To Thread - Forum Home

The Mudcat Café TM
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=161730
10 messages

How Does A Guitar Survive Heavy Strings?

20 Mar 17 - 05:07 AM (#3845774)
Subject: How Does A Guitar Survive Heavy Strings?
From: GUEST,Mathew

Hello all,


I have a Fender acoustic guitar that I put very heavy bronze strings on about a year ago. I tuned it a step down and love the sound/ feel of the strings.

However I recently picked it up again after not playing it for a while, and I've noticed that the glue holding down the bridge is starting to loosen and the bridge is starting to come up just a touch.


Is my guitar broken? Can it take the force of the strings? Will it get worse? What can I do to fix it? Is there anything I can do in future to protect my guitar AND have very heavy strings?


Thanks for the info, cheers

Mathew


20 Mar 17 - 05:46 AM (#3845778)
Subject: RE: How Does A Guitar Survive Heavy Strings?
From: Stanron

A lifting acoustic guitar bridge needs attention. Take it to a guitar tech or luthier and get advice. If it is a pin bridge you are less likely to experience the catastrophic destruction of the bridge flying off but there might be damage to the underlying structure if it is left un-attended.

Stan.


20 Mar 17 - 07:51 AM (#3845797)
Subject: RE: How Does A Guitar Survive Heavy Strings?
From: punkfolkrocker

My first ever guitar was a Shaftesbury acoustic circa 1974 [a catalogue guitar most likely manufactured by Eko]

After about 7 or 8 years I decided to put heavy strings on it.
Not long afterwards, I woke up one morning to find that with out any warning symptoms
the bridge had lifted and torn the laminated soundboard to splinters...


20 Mar 17 - 08:23 AM (#3845803)
Subject: RE: How Does A Guitar Survive Heavy Strings?
From: gillymor

You probably should have the bridge reglued professionally and if you want to string up heavier, Newtone makes low tension strings that sound pretty good and have good durability, I used them for awhile for playing rhythm on my Froggy Bottom F. Another option would be silk and steel which are low tension.


20 Mar 17 - 10:20 AM (#3845820)
Subject: RE: How Does A Guitar Survive Heavy Strings?
From: gillymor

"Is my guitar broken? Can it take the force of the strings? Will it get worse? What can I do to fix it? Is there anything I can do in future to protect my guitar AND have very heavy strings?"

Have you directed these questions to the manufacturer for their recommendations? Some guitars were not designed to be heavily strung.


20 Mar 17 - 10:21 AM (#3845821)
Subject: RE: How Does A Guitar Survive Heavy Strings?
From: Will Fly

Out of curiosity - what gauges are you actually using?

"Very heavy" is a movable feast... :-)


20 Mar 17 - 04:10 PM (#3845863)
Subject: RE: How Does A Guitar Survive Heavy Strings?
From: Merritt

+1 Talk to the manufacturer.

I have a 2005 Simon & Patrick Woodland Parlor. A short-scale guitar that I keep in open D or G tuning. I wanted more tension on the strings for picking and slide. I asked the manufacturer (Godin) if it would be ok to go from Elixir Nano lights to mediums. They said "technically, yes," but recommended having a luthier or decent tech review the situation and sign-off. Which is what I did; an in-house luthier at a shop in Pittsburgh looked it over and said "Go for it." (Wouldn't charge me.) I've had no stability, bridge, stress-related issues with this guitar for the last 6 years.


21 Mar 17 - 05:05 PM (#3846027)
Subject: RE: How Does A Guitar Survive Heavy Strings?
From: GUEST,DrWord

Mathew ~ change to mediums ~ go to frets.com to read frank's comments on your issue (ALL guitar issues!) ~ see what is required--this is a routine repair. i'm currently re-stringing a (Fender) bridge re-glue, and have no intention of going beyond 56-13 ~ good luck with your guitar, and
keep on pickin'
dennis


22 Mar 17 - 03:13 PM (#3846181)
Subject: RE: How Does A Guitar Survive Heavy Strings?
From: GUEST

Consider installing a bridge-doctor as an inexpensive repair if it shows sign of lifting.


22 Mar 17 - 04:52 PM (#3846188)
Subject: RE: How Does A Guitar Survive Heavy Strings?
From: Stanron

A lifting bridge might, only might and also might not, mean damage to strutting and/or bridge plate. Professional inspection will decide.

The bridge doctor cures a bulging sound board and not a lifting bridge. Get the lifting bridge fixed first. You can always fit a bridge doctor later if you want to.