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Lyr Add: Ballyneety's Walls

Related threads:
Lyr Req: The Night We Rode with Sarsfield (40)
Lyr Req: 'The night fell dark round Limerick' (8)


Wolfgang 18 Jun 99 - 05:31 AM
Philippa 18 Jun 99 - 07:28 AM
Wolfgang 18 Jun 99 - 08:36 AM
Brian 06 Sep 99 - 06:55 PM
Martin _Ryan 20 Sep 99 - 03:33 PM
Wolfgang 24 Sep 99 - 04:17 AM
GUEST,Fleadhman 30 Jul 03 - 02:20 PM
Ella who is Sooze 31 Jul 03 - 03:21 AM
Jim Dixon 03 Jul 09 - 04:10 PM
Jim Dixon 03 Jul 09 - 04:17 PM
smpc 04 Aug 09 - 10:42 AM
Jim Dixon 06 Aug 09 - 11:48 AM
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Subject: Lyr Add: BALLYNEETY'S WALLS
From: Wolfgang
Date: 18 Jun 99 - 05:31 AM

here's another one from the South Roscommon Singers' CD asking for corrections.

BALLYNEETY'S WALLS

The night fell dark 'round Limerick and everything was still.
It was for the foe in ambush we lay beside the hill.
Like lions bold we waited for to dash upon our prey
as we rode with Sarsfield at our head at the dawning of the day.

From Dublin came the foeman with guns and warlike store(?)
to take the town of Limerick (fade thee?) wanted ten times more,
but little was their dreaming that we would be their doom,
as we marched with Sarsfield at our head right down from wild (Slea Bloom?).

At the lonely hour of midnight each man lept on his (deed/dea?)
and through the town of (Collin?) we dashed with lightning speed
and o'er the hill we thundered towards Ballyneety's walls
where laid the (poat?) securely with guns and arms and all.

They asked for our password and Sarsfield was the man:
"Well, here I am", our general cried as down on them we ran
and as we marched into attack the moon and stars gave light.
It was for THE BATTLE OF THE BOYNE we had revenge that night.

Loud laughed our gallant general as fast we rode away
and 'twas manys the health we drank to him in Limerick town that day.
Here's another health to Sarsfield, he led us one and all,
you blew up the Royal artillery 'round Ballyneety's walls.

The historical background to that song is here: "On 10 August [1689] news of the expected arrival of the siege train reached the Limerick garrison through a Williamite deserter. Sarsfield, on a visit from the cavalry camp in Clare, at once determined to make an effort to intercept the guns and destroy them. However, with William's army encamped between Limerick and the approaching siege train, Sarsfield realised that he would have to make a large detour in order to successfully execute his plan. Thus having requisitioned a force of 500 cavalry, and with a local rapparree named Hogan acting as guide, Sarsfield proceeded up the Clare side of the Shannon, and under cover of darkness crossed the river above Killaloe. The raiding party camped that night near Keeper Hill, and the following morning continued on towards the point of interception at Ballyneety, about two miles south-west of Oola, County Tipperary. The Williamites were completely surprised when the attack went in that night and the waggoners and their escort were quickly overwhelmed. Unfortunately, in the heat of the attack, a number of non-combatants, including some women and children, also fell victim to Sarsfield men. However, this was the only blemish on this brilliantly conceived and daringly executed operation. Two of the eight guns of the siege train were completely destroyed, while the other six had their carriages wrecked. A large quantity of ammunition was also lost. along with other supplies, including a number of tin boats which would have been used as bridging material.

The destruction of the Williamite siege train was a great morale-booster for the garrison of Limerick. It raised Sarsfield's stature to new heights with the army, and provided further justification for those in favour of continuing the war. More practically, it delayed William's preparations for an assault on the city, as it was another five days before the guns which were salvaged at Ballyneety finally arrived at the siege camp." More Information about the first and the second siege of Limerick at the place where I copied this bis from: http://www.limericklife.com/History/sieges.htm

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: ADD: Ballyneety's walls
From: Philippa
Date: 18 Jun 99 - 07:28 AM

(Slea Bloom?). Slieve (Sliabh) Bloom? I think there are places of that name both in County Offaly and County Kerry


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Subject: RE: ADD: Ballyneety's walls
From: Wolfgang
Date: 18 Jun 99 - 08:36 AM

yes, Philippa, that's possible, the pronounciation fits sliabh. I hadn'd found a mountain of that name on my map showing the surroundings of Limerick. But you are right, there is one as a web search shows, a bit further away. Bset guess from now on: "Sliabh Bloom"

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: ADD: Ballyneety's walls
From: Brian
Date: 06 Sep 99 - 06:55 PM

A few suggestions

Second verse store is correct, they afer Limerick.

Third verse steed. In the second line, perhaps William? Castleconnell was the home of the Bourkes of Clan William. Last line poat=foe.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Ballyneety's walls
From: Martin _Ryan
Date: 20 Sep 99 - 03:33 PM

A few corrections - some of which Philippa and Brian have picked up:

Verse 2.1 : "store" is correct
2.2. : To take the town of Limerick, faith, they wanted ten time more
2.4. : Slieve Bloom is correct

3.1 : steed is correct
3.2. : "town of Cullen", I think
3.4. : foe is correct

Regards


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Subject: Lyr Add: BALLYNEETY'S WALLS
From: Wolfgang
Date: 24 Sep 99 - 04:17 AM

many thanks for the corrections, it was a pleasant surprise for me coming back from a vacation (even greater pleasure to see you back, Martin). As a thank you, here's the correct(ed) version.

Wolfgang

BALLYNEETY'S WALLS

The night fell dark 'round Limerick and everything was still.
It was for the foe in ambush we lay beside the hill.
Like lions bold we waited for to dash upon our prey
as we rode with Sarsfield at our head at the dawning of the day.

From Dublin came the foeman with guns and warlike store
to take the town of Limerick, faith, they wanted ten times more,
but little was their dreaming that we would be their doom,
as we marched with Sarsfield at our head right down from wild Slieve Bloom.

At the lonely hour of midnight each man lept on his steed
and through the town of Cullen we dashed with lightning speed
and o'er the hill we thundered towards Ballyneety's walls
where laid the foe securely with guns and arms and all.

They asked for our password and Sarsfield was the man:
"Well, here I am", our general cried as down on them we ran
and as we marched into attack the moon and stars gave light.
It was for the battle of the Boyne we had revenge that night.

Loud laughed our gallant general as fast we rode away
and 'twas manys the health we drank to him in Limerick town that day.
Here's another health to Sarsfield, he led us one and all,
you blew up the Royal artillery 'round Ballyneety's walls.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Ballyneety's walls
From: GUEST,Fleadhman
Date: 30 Jul 03 - 02:20 PM

The Night I rode with Sarsfields men is a different song about the same deed, the blowing up of English guns and arms at Ballyneety's Walls.I have the words and will post them when I find them.
Two great songs. I actually won an All Ireland senior ballad singing competition singing Ballyneety's Walls, so good memories.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Ballyneety's walls
From: Ella who is Sooze
Date: 31 Jul 03 - 03:21 AM

Fleadhman... this would be great! I'm going to have a crack at the Fleadh competition myself next year... I've been nagged so much to do it, I'm having a go - I usually just do the bodhran - and have done reasonably well at that. (Got through to the all ireland in my first year).

So these lyrics would be rather handy!

PS... are you off to Clonmel in August? I'm calling in on me friend in Listowel first and then going over... I love Listowel - why can't it be there again... sigh!


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Subject: Lyr Add: SONG OF SARSFIELD'S TROOPER (R D Joyce)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Jul 09 - 04:10 PM

This is the original, apparently.
Lyrics and footnotes copied from Ballads of Irish Chivalry by Robert Dwyer Joyce, edited by Patrick Weston Joyce (London: Longmans, Green, & Co., 1908):


SONG OF SARSFIELD'S TROOPER.*
[Robert Dwyer Joyce, M.D., M.R.I.A.]
Air: "Ye Natives of This Nation."**

1. The night fell dark on Limerick and all the land was still,
As for the foe in ambush we lay beside the hill;
Long impatiently we waited to rush upon our prey,
With noble Sarsfield at our head before the break of day.
From Dublin came the foeman, with deadly warlike store—
Huge guns with tons of powder and thund'ring balls galore
But little was he dreaming that there to work his bale,
We'd come with our commander bold from dark Slieve Felim's Vale.

2. At the lonely hour of midnight each man leaped on his steed,
Down moor and vale to Cullen we dashed with lightning speed;
Then eagerly we galloped to Ballyneety's wall,
Where lay our foe's encampment with guns and stores and all.
"Give the word!" — "The word is Sarsfield, and Sarsfield is the man:
And here I am!" our general cried, as down on them we ran;
Then God He cleared the firmament, the moon and stars gave light,
And for the battle of the Boyne we had revenge that night.***

3. When the convoy all were scattered we took their mighty store,
Pontoons and carts and powder casks and cannons by the score;
And hastily with eager hands we piled them up on high,
Laid down the fuse—applied the match—and blew them to the sky!
How pleasant laughed our general as fast we rode away;
And many a health we drank to him in Limerick next day:
Here's another health to Sarsfield, who in that midnight hour,
Destroyed the foe's artillery by Ballyneety's tower.


* Commemorates the destruction of King William's siege train by Sarsfield (1690), which is told in more detail in the ballad at p. 11. Read the introductory note at that page.

** For which see Joyce's Old Irish Folk Music and Songs.

*** This spirited couplet is from an old folk song on the same subject, fragments of which still remain among the peasantry: see p. 12 above.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Ballyneety's Walls
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Jul 09 - 04:17 PM

For other versions of this song and related songs, see:

Lyr Req: The Night We Rode with Sarsfield
Lyr Req: 'The night fell dark round Limerick'


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Subject: Lyr Add: BALLYNEETY'S WALLS
From: smpc
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 10:42 AM

I finally tracked down the version I was looking for off a CD called The Mountain Streams.

BALLYNEETY'S WALLS

The night we rode with Sarsfield out from Limerick to Meath
The wagon train that William hoped would help in our defeat
How clearly I remember it though now my hair is white
That clustered black and curled 'neath my trooper's cap that night

For I was one of Sarsfield's men in years though still a lad
And to be one of Sarsfield's men what boy would not be glad
For Sarsfield chose of all his troops the best and the bravest ones
To ride and raid those convoy camps that brought those English guns

'Twas silently we left the town and silently we rode
'Til o'er our heads the silent stars in silver beauty glowed
'Twas silently and stealthily well led by one who knew
We crossed the shining Shannon at the ford at Kilaloo

Then galloping O'Hogan, Ireland's fiery hearted son,
'Twas he by many a byway led us confidently on
And when the night 'twas nearly spent and we saw in the distant glow
The English convoy campfire in a quiet vale below

The password of the Willamites was Sarsfield, strange but true,
And with that word upon our lips we passed the sentry through
And when you hear my voice of upraise charge boldly one and all
No cannon from this convoy e'er must bark at Limerick's walls

The sleeping sentry on his rounds perhaps was musing o'er
His happy days of childhood on that pleasant English shore
Perhaps was thinking of his home and wishing he was there
For springtime hits the English land so wonderfully fair

At last our horses' hoof beats and our jingling guns were heard
Halt who goes there the sentry cried advance and give the word
The word is Sarsfield cried our chief and stop us he who can
For Sarsfield is the word tonight and Sarsfield is the man

One bursting cheer our headlong charge our saviours bright and keen
Our hacking at the foeman's head where'er a head is seen
The colonel leaves his wig behind bestride a horse and flies
To tell them of our Sarsfield and his daring camp surprise

We made a pile of captured guns and paper bags and stores
Then skyward in a flaming blast that great explosion roared
'Twas then we sang as home we rode with Sarsfield in the van
For Sarsfield is the word tonight and Sarsfield is the man

The night I rode with Sarsfield I shall always hold it dear
Though he is dead on Landen's Plain this many and many a year
Though he is dead and I am old my hair is all silver white
That clustered black and curled 'neath my troopers cap that night

For I was one of Sarsfield's men though yet a boy in years
I rode as one of Sarsfield's men and those men were my compeers
They're dead the most of them for yet they were Ireland's sons
That saved the walls of Limerick from those mighty English guns.

**ps the slieve blooms spreads over Laois and Offaly


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Ballyneety's Walls
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 11:48 AM

Here is the text from And as I Rode by Granard Moat by Benedict Kiely (Dublin: Lilliput Press, 1996):

The night we rode with Sarsfield out from Limerick to meet
The wagon train that William hoped would help in our defeat,
How clearly I remember it though now my hair is white
That clustered black and curly 'neath my trooper's cap that night.

For I was one of Sarsfield's men, in years though still a lad,
And to be one of Sarsfield's men what boy would not be glad?
For Sarsfield chose, of all his troops, the best and bravest ones
To ride and raid the convoy's camp that brought the English guns.

'Twas silently we left the town and silently we rode,
While o'er our heads the silent stars in silver beauty glowed.
And silently and stealthily, well led by one who knew,
We crossed the shining Shannon at the ford of Killaloe.

The galloping O'Hogan, Ireland's fiery-hearted son,
'Twas he, by many a byway, led us confidently on,
Till when the night was nearly spent we saw the distant glow
The English convoy's campfire in the quiet vale below.

Still silently and stealthily, at Sarsfield's stern command.
We close and closer drew the lines of our devoted band
'We must not fail, my comrades.' That was Sarsfield's voice that spoke.
'For Limerick and Ireland's fate depends upon this stroke.


'The password of the Willamites is Sarsfield. Strange but true.
And with that word upon our lips, we'll pass the sentries through.
Then when you hear my voice upraised, charge boldly, one and all.
No cannon from this convoy e'er must bark at Limerick's wall.'

The sleepy sentry, on his rounds, perhaps was musing o'er
His happy days of childhood on the pleasant English shore,
Perhaps was thinking of his home and wishing he were there
When springtime makes the English land so wonderfully fair.

At last our horses' hoof-beats and our jingling arms he heard.
'Halt! Who goes there?' the sentry cried: 'Advance and give the word.'
'The word is Sarsfield,' cried our Chief. 'And stop us he who can.
For Sarsfield is the word tonight. And Sarsfield is the man.'

One bursting cheer, one headlong charge, and sabres bright and keen
Are hacking at the foemen's heads where'er a head is seen.
The colonel leaves his wig behind, bestrides a horse and flies
To tell of Sarsfield's daring and the convoy camp's surprise.

We make a pile of captured guns and powder-kegs and stores,
Then skyward in one flaming blast the great explosion roars.
And then we sang, as back we rode with Sarsfield in the van:
'Ho! Sarsfield is the word tonight and Sarsfield is the man.'

The night we rode with Sarsfield, I shall always hold it dear.
Though he is dead on Landen Plain, this many and many a year.
Though he is dead and I am old, my hair all silver white
That clustered black and curly 'neath my trooper's cap that night.

For I was one of Sarsfield's men, while yet a boy in years
I rode as one of Sarsfield's men and men were my compeers.
They're dead, the most of them, afar, yet they were Ireland's sons
Who saved the walls of Limerick from the might of English guns.

[Note: I had to piece the above lines together from snippets. I was not able to determine the title or the author. I have boldfaced the differences between this version and the one posted by smpc above.--JD]


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