The Mudcat Café TM
Thread #62901   Message #1655748
Posted By: Amos
25-Jan-06 - 08:19 PM
Thread Name: BS: Popular Views of the Bush Administration
Subject: RE: BS: Popular Views of the Bush Administration
Future American lawyers to be proud of.
... and Alberto Gonzales.

http://insomnia.livejournal.com/652389.html?nc=2&style=mine
[A few good pictures on the website]

Alberto Gonzales spoke before law students at Georgetown today,
justifying illegal, unauthorized surveilance of US citizens, but
during the course of his speech the students in class did
something pretty ballsy and brave. They got up from their seats
and turned their backs to him.

To make matters worse for Gonzales, additional students came
into the room, wearing black cowls and carrying a simple banner,
written on a sheet.
[The good Ben Franklin quote: "Those who would sacrifice liberty
for security deserve neither"]

Fortunately for him, it was a brief speech... followed by a
panel discussion that basically ripped his argument a new
asshole.

And, as one of the people on the panel said,

"When you're a law student, they tell you if say that if you
can't argue the law, argue the facts. They also tell you if you
can't argue the facts, argue the law. If you can't argue either,
apparently, the solution is to go on a public relations
offensive and make it a political issue... to say over and over
again "it's lawful", and to think that the American people will
somehow come to believe this if we say it often enough.

In light of this, I'm proud of the very civil civil disobedience
that was shown here today." - David Cole, Georgetown University
Law Professor

It was a good day for dissent.




And from the WP:

Bush the Incompetent
By Harold Meyerson

Wednesday, January 25, 2006; Page A19

Incompetence is not one of the seven deadly sins, and it's hardly the worst attribute that can be ascribed to George W. Bush. But it is this president's defining attribute. Historians, looking back at the hash that his administration has made of his war in Iraq, his response to Hurricane Katrina and his Medicare drug plan, will have to grapple with how one president could so cosmically botch so many big things -- particularly when most of them were the president's own initiatives.

In numbing profusion, the newspapers are filled with litanies of screw-ups. Yesterday's New York Times brought news of the first official assessment of our reconstruction efforts in Iraq, in which the government's special inspector general depicted a policy beset, as Times reporter James Glanz put it, "by gross understaffing, a lack of technical expertise, bureaucratic infighting [and] secrecy." At one point, rebuilding efforts were divided, bewilderingly and counterproductively, between the Army Corps of Engineers and, for projects involving water, the Navy. That's when you'd think a president would make clear in no uncertain terms that bureaucratic turf battles would not be allowed to impede Iraq's reconstruction. But then, the president had no guiding vision for how to rebuild Iraq -- indeed, he went to war believing that such an undertaking really wouldn't require much in the way of American treasure and American lives.

It's the president's prescription drug plan (Medicare Part D), though, that is his most mind-boggling failure. As was not the case in Iraq or with Katrina, it hasn't had to overcome the opposition of man or nature. ...




Mr. Abramoff's Meetings

Wednesday, January 25, 2006; Page A18

HERE ARE SOME things we know about Jack Abramoff and the White House: The disgraced lobbyist raised at least $100,000 for President Bush's reelection campaign. He had long-standing ties to Karl Rove, a key presidential adviser. He had extensive dealings with executive branch officials and departments -- one of whom, former procurement chief David H. Safavian, has been charged by federal prosecutors with lying to investigators about his involvement with Mr. Abramoff.

We also know that Mr. Abramoff is an admitted crook who was willing to bribe members of Congress and their staffs to get what he (or his clients) wanted. In addition to attending a few White House Hanukkah parties and other events at which he had his picture snapped with the president, Mr. Abramoff had, according to the White House, "a few staff-level meetings" with White House aides.


I'm Feeling . . . Surveilled

» Eugene Robinson | As its servers fill up with our dreams, ambitions, beliefs and fears, Google can know too much. It's no surprise the administration wants in on the action.
Dionne: Rove's Early Warning
Miller: Palestinian Leadership Crisis
Achenblog: Jack Bauer's Lesson for Teenagers
OPINIONS SECTION: Froomkin, Toles, More

Who's Blogging?
Read what bloggers are saying about this article.
This Century Sucks - A Fair and Balanced Look at the Continuing Corrupt and Evil Whistle Ass Administration
Bloggers Didn't Rock The Vote In Canada (markus.blog-city.com)
Upper Left

Full List of Blogs (23 links) »

Most Blogged About Articles
On washingtonpost.com | On the web


Here is what we don't know about Jack Abramoff and the White House: whom he met with and what was discussed. Nor, if the White House sticks to its current position, will we learn that anytime soon. Press secretary Scott McClellan told the White House press corps: "If you've got some specific issue that you need to bring to my attention, fine. But what we're not going to do is engage in a fishing expedition that has nothing to do with the investigation."

This is not a tenable position. It's undisputed that Mr. Abramoff tried to use his influence, and his restaurant and his skyboxes and his chartered jets, to sway lawmakers and their staffs. Information uncovered by Mr. Bush's own Justice Department shows that Mr. Abramoff tried to do the same inside the executive branch.

Under these circumstances, asking about Mr. Abramoff's White House meetings is no mere exercise in reportorial curiosity but a legitimate inquiry about what an admitted felon might have been seeking at the highest levels of government. Whatever White House officials did or didn't do, there is every reason to believe that Mr. Abramoff was up to no good and therefore every reason the public ought to know with whom he was meeting....