The Mudcat Café TM
Thread #155902   Message #3688854
Posted By: GUEST
22-Feb-15 - 02:13 AM
Thread Name: BS: Vegan mudcatters
Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
3rd batch from the cache

Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 07 Jan 15 - 03:27 AM

I had another look at the Thug Kitchen recipes and they're actually not so GooP after all (for anyone who doesn't know, GooP is Gwyneth Paltrow's lifestyle blog - don't go there unless you have access to super exotic ingredients for 'cookies'.

Otherwise there are some things you can make use of for baking vegan cookies, or indeed cakes, that aren't that tough to find or expensive. Fat is simple enough of course, you just use vegetable oil, margarine or (quite popular now as a butter sub in baking) coconut oil. When replacing eggs in vegan baking however you have to consider what effect is needed; something gooey and fudgey (eg: brownies), light and airy (eg: cup cakes), or something that binds together well (eg: pancakes). For each kind of baking need there is an egg replacement that will do a similar job. Bananas and silken tofu are often employed for fudgey things, bicarbonate of soda and vinegar for airy style cakes, and flax seeds for binding. Sometimes, depending on what you're making you might employ more than one of these ingredients.

Anyway, there's an article here about it all: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/food-52/how-to-make-your-own-egg_b_6423016.html
Though to save hassle, I reckon it's probably best to hunt down photos on the web of good looking vegan bakes that other people have perfected for themselves. I use google images to do this (with keywords like "vegan cake recipe"), and I always look for a photo that shows a slice or cross section of the cake, to gauge how the 'crumb' looks.

Google Image result for 'vegan' 'cake' 'recipe'

Beware though, *some* bloggers steal other people's photos for their own use, so a great looking photo might not necessarily indicate a great recipe, but it's not the norm I've found. Alternatively just buy a book on vegan baking with good reviews on Amazon, there are a number of them out there now.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Jan 15 - 10:58 AM

I've just this minute heard some expert on Radio 4 declaring that "we now live in an obesogenic environment." *boggle*


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 08 Jan 15 - 05:13 AM

That's a new word on me.

Can't really argue with the idea that the environments in which we live, work and socialise have become increasingly stuffed with the means to make people fat. We have three takeaways within ten minutes walk of our house. It's only a small community. Everywhere you look there's advertising for that stuff too. And they wouldn't put it everywhere if it didn't work.

We are pretty primal creatures at heart, however much we like to imagine ourselves as smarter than other animals, the exact same instincts to feed and to reproduce dominate our behaviours.

In other news I had spicy black bean and sweetcorn patties for breakfast with tinned plum tomatoes and a brown roll, yum yum.

I soaked and cooked a 500g bag of black beans. Sauteed a couple each of finely diced onions and sweet peppers in a little oil Boiled and drained some frozen sweetcorn (probably a quarter of the volume of the cooked beans) Mashed it all into the beans along with plenty of salt, smoked paprika and chilli powder. I added texture and substance to the mixture with a couple handfuls of rolled oats, And used a couple of 'flax eggs' (ie: a couple of tablespoonfuls of ground flax seeds mixed with a little water and left to go goopy) to help everything to bind together nicely (like playdough) Using a well packed US Half Cup measure, and plenty of brown flour to coat them, I made FOURTEEN patties altogether.

Most of those are now in the freezer. Some in our tummies. I probably spent around £2 on the ingredients. About the same as a cheeseburger from McDs'


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,gillymor
Date: 08 Jan 15 - 07:08 AM

That sounds good CS. 2 questions:

1. Would a non-vegan substitute 2 chicken eggs for the flax eggs for that amount of beans? 2. Do the rolled oats get cooked at all before inclusion?

Thanks.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 08 Jan 15 - 07:27 AM

Hi Gillymor,

Yes I use uncooked rolled oats, the basic porridge kind. The oats get cooked when you cook the patties. I find them to be a good ingredient in patties as they improve the texture, making it less squishy. I don't like squishy bean burgers.

I usually pan fry these sorts of patties by the way, but you can bake them too. Place them on an oiled baking sheet and brush extra bit of oil over the tops. About 25mins at a medium/hot heat should do it.

Yes, you can use real eggs to bind. You'll probably get a better result with real eggs as they will help the patties to firm up as they cook.

I should amend my umm 'recipe' above by saying add in your eggs *before* you add your oats. You'll get a better idea of how many oats to add then. Use your own judgement there, I do it just by mixing in as many handfuls as are needed to bring all the ingredients together in a nice firmish 'mouldable' dough, neither too dry and crumbly nor too wet and sticky.

Don't be scared of using lots of seasoning here. I shove in a hearty quantity of salt, herbs and spice in my bean burger mixes. A whole 500g pack makes a large batch and when they taste plain they aren't any fun to eat.

A nice thing to do with these kind of patties once shaped, is to coat them in finely crushed (I use a food processor for this) tortilla chips. You get a really crunchy crumb on the outside and a moist steamy middle.

You would do it by first coating in flour, then dipping in beaten egg, and then finally coating in the crumbs. It can get a bit messy though, especially when dealing with a whole load of them!


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 08 Jan 15 - 07:35 AM

PS one egg would probably be enough.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,gillymor
Date: 08 Jan 15 - 08:02 AM

Thanks, CS. I love the notion of a tortilla chip coating.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 08 Jan 15 - 09:58 AM

I hadn't heard of the Thug book or blog until it was mentioned by my coworker, so I'm interested to read your assessment. I may have to do some more research myself.

SRS


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Jan 15 - 10:33 AM

PS one egg would probably be enough.

In France, one egg would certainly be un oeuf!


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,sciencegeek
Date: 08 Jan 15 - 10:52 AM

for those with cholesterol issues, egg whites work well for binding & keeping the flavor light.

Cooked yolks and crushed egg shells can be added to bird suet to give them a healthy treat.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 08 Jan 15 - 11:47 AM

I'm making a bean goulash (or 'bean gulyas') this evening, roughly following this recipe (check the pic, it looks really quite good):

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/13/health/nutrition/13recipehealth.html?_r=0

Somewhat unusually for me, I'm using tinned red kidney beans instead of dried, as you can get them ridiculously cheaply here in UK supermarkets so I always have them in stock. Handy for when, like tonight, you haven't planned ahead and soaked your beans!

I also find tinned red kidney beans useful to make chilli spiced bean burgers, spicy bean pate for toast or rolls, and chilli sin carne (without the beef instead of with).


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 08 Jan 15 - 01:03 PM

PS that bean gulyas should be served ladled over some boiled, crushed buttered potatoes.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 09 Jan 15 - 08:13 AM

Posters here might find this documentary called Vegucated that follows a bunch of people trying out a new vegan diet for several weeks, of interest.

Vegucated Documentary

" egucated is a 2011 American documentary film that explores the challenges of converting to a vegan diet. It "follows three meat- and cheese-loving New Yorkers who agree to adopt a vegan diet for six weeks."

The director interviewed a number of people to participate in this documentary and chose Brian, who likes to eat meat and eat out; Ellen, a psychiatrist, part-time comedian and single mother; and Tesla, a college student who lives with her family.[1] In the film Dr. Joel Fuhrman and Professor T. Colin Campbell discuss the benefits of a plant-based diet consisting of whole foods. The film also features Howard Lyman and Stephen R. Kaufman. Kneel Cohn makes a cameo appearance.

The documentary addresses the resistance that some people feel towards vegetarianism and veganism, the disconnect between farm animals and the purchasing of meat, the origins of omnivorism and the ethical, environmental and health benefits of a vegan diet. During the filming, participants visited an abandoned slaughterhouse and investigated the reality of intensive animal farming in the US. Of their own accord, they chose to trespass on a factory farm to see for themselves, and became passionate about their new-found cause."


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,sciencegeek
Date: 09 Jan 15 - 09:29 AM

encouraging criminal trespass... sounds like PETA and Green Peace vigilantes at work. The hell with science, the hell with moderation... let's shove our ideology into everyone's face. I don't care for zealotry in any of its forms...

You will never achieve meaningful reform in agribusiness with this kind of behavior.

You notice they didn't visit a certified organic grower and their free range operation. It is NOT an all or nothing option... even Buddists have the option of eating meat... and it's part of their religion. Why this facination with radical extremes? There is a desperate need for moderation and tolerance in this world... not this my way and anything and everything else is bad.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,gillymor
Date: 09 Jan 15 - 09:46 AM

That recipe for Bean Goulash sounded so good I went out and got the stuff to fix it tonight. Did you notice the link on the left side to more M.R. Shulman recipes? One of my favorite and well-worn cookbooks is her "Fast Vegetarian Feasts".


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 09 Jan 15 - 11:32 AM

Gillymor, having our goulash tonight, I made it ahead. Having it traditional style over buttery crushed boiled potatoes. What's your diet like by the way - just curious. From what you say on here, it sounds like you eat quite a bit of veggie stuff?

Here you go Sciencegeek, seeing as you clearly loved the other film about veganism so much, here's another one for you...

just kidding ;-)

Earthlings

To be honest I haven't watched this one, as I'm actually not brave enough to watch films about the animal industry. I find the news items we often see about undercover footage disturbing enough.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 Jan 15 - 11:48 AM

I agree about keeping a few cans of beans on hand. Stopping what you're doing to boil then soak then cook (the old boil for 2 minutes, let sit for an hour, then simmer till ready) slows down dinner. I usually have red kidney beans and garbanzos (chick peas) in the pantry. For some reason the black beans in the can are more expensive, so I cook a batch to freeze in ~14oz jars and they get a few minutes in the microwave on defrost.

SRS


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,sciencegeek
Date: 09 Jan 15 - 12:05 PM

I'd suggest instead that you read Nature Conservancy Novemeber/December issue on how they are working with Montana ranchers to preserve prairie open space for various species that are pushed to the edge by the trend to plow for crops.

There are humane methods for slaughtering animals... I took Slaughter Lab at the AgTech school across the valley from my University. I have raised meat animals for decades and made sure that I was able to do all aspects of the job...

Since not everyone can raise their own food, you really need to explore alternative sources if you have concerns. Only by supporting those alternatives will there be incentives for more to join the ranks.

But again... rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic - too many people will be a self correcting situation when the carrying capacity is exceeded.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 09 Jan 15 - 12:37 PM

Wondering if anyone here has had good vegetarian food out?

We very rarely eat out these days, but I've had good vegetarian Indian and Chinese food.

In particular I'd recommend a Vegetarian Thali, which is a set meal for one that you can get at Indian takeaways and restaurants in the UK. Typically, you get a couple of different vegetable curries, a rice dish, dahl, pickles and an Indian bread. Very filling! But lots of nice variety and flavour.

Not sure if you get British style Indian restaurants in the States?


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,gillymor
Date: 10 Jan 15 - 09:23 AM

Hey CS. Re my diet I only have 3 hard and fast rules:

1. No flesh from animals other than fish or shellfish.

2. It's gotta taste good.

3. Eat in moderation. I think this is the most important one.

Other than that I try to bear in mind some of Michael Pollan's ideas. I've been flirting with vegetarianism for more than 20 years and cooking vegetarian recipes that long, then about 7-8 years ago, after several bouts of diverticulitis the last of which put me in the hospital, I cut out meat other than fish and haven't had problems in that area since. However, I think moderating my eating habits is mostly responsible for my present healthy state. My wife has similar dietary habits but makes an exception for steak fajitas at our favorite Mexican restaurant several times a year. She tortures me mercilessly when we go there as she shovels them down and I remind her that Hitler had one exception as well (liver dumplings). Fortunately, Iguana Mia has several good vegetarian dishes. Chinese and Thai restaurants seem to be the best bets for vegetarian dining around here, SW Florida, and we no longer have a good Indian restaurant that I'm aware of. I do stop at a Whole Foods market in Naples occasionally which has an cafeteria type setup with international fare and a small bar with some excellent beers on tap. I hope this answers your question(s).


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 10 Jan 15 - 09:42 AM

Just had a spag bol for our dinner this afternoon, made with frozen veggie mince. I like to include plenty of finely diced onions, carrots and celery. Plus garlic and herbs. I also include a little tin of those sliced black olives in brine (drained of course), cheap as chips but they bump up the flavours perfectly. I serve my spag bol over wholemeal spaghetti, we find it has more bite and is more satisfying. I always drizzle a little EVO over it after draining and returning to the pan before serving.

We haven't really talked about veggie meat subs. I find them to be pretty hit and miss. They can be useful in a dish like spag bol which is doesn't ask much of the sub, as most of the flavour comes from the other ingredients anyway. So the mince is really only there as a textural element - as well as bumping up the protein content for those who feel unsure about such things. So mince I find quite useful. Sometimes we get Quorn but as a rule I actually prefer the wheat and soya based veggie mince that a lot of supermarkets carry as a part of their frozen own brand vegetarian foods. I generally find that it is both less soft as well as less bland than Quorn.

One Quorn veggie product we do like, is their hotdogs. Hot dogs, like mince, are often the byproduct of the worst scraps of meat that have either been left lying around on the floor in the meat packing factory (this is true - a family member once worked at a meat packing factory) or otherwise sinew and fat that's been 'reclaimed' from the carcass with chemicals. I won't go near these kinds of meat 'products' and find vegetarian alternatives simply less 'yucky.' Again, with hot dogs, the majority of the flavour comes from all the gubbins you shove onto them, like fried onions, mustard and relish - or whatever.

I can't recommend the plain old brown 'veggie burgers' much. Not gained much of a taste for them myself. But I quite like the 'Southern Fried chicken-style fillets' you can sometimes get. These can make a decent alternative to KFC style burgers (which once upon a time, I used to love!) I haven't been able to get hold of these for a while, so maybe the place who used to produce them has stopped doing so. Something similar happened a while back with veggie mince and hot dogs, which mysteriously disappeared from the shelves of UK supermarkets all at once. Anyhoo, good in a decent roll (like ciabatta) with some coleslaw, pickles and salad and a hash brown!

Anyone looking to cut back meat, should have a looksee at the alternatives available. It's good to cook, I like it. And I like cooking whole foods from scratch. But a pack of veggie sausages in the freezer can be a useful standby for those times you're out of time.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 10 Jan 15 - 10:40 AM

I once tried Quorn to make a lasagne for vegetarians. Terrible. Couldn't get any flavour into it no matter what I tried. I find it somewhat amusing that some vegetarian foods simply have to look just like meat, for reasons that completely elude me. The Quorn mince I tried was a case in point. Veggie things shaped and coloured just like sausages are another. Why, I once saw a vegetarian "lamb" chop that looked exactly like a normal lamb chop!


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 10 Jan 15 - 10:53 AM

Flirting with vegetarianism for twenty years? Me too. I first went veggie in my mid teens, at the same time that I taught myself to cook using 80's style wholefood veggie cookbooks in fact. Since then I've continued to be a minimal meat eater, and vegetarian for periods, but lately I've been excluding more animal foods. He's recently had a diagnosis of diverticularitis too, and has realised that meat doesn't do his tum any good. So he's going the same way.

Right now I'm making Seitan (pronounced SAY-tan) or 'Buddhist Meat' for the first time ever, using Vital Wheat Gluten flour. Really odd dough, super rubbery and not at all sticky.

This is the recipe I"m following, dead simple, quick and easy (barring the 1hr steam time).Hail Seitan! Slicing Sausage for Sandwiches. Not too sure about the flavourings in this recipe, we'll see. If I'm not keen I'll just try a different combo, like tomato puree, cayenne and oregano. Or Mushroom stock, soy sauce and black pepper. Or apple, sage and grainy mustard.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 10 Jan 15 - 12:00 PM

I've made the below recipe loads of time, it's my go-to for a something cosy in the evening, that isn't too unhealthy. On the stove now..

Vegan Brown Rice Pudding

In a heavy bottomed pan with a lid, put:

1 US Cup short grain brown rice 1 litre plain soya milk 1/2 US Cup dried cranberries (or other dried fruit) 1/3 US Cup maple syrup 1 stick cinnamon 1 tsp natural vanilla flavouring 2 tsp mixed spice

Bring the contents of the pan to the boil. Reduce the heat to a gentle simmer and put on the lid. Cook for about 50 minutes, or until rice is nicely tender (keep an eye on it and stir occasionally) Stir in 1 tbsp of ground flax seeds (this will make it creamy) Serve.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Jan 15 - 02:29 PM

Eggplant Parmesan for dinner tonight, using previously breaded and sauteed slices of aubergine from my garden. This will be a personal sized dish. I'll thaw then warm them to crispness in the oven. Topped with provalone and Parmesan cheese and eaten with a side of spaghetti and a vegetarian spaghetti sauce, most of the ingredients also canned or frozen from my garden. I sometimes make Parm in a casserole dish and alternate layers of breaded chicken and eggplant, but more often I make it with just the eggplant. Eggplant sliced very thin and sauteed is also excellent as a layer in lasagna, another dish that is easily vegetarian (I do use cheese in both dishes).

SRS


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 11 Jan 15 - 02:48 AM

My seitan slicing sausage worked out surprisingly well. Mr said it was a bit like doner meat, finely textured and savoury. Next time though I'm going to include chickpea flour in with the Vital Wheat Gluten, as VWG alone makes the finished sausage too rubbery - it needs something else in there to soften up the texture. Some people add mashed cooked beans, some add tofu, some use plain wholemeal flour, others use chickpea flour as it's got a good savoury flavour of it's own. I will be doing that as I've got chickpea flour in the cupboard. Discovering this stuff, will mean no more money spent on meat subs for sandwiches. Occasionally I get those meat-free slices from the chiller cabinet and they're quite expensive for what you get. Plus they typically taste pretty bland too. I'm going to try a seitan Chickie herb sausage later today

SRS: I've never tried aubergine parmesan, it looks nice though. There's a vegan version here, using nutritional yeast instead of parmesan:

http://minimalistbaker.com/vegan-eggplant-parmesan/

VEGAN EGGPLANT PARMESAN

PRINT PREP TIME 45 mins COOK TIME 30 mins TOTAL TIME > 1 hour 15 mins

Simple, 10 ingredient vegan parmesan that yields perfectly crispy, savory eggplant that pairs perfectly with red sauce and pasta of your choice! A healthy filling dinner even picky eaters will love. Author: Minimalist Baker Recipe type: Entree Cuisine: Vegan, Italian Serves: 2 INGREDIENTS EGGPLANT PARMESAN 1 medium eggplant (as narrow as possible - see notes for more tips) 1/4 cup unbleached all purpose flour (or other flour of choice) 1 cup panko breadcrumbs (GF for gluten free eaters) 2 Tbsp vegan parmesan + more for serving (or sub 1 Tbsp nutritional yeast) 1 tsp dried oregano (or 2 tsp fresh) 1/4 tsp sea salt 1/2 cup unsweetened plain almond milk (or other neutral milk) 1 tsp cornstarch PASTA + SAUCE 8 ounces pasta (such as linguini, but any kind will do, including veggie noodles or gluten free) 2 cups marinara sauce
INSTRUCTIONS Slice eggplant into thin rounds slightly less than 1/2 inch thick, and sprinkle each side liberally with sea salt. Arrange in a circular pattern in a colander and place in the sink to draw out the bitter taste of the eggplant. Let rest for 15 minutes, then rinse and arrange on a clean absorbent kitchen towel. Top with another clean dish towel and lay a baking sheet on top. Place something heavy on top, such as a cast iron skillet, to thoroughly dry for at least 10 minutes. In the meantime, preheat oven to 400 degrees F and line a baking sheet with foil and spritz with nonstick spray. Also, if making pasta, bring water to a boil in a large saucepan. Prepare your dipping stations by placing almond milk + cornstarch in one bowl; flour in another bowl; and bread crumbs + sea salt + oregano + vegan parmesan (or nutritional yeast) in another bowl. Once thoroughly dry, dip eggplant slices in flour, then almond milk mixture, then breadcrumbs. Arrange on the baking sheet and pop in oven to bake for a total of 20-30 minutes. IMPORTANT STEP: While the eggplant is in the oven, bring a large skillet to medium heat. Once hot, add 2 Tbsp olive oil (or sub canola or grape seed) and pull 3-4 eggplant rounds out of the oven at a time and sauté to give them extra crisp and texture. Cook for ~2 minutes on each side (or browned) and then return to oven to continue crisping. Do this in batches until all rounds are browned. While eggplant is browning in the oven, prepare marinara. I prefer adding my tomato sauce and spices to a serving bowl and microwaving to warm, but you could also heat it on the stove. Set aside. Once done cooking, drain pasta and cover with a towel to keep warm. Set aside. To serve: Plate pasta and eggplant slices and marinara in a dish as a dipping sauce. Additional vegan parmesan cheese makes an excellent topper. Leftovers don't really reheat well, so it's best when fresh. See notes for additional tips on crispy eggplant!


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 11 Jan 15 - 02:53 AM

Folk in the UK will probably remember this. Royal Family xmas special, featuring the sons new vegetarian girlfriend. Nanna says "Oooh that's a shame for you."

Can she have 'wafer thin' ham?


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 11 Jan 15 - 09:35 AM

Update on Garlic & Herb Chick'n Seitan, surprisingly OK. Better than Quorn, and cheaper too.

In a largish bowl, put your dry ingredients:

1 loosely packed cup Vital Wheat Gluten flour 1/4 cup chickpea flour 2 tsp dried herbs 2 tbsp nutritional yeast 1/2 tsp black pepper

In a jug, put your 'wet' ingredients:

Finely minced garlic cloves (I used several) 1 vegetable stock cube 1 cup hot water 1 - 2 tbsp sunflower oil Stir and allow to dissolve

Mix the wet and dry ingredients and knead in the bowl for a few minutes. It should congeal nicely and not be too sticky.

Get a steamer ready on the hob. Oil some kitchen foil and loosely shape your dough into a 'log'. Roll up nice and firmly into a fat sausage shape and twist the ends tight.

Pop into steamer, put on lid. Steam nice and hot for 1hr, don't forget to keep the water topped up if necessary.

Leave to cool before removing from foil and slicing.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,HiLo
Date: 11 Jan 15 - 09:52 AM

I did not think about freezing eggplant. I do grow it and have been wanting to find more uses for it. So, do you slice it, bread, then freeze it? I'd love to know more.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 11 Jan 15 - 12:35 PM

You have to cook it before freezing it or it doesn't work well. I learned that through trial and error. I dice some of it then saute, others I quarter and saute, or I bread and fry, then they go into the freezer on trays to freeze before bagging.

Other garden crops can go in fresh - I slice or dice in the way I think I'll use them (or in a unique shape, like I tend to make long thin slices of the hot peppers so I recognize them months later if I don't see the label on the bag). Arrange the peppers, onions, okra, whatever, on a baking sheet and freeze, then pour the frozen item into the seal-a-meal or heavy ziplock bag and back into the freezer.

SRS


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,HiLo
Date: 11 Jan 15 - 01:57 PM

Thank you so much, I will try that. I do freeze much of what I grow, tomatoes, beans, asparagus and so on. But I had never done so with aubergene . Thanks again.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 11 Jan 15 - 07:38 PM

When it comes to freezing, the only beans I freeze are my broad beans. I harvest them when they are slightly on the small side, as I want them whole and tender, and I can't be doing with that silly idea you get in some recipes of slipping the skins off them first. Not enough hours in the day! I blanch them for a minute first. I grow lots of French beans and runner beans, but I find these turn watery after freezing so I don't bother. Nice to have stuff just in season anyway. One year I tried salting down a crop of runner beans, but they came out disgusting. I can't grow aubergines/eggplants because my climate is too cool and humid (I have tried). The ones you buy in supermarkets usually have horrid tough skins and have gone seedy/fluffy in the middle. Useless. Lamentable, cos I love 'em!


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,gillymor
Date: 11 Jan 15 - 07:43 PM

I finally got around to the Red Bean Goulash recipe that CS linked to below (eating an abundance of fresh fish the last two days) and it came out pretty good for a first effort. I followed the recipe pretty close and served it with wide egg noodles because my mother used to serve her goulash that way though her noodles were homemade. I've got some Yukon Gold potatoes I'll serve it with next. It's going to become a regular for me, thanks CS.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 12 Jan 15 - 04:54 AM

Gillymor, we're going to make bean (and mushroom) goulash a regular in our home too. Both of us really enjoyed the earthy flavours. I used 2 tbsp paprika, 1 tbsp smoked paprika and 1 level tbsp chilli powder in our brew. I didn't have as many beans as the recipe asks for because we were low, so I added roughly half a pound of sliced chestnut mushrooms to help beef it up a bit, and they really worked. I simmered mine partly with the lid off which helped the sauce to reduce and come out more thick and stew-like, which we both preferred. Thanks for reminding me, I have all the ingredients in stock, I may make it again later.

As for frozen veg, we freeze our windowsill birds-eye chillies, they seem to work out just fine. Still burning hot! You only need three or four to make a curry that makes your eyes water. Mr's parents gave us home grown garden peas already bagged and frozen, and they were sweet and delicious.
I've also been gifted frozen home-grown peppers, which are not right for everything, but fine in stewy dishes where the texture will break down anyway. The bought supermarket sliced frozen peppers I've had have been just horrible though. I buy frozen baby broad beans and find them just fine, we also get given them bagged and frozen from his parents after the growing season is over.
During the cold months I buy frozen whole-leaf spinach which I find excellent for cooking purposes, though I've never tried freezing my own chard - I can only imagine how much hassle that would be due to the volumes involved. Frozen green beans aren't as lovely as fresh, but they're OK, so I do buy them. I find frozen swede to be unpleasantly watery, also sprouts, cauliflower and broccoli.

We may end up freezing more this year in the way of vegetables ourselves though, as we're planning to do a bit more in the garden this year.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 12 Jan 15 - 05:20 AM

One thing I find really good is freezing fresh herbs. Parsley, coriander work well. Cut the whole plant high on the main stem, put it into a plastic bag. Freeze whole. Once frozen smash the bag to crush the contents. Tip into a smaller container and return to the freezer.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,gillymor
Date: 12 Jan 15 - 07:13 AM

CS, I was thinking about adding mushrooms to the goulash as well and will do so next time. Shulman recommends pureeing a cup of the beans to add thicken the sauce in her recipe.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,sciencegeek
Date: 12 Jan 15 - 09:19 AM

tender herbs take more care in preserving to keep their best qualities.

http://www.preservingyourharvest.com/FreezingMint.html

about.com is a great resource, as well

Freezing Basil

If you simply stick a bunch of fresh basil into the freezer it will be discolored and mushy when it thaws. Yuck. The reason for this is that enzymes that decompose fresh plant material can survive freezing temperatures and work on the food even while it is in the freezer.

Fortunately, there is a way to freeze fresh basil so that it keeps its emerald green color and lovely flavor. You just have to blanch it first.

Blanching kills off those decomposing enzymes. To blanch fresh basil, bring a large pot of water to a boil. Have a big bowl of ice water ready.

Once the water is boiling, dip your bunch of basil into it just until the basil wilts. This shouldn't take more than a few seconds. You don't want to cook out the flavor of the basil, just kill off those decomposing enzymes.

As soon as the basil has wilted, immediately transfer it to the ice water. This eliminates the residual heat that would otherwise continue cooking the basil.

Pat the blanched basil dry. Strip the leaves off the stems and transfer to freezer bags and freeze. Tip: spread the leaves thinly in the bags and store flat. This will enable you to break off just what you need when you want to use some - but not all - of a bag of frozen herbs.

Freezing Basil Oil or Pesto

The blanching method above is the first step to ensuring your basil oil or pesto comes out of the freezer with the same vibrant color and taste that freshly made pesto or herbal oil has.

After you've blanched, chilled, and patted your basil dry, strip the leaves from the stems. Put them in a blender or food processor and puree, adding enough extra-virgin olive oil to make a smooth, somewhat liquid paste. Or simply use the blanched leaves to make your favorite pesto recipe before freezing.

If you just dump your oil or pesto into a big freezer container and freeze it, you'll have to take out the whole brick of pesto or oil and use it within a week. Better is to freeze it in small containers, or even better use one of the following two methods.

Freezing Pesto or Herbal Oil in Freezer Bags

Pour or spoon your oil or pesto into freezer bags. Put in just enough to cover the surface of the bag when it is horizontal. Freeze flat (horizontal). What you'll end up with is a pesto "pancake" from which you can break off just what you need.

Freezing Pesto or Herbal Oil in Freezer Containers

Alternatively, fill ice cube trays with your basil oil or pesto. Freeze, then pop out the cubes and transfer them to freezer containers (or freezer bags). Each cube will be approximately 1 tablespoon of basil oil or pesto.

Basil Vinegar

Basil vinegar is wonderful in salad dressings and marinades. One of my favorite herbal vinegars is made from the purple basil I grow in my garden preserved in white wine vinegar. The vinegar is aromatic and takes on a beautiful magenta color from the purple basil.

To make basil vinegar, follow these basic instructions for making herbal vinegars. If you grow your own basil, you can use the flowers that you pinch off to make this vinegar.

Basil Salt

Basil salt is delicious in pasta sauce recipes and on grain salads. Just leave out any other salt called for in your recipe and use the basil salt instead.

To make basil salt, substitute fresh basil leaves for the rosemary in this recipe for herb salt.

Basil Butter

To make basil butter (fabulous on pasta!), use 2 tablespoons of finely chopped fresh basil leaves in this basic herb butter recipe.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,cs
Date: 12 Jan 15 - 10:01 AM

Pesto can also be frozen in IceCube trays. As can garlic and herb buttes. And premade roux of flour and oil or butter for thickening soups and sauces.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 12 Jan 15 - 12:17 PM

We had vegan 'haggis' for our dinner today served with neeps & tatties (mashed swede and potatoes), steamed broccoli and roasted parsnips and carrots. He noticed that I'd given myself the lions share of the broccoli Hehe! I could eat a whole head of that stuff, on it's own. In fact I have done so for lunch before now. We're just like a pair of children counting how many baked beans they each have in case one gets more than the other one. :D

Broccoli is one of my top five veg. Along with spring greens, brussels sprouts and chard or spinach. All steamed (apart from chard which sets my teeth on edge if it isn't boiled) for preference. The only vegetable I find actively unpleasant is okra, jsut because of the goopy factor.

What are the other poster's fave vegetables here? And how do you like to prepare them?


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,HiLo
Date: 12 Jan 15 - 12:24 PM

Mine is baby bok choi sautéed in butter and a cornflour slurry, then drizzled with sesame oil. goes great with veggie spring rolls and basmati rice.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 13 Jan 15 - 03:22 AM

One thing I like to do with both spring greens or savoy, and brussels sprouts is quickly saute them in a little olive oil and butter and crushed garlic. Sprouts should be halved to expose the tight layers of leaves they are comprised of - the butter seeps into the sprouts and makes them very tasty.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,gillymor
Date: 13 Jan 15 - 08:56 AM

5 favorite vegetables: 1. Asparagus, steamed or roasted and especially in omelets with mild white cheese 2. Brussels Sprouts, steamed or roasted 3. Parsnips, roasted or boiled 4. Silver Queen Corn, Boiled or roasted on a grill. 5. Beets, roasted or boiled and the greens sauteed in olive oil 6. Sweet Potatoes, any which way Honorable mention: Artichokes, broccoli, hearts of palm, cauliflower, snap peas


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 13 Jan 15 - 01:23 PM

I grow things I like to eat, and in some instances I've learned to eat things that I know grow well here. Okra, for example. I never had much to do with it but my next door neighbor was having trouble getting some to grow so I planted it and gave her most of the pods, with the proviso that she should teach me how to make something with it (not boiled!). Fried okra is wonderful. I've used it in some stir fries and I have a few recipes to try out.

SRS


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 14 Jan 15 - 02:49 AM

I didn't know that about okra Stilly. I can see why it would be good fried, as the pods are rich and firm (if I remember correctly).

I can also understand how okra became a staple among poor communities, whatever it is that it releases, thickens broth and would fill bellies. Probably in a similar way to barley or oats and the way they have been used in traditional rural broths here in the UK.

Having grown up with oats and barley, I like the way they thicken up things, but not having grown up with okra, I find the mucilage it releases strange and unpleasant!


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 14 Jan 15 - 05:05 AM

Interesting idea. This chef's restaurant isn't vegan or vegetarian, but focuses on utilising sustainable ingredients.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/profiles/bruno-loubet-i-am-not-vegan-or-vegetarian-but-beef-is-out-9970350.html

Bruno Loubet, the Michelin-starred French chef famed for his classical meat dishes, is banning beef from the menu at his restaurant Grain Store.

The large, bright 200-seat restaurant, which opened in King's Cross, London, 18 months ago, has already garnered attention for making vegetables the main attraction while fish or meat take second billing. Grain Store, named London Restaurant of the Year last year at the Sustainable Restaurant Awards, uses free-range meat, sustainably sourced fish, and herbs as well as edible flowers from a community garden located next door.

But now Loubet is going one step further and plans to cut beef – which currently features in just one dish at Grain Store – from the restaurant's spring menu.

Loubet believes that, given the damage that the beef industry does to the planet ( 10kg of grain is needed to produce 1kg of beef), by serving beef, he is undoing all the good done by having a sustainable restaurant. "If I didn't I would be untrue to everything," the 53-year-old said. "I have not eaten beef for three months. I do eat it if I am in the restaurant somewhere. I am not vegetarian or vegan but I eat much less meat."


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,sciencegeek
Date: 14 Jan 15 - 09:16 AM

"Loubet believes that, given the damage that the beef industry does to the planet ( 10kg of grain is needed to produce 1kg of beef), by serving beef, he is undoing all the good done by having a sustainable restaurant."

WTF!?! The logical disconnect here is appalling... The problem with the beef industry is the agribusiness concerns that want to produce "cheap" beef no matter the cost to the environment. If raising beef is inherently wrong, why the hell is the Nature Conservancy allowing it on their Montana Ranch? Instead, they are promoting environmentally sound management on their farm and those of the "renter" which is helping to restore the habitat for threatened and endangered prairie species.

He may be a good chef, but he's a lousy conservationist... buy meat from sustainable producers... help keep them in business!!! Otherwise, the only alternative is big farms.

This "let's throw out the baby with the bathwater" mentality drives me nuts... MODERATION and CONSIDERATION is what is needed, not knee jerk reactions. That's what makes for good applied science.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: Chanteyranger
Date: 14 Jan 15 - 01:01 PM

I'm late getting back to this thread, and pleased to see so much discussion. Freda Underhill, I just want to correct one thing about my diet. It's not a low carb diet, as I eat plenty of grains and beans, just not highly processed grains such as white rice. No white flour, and very, very little whole grain flour.

my latest medical exam shows even more reduction in my A1c and cholesterol.

Earlier on in this thread, it was mentioned that tofu would not be the best choice in the stroganoff recipe. point well taken that seitan might be a better choice. however, I found that Isa Chandra's recipe, which uses tofu, to be delicious. It's got to be extra firm tofu, though, to make the recipe really work. I 'll try it with seitan, which, given seitan's consistency, will probably be even better, thanks.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Jan 15 - 02:42 PM

Land management folks are finding that letting cattle onto an area for enough time to graze off the grass then moving them to the next area helps restore a lot of the vitality of the region. The droppings and urine and walking around on all of it stimulates biological activity in the soil, as would have happened when land wasn't fenced and bison travelled over the land in such a way, moving on as soon as the grass was eaten.

It not only helps the soil, it helps predators, prairie chicken, etc. Researchers found that when they introduced wolves back into Yellowstone that predation kept the elk and other ungulates under control, reducing over-grazing, and in general improving the diversity of the animal life and the health of the land as far as water run-off.

You can take the slime out of okra if you soak it briefly in vinegar. I have a Middle Eastern cookbook that has an extensive section of front matter with lots of methods, tips, and substitutions. One of these days I'm going to try the vinegar trick then make some kind of casserole. And I think the vinegar (or fermentation) is why pickled okra isn't slimy.

SRS


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,sciencegeek
Date: 15 Jan 15 - 08:39 AM
stopped at the Asian market last night and since it was quiet asked about one of my favorite items that I haven't seen on the shelves for sometime. so I checked out the webiste for Companion Foods to give them the info to order a case:

http://www.evercompanion.com/

I've been eating their products for forty years and they have been consistent and good all that time. You might want to check them out and maybe get your local market to order for you.

Saute their braised gluten with asparagus tips for a real treat.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 15 Jan 15 - 01:24 PM

Sciencegeek: "Saute their braised gluten with asparagus tips for a real treat."

I've never had braised gluten - though I have recently successfully made gluten/seitan, in slicing sausage form, which has been a very popular discovery in our house - but it sounds good.

I have had braised tofu (see here: Braised Tofu ) and that's also really nice. Super savoury.

It's flaky because it's composed of layers of a soya-based food called 'yuba' which is created from the skin that forms on cooling vats of soya milk, so people often treat it a bit like tuna fish in salads and sandwiches.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,sciencegeek
Date: 15 Jan 15 - 01:55 PM

think of braised gluten as chewy puffy dumplings... due to the gluten... that are in a seasoned sauce... safflower oil or chili or curry flavored. That's why it's used as mock meat... it's the closest in texture to meat proteins. They can form in so that it appears to resemble duck or abalone...

I can polish off a can in a sitting... just heat it up and add to cooked rice or noodles. or just stir fry with other ingredients... very versatile and keep on hand in the pantry or the office for a quick lunch. I feel like I spend more waking hours at work than at home...


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 16 Jan 15 - 03:56 AM

We had that bean goulash again this week. I've frozen half to be eaten again next week.

I've upgraded the ratio of vegetables to beans quite considerably. I've also simplified the method slightly, so my current version of this recipe looks like what follows. I'm posting this as much for my own reference as for any one else, as I have a horrible habit of forgetting to make notes when I cook:

Bean Goulash

* Peel and chop 3 onions, 3-4 carrots, 4 sweet peppers (red or green), and the cloves from a whole bulb of garlic. Thickly slice 1lb of mushrooms.

* Heat 2 tbsp vegetable oil in a large pan and add veg. Add a little salt to help the veg to sweat and soften and saute for 5-10 minutes.

* Stir in 2 heaped tablespoons paprika, 1 tablespoon smoked paprika, and 1 level tablespoon chilli pepper. Stir for 2-3 minutes.

* Add 4 x 400g cans of drained red kidney beans (OR the contents of a 500g pack of dried kidney beans, which have been soaked overnight and well cooked earlier) 2 pints of vegetable stock, 2 tbsp tomato puree, 1 heaped teaspoon dried oregano, 1 tsp ground black pepper.

* Bring to the boil, add lid and reduce the heat. Cook on a brisk-ish simmer for half an hour. Stir occasionally.

* Stir in 2 tbsp vinegar and 1 tsp sugar.

* Remove lid and continue to simmer for a further half an hour. Stir occasionally. The sauce should reduce somewhat during this time.

* Salt to taste. Serve over mashed or crushed potatoes. Garnish liberally with chopped parsley.

Perfect warming winter fare.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: sciencegeek
Date: 16 Jan 15 - 05:49 AM

our temperatures have been below freezing for the past week, so bean burritos made a nice quick but filling supper last night. Refried pinto beans, chopped onions wrapped in a flour tortilla and lots of enchilada sauce to give it a kick.

The best refried beans I've had were cooked in bacon grease, but there has been a surge in vegetarian options. Whatever floats your boat.. but I go for the flavor. Same goes for Columbian red beans & rice... yum


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,gillymor
Date: 16 Jan 15 - 06:22 AM

CS, I want to bring up the sweet/sour contrast in my next batch of bean goulash. I'm thinking more vinegar and red sweet peppers. Any ideas?


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,gillymor
Date: 16 Jan 15 - 08:40 AM

I was directing my last question re bean goulash to any and all.

I get cans of seasoned black beans with jalapenos from Trader Joe's for a buck a piece. I nuke the beans and put some in a whole grain naan or pita pocket add onions a little bit of Chi-Chi's medium salsa and some 2% shredded cheddar. Quick, cheap and tasty. I get about 4 out of a can.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,sciencegeek
Date: 16 Jan 15 - 09:15 AM

to get fuller flavor from beans, cumin is a must as well as unsweetened dark chocolate... gives a fuller richer flavor...

add lime juice and a sprig of cilantro for brighter taste

I add dried garlic chips to my simmering chili to get deeper flavor, along with extra cumin and chocolate... and did I mention at least 4 types of beans, white and yellow corn and pazole(canned hominey). Everyone in the pool!


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 16 Jan 15 - 09:36 AM

Gillymor, for the sweet element you could add in some diced sweet potato maybe, or switch it for the carrots? I think it would be really quite nice, golden soft sweet chunks of sweet potato in the sauce. You can also buy 'sweet paprika' but I'm not sure how sweet that is, probably not very!

As for the sour element, lemon is I believe a commonly used ingredient in goulash (might want to check that though). Plus sour cream is often used dolloped on top when serving, adding an acidic tang to counterpoint the rich earthiness of the goulash.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,gillymor
Date: 16 Jan 15 - 11:03 AM

Thanks CS, I like the idea of sweet potatoes and lemon. I'll experiment.

I'm making Brazilian Black Bean Stew this weekend for the football games on Sunday. I follow the recipe pretty closely but leave out the orange juice and zest which doesn't work for me. I'll try adding chocolate as well.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 16 Jan 15 - 11:20 AM

I'm composing my online grocery shopping order right now (he hates going to the supermarket and I can't blame him either) and I've got Piri Piri Seasoning blend, garlic granules, Jerk Seasoning blend, pickled sliced jalapenos, wholegrain mustard, apple juice, and crushed chilli flakes all on my shopping list for my homemade seitan slicing sausage production line! Don't worry they won't all be going in at once, I plan to do a variety of versions, like Spicy Italian style, British pork and apple style, and a couple of others. I plan to make at least one a week for our lunch box sandwiches. He's also inclined to use sliced seitan sausage, instead of cheese because he thinks it's so tasty! Plus you can cram loads of salad in there, and unlike some sarni ingredients the seitan doesn't make everything go soggy.

Today we're having an evening 'all day breakfast' with veggie sausages, baked beans, home-cut oven baked chips, mushrooms, fried egg and bread. I give him double what I have to keep my caloric intake from going too crazy..


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 17 Jan 15 - 03:19 AM

It's interesting how many versions of the 'beans and rice' theme you find around the world.

Numerous nations seems to have some variant on this combination, with a unique set of seasonings to go with them.

The Americas in particular, seem particularly fond of rice and beans. It's interesting to note however, that it wasn't a staple until Spanish colonisers appeared on the scene and introduced rice from Asia to local cuisines. Their African slaves apparently played an even stronger role at the same time, by introducing African rice to local American cuisines.

Wiki on Rice & Beans


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: sciencegeek
Date: 17 Jan 15 - 03:37 AM

started as cheap food to feed slaves, but it doesn't hurt that it's healthy and tasty stuff.

I wonder how much it was to replace amaranth, which the Spanish banned as too heathen ... imagine wheat being banned because it was used to make the "host" in Catholic masses...

religious zealotry knows no bounds...


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,gillymor
Date: 17 Jan 15 - 08:29 AM

Any idea how much baker's chocolate to add to 3 cups (dry) black beans?

I couldn't find any google answers but did find a number of recipes for black bean brownies, some with avocado or sweet potato. Interesting.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 17 Jan 15 - 08:44 AM

Gillymor, three cups in volume, sounds roughly the same as 1lb in weight to me. I use 1lb beans to make up my chilli and I add a good 2 tbsp cocoa powder along with 1tbsp dark brown sugar to enrichen the sauce. I don't know about bakers chocolate though.

Loads of vegan recipes out there for using vegetables in puddings and cakes! Avocado is the latest thing to use to make vegan chocolate mousse :) I tend to use silken tofu for vegan puds, but avocado is richer and fattier and probably more appropriate texturally.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 17 Jan 15 - 11:50 AM

Has anyone on here ever had cheeseless pizza?

I've had one attempt so far, and it didn't really come out that tasty. Just pureed beans and spinach! It wasn't good. Though I suspect I could have made the cannellini bean puree more 'olive-oily' - after all beans and bread do go together well. I think I was too stingy with the fat content, maybe that would have made all the difference when trying to swap out the cheese.

Mr loves his mozzarella, but I'm pretty much cheese-free now. I'd like to be able to make a cheese-free version for me, and a mozzarella smothered one for him at the same time. I make super thin crust, so it's not as bad as it sounds, and I usually only eat half in one sitting - sometimes he'll actually eat his and my leftovers which is fine for him as he burns a LOT of calories at work.

A traditional pizza style thing I've seen is pissaladiere (sp?). I think it's French. That's topped with caramelised onions and olives and sounds bloody great. Anyone had one of those on hols?

Does anyone have any completely random ideas? I'm wondering if olive tapenade might be good, or pesto.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,Ed
Date: 17 Jan 15 - 01:06 PM

Pissaladière traditionally contains anchovies, but I don't see why you couldn't make it without them if you wanted it to be vegan. Just add more olives, I guess.

Nigel Slater's recipe looks a good starting point.

Pureed beans on a pizza don't sound at all appealing to me. I think that onions are key here. Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's Kale and Onion Pizza sounds good.

Yes, I know it contains a little cheese, but maybe another starting point?


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Jan 15 - 02:45 PM

Focaccia bread is like pizza crust with olive oil, fresh or dry herbs, onion and garlic power, and I usually sprinkle on a little provalone and romano, but I bet instead you could sprinkle on some tofu cheese and some of the yeast products that are meant to mimic Parmesan/romano cheeses. Or just stop at the olive oil, salt, garlic powder and herbs (I use fresh oregano and basil from the garden, or some of my frozen basil sprinkled over the top. Frozen it stays greener longer). I like tomatoes on pizza but I don't always put on tomato sauce any more. I thawed some sauce for a pizza a few weeks ago and it turned out to be my Lydia's summer simmered sauce - a meatless tomato sauce with diced eggplant. I spread it on anyway and it was wonderful.

A thing you learn when living in the Southwest of the US is that just about anything can be served in a tortilla. The flat bread can be served fresh and warm and soft (corn or wheat), or something can be put into it, rolled or folded, then sauteed or baked. Make a spicy bean mix then put some in a tortilla for a burrito and serve it topped with a zesty salsa or pico de gallo, and guacamole on top and you have a beautiful, delicious and festive meal.

SRS


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 17 Jan 15 - 03:02 PM

Stilly, Woof! Aubergine pizza. Rich and creamy and bang on target with the other flavours (bean puree just wasn't) Beeb has one here that includes pesto and goats cheese, but not much goats cheese so I reckon you could easily go without it:

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/pesto-pizza-aubergine-goats-cheese

Ed, nice one with the onion and kale one too! I like spinach on pizza for it's richness, but it can be rather watery and consequentially soggy. Kale, or even spring greens, would be a great alternative. I love my dark greens and they would be perfect combined with caramelised onions.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: sciencegeek
Date: 18 Jan 15 - 07:06 AM

if using a brick of baker's chocolate, I just break of a square at at time to add to my chili and taste along the way... lol since I never make it the same way twice. To me chili is like soup or stew... use what's at hand and maybe experiment along the way... :)

as a change from pizza and good for those with gluten issues, try tostadas ... corn tortillas fried or baked flat (not folded like for tacos) and then covered with seasoned beans, lettuce, tomato, onion, cheese & salsa.... OK, I know no restraint here. Hubby is not so fond because after the first bite it falls all apart... but I love it!


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,gillymor
Date: 18 Jan 15 - 08:46 AM

That's just what I did, SG. I was looking for a jumping off point and I started with an ounce and put another 1/2 oz. into the soup. It came out pretty good and the chocolate worked well with the orange juice, which I decided to add after all. Thanks to you and CS. The black beans and the large snook that I caught last night will make a nice feast for 4 today.


Subject: RE: BS: Vegan mudcatters
From: GUEST,HiLo
Date: 18 Jan 15 - 10:47 AM

I use naan bread as a base for Pizza, it is perfect for that. I only top it with veg, Peppers, mushro