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Lyr Req: Slievenamon

DigiTrad:
SLIEVENAMON


Related threads:
Info on "Slieve Na Mban" (25)
Tune Req: sliab na ban (19)
Lyr Req: Sliabh na Monh (8)


In Mudcat MIDIs:
shliabh na mBan


Teru 01 Mar 97 - 06:45 AM
Valery Malin vmalin@ix.netcom.com 01 Mar 97 - 12:18 PM
Teru 01 Mar 97 - 09:04 PM
Martin Ryan 03 Mar 97 - 05:53 AM
Teru 23 Jun 97 - 08:02 PM
Virginia Blankenhorn 23 Jun 97 - 09:28 PM
Teru 24 Jun 97 - 07:28 PM
Martin Ryan 24 Jun 98 - 12:27 PM
Philippa 29 May 99 - 09:42 AM
Philippa 29 May 99 - 09:54 AM
29 May 99 - 10:12 AM
SingsIrish Songs 29 May 99 - 10:08 PM
Virginia's husband 29 May 99 - 10:48 PM
Annraoi 30 May 99 - 08:32 PM
Philippa 01 Jun 99 - 05:44 PM
Annraoi 01 Jun 99 - 09:04 PM
Philippa 02 Jun 99 - 01:26 PM
Philippa 03 Jun 99 - 08:47 AM
Philippa 03 Jun 99 - 09:18 AM
Philippa 03 Jun 99 - 10:29 AM
Annraoi 05 Jun 99 - 03:17 PM
Philippa 05 Jun 99 - 04:53 PM
Philippa 07 Jul 99 - 09:42 AM
Martin _Ryan 10 Jul 99 - 08:11 PM
Philippa 11 Jul 99 - 09:16 AM
Martin _Ryan 11 Jul 99 - 06:54 PM
Philippa 27 Aug 99 - 09:51 AM
Philippa 27 Aug 99 - 10:02 AM
Philippa 04 Sep 99 - 07:11 PM
Philippa 08 Sep 99 - 06:46 PM
09 Sep 99 - 05:01 AM
11 Sep 99 - 11:06 AM
Philippa 11 Sep 99 - 05:46 PM
Philippa 16 Sep 99 - 12:46 PM
Philippa 20 Sep 99 - 01:52 PM
Philippa 14 Dec 99 - 06:07 PM
Wolfgang 16 Dec 99 - 04:26 AM
Mick Lowe 16 Dec 99 - 08:40 PM
Wolfgang 19 Dec 99 - 05:03 PM
Wolfgang 19 Dec 99 - 05:06 PM
MartinRyan 12 Jun 00 - 05:15 PM
paddymac 14 Mar 02 - 02:14 AM
GUEST,Philippa 14 Mar 02 - 10:30 AM
GUEST,Philippa 22 Jun 02 - 09:26 AM
Peter T. 23 Jun 02 - 09:05 AM
GUEST,Aine Ryan 31 Dec 06 - 06:43 AM
McGrath of Harlow 31 Dec 06 - 08:20 PM
GUEST,Rónán Ó Donnchadha 18 Mar 07 - 02:00 PM
Jim Lad 18 Mar 07 - 02:49 PM
An Buachaill Caol Dubh 19 Mar 07 - 12:30 PM
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GUEST 10 Sep 18 - 01:39 PM
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Subject: Slievenamon
From: Teru
Date: 01 Mar 97 - 06:45 AM

Does anyone know the words for this beautiful Irish song sung by Louise Morrissey?

Thank you.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SLIEVENAMON (Charles I. Kickham)
From: Valery Malin vmalin@ix.netcom.com
Date: 01 Mar 97 - 12:18 PM

According to an Irish songbook that we have, Slievenamon was written by Charles I. Kickham, born in Co. Tipperary in 1828, who died in Dublin in 1882. The title means "Woman of the Mountain."

Here are the lyrics:

Alone, all alone, by the wave-washed strand
All alone in the crowded hall.
The hall is gay, and the waves they are grand.
But my heart is not here at all.
It flies far away, by night and by day
To the times and the joys that are gone.
And I will never forget the sweet maiden I met
In the valley near Slievenamon.

It was not the grace of her queenly aire
Nor her cheek of the rose's glow
Nor her soft black eyes, not her flowing hair
Nor was it her lily-white brow,
Twas the soul of truth, and of melting ruth
And the smile like a summer dawn
That sold my heart away on a soft summer day
In the valley near Slievenamon.

In the festive hall, by the starwashed shore,
Ever my restless spirit cries.
"My love, on, my love, shall I ne'er see you more.
And my land, will you never uprise?
By night and by day, I ever, ever pray
While lonely my life flow on
To see our flag unfurled and my true love to enfold
In the valley near Slievenamon.

Hope this helps you.

Val

HTML line breaks added in place of double spacing. --JoeClone, 3-May-03.


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Teru
Date: 01 Mar 97 - 09:04 PM

Dear Val,

Thank you very much for your help. The lyrics are what I have been looking for.

I am also pleased to know the small history of this song.

Thanks again.

With kindest regards

Teru (Teruhiko Kachi, Japan)


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 03 Mar 97 - 05:53 AM

"Slievnamon" means "Mountain of the Women", rather than vice versa. There is also another lovely Gaelic song with teh same name and an even mor beautiful tune

Regards


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Teru
Date: 23 Jun 97 - 08:02 PM

Does anyone know more about the sotry of this song? What is "the hall"? What do "the times and the joys that are gone" mean? The words "my land, will you never uprise", and "see our flag unfurled" sound somewhat patriotic. Is Slievenamon a apecial place of historic interest? I tried in vain to look up it in a textbook of Irish history. I wonder if there is any relatioship of the song to the Great Famine, because the writer lived in those days.

I'll appreciate any information.

Thank you.

Teru


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Virginia Blankenhorn
Date: 23 Jun 97 - 09:28 PM

Slievenamon ("Sliabh na mBan" -- "The Hill of the Women" in Irish Gaelic) is a place name in County Tipperary in the southeast of Ireland. There are two songs associated with this place-name. The more recent of the two is the one by Charles Kickham, a poet who lived in Clonmel, Co. Tipperary, in the latter half of the 19th century. His poem bears all the marks of the romantic period, with wishful references to Ireland's longstanding wish to be free of English rule (this is what the poet means by "My country will you never uprise" and the reference to the flag in the next-to-last line). The verse also implies that the poet is enjoying the high-life on some foreign shore (as an emigrant, presumably -- though Charles Kickham was obviously never an emigrant if he imagines any such thing). Except for the fact that the verse is much too flowery, this poem contains many themes common to much Irish poetry, including parted lovers, an emigrant looking back at Ireland with longing, and patriotic fervor. The air to which this verse is sung is also, judging by its style and general soppiness, a product of the "drawing-room" song tradition.

The other song "Sliabh na mBan" exists in Irish -- I know of no singable verse translation, though somebody may know better than I do -- and is the one my mother-in-law always refers to as "the old `Sliabh na mBan'". If anyboy has access to an old songbook compiled by Fr. Padruig Breathnach called Ar gCeol Feinig (Dublin, 1920), it's in there (p. 136). This is a political song that recounts the events of a battle in 1796 (the Year of the French), and has nothing whatever to do with the other song. The air is also different and much more authentic. The song has been recorded numerous times; one performance that I remember particularly was by the fine Irish tenor Sean O Se (O'Shay).

Virginia


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Teru
Date: 24 Jun 97 - 07:28 PM

Virginia:

Many thanks for your information. You wrote almost all I had wanted to know.

With my kindest regards

Teru


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 24 Jun 98 - 12:27 PM

Virginia

Regarding the Irish language song of this name to which you refer.It is, as you say, about an incident in the run-up to the 1798 rebellion in Ireland. One of the many CD's produced for the bicentenary has a version sung by a fine singer called Aine Ni Cheallaigh, who now lives in the area. Her very full, unaccompanied version lasts nine and a half minutes!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Sliabh na mBan
From: Philippa
Date: 29 May 99 - 09:42 AM

Virginia Blankenhorn (23 June 97): there is a (more or less) singable English-language translation of the Irish song in Dominic Behan's songbook ("Ireland Sings" ?)including verses such as:

But if I knew-ew-ew this tale was true-u-u
I'd sing like the blackbird a happy song
To see broken ranks swinging, to hear French trumpets ringing
all along the banks [slopes?] of Sliabh na mBan.


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Subject: RE:Dominic Behan
From: Philippa
Date: 29 May 99 - 09:54 AM

"Ireland Sings" by Dominic Behan, copyright 1965 Essex Music, LTD. London, England


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From:
Date: 29 May 99 - 10:12 AM

another thread about songs about Sliabh na mBan: sliab na ban (sic)


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: SingsIrish Songs
Date: 29 May 99 - 10:08 PM

I love that song and call it my signature song...was most popular at t'pub I used to sing at...Anyroadup, all the information about the song is good to know. Thanks for posting! It amazes me that the songbooks I've come across mis-translate the title...it is a different "feel" with the accurate translation being Mountain (or Hill) of the Women!

-Mary


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Virginia's husband
Date: 29 May 99 - 10:48 PM

Hello,

I have beeb reading what you all have written about Sliabh Na mBan. I have the full of its words if you'd all like them, but the man you should listen to is Nioclas Toibin from Ring, Co. Waterford. He was a great, mighty singer. The air is older than the song itself. My family years ago sung it and is similar to another air, Cath ceim an fheir The Battle of the Deer's Leep, which is an Elizabethan song from the Ulster poet Aoghan an Fhir rua mhoir. Beyond that, I don't know much. Sorry to be without knowledge on this.


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Annraoi
Date: 30 May 99 - 08:32 PM

I thought I was familiar with the Ulster poets of the C17 and C18. I must confess to never having heard of this particular individual. More information. please. Philippa, any info from your sources ? The song referred to is "Cath Chéim an Fhiaidh". Annraoi


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon /Sliabh na mBan
From: Philippa
Date: 01 Jun 99 - 05:44 PM

correction to 29 May; I remember that the last line of the verse should be "as freedom they come bringing to Sliabh na mBan"

I got the book from Dominic himself when I was about 18-19, but I don't know where it is now
Annraoi, I don't think this is an Ulster song at all, but rather from the southwest of Ireland. It begins "Is oth liom féinig" and isn't like Cath Chéim an Fhiadh as I recall the later (doesn't Cath Chéim... share an air with one of the Orange marching tunes??)Well, we'll wait for Virginia's husband (David?) to clear that up. I got the words to Sliabh na mBan in Irish from Áine Uí Cheallaigh but didn't learn them; I'll have to look through my song sheets. Or you could look for her Gael-Linn recording.

will keep an eye out for Aoghan an Fhir rua mhóir; meanwhile we're looking for info on S MacAmbróis for the Quiet Land of Erin thread; an féidir leat cuidiú le sin, a thaisce?


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Annraoi
Date: 01 Jun 99 - 09:04 PM

Dhéanfaidh mé mo dhícheall, a stór. Nach uafásach an scéala fá Eithne Ní Uallacháin ! Is doiligh liom é a chreidbheáil go fóill. Annraoi


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Philippa
Date: 02 Jun 99 - 01:26 PM

we're getting very off topic, but Annraoi refers to a lovely singer named Eithne Ní Uallacháin who died suddenly last month.


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon /Sliabh na mBan
From: Philippa
Date: 03 Jun 99 - 08:47 AM

The thread name turned out to be generic as we have discussed three songs with the same title, a place-name. The Irish lyrics of the song which Virginia and I brought up can be found at the Songs of 1798 web page


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Subject: RE: Sliabh na mBan/ Cath Chéim an Fhia
From: Philippa
Date: 03 Jun 99 - 09:18 AM

re "Virginia's husband" and Annraoi, there's another poem, from county Cork, with a similar -sounding title to Cath Chéim an Fhiaidh: Cath Chéim an Fhiath

"Cath Chéim an Fhia" is in Tomas Ó Canainn's "Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland", book + cassette, which unfortunately I don't have a copy of. It's also recorded by James Galway with the Chieftains; the song of the deer (Fhiaidh not Fhiath). Sound sample at http://www.reliablehost.com/planetearthmusic/CelticMinstrel.htm
- no headphones hear, but maybe someone else can report back on any correspondence between this air and "Sliabh na mBan" /As for Orange airs, maybe I had "Rosc Catha na Mumhan" in mind!!


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Subject: Sliabh na mBan / Cath Chéim an Fhia
From: Philippa
Date: 03 Jun 99 - 10:29 AM

"Cath Chéim an Fhiaidh" as published in "Amhraín na nGleann" is the same as "Cath Chéim an Fhiath" as posted at http://www.sleeping-giant.ie/inchigeelagh/stories/thefulltext.html . The book attributes the lines to Máire Bhuidhe Ní Laoghaire. Máire was from Céim an Fhéith, Co Cork and you can find some biographical details of her via the above URL (clickable link is on my previous message). Of big red Aoghan of Ulster I still know nothing.


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Annraoi
Date: 05 Jun 99 - 03:17 PM

vis a vis Mac Ambróis. Tá leabhar amuigh ag Derek Bell agus Liam "Ólta le Ceolta" ina ndéantar tagairt don fhile. Ní cuimhneach liom ainm an leabhair, ach tháinig sí amach ar na mallaibh. Tá mé ag déanamh go dtearn Ruairí Ó Bléine tagairt dó fosta ina leabhar "Presbyterians and the Irish Language." Tá dhá scéal i dtaobh an amhráin "Aird a' Chumhaing". 1) Bhí an file in Albain ag obair. Lá amháin, bhí sé ina shuí ar bheanna na hAlban ag amharc siar ar chósta Aontroma abhí le feiceáil ag bun na spéire. Bhuail taom cumhaí é agus scríobh sé an dán fán a áit dhúchais. Bhí sé chomh tógtha sin go dtáinig sé arais 'na' bhaile. 2) Bhí an file ar tí a dhul anonn go hAlbain, ach nuair a smaointigh sé ar an tsaol a bheadh aige thall, ibhfad óna mhuintir is óna áit féin, shocraigh sé ar gan imeacht ar chor ar bith agus scríobh sé an dán.Tá sé mar "amhrán náisiúnta" ag Glinntí Aontroma ó shoin. Annraoi


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Philippa
Date: 05 Jun 99 - 04:53 PM

Go raibh maith agat, a Annraoi.
Anyone who wants to know what Annraoi's message (5 June) is about- or to comment further on it - should proceed to the Aird a' chumhaing/ Quiet Land thread


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Philippa
Date: 07 Jul 99 - 09:42 AM

I've been looking at song books at Derry's central library today. Two of them gave English translations for SWliabh na mBan.
Follow the link given on this thread on 3 Jun for Songs of 1798. When you get there, scroll down a few songs and you'll see "Sliabh na mBan".
The English translations are for two verses,the one that begins "Is oth liom féinig" (v. #2) and "Tá an Francach faobhrach" (v #7)

from Mary O'Hara "A Song for Ireland". London:Michael Joseph,1982:
I dread the thought of the day's defeat
When the Gaels were slaughtered
For the invaders are mocking us
Claiming that they don't fear our lances or pikes.
To start with, our leader failed to turn up and we were unprepared in disarray
Driven like cattle without cowherd
On the sunny slopes of Sliabh na mBan

The eager French are ready in their ships
Tall masts sailing at sea for some time now
It is rumoured that they're heading for Irleand
To restore their rights to the unfortunate Gael.
If I thought that such a story was true,
My heart would be as light as a blackbird on the thorn.
That invaders would be vanquished and the horn would sound once more
On the sunny slopes of Sliabh na mBan

From Dominic Behan. "Ireland Sings". Essex Music, 1973 (distributed by Music Sales Corp) Singable (with tune simplified a little bit)translation by Wolfe Stephens (c 1965, Coda Music)

My heart it is broken
in sorrow a token
of regret for jeers now spoken by the English lords
They knew we could do no harm for they knew we posses'd no arms
But forks and pikes and but a handful of rusted swords.
We had no major, mo hero leader,
No man to order us we drifted on
Like cows to a drover e'er the fair day is over
We scattered on the sunny shoulders of Sliabh na mBan

But the French are waiting
Their masts are straining
And people they are saying they sail the sea
With their ships all in serried lines and their order is grand and fine
And they race against the wind to set old Irleand free.
Now if I knew this tale was true
I'd sing like the blackbird for you a happy song.
To see broken ranks swinging and hear French trumpets ringing
as Freedom they come bringing to Sliabh na mBan

The notes in the Behan book incorrectly translate Sliabh na mBan as the white mountain instaid of as the mountain of the women. Can anybody tell us more about "Wolfe Stephens" or another translator in the book, "Fintan Connolly"? I do suspect that these are pen names based on heroes such as Fintan Lawlor, James Connolly, Wolfe Tone, James Stephens???


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Martin _Ryan
Date: 10 Jul 99 - 08:11 PM

Philippa

I know you're right about "Wolfe Stephens" and suspect you are equally so about "Fintan Connolly".

Regards


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Philippa
Date: 11 Jul 99 - 09:16 AM

so who are they really, Martin? Dominic féin??


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Martin _Ryan
Date: 11 Jul 99 - 06:54 PM

Philippa

Yes - certainly the Wolfe Stephens name.

Regards


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Subject: Lyr Add: SLIABH NA MBAN
From: Philippa
Date: 27 Aug 99 - 09:51 AM

I found some more verses in books and I wonder does anyone know of tunes for them:

1)Sliabh na mBan - in D O Muirithe, An t-Amhrán Macarónach:

Éistig sealad liom go neosfad scéal dábh
Go cruinn le éifeacht I nGaeilge cheart,v Go bhfuil sliocht Chalvin agus Luther traochta,
Gan fíon gan féasta, gan réim gan neart;
Go bhfuil Dónal O'Connell I mbun cúil Gaeilibh,
Is go deimhin ní baol díbh go tógfaidh breab,
Go mbeidh ár bparliamint againn gan mhoill in Éirinn
Agus ár gcampaí ag pléireacht ar Sliabh na mBan.

Ye true sons of Erin pray pay attention
Whilst I relate a fine tale to you,
He orange clan will be soon done over,
Without wine or porter, what will they do?
Brave O'Connell in our case will struggle,
And for their bribes he cares not a damn.
Our trade and parliament he will bring over,
And with joy will hail them on Sliabh na mBan.

(and 6 more verses, 3 in Irish, 3 in English corresponding to the Irish verses)

2)Ar Shliabh na mBan - in D O hOgáin , Duanaire Thiobraid Arann., Dublin, 1981:

Ar Shliabh na mBan an lá úd, mo chráiteacht, ba dhubhach ár scéal -
Ins na carraigí dá gcarnadh is a lán againn ag luá sa bhfraoch;
Ins na carraigí dá gcarnadh is a lán againn ag luá sa bhfraoch;
Is ní stadamair den stair úd stát dúinn is talamh shaor

Gheobhadh Captaen Paor an lá úd stát dúinn is talamh shaor
Ach claíomh a thabhairt inár láimh dúinn neamhspleách le gall nó Gael,
Claíomh a thabhairt inár láimh dúinn neamhspleách le gall nó Gael
Mo chreach, ní mar sin atá, 'tharla dhos na cnú a bheith caoch!


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Subject: Lyr Add: SLIABH NA mBAN
From: Philippa
Date: 27 Aug 99 - 10:02 AM

If you're familiar with Irish language songs, please do look at the message before this one and see if you can help with my query.

But I also want to paste in the lyrics from the link I gave on 3 June. 1) because sometimes when one tries a link, the web page is no longer available and 2) because I hope to get an abc for the tune.

A translation is given of the the final verses. and there are also translations at my posting of 7 July. I don't think any of the green clickies will lead you to songs about Sliabh na mBan!

SLIABH NA mBAN

Ní airím véarsa ó lon ná ó chéirseach
Is ní fhásann féar ins na coillte ceart';
Níl suim ag an spéirbhean i spórt ná i bpléisiúr
Ach í ag gol is ag béiceadh is ag réabadh bas.
Á rá gan faothamh, ní bhfaighidh na séimhfhir
Aon oíche in Éirinn ná uain chun reast,
Ag an trúp seo meirligh is iad ag teacht lena chéile,
Is go mbuailfear caoch sinn ar Shliabh na mBan.

Is is oth liom féinig bualadh an lae úd
Do dhul ar Ghaeil bhocht 'is na céadta slad;
Mar tá na meirligh ag déanamh géim dínn,
Is a rá nach aon ní leo píc ná sleá.
Níor thánig ár major i dtús an lae chughainn,
Is ní rabhamar féinig i gcóir ná i gceart,
Ach mar a sheolfaí tréada de bha gan aoire
Ar thaobh na gréine de Sliabh na mBan.

Mo léan léir ar an dream gan éifeacht
Nár fhan le héirim istoíche is stad,
Go mbeadh dúthaí Déiseach is iarthar Éireann
Ag teacht lena chéile ón tír aneas.
Go mbeadh ár gcampaí déanta le fórsaí tréana,
Bheadh cúnamh Dé linn is an saol ar fad,
Is ní dhíolfadh meirleach darbh ainm Néill sinn
Is bhuafaí an réim linn ar Shliabh na mBan.

Is é Ros do bhreoigh is do chloígh go deo sinn,
Mar ar fágadh mórchuid dínn sínte lag;
Leanaí óga 'na smóla dóite
Is an méid a fhan beo dhíobh cois claí nó scairt;
Ach geallaim féin díbh an té dhein an foghla,
Go mbeamna i gcóir dó le píc is le sleá,
Is go gcuirfeam yeomen ar crith 'na mbróga,
Ag díol a gcomhair leo ar Shliabh na mBan.

Tá na cóbaigh mhóra ag iarraidh eolais,
Tá an aimsir óg is an chabhair ag teacht;
An Té mhill na gnótha is É a leigheasfaidh fós iad,
Is ní dhíolfam feoirling leo, cíos ná sleá.
Píosa corónach, an chuid ba mhó dhe,
Luach éiric bó nó teaghlach deas,
Beidh rince ar bhóthre is soilse á ndó 'gainn,
Beidh meidhir is mórtas ar Shliabh na mBan.

Is mó fear aosta is crobhaire gléigeal,
Ó am go chéile a chuaigh that lear,
A bhfuail córdaí caola ag baint lúth a ngéag díobh,
I ndoinsiúin dhaora go doimhin faoi ghlas;
Gardaí taobh leo ná leomhfadh sméid' orthu,
Do dhéanfadh plé dóibh i dtíortha thar lear;
Á dtabhairt saor óna namhaid gan bhuíochas,
In am an tsaothair ar Shliabh na mBan.

Is tá an Francach faobhrach is a loingeas gléasta,
Le cranna géara acu ar muir le seal;
'Sé an síorscéal go bhfuail a dtriall ar Éirinn,
Is go gcuirfid Gaeil bhocht' aris 'na gceart.
Dá mba dhóigh liom féinig go mb'fhíor an scéal úd,
Bheadh mo chroí chomh héadrom le lon ar sceach,
Go mbeadh cloí ar mheirligh is an adharc á séideach,
Ar thaobh na gréine de Shliabh na mBan.

[Seo é leagan Béarla ar an véarsa deireanach:]

For on the ocean are ships in motion,
And glad devotion on France's shore,
And rumour's telling; "they'll now be sailing
To help the Gael in the Right once more."
O! if true's that story, by my hopes of glory,
Like the glad bird o'er me I'll lilt my rann!
Were the robber routed! the Saxon flouted!
How we would shout it, old Sliabh na mBan!


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Subject: RE: Sliabh na mBan
From: Philippa
Date: 04 Sep 99 - 07:11 PM

at you'll find the air for the most recent set of lyrics in this thread. Thanks Alison.
Has anyone got information on either of the other two Sliabh na mBan songs I added to the thread on 27 Aug?


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Philippa
Date: 08 Sep 99 - 06:46 PM

1) The oldest known manuscript of the song Una Bhán, transcribed circa 1772, contains 45 verses, but only 4 or 5 are commonly sung today. I once learned 43 verses of the Scottish ballad Gill Morice. It's clear that many of our ancestors sang and listened to longer songs than most of us enjoy nowadays. Martin Ryan has written to tell me that he spoke with Aine ui Cheallaigh who has a very long version of Sliabh na mBan and that she sings the two verses I found in O hOgain's book.

2) I came into this thread responding to Virginia Blankenhorn who said she didn't know of any singable English translation of the song. In fact, it's now looking as if this song is as much translated as Róisín Dubh/Dark Rosaleen. Séamus Ennis, a well-known piper, singer and collector translated Sliabh na mBán and Al O'Donnell sang it on his second LP on the Leader Tradition label. Yet another singable translation is published in Fleur Robertson, ed "Irish Ballads", Dublin: Gill and MacMillan, 1996. Eoghan O hAnluain wrote the background notes about Sliabh na mBán for the book, and I imagine was also responsible for the translation.


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From:
Date: 09 Sep 99 - 05:01 AM

I'm afraid I confused Philippa recently! Aine sings the seven verses given by her on Aug. 27 - but in a different order.

She doesn't recognise the two quoted by O Muirithe - but thinks they are perfectly singable to the usual air. For my part, I'm sure I've heard reference at least to the "Luther agus Calvin" verse. I think Eamon O Broithe mentioned it during the course of a lecture on the (very few) contemporary songs in Irish about the '98 rising.

I didn't ask Aine about the O Hogain verses - they look to me to be a different song.

I'll have a look in the Irish Traditional Music Archive when I get a chance.

Martin Ryan


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From:
Date: 11 Sep 99 - 11:06 AM

I don't find the O Muirithe verses singable to the tune. Unfortunately I don't have my own copy of the book to compare the rest of the verses with the better-known Sliabh na mBan. But we await further information from Martin - and from anyone else.


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Subject: RE: Sliabh na mBan
From: Philippa
Date: 11 Sep 99 - 05:46 PM

Notes from the 1978 recording by Al O'Donnell on the Leader label:
According to the notes by folksong collector Tom Munnelly, the song was composed by Michéal O Longáin of Carrignavar and translated by Seamus Ennis.

Here follow the rest of Munnelly's notes: In July 1798 a party of Tipperary insurgents gathered at Carrigmoclear on the slopes of Sliabh na mBan. They were betrayed by Thomas Neill, an innkeeper from Ninemilehouse. English troops under Generals Myers, St John and Asgill routed the rebels with much slaughter.

Neill fled before some surviors of the conflict attacked and wrecked his inn. a century later Dr George Sigerson (1838-1925) wrote of Neill, "The country people are very cautious not to intermarry with any of his or any other traitor's descendants."


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Subject: Tune Add: VALLEY NEAR SLIEVENAMON
From: Philippa
Date: 16 Sep 99 - 12:46 PM

If you go way up to the second message of this thread, you'll get lyrics for an english language song, The Valley of Slievenamon. Below is an abc for that song copied from IrTrad-L:
X:200
T:Valley Near Slievenamon
R:waltz
S:From the playing of Mike Lennon
B:Jim Coogan's Session Tunes
Z:Music: Jean Lewis
Z:abc's: Michael Hogan
M:3/4
L:1/4
K:G
Bc|:d3|e2 d|G3|D2 G|B3|c2 d|E3|EAG|F3|
D2 E|F2 c|B2 A|GFG|E2 F|1 G3|GBc:|2 G3|GFG||
|:A2^G|A2 B|c3|cdc|B3|G2 A|B3|B2 d|^c3|A2 B|^c2 g|f2 e|
d^cd|c>B c| B>_B=B/_B/|A2 d|e2 d|e2 d|G3|GDG|B3|c2 d|E3|EAG|
F3|D2E|F2 c|B2 A|GFG|E2 F|G3|1 GFG:|2 G3|G||

source: IrTrad-L archives

index of Slievenamon threads at IrTrad-L:
archive search via http://listserv.heanet.ie/irtrad-l.html


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Subject: RE: Sliabh na mBan
From: Philippa
Date: 20 Sep 99 - 01:52 PM

This is a funny thread because it's about one song title -or actually one place name - but many songs. I should add some info. about the song from O Muirithe's book which I mentioned on 27 AUG., the one with the verse about the followers of Calvin and Luther. It is not a song from 1798, but a song about Catholic emancipation and Daniel O'Connell who in 1830 became the first Catholic Member of Parliament.

In Michael Mulcahy & Marie Fitzgibbon, "The Voice of the People: Songs and History of Ireland", Dublin: O'Brien Press, 1982 . There is another 19th c song about emancipation, 'The Downfall of the Tithes at Slievenamon'the history of the Irish race webpages. the site is very strong on O'Connell. There's plenty about 1798 at 1798 - Ireland


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Philippa
Date: 14 Dec 99 - 06:07 PM

Mick Lowe - I won't perpetuate your 'Sliabh na Monh' thread - unless I find a Vietnamese version. Aine gave you the Irish for the song you want (it's in this thread too). But you were looking for an English lang. version and I believe it's the Séamas Ennis translation. Probably Wolfgang Connacht (or Hell) could transcribe it for you from his Al O'Donnell recording.


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Wolfgang
Date: 16 Dec 99 - 04:26 AM

I'll have a look (or whatever the acoustic equivalent for that word is) how different the Al O'Donnell version is.

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Mick Lowe
Date: 16 Dec 99 - 08:40 PM

Thanks for the wit Philippa.. being English and not understanding Gaelic at all, I was merely quoting the request I had..

And can I throw the proverbial spanner in the works.. I have a cd entitled "Music of Ireland" upon which is a track called Slieveamon, performed by the Royal Irish Rangers with Anne-Marie O'Farrell on harp, that is nothing like the song I know as Slieveamon.. so is this one of the "other" tunes you mentioned Philippa I ask myself

And I wouldn't be me if I didn't ask.. re your reference to the Derry Library.. why haven't you sent me info on venues where to play in Ireland.. there is a distinct shortage of such places on my website, apart from in Belfast...

And thanks for all your help

Mick


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Subject: Lyr Add: SLIABH NA MBAN
From: Wolfgang
Date: 19 Dec 99 - 05:03 PM

Here's the Sliabh na mBan transcribed from the Al O'Donnell LP. I don't recollect whether it is my transcription or somebody's else copied by me. Yes it's a completely different song both tune and lyrics from the „Alone all alone" song. I forgot to bring the sleeve notes (telling more about the particular incident described in the song) with me, but I'll try to remember to post them as well in a week or so. Recollection says that Ennis is the translator as Philippa has written. Isn't it a beautiful song?

Wolfgang

SLIABH NA MBAN

I hear no verses from thrush or blackbird
and grass grows dimly on the forest path,
the gorgeous maiden with grief is laden
with eternal wailing beating hands bereft.
She cries all pining that the young men
in Ireland nightly no rest can plan.
The troop of rangers, all-plundering strangers
on the sunny side slopes of Sliab na mBan.

I grieve my saying that that day's slaying
should have gone on, Gaels in their hundreds dead,
because the stranger is making game of us
saying pikes for them hold fear nor dread.
Our major came not in time of day break
we weren't prepared with our pikes as one,
but as wild sheep nearing a shepherd shearing
on the sunny side slopes of Sliab na mBan.

The Frenchman's rallying with sharp masts steadying
his top sails, bending at sea a while.
His frequent sea cracks mean out isle he's seeking
and for Gaels who see once more in power and style.
Could I believe that he's not deceiving
my heart wouldn't be weaving like the lark at dawn
to down the stranger and hear the hunt's horn blazing
on the sunny side slopes of Sliab na mBan.

New Ross 'tis known wasn't what beat us woefully
and left the horde of us stretched and weak,
we babes unclothed as cinders smouldering
and those who fought (bore at?) lying by ditch and dike.
I have it sworn now that he who lowered us
we'll be before him with pikes each man
and teach the yeoman to fear the foeman
when we pay the score to them at Sliabh na mBan.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SLIABH NA MBAN
From: Wolfgang
Date: 19 Dec 99 - 05:06 PM

SLIABH NA MBAN

I hear no verses from thrush or blackbird
and grass grows dimly on the forest path,
the gorgeous maiden with grief is laden
with eternal wailing beating hands bereft.
She cries all pining that the young men
in Ireland nightly no rest can plan.
The troop of rangers, all-plundering strangers
on the sunny side slopes of Sliab na mBan.

I grieve my saying that that day's slaying
should have gone on, Gaels in their hundreds dead,
because the stranger is making game of us
saying pikes for them hold fear nor dread.
Our major came not in time of day break
we weren't prepared with our pikes as one,
but as wild sheep nearing a shepherd shearing
on the sunny side slopes of Sliab na mBan.

The Frenchman's rallying with sharp masts steadying
his top sails, bending at sea a while.
His frequent sea cracks mean out isle he's seeking
and for Gaels who see once more in power and style.
Could I believe that he's not deceiving
my heart wouldn't be weaving like the lark at dawn
to down the stranger and hear the hunt's horn blazing
on the sunny side slopes of Sliab na mBan.

New Ross 'tis known wasn't what beat us woefully
and left the horde of us stretched and weak,
we babes unclothed as cinders smouldering
and those who fought (bore at?) lying by ditch and dike.
I have it sworn now that he who lowered us
we'll be before him with pikes each man
and teach the yeoman to fear the foeman
when we pay the score to them at Sliabh na mBan.


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: MartinRyan
Date: 12 Jun 00 - 05:15 PM

Just came across THIS broadside version which may be of interest.

Regards


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Subject: Lyr Add: SLIABH NA MBAN
From: paddymac
Date: 14 Mar 02 - 02:14 AM

I recently came across the gaelic version of this song posted here. There was a brief English commentary which said that it spoke to the men of Lienster and Munster and related to the Rising of 1798. I'm not a speaker of Gaelige, so I can't comment on the comment. I did do a super-search, which revealed that there are apparently two different songs of this name, the most widely known of which is the one attributed to Charles Kickham. The flow of these lyrics seem to mesh with the air for Kickham's song. I would be most appreciative if one of our speakers of Irish might render a translation of these lyrics, or at least advise as to the alleged Provincial exchanges. I apologize for the lack of (diacritical?) marks, but if my machine does them, it hasn't let me in on the secret.

SLIABH NA MBAN
(this version claimed to be about 1798)

Ni airim vearsa o lon na o cheirseach,
Is ni fhasann fear ins no coillte ceart;
Nil suim ag an speirbhean i sport na i bpleisiur,
Ach i ag gol is ag beiceadh is ag reabadh bas.
A ra gan faothamh, ni bhfaighidh na seimhfhir,
Aon oiche in Eirinn na uain chun reast,
Ag an trup so meirligh is iad ag teacht lena cheile,
Is go mbuailfear caoch sinn ar Shliabh na mBan.

Mo lean leir ar an dream gan eifeacht,
Nat fhan le heirim istoiche is stad,
Go mbeadh duthai Deiseach is iarthar Eireann,
Ag teacht lena cheile om tir aneas.
Go mbeadh ar gcampai deanta le forsai treana,
Bheadh cunamh De linn is an saol ar fad,
Is ni dhiolfadh meirleach darbh ainm Neill sinn,
Is bhuafai an reim linn ar Shliabh na mBan.

Is mo fear aosta is crobhaire gleigeal,
O am go cheile a chuaigh that lar,
A bhfuil cordai caola ag baint luth a ngeag diobh,
I ndoinsiuin dhaora go doimhin faoi ghlas;
Gardai taobh leo na leomhfadh smeid' orthu,
Do dheanfadh ple dhoibh i dtiortha thar lear;
A dtabhairt saor ona namhaid gan bhuiochas,
In am an tsaorhair ar Shliabh na mBan.

Is ta an Franach faobhrach is a loingeas gleasta,
Le cranna geara acu ar muir le seal;
Se an siorsceal go bhfuil a drtriall ar Eirinn,
Is go gcuirfid Gaeil bhocht aris na gceart.
Da mba dhoigh liom feinig go mb'fhior an sceal ud,
Bheadh mo chroi chomh headrom le lon ar sceach.
Go mbeadh cloi ar mheirligh is an adharc a seideadh,
Ar thaobh na greine de Shliabh na mBan.

line breaks added by mudelf ;-)


Message transferred from a duplicate thread.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon again
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 14 Mar 02 - 10:30 AM

Have you seen the long threads already in the archives about the Slevenamon / Sliabh na mBan songs ? See if they give you the information you seek... if you still need a translation please get back to us.

Did you get your verses from http://www.iol.ie/~fagann/1798/songs4.htm this songs of 1798 site? To make line breaks, add the letters br inside angle brackets < after each line.
There are several ways to make the diacritical marks (accent marks, etc). Although not the simplest, the method given on this chart seems to be the most enduring and reliable for use on Mudcat.

previous threads include
Slievenamon (above)
"Slieve Na Mban"

Message transferred from a duplicate thread.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: Lyr Add: SLIABH na mBAN
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 22 Jun 02 - 09:26 AM

Terry Moylan, ed. "The Age of Revolution in the Irish Song Tradition 1776 - 1815", Dublin: Lilliput Press, 2000 has the song that begins: "Ní airím véarsa ó lon ná ó chéirseach"
2nd verse begins "Is oth liom féinig bualadh an lae úd" (see my posting above, 27-Aug-99). Moylan got his text from Nioclás Tóíbin, "Duanaire Deiseach" (1978) and says this song is often attributed to Micheál Óg Ó Longáin.

Moylan also gives a poem by Dr Campion called Slievenamon, which is not the same as any of the songs so far discussed, but is about the same battle of 1798. It begins "Two thousand men for Ireland, upon the mountain top!".

And he gives George Sigerson's poetic translation of the song attributed to Ó Longáin. Of this "Sliabh na mBan", Moylan writes, "It is not a literal translation, but it is very close and it also retains the metre and fhyming scheme of the original. It is taken from Denis Devereaux's Songs & Ballads of 98, where the air is stated to be 'Not more welcome than the fairy numbers', a song from Moore's Melodies"

SLIABH na mBAN

Weep the great Departed - the Patriot-hearted!
With life they parted for Ireland's right,
To them give glory, while tyrants gory
Spread the false story, 'They fled in fright".
Oh, 'twas small our terror! we fell to Error -
No chiefs there were, or an ordered van;
Yet when came war's rattle, we fled not battle,
Though like herdless cattle on Sliabh na mBan!

May the grief each ray shuns curse their impatience,
Who did haste our Nation's uprise from night,
Ere the Sooth could gather its clanns together,
And on this heather with the West unite!
Our camp had warriors! - Ay, Freedom's barriers!
The God-sent carriers of Slavery's van!
Oh! No spy had found them - no fetter bound them-
We'd be freed men round them on Sliabh na mBan.

Though at Ross defeated, few, few retreated;
Death comes - they meet it with push of pike!
Then were dragged the dying, and poor babes crying,
The flames to lie in, from ditch and dyke;
Ye who wreaked this slaughter, for the crimes you wrought there
We swear like water your blood shall run;
Yet savage yeomen, of hell an omen,
We'll meet ye, foemen, on Sliabh na mBan!

Ah! many an old man, and star-bright bold man,
Who long did hold on to free their Isle,
Lie pale and markless, in deathly starkness
Bowed down in darkness of dungeon vile.
There, eve and morning, they bear all scorning.
Threats, lashes, mourning that their tyrants plan;
We'll pay soon your labours, O coward neighbours!
With our musty sabres on Sliabh na mBan!

For on the Ocean are ships in motion,
And glad devotion on France's shore;
And rumour's telling: "They'll now be sailing
To help the Gael in the Right once more".
Oh! If true's that story, by my hopes of glory,
Like the glad bird o'er me I'll lilt my rann!
Were the robber routed, the Saxon flouted
How we could shout it, old Sliabh na mBan.

Ho! The clowns are quaking, and councel taking,
Good times are making their firm approach,
When those who weakly still preach, "Bear meekly",
Will mourn all bleakly in dark reproach;
While gold and chattel, broad lands and cattle,
Pay them whose battle made freedom dawnl
And wayside dances our joy enhances,
With the gold fire-glances o'er Sliabh na mBan.


Some information on the translator from Kathleen Hoagland, ed. "1000 Years of Irish Poetry":

George Sigerson (1836-1925) was born near Strabane, Co Tyrone and died in Dublin. He had medical training in France and was later a Professor of Biology at University College, Dublin. Sigerson translated and wrote medical books, and was also a proficient Gaelic scholar and president of the National Literary Society from 1893 until his death.

He also translated Seán Ó Duibhir a Ghleanna, An Spailpín Fánach and composed The Mountains of Pomeroy (a patriotic re-working of an older Reynardine song)


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Subject: RE: Slievenamon
From: Peter T.
Date: 23 Jun 02 - 09:05 AM

For the non-Gaelic among us, I wonder if someone could comment on whether the translation on the Al O'Donnell album (Cited just above) or the flowery one ("May the grief each ray shuns" rhymes with Nations!!) is closer to the original. I can't believe that the flowery one, apart from its metrics, can be close -- apart from its bizarre diction. It would be nice if someone could comment on the tone or style of the original -- is it spare, or flowery?

yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Slievenamon
From: GUEST,Aine Ryan
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 06:43 AM

there are several versions of music titled Slievenamon. this version is by Tipperary man Charles Kickham.
The title is translated from Slieve na mban Mountain of the women.
One version of the tale is that the women hid in the mountain while the men fought off the enemy.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Slievenamon
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 08:20 PM

My father used to sing the song's ending as:

To see our flag unfold and my true love to hold,
'Neath the Green White and Gold
In the valley near Slievenamon.


I know it doesn't scan too well, but they had other priorities than scansion in the Third Tipp Brigade.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Slievenamon
From: GUEST,Rónán Ó Donnchadha
Date: 18 Mar 07 - 02:00 PM

There is no evidence from his manuscripts,or those of his sons Peadar and Pól, that Micheál Óg Ó Longáin was the author of this song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Slievenamon
From: Jim Lad
Date: 18 Mar 07 - 02:49 PM

I have an MP3 track of this one on my website if you want to have a wee listen.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Slievenamon
From: An Buachaill Caol Dubh
Date: 19 Mar 07 - 12:30 PM

Further to the C19th Broadsheet given by Martin Ryan all of seven years ago, this version is substantially the same as that in O'Lochlainn's "Irish Street Ballads" (where it has "Kilkenny", "I.S.B." has "Knocktopher" )


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Slievenamon
From: GUEST,Gabriel
Date: 20 Oct 11 - 02:50 PM

I have always adored this song.

The one reference in it that I simply don't understand is the 5th line of the second verse. 'Twas the soul of truth, and of melting ruth'.

What in heaven's name is 'melting ruth' about?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Slievenamon
From: MartinRyan
Date: 20 Oct 11 - 03:13 PM

Archaic sense of "ruth" - regret, sorrow.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Slievenamon
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Sep 18 - 01:39 PM

Of course those two verses would not be in Sliabh na mBan, which is quite clearly a United Irishman song, an organisation which opposed any conflicts between different religious affiliations and called for the unity of "Catholic, Protestant and Dissenter" (i.e Catholic, Anglican and Non-episcopalian Protestant sects but didn't mention atheists!).

It is generally thought to have been composed by Mícheál Óg Ó Longáin, a United Irishman who it is believed participated in the Rising and had to go on the run afterwards, one of the few Irish-language poets or song composers dealing withe the United irish at the time, a movement the leadership of which was mostly of colonist background with English as their primary language. In addition, revolutionary Republican ideas were coming in from France, England, Scotland and the US, so that most of those too were in English.


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