:01 AM

That link... you might want to start it at around 40 seconds in!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Nickety Nackety Now Now Now/NickNackSong
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 04 Feb 17 - 05:14 PM

Hi Richie,
Just spotted your query. Have we sorted this?
If not my article 26 of the Dungheap articles on the Musical Traditions website covers the history and evolution of both songs.


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