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BS: Xmas Pud

Long Firm Freddie 04 Nov 00 - 12:36 PM
Troll 04 Nov 00 - 03:13 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 04 Nov 00 - 03:15 PM
Mrrzy 04 Nov 00 - 03:53 PM
Long Firm Freddie 04 Nov 00 - 04:00 PM
sophocleese 04 Nov 00 - 04:15 PM
Long Firm Freddie 04 Nov 00 - 04:24 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 05 Nov 00 - 10:00 AM
Naemanson 05 Nov 00 - 10:03 AM
catspaw49 05 Nov 00 - 10:48 AM
Greyeyes 05 Nov 00 - 11:19 AM
Noreen 05 Nov 00 - 11:20 AM
Allan C. 05 Nov 00 - 11:38 AM
Naemanson 05 Nov 00 - 11:41 AM
catspaw49 05 Nov 00 - 11:42 AM
Long Firm Freddie 05 Nov 00 - 12:03 PM
catspaw49 05 Nov 00 - 12:09 PM
Greyeyes 05 Nov 00 - 12:12 PM
Greyeyes 05 Nov 00 - 12:14 PM
Long Firm Freddie 05 Nov 00 - 12:17 PM
Long Firm Freddie 05 Nov 00 - 12:19 PM
Matt_R 05 Nov 00 - 12:21 PM
Naemanson 05 Nov 00 - 01:04 PM
Greyeyes 05 Nov 00 - 01:24 PM
Greyeyes 05 Nov 00 - 01:37 PM
Greyeyes 05 Nov 00 - 01:38 PM
Penny S. 05 Nov 00 - 03:24 PM
Liz the Squeak 05 Nov 00 - 03:39 PM
Kim C 06 Nov 00 - 11:51 AM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 06 Nov 00 - 12:21 PM
Penny S. 06 Nov 00 - 12:56 PM
Greyeyes 06 Nov 00 - 01:14 PM
Mrs.Duck 06 Nov 00 - 01:36 PM
Naemanson 06 Nov 00 - 01:39 PM
Greyeyes 06 Nov 00 - 01:41 PM
Greyeyes 06 Nov 00 - 01:43 PM
MMario 06 Nov 00 - 01:45 PM
dick greenhaus 06 Nov 00 - 01:54 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 19 Nov 00 - 04:29 PM
Greyeyes 19 Nov 00 - 04:45 PM
nutty 19 Nov 00 - 04:49 PM
Greyeyes 19 Nov 00 - 04:50 PM
Amos 19 Nov 00 - 05:30 PM
Linda Kelly 19 Nov 00 - 06:31 PM
Greyeyes 19 Nov 00 - 06:43 PM
Naemanson 19 Nov 00 - 09:20 PM
Hotspur 19 Nov 00 - 10:18 PM
kimmers 20 Nov 00 - 12:46 AM
Noreen 20 Nov 00 - 11:09 AM
GUEST,Becky 20 Nov 00 - 12:24 PM
SINSULL 21 Nov 00 - 10:22 AM
Amergin 21 Nov 00 - 11:39 AM
Liz the Squeak 21 Nov 00 - 12:36 PM
John in Brisbane 22 Nov 00 - 06:29 PM
mousethief 22 Nov 00 - 06:31 PM
Liz the Squeak 23 Nov 00 - 06:11 PM
Naemanson 10 Dec 00 - 10:11 PM
Naemanson 10 Dec 00 - 10:12 PM
GUEST,Greyeyes (at work) 11 Dec 00 - 07:45 AM
Noreen 11 Dec 00 - 10:37 AM
Naemanson 11 Dec 00 - 12:12 PM
annamill 11 Dec 00 - 12:30 PM
Greyeyes 11 Dec 00 - 02:03 PM
Penny S. 11 Dec 00 - 04:18 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 11 Dec 00 - 05:26 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 12 Dec 00 - 09:18 AM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 12 Dec 00 - 09:19 AM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 12 Dec 00 - 09:20 AM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 29 Oct 02 - 04:45 PM
GUEST,Kim C no cookie 29 Oct 02 - 04:50 PM
JudeL 30 Oct 02 - 07:08 AM
catspaw49 30 Oct 02 - 08:07 AM
Nigel Parsons 30 Oct 02 - 12:15 PM
Penny S. 03 Nov 02 - 02:15 PM

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Subject: Xmas Pud
From: Long Firm Freddie
Date: 04 Nov 00 - 12:36 PM

I've just mixed my Christmas Pudding. Anyone wanna stir it up and make a wish?

LFF


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Troll
Date: 04 Nov 00 - 03:13 PM

Gotcha Freddie! Here's a stir and a hope that my arthritis doesn"t get any worse.

troll


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 04 Nov 00 - 03:15 PM

The only time I made it this early it was green and hairy by the time Christmas rolled around. How do you keep it from getting moldy>


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Mrrzy
Date: 04 Nov 00 - 03:53 PM

Ooh, thanks. I'm not telling it, though! Tell your wish and it doesn't come true, or doesn't that hold for this?


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Long Firm Freddie
Date: 04 Nov 00 - 04:00 PM

Animaterra: plenty of booze in the recipe(rum, barley wine and stout), and a nice cool place to keep it (the garage). Oh, and I feed it with a little bit of rum each week till Christmas.

Hope the dreaded "Arthur" doesn't trouble you too much, troll.

LFF


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: sophocleese
Date: 04 Nov 00 - 04:15 PM

oooh, goody making my wish right now! Not telling though.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Long Firm Freddie
Date: 04 Nov 00 - 04:24 PM

I thought the not telling thing was only for when you pull the wishbone from the turkey...

Anyway, whisper your wishes, and I promise not to tell!

LFF


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 10:00 AM

Thanks for the advice, LLF (tho' I don't have a garage)- will next week be time enough in advance of the season? I've scheduled one full day of cooking and baking for Thanksgiving- no reason why I can't keep the pudding pot on the back burner too!


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Naemanson
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 10:03 AM

OK, I'll show my ignorance. What is the tradition? What is the recipe? How does this all work?


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: catspaw49
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 10:48 AM

I generally decorate my pud for Christmas, although I rarely call him my pud, much preferring to use "tool" or "crank" and his given name, "Joe Smackers." The problem with doing anything this early is that the decorations look a little worse for wear by the big day. He does have a nice little Santa Claus outfit that's due back from the cleaners at the end of the month. Check back with me then!

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Greyeyes
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 11:19 AM

The tradition in England is that a christmas pudding is made about a month before Christmas, and everyone in the household will stir the mixture at some point in its production and make a wish for the coming year while stirring.

Usually the pudding would be kept for a year, and the preceding years pud eaten at christmas, but this is unusual these days, with centrally heated houses and few proper larders left most people eat it the year they make it.

Traditionally "stir up Sunday" is the Sunday before advent, which this year is 26th Nov, so Long Firm Freddie is actually a bit previous. If you really want a recipe, and there are many, I'll happily post one.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Noreen
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 11:20 AM

Lovely picture, Spaw!!

Brett, it's a very rich mixture of dried fruit, eggs, flour, sugar, spices, suet, brandy, etc., steamed for hours and hours in a pudding bowl and served up after Xmas dinner covered in flaming brandy, with a sprig of (burning!) holly in the top, with white sauce or brandy butter.
The white sauce contains brandy too...

I'll post my Nana's recipe later if you want more details.

Noreen


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Allan C.
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 11:38 AM

Thanks, 'Spaw. I knew I could count on you to say what I originally thought this thread was about.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Naemanson
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 11:41 AM

We have a lovely set of books called the Life Book Of Christmas. It was published by Life Magazine in 1963, long before Time bought it out and the company became Time-Life. These books are very much a part of our family traditions of Christmas.

There is an occasional mention of Christmas Pudding and even a very complicated recipe for making a huge plum pudding. I've always wanted to do that but thought the process too complicated and expensive for the experiment. I would appreciate an easier recipe.

Please do post.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: catspaw49
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 11:42 AM

Happy to oblige Allan. Actually, as you know, its kinda' my job around here. This keeps the reps of others unsullied and I view it as a community service.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Long Firm Freddie
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 12:03 PM

Yeah, I like to start Christmas early! The recipe I use is by Delia Smith. She's so popular in England, supermarkets run out of whatever she's used on her programme the night before...

Interestingly, Delia reckons stir up Sunday is 25 weeks after Trinity, which in turn depnds (I understand, I'm certainly no expert) on when Easter falls.

She gives a prayer for that day, known as the Collect:

Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord,
the wills of thy faithful people,
that they plenteously bringing forth
the fruit of thy good works, may
be of thee plenteously rewarded.

LFF

PS Spaw, can I say, here and now, that however cute he may be, I don't want your little pud coming down my chimney on Christmas Eve?


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: catspaw49
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 12:09 PM

I can understand that Freddie...........But would you rather have him stirring your pudding?

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Greyeyes
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 12:12 PM

A Christmas Pudding recipe

8oz shredded suet, 4oz self raising flour, 8oz white breadcrumbs (grated from a stale loaf), 1 heaped teaspoon mixed spice, 1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg, 1/4 teaspoon powdered cinamon, 1lb soft brown sugar, 8oz sultanas, 8oz raisins, 1 1/4lb currants, 2oz mixed candied peel, 2oz almonds (blanched skinned & chopped), 1 apple, peeled, cored & finely chopped, grated rind of 1 orange & 1 lemon, 4 eggs, 4 tablespoons dark rum, 5 fl.oz barley wine, 5 fl.oz stout (Guinness).

Put the suet, flour, breadcrumbs, spices and sugar in a bowl, mixing in each ingredient thoroughly before adding the next. Then gradually mix in all the fruit, peel and nuts and follow these with the apple and the orange and lemon rind.

In a different bowl beat up the eggs, and mix the rum, barley wine and stout into them. Empty all this over the dry ingredients- then stir very hard indeed. (this mixing is vital and why traditionally everyone joins in, it is hard work!) The mixture should be of a good dropping consistency, add more stout if necessary.

After the mixing cover the bowl with a cloth and leave it overnight. The next day grease 2 2pint pudding basins (or 4 1pint) and pack the mixture into them right to the top. Cover each basin with a square of greaseproof paper, and with a square pudding cloth on top (any clean kitchen cloth will do). Tie these round the rims of the basins with string, then tie the corners of the cloth together on top.

Steam the pudding for 8 hours, make sure the water doesn't boil away,. When cooked and cooled remove the cloth and paper and replace with a fresh lot. Store in a cool dry place and when ready to eat steam for a further 2 hours.

Any left-overs can be sliced and fried in butter the next day, or turned into christmas pudding ice-cream.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Greyeyes
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 12:14 PM

This is a Delia Smith recipe, so may be the very one LFF has made.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Long Firm Freddie
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 12:17 PM

Actually, Spaw,there is a tradition of hiding little charms in the pudding for luck; but I don't think there'd be too many shrieks of delight at the Christmas dinner table on finding Mr Smackers in one's bowl!

LFF


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Long Firm Freddie
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 12:19 PM

It is, Greyeyes, it is. Yum yum!

LFF


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Matt_R
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 12:21 PM

Have you made corn pud? You need corn, mashed potatos, crusty Stovetop stuffing....and a garbage disposal.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Naemanson
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 01:04 PM

OK, I've printed out the recipe and now I have a few questions. Most of this boils down to the fact that while we share a language we don't necessarily share the same meanings for words.

How are sultanas different from raisins and currants?

What is candied peel?

What does a pudding basin look like?

Is a pudding cloth the same as a cheesecloth, i.e., a loosely woven soft white cloth?

Now to talk about the stirring. If I understand the above posts you guys keep it in the precooked condition for a month stirring it constantly? Is that correct? Why aren't you all dead from food poisoning?

I'm looking forward to putting this together this year. I don't think I'll do the one month stirring thing though. How big is the finished product?


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Greyeyes
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 01:24 PM

Yes you keep it till christmas, after you've steamed it for 8 hours, no you don't stir it after it's steamed. The stirring only lasts one night. as I said above they used to keep them for a year. It's basically booze dried fruit and sugar, it doesn't go off. Make sure it's cool and dark, an old fashioned larder preferably.

Sultanas raisins and currants are all dried grapes of various kinds, but distinctly different. Most of the brands available in the UK come from USA so you must have them, perhaps you call them something different.

Candied peel is the peel of citrus fruits preserved by impregnating with a sugar syrup, a vital ingredient in traditional English fruit cakes.

Pudding basins, difficult to describe, try here, can't do blue clickies sorry. http://www.be-ro.com/basics/puddbas.htm

Puddingg cloths, yes cheesecloth, or muslin, doubled over , would do fine.

You must steam it for 8 hours the day after stirring, or it will definitely go furry. Good luck.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Greyeyes
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 01:37 PM

Click here


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Greyeyes
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 01:38 PM

Blimey it worked.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Penny S.
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 03:24 PM

I usually soak the dried fruit in the booze overnight before the mixing. I don't like the currants (small black dried grapes, so I substitute more of the others. Grated carrot can also be used, but I can't remember what that is substituted for (wartime recipe, but results in a moister pudding). The types of nuts can be varied, and I have also used glace cherries.

Somewhere here, I posted last year's recipe for a chocolate Christmas Pudding.

Penny


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 05 Nov 00 - 03:39 PM

Pudding basin is any deep, rounded, slightly tapered bowl that has a lip on it, for tying the cloth around. Put pudding mix in bowl. Place cloth over the top and tie piece of string around top of bowl. Pull up to lip, and tie the ends of the cloth over the top of the bowl. This gives you a handy bit to stick the spoon under when you fish it out the steamer and the string should catch on the lip and stop the cloth coming off.

If you want it to burn well, keep adding alcoholic beverage of choice - brandy or rum are best, but you can use scotch if you really must..... When you come to lighting it, put pudding on a flameproof dish that is big enough to leave you hand holds on either side. Get a friend to help you, who doesn't mind if they lose their eyebrows. Warm about 1 cup of whatever alcohol you used - brandy or rum, but do not allow to boil. It should be about blood heat, or so that it feels nicely warm when you stick your finger in it. If you burn your finger, the alcohol has already burned off, start again.....

Pour all but one big metal spoonful of warmed alcohol over hot pudding. Take pudding to door of dining room, get friend to take the spoonful of the alcohol, set light to it and pour over pudding. This should set the lot off, and you should be able to put a flaming pudding on the table. Christmas pudding often has a bitter taste. This is what burnt holly tastes like. Do not use plastic decorations/charms inside.

Charms - Button - bachelors button, the person finding this would remain unmarried.

Silver sixpence/thruppeny bit (pre decimal sterling money, ask someone older than me....) meant wealth over the year.

Thimble - thrift - person finding this would not be so lucky.

Ring - person finding this would marry in the following year.

Oh, and have a bucket of water on standby for those overhanging decorations, or if you can't wait for your pudding. I did one a couple of years ago that didn't go out for 20 mins....

LTS


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Kim C
Date: 06 Nov 00 - 11:51 AM

I will take a stir but the wish is secret. :)


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 06 Nov 00 - 12:21 PM

Can't wait to try the recipe! And I'll have to dig out my English/American cooking conversion chart.
I have two pudding basins(have had them for years, after long searching) with lids that snap on. Are you telling me I didn't have to go to the expense, that any old bowl would do??


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Penny S.
Date: 06 Nov 00 - 12:56 PM

Only if it's the right shape. The original pudding was made in a cloth tied up into a ball shape, and a pudding basin tries to have those sort of proportions, so a wide topped bowl wouldn't do. It's like a large tea-cup? And the sizes are measured in pints.

This link should take you to a picture. If it doesn't, search for pudding basins.

Basins

Penny


--- Link fixed. Closing quotes added ---
-- PA --


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Greyeyes
Date: 06 Nov 00 - 01:14 PM

I've investigated Naemanson's queries a bit further and it appears that what we call sultanas are known as golden raisins in the states. Candied peel is specified in a number of US fruit cake recipes I found so should be readily available.

Apparently the stirring should be from east to west, in honour of the three wise men.

Pudding basins with snap on lids are ideal. You can improvise with mixing bowls and the like but there's no substitute for the genuine article.

Good luck to anyone who tries the recipe.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Mrs.Duck
Date: 06 Nov 00 - 01:36 PM

The tredition in our family was to make the pudding on Christmas eve aand then eat the one we made the year before.. The pudding was steeamed until cooked and then resteamed for about an hour when ready to be eaten. The sugar and alcohol prevent anything going off I use a similar recipe without the suet for Christmas cake and that too can be kept for months or longer as long as it is well fed and has no icing.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Naemanson
Date: 06 Nov 00 - 01:39 PM

Once I saw the picture I realized I already own a pudding basin. It is a ceramic bowl in that shape with a bit of a lip to hold the string. I must have inherited it in the divorce or maybe bought it in a yard sale.

I am looking forward to trying this out. I will let you know how this turns out. BTW, how do you know when it is done? Or will any 8 to 10 hour stretch of boiling do the job?

Thanks to all.

Oh, And I'll try a stir at your pudding and a wish that mine turns out tasty and beautiful.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Greyeyes
Date: 06 Nov 00 - 01:41 PM

I know some married couples keep the top tier of their wedding cake to use as the christening cake for their firstborn. It can be perfectly edible after even a couple of years if stored properly, and usually improves with up to a few months storage.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Greyeyes
Date: 06 Nov 00 - 01:43 PM

Stick to the timing in the recipe Brett, it will be cooked, trust Delia!


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: MMario
Date: 06 Nov 00 - 01:45 PM

*donning flame retardent suit*

Steamed puddings (of varying types) are a tradition in my family at both thanksgiving and christmas -- but we have always served them the day of steaming (or more recently - the day after) (microwaves are a wondrous thing...)


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 06 Nov 00 - 01:54 PM

For those unfamiliar with puddings, check out Sam Small's Chruistmas Pudding in DigiTrad


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 19 Nov 00 - 04:29 PM

Well, my pudding's all cooked and on the porch. Brett, how about you? I forgot to ask you in person if you tried it! I found I had a recipe almost identical to Delias, copied years ago from a "Christmas Traditions" book. Made my wish, added the charms LTS suggested (wrapped in foil to make it harder to swallow them by accident!).


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Greyeyes
Date: 19 Nov 00 - 04:45 PM

Bravo, I'm doing mine next week.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: nutty
Date: 19 Nov 00 - 04:49 PM

You can cut down on the cooking time by using a pressure cooker but make even more sure that it doesn't boil dry

I tend to cook mine for about 1 hour ( gently simmering ) initially, then I switch off the heat as the pudding continues to cook as the pressure goes down

On Christmas day I do the same thing for about 20mins before serving, covered in warm brandy and set alight .


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Greyeyes
Date: 19 Nov 00 - 04:50 PM

Cheat!


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Amos
Date: 19 Nov 00 - 05:30 PM

All I can say is it has been a long while since anyone asked me to give their pud a stir, and I am really not quite sure how to handle it! I'll have to subscribe to Catspaw's "The Out-of-Practice Git's Illustrated Guide to Compromising Invitations and Unexpected Opportunities",'Spaw, Cat, illus., 312 pp., autogr. by author, $39.95 if ordered before next Wednesday, fair condition-- some pages show signs of staining.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Linda Kelly
Date: 19 Nov 00 - 06:31 PM

I shall of course be following the tradition as established by our dear old Queen- nipping down to Tesco,s and buying one for £8.99 - this way I save time and avoid poisoning the whole family.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Greyeyes
Date: 19 Nov 00 - 06:43 PM

Cheat!


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Naemanson
Date: 19 Nov 00 - 09:20 PM

Kendall and I each had a compromising invitation this wekend from Sinsull and Marymac! See the thread on what happened in Derry.

I have not yet tried this recipe. I am planning on doing it on 12/9 for eating on 12/10. I have some friends who put up a huge Christmas tree (at least 12' tall) and have a big decorating party. I will make the pudding for that.

Wish me luck!


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Hotspur
Date: 19 Nov 00 - 10:18 PM

Sultanas are dried green grapes, called golden raisins in the States. "Regular" raisins are dried red grapes. Dried currants are dried currants, not grapes. Candied peel is either lemon or orange peel. Some of the big spice companies sell it already cut up into little pieces for you (otherwise, try a candy shop.) Incidentally, I read someplace that the meaning of the word "plum" in terms of puddings is disputed. Obviously, it doesn't mean fresh plums. Some sources say it refers to prunes (dried plums), other say it refers to raisins.

I love making plum pudding!


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: kimmers
Date: 20 Nov 00 - 12:46 AM

I haven't made Delia Smith's pudding recipes, but I made two of her fruitcake recipes a couple of years ago and they were smashing (and one could get smashed eating them). I didn't have too much trouble with the terms and units, if I recall; it goes better if you have a good kitchen scale. So one American was able to figure it out!

And the fruitcakes should be 'fed' too, weekly... just pour a little booze on them and wrap them up again. I used rum that year; next time I might try Irish whisky.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Noreen
Date: 20 Nov 00 - 11:09 AM

Just a note about adding charms to the pud: if you wrap them in aluminium foil as suggested above, some aluminium will be leached into the pud by the action of fruit acids. This is particularly significant if the pud is to be stored for a long time.

A better idea is to use buttered greaseproof paper to wrap your insertions. :0)

Best of luck to all with your puds. I never think to make mine this far in advance, but maybe I will this year now thatyou've got me thinking about it.

One more warning for those who've not made or served Xmas pudding before: it is extremely filling due to its dense texture and rich flavour. You only need to serve about a tablespoonful to each person, particularly after a large main course, so don't worry that it won't be big enough. My '2 pint basin' pudding serves the twelve or so people who sit down to Christmas dinner.

Yum!

Noreen


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: GUEST,Becky
Date: 20 Nov 00 - 12:24 PM

I have a recipe for figgy pudding from my (American) grandmother. Last year I split it and tried the 4-hour steaming and the 5 minute microwaving. Both worked. (I think I actually nuked the one longer than that, and it ended up a little tough and dry. It was also pale. The steamed one was moist, dark, and lovely. I made a lemon sauce, but didn't add any liquor.)

Anybody got any interesting traditions associated with the figgy, rather than plum?

~ Becky in Tucson


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: SINSULL
Date: 21 Nov 00 - 10:22 AM

Yes, while singing "Bring us a figgy pudding" someone always becomes the monster Muppet and shouts "Won't go! Won't go! Won't go" until suitably subdued. Does that count.

I am stirring the pudding and wishing for health, happiness and lots of beautiful babies for the coming year.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Amergin
Date: 21 Nov 00 - 11:39 AM

I'll take a stir at the pudding and wish that my heart stays two sizes too small....


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 21 Nov 00 - 12:36 PM

Lots of beautiful babies?? Phew! I'm investigating wishing my eggs to someone - want to do a deal?? My wish would be for us all to be there again the following year.

LTS - who had better get on and make one for next year - I still have one and a bit of last years' left, if anyone wants to try it?? (useful as a doorstop....)


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: John in Brisbane
Date: 22 Nov 00 - 06:29 PM

Tried to send this a few days ago but the Internet Network has suffered a major disaster in the Asia Pacific region.

Get out your violins before I start. The Christmas after my father died in 1961 my mum told us kids that she didn't have time to make the Christmas pudding, so I volunteered to make it from the recipe that had come out from Scotland in the 1850's. I've been making it ever since (pardon me, my wife now carries on the tradition) and oodles of friends and their parents and siblings have picked up the method.

There are some basics that I'll cover off here. Our pudding is alawys cooked in a pre floured cloth which is 1 yard square and traditionally was made from flour bags sown together. These days we use calico and i metre square will work just as weell, but there is an excess of cloth at the end after you've tied it.

There are lots of recipes - I gladly share my family's - but once the ingredients are combined they are placed on the floured side of the cloth, tied at the top with a bootlace and placed in a large pot of boiling water for 6 hours. IT MUST NEVER GO OFF THE BOIL and you will need to top up with boiling water from time to time. Other than this these puddings are virtually idiot proof - even a nine year old could make one.

The aspect of storage is a vexed one for me. If you live in Australia pudding making time is hot and in my case very humid. There are the right sort of conditions for breeding all sorts of lovely green and blue moulds. In my experience cooking it from 1 to 7 days before the event is very safe. Anything earlier than that you need to watch it like a hawk - hang in a place where you see it constantly. In the unlikely event that there are any left overs, the best storage place is the freezer. I have heard countless stories of woe from those who try to keep a pudding for extended periods in the larder (rather than the freezer). In the Australian climate you are left with a dessicated tasteless lump.

To heat an entire pudding in the cloth place in a large pot of simmering water for 90 minutes. Serve with your choce of custard, cream, ice cream or brandy butter. Or it's delicious served cold with slices of fresh mango, peaches and apricots - in season here at Christmas.

Regards, John


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: mousethief
Date: 22 Nov 00 - 06:31 PM

But wouldn't "The Dessicated Tasteless Lump" be a great name for a band?


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 23 Nov 00 - 06:11 PM

I thought it already was, but then realised it was Peter Stringfellow....

LTS *BG*


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Naemanson
Date: 10 Dec 00 - 10:11 PM

OK, I bought the ingrediants on Thursday, mixed them on Friday, steamed one pudding on Saturday and finished the steaming and ate it on Sunday. I realize that is too quick (to judge from the posts above) but I wanted to have this pudding for the tree trimming ad my friends' house.

The votes are in and after fifty or sixty recounts we come to a 50-50 split on the opinions of the pudding. Generally the adults loved it and the kids were against it. My own daughter said she'd rather eat lima beans and that is a definite vote against!

It has a smoky flavor, tasting almost burned, that I at first wanted to put down to poor cooking. Then as I ate it I decided it was not burned. The flavor was universal and not regionalized to one area. The pudding was dark brown and tasted of the fruit and the spice, and this smoky flavor. I was uncertain and thought I would not like it but I realized it is probably an acquired taste, much like beer.

Tomorrow I take the leftovers in to the office and let the experts try it. I may need to pour a little rum over it to influence their votes. Enough rum and all the chads will get pregnant!

Thanks to the UK contingent for your help in this experiment.

Merry Christmas!


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Naemanson
Date: 10 Dec 00 - 10:12 PM

BTW, did I get it right or did I burn it?


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: GUEST,Greyeyes (at work)
Date: 11 Dec 00 - 07:45 AM

I can't explain a smokey flavour, unless it's because of the allspice! (BG).


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Noreen
Date: 11 Dec 00 - 10:37 AM

Brett, as long as it never boils dry, it is impossible to burn it. It should have a 'dark brown' flavour, but I wouldn't have thought it smoky- hmmm.

Generally in my experience, younger children aren't that impressed, but it grows on them... :0)

I'll have to make mine soon!

Noreen


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Naemanson
Date: 11 Dec 00 - 12:12 PM

I have boiled the other one and have it in the refrigerator. I assume it will be OK until I take it home for Christmas. Someone above mentioned feeding it with rum or whiskey. Is that a matter of pouring teaspoons of booze on to the pudding or is something else going on?


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: annamill
Date: 11 Dec 00 - 12:30 PM

This all sounds really good! Where can I buy one?

Love, annamill


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Greyeyes
Date: 11 Dec 00 - 02:03 PM

Feeding it is as you describe Brett, but I wouldn't bother, it's a technique usually used for Christmas cakes, which are generally made much earlier than the pudding.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Penny S.
Date: 11 Dec 00 - 04:18 PM

currant: dried fruit of a seedless variety of grape grown in the Levant, much used in cookery; red, white, black ~ fruit of Ribes. Derives from raisins of Corauntz (ME) as in modern French "raisins de Corinthe". OED

And in my opinion are wizened hard pellets, prone to sticking out of whatever you are cooking and burning to carbonised ball bearings. They are OK if well soaked and contained within something, as in Garibaldi biscuits or dry fly pie.

The charms - we used sixpences, in lieu of silver threepenny bits, and because of the risk of leaching, Mum left them to the last minute before serving, stuck a knife in the pud and inserted the coins. We've still got the last ones from before decimalisation! When we were small, it was enough to go and spend on goodies. Mum always made sure we got one each.

Penny


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 11 Dec 00 - 05:26 PM

Annamill,

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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 12 Dec 00 - 09:18 AM

Oops, how did that happen? Here's a website for Xmas pudding and many other UK imports;

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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 12 Dec 00 - 09:19 AM

Damn! Here's the url. Dunno what I'm doing wrong!!
http://www.britishtraditionals.com/framepears.htm
or you could just check the local grocery store. I found a smallish pudding at ours this week.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 12 Dec 00 - 09:20 AM

Damn! Here's the url. Dunno what I'm doing wrong!!
http://www.britishtraditionals.com
or you could just check the local grocery store. I found a smallish pudding at ours this week.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 29 Oct 02 - 04:45 PM

OK, now, here's a dilemma:
I've been 10 months off the bottle; no alcohol is allowed in my house or my food- is there a good way to make plum pudding without it? Could I substitute New England (non-hard) cider and/or cranberry juice? Ginger ale? Help!


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: GUEST,Kim C no cookie
Date: 29 Oct 02 - 04:50 PM

Animaterra, you could use rum extract instead of the real thing. Will give you all the flavor and none of the booze. I think extracts have, maybe, .05% alcohol or something like that, for a preservative.

The fruit juice substitution might work too. The recipe I use calls for a little orange juice anyway. I'd say, maybe use a combination of cider and cranberry juice? Or Cranapple, which would be about the same. Heck, you might come up with a great new recipe!

And by the way, everyone, the wish I made in November of 2000, came true the next year. Still can't tell you what it is, though. ;-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: JudeL
Date: 30 Oct 02 - 07:08 AM

My dad tells this story of when he was young (he's now 79) and my nan (grandmother) used to make xmas puds and they would be stored in a row on a high shelf in the kitchen. This is in the days before centrally heated houses. One day my dad and one of his brothers being the only ones in the house couldn't resist just trying a little bit of this year's batch, but they knew than my nan would raise cain if she found out. So they climbed up and took one out of it's bowl unwrapped it, sliced the bottom off it, wrapped it back up, and put it back. Since the bowl got smaller to the bottom the pud stayed at the top of the bowl and my nan didn't find out until she went to cook it, by which time it was impossible to say for certain who'd done it. She apparently threatened to never make one again, which was such an awful threat that my uncle (being younger) confessed and dropped dad in it. According to dad the worst bit of the punishment was my nan said that since they'd already had their share they didn't need any more, so they went without. Now some 70 years later my dad still has an agrieved note in his tone when he recalls the incident and being squealed on by Uncle Peter.


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: catspaw49
Date: 30 Oct 02 - 08:07 AM

Another year and once again time to get out "Joe Smackers" Christmas outfit!!!

This year I think it is time to stop the silly stirring stuff and everyone should pound their pud for Christmas. If you are female and have come into this life unequipped with a pud, no problem. I am sure you can find a willing pud owner who will enjoy having his pud pounded by you. If for some reason or another you can't find someone with a pud to pound, I can make myself available. Please call for an appointment.....or perhaps even several.

Looking forward to a really merry Christmas,
Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 30 Oct 02 - 12:15 PM

Just a minor correction, "Stir-up Sunday" is not necessarily the 25th Sunday in Trinity. It is the Sunday next before (immediately preceeding) Advent. Due to the vagaries of the dating of Easter (The first Sunday after the full moon following the vernal equinox) Trinity is a season of varying length (to take up the slack in the calendar).
Stir-Up Sunday this year will be 24th November, so you still have time to gather the ingredients and a pudding bowl

Nigel


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Subject: RE: BS: Xmas Pud
From: Penny S.
Date: 03 Nov 02 - 02:15 PM

Animaterra, I would think cider would work well. I've checked on Marks and Spencer's alchohol free pudding, and they used orange juice - grape juice would fit with the other ingredients as well. M&S also had golden syrup and treacle and candied apple in that particular recipe. It did occur to me that adding something like apple cheese, or a fruit nectar would add the richness you would get with the alchoholic liquids. Not the preserving effect, though, so you would not find the pudding would keep as well. I wouldn't go for flavouring, myself - you can get the rummy sort of flavour from some sorts of sugars - muscovado, for one.

Penny


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Mudcat time: 20 October 2:47 AM EDT

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