The Mudcat Café TM
Thread #5029   Message #28450 Posted By: McGrath
15-May-98 - 06:22 PM
Thread Name: Origins: Finding of Moses (Michael Moran/Zozimus)
Subject: Lyr Add: THE FINDING OF MOSES (Moran/Zozimus)
THE FINDING OF MOSES
(Michael Moran - 'Zozimus')

On Egypt's banks, contagious to the Nile
The auld Pharaoh's daughter, she went to bathe in style
She took her dip and she came unto the land
And to dry her royal pelt she ran along the strand
A bulrush tripped her whereupon she saw
A smiling baby in a wad of straw
She took him up and says she in accents mild
"Oh tar-an-a-gers, now me girls, which one of yis owns the child?"

She took him up and she gave a little grin
For she and Moses were standing in their skin
"Bedad now" says she "it was someone very rude
Left a little baby by the river in his nude."
She took him to her auld lad sitting on the throne
"Da," says she, "will you give the boy a home?"
"Bedad now," says he, "sure I've often brought in worse.
Go my darling daughter and get the child a nurse."

An auld blackamore woman among the crew
Cried out, "You royal savage, what's that to do with you?
Your royal ladies is too meek and mild
To beget dishonestly this darling little child."
"Ah then," says the Pharaoh, "I'll search every nook
From the Phoenix Park down to Donnybrook
And when I catch a hoult of the bastard's father
I will kick him from the Nile down to the Dodder."

Well they sent a bellman to the market square
To see if he could find a slavey there
But the only one now that he could find
Was the little young one that left the child behind
She came up to the Pharaoh, a stranger, mareyah
Never lettin' on that she was the baby's ma
And so little Moses got his mammy back
Which shows that co-in-ci-dence is a nut to crack.

Written by "Zozimus" (Michael Moran) b. 1794 d. 1846

Frank Harte sings the definitive version of this song and the words were taken from his book "Songs of Dublin" (1976) which is now in reprint. Frank is a Dubliner (like myself) and it is difficult to accurately write the phonetics of the accent as applicable to this song. And it must be said that this song is best suited to the Dublin style of phraseology and pronunciation. I sing this song at every available opportunity when that Harte fella isn't around. I never tire of it but while my friends are sick of me, but not the song. I am delighted others are showing an interest in this marvelous gem of Dublineese.

Frank McGrath
Nenagh Singers Circle