The Mudcat Café TM
Thread #41051   Message #593304
Posted By: Charley Noble
15-Nov-01 - 11:53 AM
Thread Name: Help: Songs to celebrate community
Subject: RE: Help: Songs to celebrate community
Well, here's another song from my working draft of PITY THE DOWNTRODDEN LANDLORD: A Housing and Neighborhood Song Book.

This latter day revival song is a direct appeal for open housing, individual rights and tolerance for the rights of others, and a sharing of the joys of this earth. Folk singer Pete Seeger wrote this song back in 1966 and provided this advice for singing it:

"I find I like to sing this song with no accompaniment whatsoever. Theoretically it should be possible to make up accompaniment which would not detract but I have not been able to find it. The lack of accompaniment also frees the voice for holding out some notes and shortening others in a free "imperiodic rhythm." I guess this is the same reason why the old Irish ballad singers also preferred to sing with no accompaniment."

Words and music by Pete Seeger © 1966 Stormking Music, Inc. In Sing out!, Vol. 17, #3, pp. 13

My Father's Mansion

My father's mansion has many rooms,
With rooms for all of His children,
As long as we do share His love,
And see that all are free.

And see that all are free to grow,
And see that all are free to know,
And free to open or to close,
The door of their own room.

What is a room without a door
Which sometimes locks or stands ajar?
What is a room without a wall
To keep out sight and sound from all?

And dwellers in each room should have
The right to choose their own design,
And color scheme to suit their own,
Though differing from mine.

My father's mansion's many rooms,
Have room for all His children;
If we do but share in His love,
And see that all are free.

The choice is ours to share this earth,
With all its many joys abound,
Or to continue as we have
And burn God's mansion down.

My father's mansion's many rooms,
Have room for all His children;
If we do but share in His love,
And see that all are free.

Landlady's Daughter, not to be confused with Charley Noble