The Mudcat Café TM
Thread #6080   Message #4135411
Posted By: GUEST,Rory
05-Feb-22 - 06:52 PM
Thread Name: Lyr Req: An Gaoth Andheas/South Wind
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: An Gaoth Andheas/South Wind
A version of the song collected from oral tradition by Irish scholar Patrick Lynch in Mayo in May 1802, for Edward Bunting's Collection, in which none of Lynch's two hundred collected and translated songs were ever published by Bunting.

Patrick Lynch Irish Gaelic transcription in:
The Edward Bunting Collection in Special Collections & Archives, Queen's University Belfast
MS 4/18 Manuscript collection of Irish songs in Gaelic by Patrick Lynch.
Page 58.
Not as yet available to view.

Collected from Rush, a shoemaker in Castlebar May 1802,


Patrick Lynch Irish Gaelic fair copy (neatly re-written):
MS 4/7 Manuscript collection of Irish songs in Gaelic by Patrick Lynch.
Song 67
MS 4.7.103, page 108, and
MS 4.7.104, page 109

Patrick Lynch Irish Gaelic fair copy: A Ghaoith on ndeas


A Ghaoith on ndeas

A ghaoith on ndeas na mbraon mbog glas,
A ní gach faithche féarmhar,
Bheir iasg ar ais is grian a dteas,
Agus líon is meas ar ghéagaibh.

Más síos ar fad mar mbínn féin seal
Is miangach leat-sa séideadh,
Cuiriom Rígh na bhFeart ghad chaomhaint ar neart,
Agus tabhair dhon tír sin blas mo bhéil-se!

Sin mé ó ndeas na naomh chéim cleas
Nach ndéanann neach sa’ saoghal so,
Mar íslíghim gaimh is sgaoliom leac
Is díbrighim sneacht’ as sléibhte.

Ó taoi tú ar lear go bhfuíghe tú mo neart,
‘S gur mian liom do leas a dhéanamh,
Bhfúige mé mo bheannacht ins gach én tslíghe ar maith leat,
Agus chaoídhche a gCathair Éamon!

A Chonnachta an tsóigh, an tsuilt is an spóirt,
An imirt agus an ól fhíona,
Sin chugaibh mo phóg na roith ans a’ ród,
Leigiom le seól gaoithe í.

Tá mise beó a mboige na seód,
Mar a mbrúightear gach seórt bíghe dhom,
Ach is mion liom fós tarraing ar do chóir,
Muna gcluine mé ach ceól phíopa!


verse 1 line 3
eas (cascade, waterfall) in MS fair copy
ais (back) in MS transcription


Patrick Lynch translation:
MS 4/32 Manuscript of English prose translations by Patrick Lynch.
Song 94
Missing page in manuscript.

Patrick Lynch translation reprinted in the Journal of the Irish Folk Song Society, Volume VII, 1909, pp.24-25.


Wind from the South

The Youth says:
O wind from the south with your soft clear drops,
Which makes the plains be covered wirh grass,
Gives fishes to the brook and heat to the sun,
And abundance of fruit on the shrubs.

If it is downwards as far as I have once lived,
You are determined to blow,
May the King of power preserve you in strength,
And give to that country the taste of my mouth.

The Wind says:
Here I come from the south with heavenly power,
To perform what none on earth could do;
I humble the fury of winter and dissolve hard sheets of ice,
And banish the snow from the mountains.

Since you are in distress you shall have my help,
I incline to grant you the favour;
I shall leave your blessing in every place you choose,
But especially in Cahir Eamonn.

The Youth says:
O Connacht! full of happiness, cheerfullness, and sports,
Of gaming and drinking wine!
Behold, there goes my kiss to you running in the road,
I let it go with the gales of the wind.

I am living here in softness of jewels (luxury),
Where a variety of meals are dressed for me,
But still I would incline to draw towards you,
If I should but hear the music of the pipes.


A literal translation

The Youth says:
O wind from the south with the soft clear drops,
Makes every plain grassy,
Brings back the fish and heat to the sun,
And abundance of fruit on the branches.

If it is downwards where I once lived,
You are determined to blow,
I send the King of Miracles to protect you with strength,
And give to that country the taste of my mouth.

The Wind says:
That's me from the south with difficult saintly feats,
That no other does in this world;
As I humble the winter and scatter the ice,
And banish the snow from the mountains.

Since you are abroad you will find my strength,
And I desire to do the best for you;
I will leave my blessing in every way (route) you would like,
And always in Cahir Edmund.

The Youth says:
O Connacht! the happiness, the joy and and the sport,
Gaming and drinking wine!
That's my kiss to you running in the road,
I let it sail (drift) in the wind.

I live in the softness of jewels (luxury),
Where all kinds of food are boiled (cooked, dressed) for me,
But I still desire to draw near you,
If I only here pipe music.

.