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JUTLAND
(Les Sullivan)

Where are you goin' my Billy-O, (2x)
I'm joining a ship in Scapa Flow,
That's where I'm going my Nancy.
I'm joining "Queen Mary" Nancy-O,
Joining "Queen Mary" Nancy-O,
She's bristling with guns and ready to go,
To sail to glory with Jellicoe,*
But where is "Queen Mary"? Gone Now!
And where is the glory? Gone Now!
And six thousand sailors, Gone Now!
They have gone to the bottom at Jutland.

Where are you goin' my Rodney-O, (2x)
I'm joining a ship in Scapa Flow,
That's where I'm going my Nancy.
I'm joining "Invincible" Nancy-O,
Joining "Invincible" Nancy-O,
She's bristling with guns and ready to go,
To sail to glory with Jellicoe,
But where is "Invincible"? Gone Now!
And where is the glory? Gone Now!
And six thousand sailors, Gone Now!
They have gone to the bottom at Jutland.

Where are you goin' my Johnny-O, (2x)
I'm joining a ship in Scapa Flow,
That's where I'm going my Nancy.
I'm joining the "Black Prince" Nancy-O,
Joining the "Black Prince" Nancy-O,
She's bristling with guns and ready to go,
To sail to glory with Jellicoe,
But where is the "Black Prince"? Gone Now!
And where is the glory? Gone Now!
And six thousand sailors, Gone Now!
They have gone to the bottom at Jutland.

The Battle of Jutland was a sea battle between the British and the German fleets
, May 31/June 1 1916. The three ships mentioned above are three of the top four
British losses ('Indefatigable'
isn't a good name for a song because it's too long). The battle was a victory f
or the British fleet though it doesn't look so at the first glance. Britain lost
a larger number of ships, more ship tonnage, and much more hands (about three t
imes as much as Germany). The number of hits, however, saw a large British advan
tage. It seems curious that a fleet scoring about twice as much hits as the oppo
sing fleet lost much more hands and slightly more material. The reason is a
faulty design in British ship construction which meant that some British ships w
ent down with very few hits whereas German ships returned into the harbour with
many hits on them. For the same reason, the British ships went down very quickly
taking with them nearly all hands, whereas the German ships (with one single ex
ception) went down slowly and a large number of hands could be taken on other sh
ips. That so many large British pre-Dreadnought ships went down so quickly in a
victorious battle after only very few hits is the historical background to the s
ong above. Why was it a British victory after all, despite larger losses inflict
ed on them? It was
the last time in that war that the German fleet left the harbour. On the day fol
lowing the battle, who was there on the ocean looking for survivors or enemy shi
ps having lost their way? The
loser of that particular battle but long run winner. WH

*: Jellicoe: Sir John Jellicoe, 1859-1935, commander of the British fleet at the
battle of Jutland, later First Sea Lord.

@war @ship @death @sailor
filename[ JUTLAND
SK WH



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