The Mudcat Café TM
Thread #54759   Message #860841
Posted By: MMario
07-Jan-03 - 02:08 PM
Thread Name: Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman
Subject: Lyr Add: THE MAIDS OF SIMCOE
THE MAIDS OF SIMCOE
(from the singing of Archie Lant)
(Doerflinger - Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman - pp241-242)

Come all ye maids of Sim-coe, give ear to what I write,
In cross-ing Lake On-ta-ri-o where rafts-men take de-light.
In cross-ing Lake On-ta-ri-o as jol-ly rafts-men do,
While your low-land, loaf-ing farm-ers can stay at home with you.

The lowland loafing farmers they thell their girls fine tales
All of the dangers they go through in crossing over their fields,
In cutting off their grass so green that's all what they can do,
Whilst us poor jolly raftsmen runs they St. Lawrence through.

And when the sun it does do down, away they'll swing their ploughs,
And when it does grow darker, it's homeward they march on,
And when the clock strikes eight or nine off to their beds they'll crawl,
Whilst us poor jolly raftsmen stand many's the bitter squall.

The wind blows from the mountains, which toss up upside down,
And sets us in confusion for fear we'd all be drowned.
The wind blows from the west, my boys, which drives our raft along,
Cheer up, Cheer up, my lively lads, your balsom oars spring on!

It's lee bore down and lee bore round, and set your sails to right!
It's we'll sail out immediately and leave those lakes behind.
It's we'll sail out immediately and bid those lakes adieu.
We'll steer our course all for Quebec, all sorrows to subdue.

All sorrows to subdue, my boys, since joy has come to town;
We'll call into a tev-er-en and there we'll all sit down.
We'll call for eggs and brandy, boys, and merrilye pass it round;
We'll drownd all sorrow in a glass since joy has come to town!

Since joy has come to town, my boys, it's homeward we'll march on,
To see our wives and sweethearts that we've left behind to mourn.
We'll dance and sing and merrilye be as we oft-time done before,
And when our money is all spent, we'll hunt the woods for more.

Doerflinger notes the last two words were spoken.