The Mudcat Café TM
Thread #1052   Message #1799933
Posted By: Q (Frank Staplin)
02-Aug-06 - 02:20 PM
Thread Name: Origins: Pastures of Plenty (Woody Guthrie)
Subject: Lyr Add: PASTURES OF PLENTY (Woody Guthrie)
There are several slightly differing versions of lyrics. Ludlow Music obtained renewed copyright in 1960 and 1963; I have not seen these issues, and they may differ from each other. How close are they to the older sung versions of the 1940's?
Here is the one from "Woody Guthrie Folk Songs," 1963, Intro. Pete Seeger, p. 22 with music and chords. It differs in some lines from the one in the DT, and the one in "Sing Out!," also indicated as copyright Ludlow 1960, 1963.

Lacking is the verse about orchards of peaches and prunes.

Lyr. Add: PASTURES OF PLENTY
(Woody Guthrie, copyright Ludlow 1960, 1963)

It's a (Em)mighty hard road that my poor hands have hoed,
My (G)poor feet have travelled a hot dusty (B7)road,
(Em)Out of your dustbowl and westward we roll,
Through deserts so hot and your (A7)mountains so (Em)cold.

I've wandered all over your green growing land.
Wherever your crops are I've lent you my hand,
On the edge of your cities you'll see me and then,
I come with the dust and I'm gone with the wind.

California, Arizona, I've worked on your crops,
Then north up to Oregon to gather your hops,
Dig beets from your ground, I cut grapes from your vines,
To set on your tables that light sparklin' wine.

Green Pastures of plenty from dry desert ground,
From the Grand Coulee Dam where the water runs down,
Ev'ry State of this Union us migrants have been,
*We come with the dust and we're gone with the wind.

It's always we ramble that river and I,
All along your green valleys I'll work till I die,
I'll travel this road until death sets me free,
'Cause my Pastures of Plenty must always be free.

It's a mighty hard road that my poor hands have hoed,
My poor feet have travelled this hot dusty road,
On the edge of your cities you'll see me and then,
I come with the dust and I'm gone with the wind.

*We work in your fight & we'll fight til we win" is the last line of the 'Green Pastures' verse in "Sing Out!" Probably changed for Union labor, but has little application to the dust bowl migrants of the song.