The Mudcat Café TM
Thread #126347   Message #2825673
Posted By: Gibb Sahib
30-Jan-10 - 01:46 PM
Thread Name: From SF to Sydney - 1853 Shanties Sung?
Subject: RE: From SF to Sydney - 1853 Shanties Sung?
Thanks, John, for the excellent historiography of "South Australia."

I'll just add a couple bits.

I do have this article:
1928         Saunders, William. "Sailor Songs and Songs of the Sea." Musical Quarterly 24(3):339-357.

He cites The related/variant chantey with the Cape Cod girls theme. Here's the passage:

"I have only recently also received from America a similar composition which, although
employed as a shanty by the Cod Fishers of Newfoundland, with
whom it is a prime favourite, is likewise more of a folk-song than
a true shanty:—

Cape Cod girls they have no combs,
Heave away, Heave away,
They comb their hair with codfish bones,
We are bound for Australia.
Heave away, my bully, bully boys,
Heave away, Heave away,
Heave away, and don't you make a noise,
We are bound for Australia

Cape Cod boys, they have no sleds,
Heave away, Heave away,
They slide down hill on codfish heads,
We are bound for Australia. "

Note: "folk songs of the sea" is Saunders' term for what we might call forebitters.

Parrish (1942) has this version, pg 220:

Haul away, I'm a rollin' king
haul away, haul away
I'm boun' for South Australia.
Yonder come a flounder flat on the groun'
haul away, haul away
I'm boun' for South Australia.
Belly to the groun' an' back to the sun
haul away, haul away
I'm boun' for South Australia.
Ain' but one thing worry me
haul away, haul away
I'm boun' for South Australia
I leave my wife in Tennessee
haul away, haul away
I'm boun' for South Australia
Haul away, I'm a rollin' king
haul away, haul away
I'm boun' for South Australia

It seems like there was no grand chorus, which is about right if the stevedores were using it for hauling. Also note the pure use of "haul away". And while we're there, notice the pure use of "heave away" in LA Smith's, Harlow's and Saunders' versions. The mix of heave and haul -- possibly because the task was pumping -- seems to first show up in Doerflinger's Laurie. Lloyd's version would seem to have popularized heave/haul, but I can't say whether he heard that from his oral source or was influenced by Doerflinger -- a text he is known to have used as part of making up his renditions.

To my mind, Colcord's 1924 version *must* be copied out of LA Smith. (And I always like to remind how much of Smith's work was plagiarized from the 1882 article, suggesting that even more of it was "culled" from other sources.) And I would not be surprised if Saunders culled his Codfish version "recently received from America" from Colcord -- either that, or the song was very well standardized around that time. Hugill's text version of South Australia/Rolling King looks to be a mash of all the sources he'd *read*, if not also what he used to sing/hear.

Note also that the tune of Harlow's South Australia is very similar to Smith/Colcord, though clearly from an independent source....and this tune has some significant difference to the well-known tune today. In fact, Doerflinger's and Hugill's text versions are also closer to the others' tune, not today's. Today's no doubt come again from -- no surprise -- Lloyd & Co., fine purveyors of contrived ditties. Most disappointingly, in his later recorded performances, Hugill seems to adjusted to the new revival version in terms of tune and chorus; he spiced up his versions with some of the saltier verses, however.

When I have sung this in the past, it has also been a mash up of what I've read/heard. So a small disclaimer: when I did it for the YouTube project, at that particular point, I was not so concerned (as I was later) with realizing Hugill's *text* version to a T.

Gibb