Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Origins: Lord Randall

DigiTrad:
BONNIE TAMMY
BONNIE WEE CROODLIN DOO
HENRY MY SON
LORD RANDAL
LORD RONALD


Related threads:
Help to identify a folk song-poison berries (16)
Lyr Req: The Wild Wild Berry (8)
Lyr Add: Lord Rendal (2)
Lyr Req: Lord Randall parody (Roaring Jelly) (18)
(origins) Origins: Bonnie wee croodin doo/Lord Randall (10)
Lyr Req: Tony Rose's Lord Rendal (3)
lord Randall (7)


Ian 01 Apr 99 - 09:31 AM
skw@worldmusic.de 01 Apr 99 - 09:37 AM
01 Apr 99 - 02:17 PM
Ian 06 Apr 99 - 01:12 PM
Barry Finn 06 Apr 99 - 01:46 PM
Rick Haverty 06 Apr 99 - 01:53 PM
Antaine 06 Apr 99 - 07:54 PM
Ian 08 Apr 99 - 07:19 AM
Jane Bird 08 Apr 99 - 11:37 AM
AlistairUK 08 Apr 99 - 12:56 PM
GUEST,Bubba 16 May 00 - 11:32 PM
Sandy Paton 17 May 00 - 12:05 AM
Susan A-R 17 May 00 - 11:58 PM
Chicky 18 May 00 - 03:51 AM
Kim C 18 May 00 - 01:15 PM
Peg 18 May 00 - 01:49 PM
Malcolm Douglas 18 May 00 - 07:33 PM
Sandy Paton 18 May 00 - 09:43 PM
Charlie Baum 19 May 00 - 12:00 AM
GUEST,ohwilliedear@yahoo.com 19 May 00 - 10:50 AM
UB Ed 14 Jul 03 - 03:49 PM
Mary Humphreys 14 Jul 03 - 06:15 PM
GUEST,Jane Bird 15 Jul 03 - 05:09 AM
Malcolm Douglas 15 Jul 03 - 10:36 AM
IanC 15 Jul 03 - 11:29 AM
GUEST,gcarrier62@go.com 15 Jul 03 - 12:00 PM
Amos 15 Jul 03 - 12:44 PM
Mary Humphreys 15 Jul 03 - 12:52 PM
UB Ed 15 Jul 03 - 01:59 PM
GUEST,Jane Bird 16 Jul 03 - 04:18 AM
HuwG 16 Jul 03 - 07:22 AM
GUEST,leeneia 16 Jul 03 - 10:41 AM
MMario 16 Jul 03 - 10:46 AM
MMario 16 Jul 03 - 10:58 AM
GUEST,Q 16 Jul 03 - 12:09 PM
GUEST,MMario 16 Jul 03 - 12:24 PM
Malcolm Douglas 16 Jul 03 - 08:02 PM
GUEST,Q 16 Jul 03 - 08:29 PM
Malcolm Douglas 16 Jul 03 - 08:38 PM
GUEST 16 Jul 03 - 09:33 PM
GUEST,Q 17 Jul 03 - 01:10 AM
GUEST,MMario 17 Jul 03 - 09:03 AM
GUEST,The Half 12 Oct 03 - 11:03 PM
The Fooles Troupe 12 Oct 03 - 11:39 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 12 Oct 03 - 11:49 PM
Doug Chadwick 13 Oct 03 - 03:47 PM
Snuffy 13 Oct 03 - 07:43 PM
Joe_F 13 Oct 03 - 08:47 PM
GUEST,Bob Coltman 08 Feb 07 - 11:27 AM
A Wandering Minstrel 09 Feb 07 - 08:30 AM
Richie 28 Nov 11 - 02:10 PM
GUEST,banjopicker 28 Nov 11 - 07:15 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:









Subject: Lord Randall
From: Ian
Date: 01 Apr 99 - 09:31 AM

"Lord Randall" doesn't seem to be in the DT database. Anyhow, I'm interested in different variant versions, so what are the lyrics of the one you sing or like best? Does anybody know any special versions of the "green and yellow" variants?

Thanks!
Ian

Check this thread (click) for a German version of "Lord Randall."


Traditional Ballad Index entry for this song:

Lord Randal [Child 12]

DESCRIPTION: (Lord Randall) comes home; his mother questions him about his day. He answers each question accurately but incompletely, concluding with a request to rest. At last he reveals that his sweetheart has poisoned him.
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1787
KEYWORDS: murder lover farewell lastwill food poison
FOUND IN: Britain(England,Scotland(All)) US(All) Ireland Canada(Mar,Que)
REFERENCES (34 citations):
Child 12, "Lord Randal" (21 texts, 2 tunes) {Bronson's #31, #33}
Bronson 12, "Lord Randal" (103 versions plus 9 in addenda)
BarryEckstormSmyth pp. 46-72, "Lord Randall" (12 texts plus 3 fragments and 2 quotations from non-Maine sources, 6 tunes plus 1 unrelated item; the "N" text is a rewrite which ends with Randall's accidental death) {Bronson's #42, #37, #16, #72, #23, [], #11; Bronson's #70 is a tune for text "J," which is printed without a melody}
Belden, pp. 24-28, "Lord Randall" (5 texts, 1 tune) {Bronson's #41}
Randolph 5, "Johnny Randolph" (4 texts, 3 tunes) {A=Bronson's #21, B=#26, D=#96}
Eddy 5, "Lord Randal" (4 texts, 3 tunes) {Bronson's #73, #95, #94}
Flanders/Olney, pp. 37-39, "Jimmie Rendal"; pp. 200-201, "Lord Randall" (2 texts)
Davis-Ballads 6, "Lord Randal" (15 texts [two of them in an appendix] plus a fragment; 4 tunes entitled "John Willow, My Son," "Johnny Rillus," Johnny Rilla," "Lord Randal"; 2 more versions mentioned in Appendix A) {Bronson's #64, #28, (F version not reproduced), #58}
Davis-More 7, pp. 51-60, "Lord Randal" (5 texts plus an excerpt, 3 tunes)
BrownII 6, "Lord Randall" (3 texts)
Chappell-FSRA 4, "Lorendo" (1 text, 1 tune) {Bronson's #8}
Hudson 4, pp. 69-70, "Lord Randall" (2 texts)
Brewster 7, "Lord Randall" (1 text)
Creighton/Senior, pp. 9-11, "Lord Randal" (2 texts plus 1 fragment, 2 tunes) {Bronson's #48, #86}
Leach, pp. 81-85, "Lord Randal" (4 texts)
OBB 66, "Lord Randal" (1 text)
Friedman, p. 178, "Lord Randall" (3 texts)
Warner 107, "Lord Randall"; 108, "Jimmy Ransome" (2 texts, 1 tune)
Sharp-100E 18, "Lord Rendal" (1 text, 1 tune) {Bronson's #90}
Niles 9, "Lord Randall" (2 texts, 2 tunes)
Gummere, pp. 168+336-337, "Lord Randal" (1 text)
Sharp/Karpeles-80E 7, "John Randolph (Lord Randal)" (1 text, 1 tune -- an expanded composite version) {Bronson's #53}
Scott-BoA, pp. 23-24, "Lord Ronald" (1 text, 1 tune)
Hodgart, p. 34, "Lord Randal" (1 text)
JHCox 4, "Lord Randall" (6 texts plus mention of 6 more)
JHCoxIIA, #3, pp. 14-15, "The Jealous Lover" (1 text, 1 tune) {Bronson's #38}
Ord, pp. 458-459, "Lord Randal" (1 text)
LPound-ABS, 1, p. 3, "Johnny Randall"; p. 4, "Jimmy Randolph" (2 texts)
MacSeegTrav 4, "Lord Randall" (2 texts, 2 tunes)
TBB 11, "Lord Randal" (1 text)
SHenry H814, p. 415, "Lord Ronald" (1 text, 1 tune, incorrectly labelled "Child 92")
Darling-NAS, pp. 43-44, "Lord Randall"; "Johnny Randall" (2 texts)
Silber-FSWB, p. 346, "Lord Randall" (1 text)
DT 12, LORDRAN1* LORDRNLD* EELHENRY* EELHENR2

Roud #10
RECORDINGS:
Sara Cleveland, "My Bonny Bon Boy" (on SCleveland01)
Ewan MacColl, "Lord Randal" (on ESFB1, ESFB2)
Lawrence Older, "Johnny Randall" (on LOlder01)
Jeannie Robertson, Elizabeth Cronin, Thomas Moran, Colm McDonough, Eirlys & Eddis Thomas [composite] "Lord Randal" (on FSB4, FSBBAL1) {cf. Bronson's #43.2 in addenda}
Pete Seeger, "Lord Randall" (on PeteSeeger25)
CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "Billy Boy"
ALTERNATE TITLES:
Jimmy Randolph
Jimmy Randal
Bonnie Wee Croodlin Doo
Tiranti, My Love
Henry, My Son
Willie Ransom
Notes: A few versions, such as that recorded by Lawrence Older, make Randall's wife, rather than his sweetheart, his murderer. Wonder if she found out about that other girl he was fooling around with.
I've seen several sources (notably Davis) mention that John Randolph of Virginia knew the song which sometimes bears his name. The text Randolph cited appears, however, to have been "Wheel of Fortune" or something similar.
Barry et al claim "It is reasonably safe to assert that, of all the English ballads, 'Lord Randall' holds in the United States the leading position, as regards the extent of purely traditional currency. 'Barbara Allen' and 'Lord Thomas' are, no doubt, known to more folk-singers, yet it cannot be said that their popularity is due solely to tradition, since both have been many times reprinted in pocket songsters. On the other hand, we know of no American broadside or songster text of 'Lord Randall.'" - RBW
File: C012

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions

The Ballad Index Copyright 2003 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: skw@worldmusic.de
Date: 01 Apr 99 - 09:37 AM

There is at least one version. I searched for 'Randal', and it came up. I'll see if I have other versions at home. - Susanne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From:
Date: 01 Apr 99 - 02:17 PM

Search DT for (Child) '#12'(click here)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Ian
Date: 06 Apr 99 - 01:12 PM

Hi! Anybody out there got a version?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Barry Finn
Date: 06 Apr 99 - 01:46 PM

Hi Ian, it's in the DT (7 versions) as Susan pointed out. Go to the top right hand corner of this page & in the box above the search button enter #12 , this will bring up all of the versions in the database of Child ballad #12 of which Lord Randal belongs. Barry


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Rick Haverty
Date: 06 Apr 99 - 01:53 PM

I heard a version by Pete Morton that I really liked. You can find him on Harbourtown Records at...

http://www.rootsworld.com/harbourtown/harbcat.html

PETE MORTON / ROGER WILSON / SIMON EDWARDS "Urban Folk Vol. 1" (Now available as a two CD set with Urban Folk Volume II, Self Destructive Fools) tracks: Love's Trainee (part one) / The Fox / Hey Joe / Lord Randall / Absent Love / Old Joe Clark - The Louisiana Two Step / Delia / Bleak Mist / Rambleaway / False Bride / Shadow of an Absent Friend / It Takes a Lot to Laugh, it Takes a Train to Cry.

Rick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: AMHRÁN NA HEASCAINNE / SONG OF THE EEL
From: Antaine
Date: 06 Apr 99 - 07:54 PM

Amhrán na hEascainne

"Cé raibh tú ó mhaidin a dheartháirín ó?
Cé raibh tú ó mhaidin a phlúir na bhfear óg?"
"Ag iascach 's ag foghlaereacht, cóirigh mo leaba dhom,
Tá mé tinn fá mo chroí agus caithfidh mé luí."

"Céard a d'ith tú ag do bhricfeasta a dheartháirín ó?
Céard a d'ith tú ag do bhricfeasta a phlúir na bhfear óg?"
"Eascann a raibh lúb uirthi, nimh fuinte brúite uirthi,
Tá mé tinn fá mo chroí agus caithfidh mé luí."

"Céard a fhágfas tú ag do dheartháir a dheartháirín ó?
Céard a fhágfas tú ag do dheartháir a phlúir na bhfear óg?"
"Muise, cúig mhíle punt aige, gunna agus cú aige,
Tá mé tinn fá mo chroí agus caithfidh mé luí."

"Céard a fhágfas tú ag do dheirfiúr a dheartháirín ó?
Céard a fhágfas tú ag do dheifiúr a phlúir na bhfear óg?"
"Caoirigh beaga bána aici, na beithigh le bleán aici,
Tá mé tinn fá mo chroí agus caithfidh mé luí."

"Céard a fhágfas tú ag t'athair a dheartháirín ó?
Céard a fhágfas tú ag t'athair a phlúir na bhfear óg?"
"Eochair mo stábla aige, sin agus mo láir aige,
Tá mé tinn fá mo chroí agus caithfidh mé luí."

"Céard a fhágfas tú ag do mháithrín a dheartháirín ó?
Céard a fhágfas tú ag do mháithrín a phlúir na bhfear óg?"
"Má fhágaim an saol go brách aici, fágfad croí cráite aici,
Tá mé tinn fá mo chroí agus caithfidh mé luí."

"Céard a fhágfas tú ag do chuid páistí a dheartháirín ó?
Céard a fhágfas tú ag do chuid páistí a phlúir na bhfear óg?"
"Muise fuacht fada 'gus seachrán, oíche ar gach bothán,
Tá mé tinn fá mo chroí agus caithfidh mé luí."

"Céard a fhágfas tú ag do bhean phósta a dheartháirín ó?
Céard a fhágfas tú ag do bhean phósta a phlúir na bhfear óg?"
"Ifreann mar dhúiche aici, na Flaithis a bheith dúinte uirthi,
Tá mé tinn fá mo chroí agus bead go deo deo."


The Song of the Eel (Lord Randall)

"Where have you been since morning, my pet?
Where have you been since morning, oh flower of young men?"
"Fishing and fowling. Make my bed for me.
I'm sick in/to my heart and I'll have to lie down."

"What did you eat at your breakfast, my pet?
What did you eat at your breakfast, oh flower of young men?"
"An eel with a twist in her, poison kneaded and mixed into her.
I'm sick in/to my heart and I'll have to lie down."

"What will you leave your brother, my pet?
What will you leave your brother, oh flower of young men?"
"Five thousand pounds, a gun and a hound.
I'm sick in/to my heart and I'll have to lie down."

"What will you leave your sister, my pet?
What will you leave your sister, oh flower of young men?"
"Little white sheep and the cattle to milk.
I'm sick in/to my heart and I'll have to lie down."

"What will you leave your father, my pet?
What will you leave your father, oh flower of young men?"
"The key to my stable, that and my mare.
I'm sick in/to my heart and I'll have to lie down."

"What will you leave your mother, my pet?
What will you leave your mother, oh flower of young men?"
"If I leave life forever to her I'll leave her a broken heart.
I'm sick in/to my heart and I'll have to lie down."

"What will you leave your children, my pet?
What will you leave your children, oh flower of young men?"
"A long time wandering in the cold, and each night a different shelter.
I'm sick in/to my heart and I'll have to lie down."

"What will you leave your wedded wife, my pet?
What will you leave your wedded wife, oh flower of young men?"
"Hell as her surroundings and Heaven to be closed on her.
I'm sick in/to my heart and will be for ever and ever."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Ian
Date: 08 Apr 99 - 07:19 AM

Thanks, Antaine! I'll take some advice on the pronunciation of the 1st version. Anyone got any more?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Jane Bird
Date: 08 Apr 99 - 11:37 AM

My Mum used to sing a song which she learned from Guide camp (the Girl Guides, that is, the UK), which was usually rendered in a exaggerated London accent. I can't remember most of it, but the chorus went:

"Green and yellar, Green and yellar. Mother be quick, I wanna be sick, I wanna lay me down and die."

It sounds to like a music hall version of the song, but I don't know any more than that.

Yours, Jane Bird


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: AlistairUK
Date: 08 Apr 99 - 12:56 PM

Green and Yella or Henry My Son and the chorus I know is Mother be quick
I'm gonna be sick
And lay me down to die


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: GUEST,Bubba
Date: 16 May 00 - 11:32 PM

My grandmother used to sing me a version I'm trying hard to remember.

The boy's name was Johnny Wilbur I think.

What ya gonna leave to your sweetheart, Johnny Wilbur my son? What ya gonna leave to your sweetheart, my fortunate one?

I can't recall the response, but it ended with "I'm sick to my heart and I want to lie down."

Or at least that is what I think I remember. I was rather small when I heard it. She would let me rest my head in her lap as she stroked my head and sing me the song. I must have been something like 6 years old.

Anyone heard this version or something close?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 17 May 00 - 12:05 AM

Sara Cleveland, remarkable traditional singer from the Upper Hudson River Valley in New York State, recorded a fine variant called "My Bonny Bon Boy" (that was Sara's spelling, but it may be from "bawn" - white) on her Folk-Legacy album, now available as a cassette. But I think my favorite version is the one I learned from Robin Hall in London, 1958, "Wee Croodlin' Doo" (Wee Cooing Dove), in which the villainous poisoner with the tainted fish is a wicked stepmother. I recorded it on my Elektra album in 1959.

Sandy (creaking back to his rocking chair now)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Susan A-R
Date: 17 May 00 - 11:58 PM

When singing with a couple of my friends a few years ago, we decided to start out with a Lord Randall variant, a particularly plaintive one, and then headed for the Green and Yeller version. It's fun!! I recommend it. (this is my 11 year old nephew's current favorite, though he hasn't heard the Paton rendition of Comet yet.)

Susan


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Chicky
Date: 18 May 00 - 03:51 AM

The version I know is from the Creel's album Appellation (one of my all-time favourite recordings). It's very similar to the one in the DT here, but the villain is the stepmother. The liner notes describe the Lord Randall tradition as "the ritual of pre-Christian ... king sacrifice is acted out in the poisoning of the lord of the castle".

The lyrics of their version (with 2nd and subsequent verses cut down) are:

Where have you been all the day
Me own dear darling boy?
Where have you been all the day
Me own dear comfort and joy?
I have been to my step-mother
Make my bed mummy do
Make my bed mummy do

What did she give you for your supper?
I got fish and I got bread.

Where did she get the fish that she gave you?
Hedges sought 'em and ditches caught 'em.

What did you do with your fish bones?
I gave them to my greyhounds.

Tell me what did your greyhounds do?
There they swelled and there they died.

I fear that she does you a deadly wrong.
She took me in and did me slay.

What will you leave all to your mother?
I leave her me house and me land.

Tell me what will you leave your step-mother?
Buy her rope and there let her hang
by a halter that hangs on yon tree
for the poisoning of me

Cheers Chicky


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Kim C
Date: 18 May 00 - 01:15 PM

I learned this off a CD my father-in-law brought back from London. It's called "Voices" and it's a compilation of all acapella songs by various artists. I apologize for not knowing the singer's name off the top of my head! For some odd reason, this is one of my favorite songs to sing. I just like the way the melody moves.

Where have you been, Randall, my son?
Where have you been, my sweet pretty one?
I've been to my sweetheart's. Oh, make my bed soon,
For I'm sick to my heart and fain would lie down.

There's four or five more verses, anyway, he leaves his land and houses to his father, his gold and silver to his mother, and to his sweetheart he leaves "a rope to hang her."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Peg
Date: 18 May 00 - 01:49 PM

Maddy Prior does a nice version of this on "Year" which she titles "What Had you for your Supper" ( I think) and she changes the lyrics a bit to reflect the ecological disasters that have beset modern England (pollution, nuclear waste, etc.)

peg


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 18 May 00 - 07:33 PM

I suspect that the Creel version given by Chicky, above, was learnt from Martin Carthy's 1972 album, Shearwater.  The "ritual of pre-Christian ... king sacrifice" bit, on the other hand -so far as it relates to this song- they probably made up all by themselves.

Malcolm


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 18 May 00 - 09:43 PM

I agree, Malcolm.

Doubting Sandy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Charlie Baum
Date: 19 May 00 - 12:00 AM

An updated modern version?

What did you have for your supper, John Randolph, my son
What did you have for your supper, pray tell me little one
Some kind of sushi...[etc.]

--Charlie Baum


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: GUEST,ohwilliedear@yahoo.com
Date: 19 May 00 - 10:50 AM

Good version of Lord Randall was done by a North Carolina tobacco farmer who made a record or two named Frank Proffitt.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: LORD RANDALL (from The Prodigals)
From: UB Ed
Date: 14 Jul 03 - 03:49 PM

A group called the Prodigals does something like this:

LORD RANDALL

Where did you go, Lord Randall my son?
Where did you go, my beloved one?
Down in the glen, down in the glen.
Make me my bed. I've a pain in me head,
And I fain would lie down, and I fain would lie down.

What did you do there, Lord Randall my son?
What did you do there, my beloved one?
I dined with my true love, I dined with my true love,
Make me my bed, I've a pain in me head.
And I fain would lie down, and I fain would lie down.

What did you eat there, Lord Randall my son?
What did you eat there, my beloved one?
Eels and eels broth, eels and eels broth,
Make me my bed, I've a pain in me head.
And I fain would lie down, and I fain would lie down.

I fear you are poisoned, Lord Randall, my son.
I fear you are poisoned, my beloved one.
Indeed I am poisoned, indeed I am poisoned,
Make me my bed, I've a pain in me head.
And I fain would lie down, and I fain would lie down.

What will you leave to your mother, my son?
What will you leave to your mother, oh ill-fated one?
My gold and my silver, my gold and my silver.
Make me my bed, I've a pain in me head.
And I fain would lie down, and I fain would lie down.

What will you leave to your sweetheart, my son?
What will you leave to your sweetheart, oh ill-fated one?
A rope to hang her, a rope to hang her,
Make me my bed, I've a pain in me head.
And I fain would lie down, and I fain would lie down.

Good number. Anyone have some source background for this?

Ed


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Mary Humphreys
Date: 14 Jul 03 - 06:15 PM

My favourite version, and one which I used to sing as aa question and answer song with my younger son - which I call my ' back of the fridge song' ( after the green mould frequently found on various long-forgotten items ) is this one, collected from Mrs Cremer, Eccles, Lancashire. From Bronson.

Where have you been all the live-long day,
My little wee croodin'doo?
I've been to see my stepmother
Mammy come make my bed noo.

What dod your stepmother give you to eat
My little wee croodin doo
She gave to me a wee wee fish
All covered in green & blue.

And what did she do with the bones of the fish,
My little wee croodin doo
She gave them to mny wee wee dog
Mammy come make my bed noo.

And what did your dog when he'd ate of the fish
My lttle wee croodin doo
He stretched his wee wee limbs and died
Mammy as I do noo
Mammy as I do noo.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: GUEST,Jane Bird
Date: 15 Jul 03 - 05:09 AM

Blimey! The longevity of some threads!

I had a Mudcat cookie the last time I contributed to this discussion, and since then I've relearnt the song (the "Green and Yella" version) from my Mum and I sing it quite regularly.

There's a very stark and slightly surreal version on the EFDSS CD, "A Century of Song". Ray Driscoll sings "The Wild, Wild Berry":

"You had better I entreat to eat toads for the meat
Than to eat of the wild, wild berry"

The song describes the protagonist eating woody nightshade, which fascinates me, because it's deadly nightshade that's the real killer.

But perhaps I'm just being pedantistic.

Jane


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 15 Jul 03 - 10:36 AM

The Wild Wild Berry


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: IanC
Date: 15 Jul 03 - 11:29 AM

Bittersweet (Woody Nightshade) contains the alkaloid Solanine and the amorphous glucoside Dulcamarine, to which the characteristic bittersweet taste is due. Sugar, gum, starch and resin are also present. Solanine acts narcotically; in large doses it paralyses the central nervous system, without affecting the peripheral nerves or voluntary muscles. It slows the heart and respiration, lessens sensibility, lowers the temperature and causes vertigo and delirium, terminating in death with convulsions.

:-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: LORD RANDALL (from Tom Glazer)
From: GUEST,gcarrier62@go.com
Date: 15 Jul 03 - 12:00 PM

This comes from Tom Glazer's version as heard on Volume I of the "Musical Heritage of America" (CBC Records, 1974)

Where have you been all the day
Randall my son? Tell me
where have you been all the day
My pretty one?

I've been to my sweetheart's, mother,
I've been to my sweetheart's, mother,
Make my bed soon, for I'm sick to my heart
And I fain would lie down.

What have you been eating there, etc
Eels and eel broth, mother, etc.

What was the color of their skin?
Spickled and spackled, mother,

What will you leave your sister?
My houses and cattle, mother

What will you leave your brother?
My gold and my silver, mother

What will you leave your sweetheart?
A rope to hang her, mother


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Amos
Date: 15 Jul 03 - 12:44 PM

That's pretty much the song as I have always sung it. I have no idea where I got it from, though!

A


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: LORD RANDALL (Welsh version)
From: Mary Humphreys
Date: 15 Jul 03 - 12:52 PM

Here is a Welsh version of the same song, which goes straight from the 'speckled fish' answer to the living will bits of the song.
The last bequest is the same as the English version. Interestingly, it can be dated to post-1850 as the sister gets a sewing machine as her legacy!I will translate for those as wants it. PM me. Sang it at Sutton ( Biggleswade ) Folk Club last week - with props operated by Anahata and translation flash cards by Jan Lane. Went down a treat.

Ple buost ti neithiwr mab annwyl dy fam ( x 2 )
Pysgota mam annwyl, O ch'weiriwch fy ngwely
R'wy'n glaf, r'wy'n glaf
A'm calon ar fyned i'r bedd

Pa liw oedd dy bysgod, mab annwyl dy fam
Rhai brithion, mam annwyl

Be' roi di i'th tad,mab annwyl dy fam
Wel,pum punt mam annwyl

Be' roi di i'th chwaer,
Wel.injian i wnio,o'ch'weiriwch fy ngwely

Be' roi di i'th fam
Wel, ffortiwn, mam annwyl

Be' roi di i'th gariad
Wel' cortyn i'w chrogi o'ch'weiriwch fy ngwely
R'wy'n glaf, r'wy'n glaf
A'm calon ar fyned i'r bedd


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: UB Ed
Date: 15 Jul 03 - 01:59 PM

So, is this a song within a tradition of poison? What's up with the Child ballads references?

Seems the theme is old with multiple variations and tunes.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: GUEST,Jane Bird
Date: 16 Jul 03 - 04:18 AM

Thanks for the warning, Ian C, I shan't be eating any Deadly or Woody Nightshade, then!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: LORD RENDAL (Geordie parody)
From: HuwG
Date: 16 Jul 03 - 07:22 AM

I recall hearing, many years ago, a spoof "teach-youself" language record called, "Larn yersel' Geordie". It featured a version of Lord Rendal [this is one spelling I have seen, not a typo], which went as follows, to the best of my recollection:


Lord Rendal (to be sung in a strong Tyneside accent)

Oh, where hev yer bin, my son, my son
Oh, where hev yer bin, my bonny young man ?

Ah've bin to the club
Ah could do with a sub
For ah'm bad with the beer
And ah've had me fill

Where got ye yer beer, my son, my son
Where got ye yer beer, my bonny young man ?

Ah got it at Carter's
It rubbered me garters
Ah'm weary with boozin'
And ah've had me fill

What had ye for beer, my son, my son
What had ye for beer, my bonny big fool ?

Ah had broon, Ah had Ambers
In the back bar at Bamber's
Ah'm weary with boozin'
And ah've had me fill

What became of your money, my son, my son
What became of your money, my bonny young man ?

Ah spent it on lasses
And glasses of Basses
Ah'm weary with boozin'
Ah think Ah'll stay home !





Notes:
Geordie pronunciation: "Hyem" = home; "beor" = beer; "dee" = do;
Geordie folklore: "Broon" = Newcastle Brown Ale (also known as "Lunatics' Broth" or "Journey into Space"); "sub" = loan
Unknown Geordie folklore (to me anyway): "Carter's", "Bamber's", "to rubber one's garters"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 16 Jul 03 - 10:41 AM

I read somewhere that the children's song "O, Where Have You Been, Billy Boy, Billy Boy?" is a parody of Lord Randall.

Seems believable.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: LORD RANDALL (from Child)
From: MMario
Date: 16 Jul 03 - 10:46 AM

This is what I have from Child:

Child 12A
O WHERE ha you been, Lord Randal, my son?
[And where ha you been, my handsome young man?]
I ha been at the greenwood; [mother, mak my bed soon,]
[For Im wearied wi hunting, and fain wad lie down.]

An what met ye there, Lord Randal, my son?
O I met wi my true-love;

And what did she give you, Lord Randal, my son?
Eels fried in a pan;

And wha gat your leavins, Lord Randal, my son?
[And wha gat your leavins, my handsom young man?]
My hawks and my hounds;

And what becam of them, Lord Randal, my son?
[And what becam of them, my handsome young man?]
They stretched their legs out an died;

O I fear you are poisoned, Lord Randal, my son!
[I fear you are poisoned, my handsome young man!]
O yes, I am poisoned;

What dye leave to your mother, Lord Randal, my son?
[What dye leave to your mother, my handsome young man?]
Four and twenty milk kye; [mother, mak my bed soon,]
[For Im sick at the heart, and I fain wad lie down.]

What dye leave to your sister, Lord Randal, my son?
[What dye leave to your sister, my handsome young man?]
My gold and my silver;

What dye leave to your brother, Lord Randal, my son?
[What dye leave to your brother, my handsome young man?]
My houses and my lands; mother,

What dye leave to your true-love, Lord Randal, my son?
[What dye leave to your true-love, my handsome young man?]
I leave her hell and fire;


Child 12B
O WHARE hae ye been a day, Lord Donald, my son?
O whare hae ye been a day, [my jollie young man?]
Ive been awa courtin; [mither, mak my bed sune,]
[For Im sick at the heart, and I fain wad lie doun.]

What wad ye hae for your supper, Lord Donald, my son?
What wad ye hae for your supper,
Ive gotten my supper;

What did ye get for your supper, Lord Donald,my son?
What did ye get for your supper,
A dish of sma fishes;

Whare gat ye the fishes, Lord Donald, my son?
Whare gat ye the fishes,
In my fathers black ditches;

What like were your fishes, Lord Donald, my son?
What like were your fishes,
Black backs and spreckld bellies;

O I fear ye are poisond, Lord Donald, my son!
O I fear ye are poisond,
O yes! I am poisond;

What will ye leave to your father, Lord Donald my son?
What will ye leave to your father,
Baith my houses and land;

What will ye leave to your brither, Lord Donald, my son?
What will ye leave to your brither,
My horse and the saddle;

What will ye leave to your sister, Lord Donald, my son?
What will ye leave to your sister,
Baith my gold box and rings;

What will ye leave to your true-love, Lord Donald, my son?
What will ye leave to your true-love,
The tow and the halter, for to hang on yon tree,
And lat her hang there for the poysoning o me.


Child 12C
WHATRrS become of your hounds, King Henrie, my son?
Whats become of your hounds, my pretty little one?
They all died on the way; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im sick to the heart, and I fain wald lie down.

What gat ye to your supper, King Henry, my son?
What gat ye to your supper, my pretty little one?
I gat fish boiled in broo; mother, mak my bed soon,
For Im sick to the heart, and I fain wald lie down.

What like were the fish, King Henry, my son?
What like were the fish, my pretty little one?
They were spreckled on the back and white on the belly; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im sick to the heart, and I fain wald lie down.

What leave ye to your father, King Henry, my son?
What leave ye to your father, my pretty little one?
The keys of Old Ireland, and all thats therein; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im sick to the heart, and I fain wald lie down.

What leave ye to your brother, King Henry, my son?
What leave ye to your brother, my pretty little one?
The keys of my coffers and all thats therein; mother, mak my bed soon,
For Im sick to the heart, and I fain wald lie down.

What leave ye to your sister, King Henry, my son?
What leave ye to your sister, my pretty little one?
The worlds wide, she may go beg; mother, mak my bed soon,
For Im sick to the heart, and I fain wald lie down.

What leave ye to your trew-love, King Henry, my son?
What leave ye to your trew-love, my pretty little one?
The highest hill to hang her on, for shes poisoned me and my hounds all; mother, make my bed soon,
Oh Im sick to the heart, and I fain wald lie down.


Child 12D
O WHERE hae ye been, Lord Randal, my son?
O where hae ye been, my handsome young man?
I hae been to the wild wood; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im weary wi hunting, and fain wald lie down.

Where gat ye your dinner, Lord Randal, my son?
Where gat ye your dinner, my handsome young man?
I dind wi my true-love; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im weary wi hunting, and fain wald lie down.

What gat ye to your dinner, Lord Randal, my son?
What gat ye to your dinner, my handsome young man?
I gat eels boild in broo; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im weary wi hunting, and fain wald lie down.

What became of your bloodhounds, Lord Randal, my son?
What became of your bloodhounds, my handsome young man?
O they swelld and they died; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im weary wi hunting, and fain wald lie down.

O I fear ye are poisond, Lord Randal, my son!
O I fear ye are poisond, my handsome young man!
O yes! I am poisond; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im sick at the heart, and I fain wald lie down.


Child 12E
AH where have you been, Lairde Rowlande, my son?
Ah where have you been, Lairde Rowlande, my son?
Ive been in the wild woods; mither, mak my bed soon,
For Im weary wi hunting, and faine would lie down.

Oh youve been at your true loves, Lairde Rowlande, my son!
Oh youve been at your true-loves, Lairde Rowlande, my son!
Ive been at my true-loves; mither, mak my bed soon,
For Im weary wi hunting, and faine would lie down.

What got you to dinner, Lairde Rowlande, my son?
What got you to dinner, Lairde Rowlande, my son?
I got eels boild in brue; mither, mak my bed soon,
For Im weary wi hunting, and faine would lie down.

Whats become of your warden, Lairde Rowlande, my son?
Whats become of your warden, Lairde Rowlande, my son?
He died in the muirlands; mither, mak my bed soon,
For Im weary wi hunting, and faine would lie down.

Whats become of your stag-hounds, Lairde Rowlande, my son?
Whats become of your stag-hounds, Lairde Rowlande, my son?
They swelled and they died; mither, mak my bed soon,
For Im weary wi hunting, and faine would lie down.


Child 12F
O WHERE hae ye been, Lord Ronald, my son?
O where hae ye been, Lord Ronald, my son?
I hae been wi my sweetheart; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im weary wi the hunting, and fain wad lie down.

What got ye frae your sweetheart, Lord Ronald, my son?
What got ye frae your sweetheart, Lord Ronald, my son?
I hae got deadly poison; mother, make my bed soon,
For life is a burden that soon Ill lay down.


Child 12G
WHERE have you been today, Billy, my son?
Where have you been today, my only man?
Ive been a wooing; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im sick at heart, and fain would lay down.

What have you ate today, Billy, my son?
What have you ate today, my only man?
Ive ate eel-pie; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im sick at heart, and shall die before noon.


Child 12H
WHERE was you all day, my own pretty boy?
Where was you all day, my comfort and joy?
I was fishing and fowling; mother, make my bed soon,
Theres a pain in my heart, and I mean to lie down.

What did you have for your breakfast, my own pretty boy?
What did you have for your breakfast, my comfort and joy?
A cup of strong poison; mother, make my bed soon,
Theres a pain in my heart, and I mean to lie down.

I fear you are poisoned, my own pretty boy,
I fear you are poisoned, my comfort and joy!
O yes, I am poisoned; mother, make my bed soon,
Theres a pain in my heart, and I mean to lie down.

What will you leave to your father, my own pretty boy?
What will you leave to your father, my comfort and joy?
Ill leave him my house and my property; mother, make my bed soon,
Theres a pain in my heart, and I mean to lie down.

What will you leave to your mother, my own pretty boy?
What will you leave to your mother, my comfort and joy?
Ill leave her my coach and four horses; mother, make my bed soon,
Theres a pain in my heart, and I mean to lie down.

What will you leave to your brother, my own pretty boy?
What will you leave to your brother, my comfort and joy?
Ill leave him my bow and my fiddle; mother, make my bed soon,
Theres a pain in my heart, and I mean to lie down.

What will you leave to your sister, my own pretty boy?
What will you leave to your sister, my comfort and joy?
Ill leave her my gold and my silver; mother, make my bed soon,
Theres a pain in my heart, and I mean to lie down.

What will you leave to your servant, my own pretty boy?
What will you leave to you servant, my comfort and joy?
Ill leave him the key of my small silver box; mother, make my bed soon,
Theres a pain in my heart, and I mean to lie down.

What will you leave to your children, my own pretty boy?
What will you leave to your children, my comfort and joy?
The world is wide all round for to beg; mother, make my bed soon,
Theres a pain in my heart, and I mean to lie down.

What will you leave to your wife, my own pretty boy?
What will you leave to your wife, my comfort and joy?
Ill leave her the gallows, and plenty to hang her; mother, make my bed soon,
Theres a pain in my heart, and I mean to lie down.

Where shall I make it, my own pretty boy?
Where shall I make it, my comfort and joy?
Above in the churchyard, and dig it down deep,
Put a stone to my head and a flag to my feet,
And leave me down easy until Ill take a long sleep.


Child 12I
O WHERE have you been, Tiranti, my son?
O where have you been, my sweet little one?
I have been to my grandmothers; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im sick to my heart, and Im faint to lie down.

What did you have for your supper, Tiranti, my son?
What did you have for your supper, my sweet little one?
I had eels fried in butter; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im sick to my heart, and Im faint to lie down.

Where did the eels come from, Tiranti, my son?
Where did the eels come from, my sweet little one?
From the corner of the haystack; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im sick to my heart, and Im faint to lie down.

What color were the eels, Tiranti, my son?
What color were the eels, my sweet little one?
They were streake:d and stripe:d; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im sick to my heart, and Im faint to lie down.

Whatll you give to your father, Tiranti, my son?
Whatll you give to your father, my sweet little one?
All my gold and my silver; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im sick to my heart, and Im faint to lie down.

Whatll you give to your mother, Tiranti, my son?
Whatll you give to your mother, my sweet little one?
A coach and six horses; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im sick to my heart, and Im faint to lie down.

Whatll you give to your grandmother, Tiranti, my son?
Whatll you give to your grandmother, my sweet little one?
A halter to hang her; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im sick to my heart, and Im faint to lie down.

Wherell you have your bed made, Tiranti, my son?
Wherell you have your bed made, my sweet little one?
In the corner of the churchyard; mother, make my bed soon,
For Im sick to my heart, and Im faint to lie down.


Child 12J
O WHARE hae ye been a day, my bonnie wee croodlin dow?
O whare hae ye been a day, my bonnie wee croodlin dow?
Ive been at my step-mothers; oh mak my bed, mammie, now!
Ive been at my step-mothers; oh mak my bed, mammie, now!

O what did ye get at your step-mothers, my bonnie wee croodlin dow? [iTwicer.]
I gat a wee wee fishie; oh mak my bed, mammie, now! [iTwicer.]

O whare gat she the wee fishie, my bonnie wee croodlin dow?
In a dub before the door; oh mak my bed, mammie, now!

What did ye wi the wee fishie, my bonnie wee croodlin dow?
I boild it in a wee pannie; oh mak my bed, mammy, now!

Wha gied ye the banes o the fishie till, my bonnie wee croodlin dow?
I gied them till a wee doggie; oh mak my bed, mammie, now!

O whare is the little wee doggie, my bonnie wee croodlin dow?
O whare is the little wee doggie, my bonnie wee croodlin doo?
It shot out its fit and died, and sae maun I do too;
Oh mak my bed, mammy, now, now, oh mak my bed, mammy, now!


Child 12K
O WHAUR hae ye been a the day, my little wee croodlin doo?
O Ive been at my grandmothers; mak my bed, mammie, now!

O what gat ye at your grandmothers, my little wee croodlin doo?
I got a bonnie wee fishie; mak my bed, mammie, now!

O whaur did she catch the fishie, my bonnie wee croodlin doo?
She catchd it in the gutter hole; mak my bed, mammie, now!

And what did she do wi the fish, my little wee croodlin doo?
She boiled it in a brass pan; O mak my bed, mammie, now!

And what did ye do wi the banes ot, my bonnie wee croodlin doo?
I gied them to my little dog; mak my bed, mammie, now!

And what did your little doggie do, my bonnie wee croodlin doo?
He stretched out his head, his feet, and deed; and so will I, mammie, now!


Child 12L
WHAR hae ye been a the day, Willie doo, Willie doo?
Whar hae ye been a the day, Willie, my doo?

Ive been to see my step-mother; make my bed, lay me down;
Make my bed, lay me down, die shall I now!

What got ye frae your step-mother, Willie doo, Willie doo?
What got ye frae your step-mother, Willie, my doo?

She gae me a speckled trout; make my bed, lay me down;
She gae me a speckled trout, die shall I now!

Whar got she the speckled trout,Willie doo, Willie doo?
She got it amang the heather hills; die shall I now.

What did she boil it in, Willie doo, Willie doo?
She boild it in the billy-pot; die shall I now!

What gaed she you for to drink, Willie doo, Willie doo?
What gaed she you for to drink, Willie, my doo?

She gaed me hemlock stocks; make my bed, lay me down;
Made in the brewing pot; die shall I now!

They made his bed, laid him down, poor Willie doo, Willie doo;
He turnd his face to the wa; hes dead now!


Child 12M
WHERE hae ye been a the day, my bonny wee croodin doo?
O I hae been at my stepmothers house; make my bed, mammie, now, now, now,
Make my bed, mammie, now!

Where did ye get your dinner? my, etc.
I got it at my stepmothers; make, etc.

What did she gie ye to your dinner?
She gae me a little four-footed fish.

Where got she the four-footed fish?
She got it down in yon well strand; O make, etc.

What did she do with the banes ot?
She gae them to the little dog.

O what became o the little dog?
O it shot out its feet and died; O make, etc.


Child 12N
FARE hae ye been a day, a day, a day,
Fare hae ye been a day, my little wee croudlin doo?

Ive been at my step-mammies, my step mammies, my step-mammies,
Ive been at my step-mammies; come mack my beddy now!

What got ye at yer step-mammies,
My little wee croudlin doo?

She gied me a spreckled fishie;
Come mack my beddy now!

What did ye wi the baenies oet,
My little wee croudlin doo?

I gaed them till her little dogie;
Come mack my beddy now!

What did her little dogie syne,
My little wee croudlin doo?

He laid down his heed and feet;
And sae shall I dee now!


Child 12O
O WHERE hae ye been a the day, my wee wee croodlin doo doo?
O where hae ye been a the day, my bonnie wee croodlin doo?
O I hae been to my step-mammies; mak my bed, mammy, noo, noo,
Mak my bed, mammy, noo!

O what did yere step-mammie gie to you? etc.
She gied to me a wee wee fish, etc.

[O] what did she boil the wee fishie in?
O she boiled it in a wee wee pan; it turned baith black an blue, blue,
It turned baith black an blue.

An what did she gie the banes ot to?
O she gied them to a wee wee dog; mak, etc.

An what did the wee wee doggie do then?
O it put out its tongue and its feet, an it deed; an sae maun I do, noo, noo,
An sae maun I do noo!


Child 12P
Where hae ye been a day, Lord Ronald, my son?
Where hae ye been a day, my handsome young one?
Ive been in the wood hunting; mother, make my bed soon,
For I am weary, weary hunting, and fain would lie doun

O where did you dine, Lord Ronald, my son?
O where did you dine, my handsome young one?
I dined with my sweetheart; mother, make my bed soon,
For I am weary, weary hunting, and fain would lie doun.

What got you to dine on, Lord Ronald, my son?
What got you to dine on, my handsome young one?
I got eels boiled in water that in heather doth run,
And I am weary, weary hunting, and fain would lie doun.

What did she wi the broo o them, Lord Ronald, my son?
What did she wi the broo o them, my handsome young one?
She gave it to my hounds for to live upon,
And I am weary, weary hunting, and fain would lie doun.

Where are your hounds now, Lord Ronald, my son?
Where are your hounds now, my handsome young one?
They are a swelled and bursted, and sae will I soon,
And I am weary, weary hunting, and fain would lie doun.

What will you leave your father, Lord Ronald, my son?
What will you leave your father, my handsome young one?
Ill leave him my lands for to live upon,
And I am weary, weary hunting, and fain would lie doun.

What will you leave your brother, Lord Ronald, my son?
What will you leave your brother, my handsome young one?
Ill leave him my gallant steed for to ride upon,
And I am weary, weary hunting, and fain would lie doun.

What will you leave your sister, Lord Ronald, my son?
What will you leave your sister, my handsome young one?
Ill leave her my gold watch for to look upon,
And I am weary, weary hunting, and fain would lie doun.

What will you leave your mother, Lord Ronald, my son?
What will you leave your mother, my handsome young one?
Ill leave her my Bible for to read upon,
And I am weary, weary hunting, and fain would lie doun.

What will you leave your sweetheart, Lord Ronald, my son?
What will you leave your sweetheart, my handsome young one?
Ill leave her the gallows-tree for to hang upon,
It was her that poisoned me; and so he fell doun.


Child 12Q
O whare hae ye been, Lord Randal, my son?
O whare hae ye been, my handsome young man?
Oer the peat moss mang the heather, mother, mak my bed soon,
For Im weary, weary hunting, and fain wad lie down.

What leave ye to your father, Lord Randal, my son?
What leave ye to your father, my handsome young man?
I leave my houses and land, mother, mak my bed soon,
For Im weary, weary hunting, and fain wad lie down.

What leave ye to your brother, Lord Randal, my son?
What leave ye to your brother, my handsome young man?
O the guid milk-white steed that I rode upon,
For Im weary, weary hunting, and fain wad lie down.

What leave ye to your true-love, Lord Randal, my son?
What leave ye to your true-love, my handsome young man?
O a high, high gallows, to hang her upon,
For Im weary, weary hunting, and fain wad lie down.


Child 12R
Whare hae ye been a day, my little wee toorin dow?
Its Ive been at my grandmammys; mak my bed, mammy, now.

And what did ye get frae your grandmammy, my little wee toorin dow?
Its I got a wee bit fishy to eat; mak my bed, mammy, now.

An what did ye do wi the banes o it, my little wee toorin dow?
I gied it to my black doggy to eat; mak my bed, mammy, now.

An what did your little black doggy do syne, my little wee toorin dow?
He shot out his head, and his feet, and he died; as I do, mammy, now.


Child 12S
Where have you been today, Randall, my son?
Where have you been today, my only man?
I have been a hunting, mother, make my bed soon,
For Im sick at the heart, fain woud lie down.
Dear sister, hold my head, dear mother, make my bed,
I am sick at the heart, fain woud lie down.

What have you eat today, Randal, my son?
What have you eat today, my only man?
I have eat an eel; mother, make, etc.

What was the colour of it, Randal, my son?
What was the colour of it, my only man?
It was neither green, grey, blue nor black,
But speckled on the back; make, etc.

Who gave you eels today, Randal, my son?
Who gave you eels today, my only man?
My own sweetheart; mother, make, etc.

Where shall I make your bed, Randal, my son?
Where shall I make your bed, my only man?
In the churchyard; mother, make, etc.

What will you leave her then, Randall, my son?
What will you leave her then, my only man?
A halter to hang herself; make, etc.


Child 12U
Whare were ye the lea lang day,
[My wee crooding doo, doo?]
I hae been at my step-dames;
[Mammy, mak my bed noo, noo!]

Whare gat she the wee, wee fish?
She gat it neist the edder-flowe.

What did she wi the fishies banes?
The wee black dog gat them to eat.

What did the wee black doggie then?
He shot out his fittie an deed;
[An sae maun I now too, too.]


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Tune Add: LORD RANDALL (several versions)
From: MMario
Date: 16 Jul 03 - 10:58 AM

And here is what I have from Bronson:

X:1
T:LORD RONALD MY SON
N:Johnson - 1792
N:Collected by Robert Burns - Ayshire
N:Bronson 12.1
I:abc2nwc
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:C
z4(G3/2 A)|B2B2(B d)|(c B) A2(B d)|e2e2(d B)|(B2A2)"^|"(B d)|e3d (B G)|(D E) G2(G A)|B2(c B) (A3/2 G/2)|G4"^|"(G3/2 A/2)|B2B2B d|(c B) A2B d|e2d2(d B)|(B2A2)"^|"B d|e3d B G|D2G2(G A)|B2(c B) (A3/2 G/2)|G4
w:Oh_ where_ hae_ ye_ been [Lord_ Ron-ald, my_ son?]_Oh_ where_ hae_ ye_ been [Lord_ Ron-ald,_ my_ son?]I_ hae been wi' my sweet_-heart, [mo-ther make my bed_ soon]_For I'm wea-ry with the hun-ting and_ fain wad_ lie_ down.
|]

X:2
T:LORANDO
N:Chappell 1939
N:Sung by Carles Tillett 1935
N:Bronson 12.8
I:abc2nwc
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:C
G2B B d2e2|d2B4G2|B2d4e2|A8"^|"|G2B B d2e2|d2B4c2|d2B4A2|G8"^|"|e2e e e2g2|d2B4G G|G2G4e2|d8"^|"|B B B4G2|A2E4G G|B2G4A2|G8
w:Where have you been, Lo-ren-do, [Lo-ren-do my son?]Where have you been, Lo-ren-do, [my dear lit-tle one?]I've been to see my sweet-heart, [mo-ther make my bed soon][I am sick to my heart and I wish to lie down]
|]

X:3
T:LORD RANDAL
N:Sharp
N:sung by MRs. Mary Sands 1916
N:Bronson 12.14
I:abc2nwc
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:C
z6G G/2 A/2|B2A2G2|B2d2B d|B2G2A2|G4"^|"G G/2 A/2|B2A2G2|B2d2(B c)|A2F2G2|G4"^|"g2|e2d2g2|e2d2e d|B2G2G2|B4"^|"(G B) A2G2G2|B2d2B d|B2G2A2|G6
w:What did you eat for your sup-per, [Jim-my Ran-del my son?]What did you eat for your sup-per, [My_ own dear-est one?]Cold poi-sen, cold poul-try [Moth-er, make my bed soonFor_ I am sick-hear-ted and I want to lie down]
|]

X:4
T:LORD RONALD
N:Shuldham-shaw 1949
N:Sung by James Laurenson - 1947
N:Bronson 12.24
I:abc2nwc
M:6/4
L:1/8
K:C
z8z2D2|G2B2e2d2B2G2|E (G2E2)E D3"^|"D2|D2G2B2d2B2A2|A2G2G2G4"^|"D D|G2B2e2d2B2G2|E2G2E2(E2D4)"^|"|D2G2A2A4A2|A2G2G2G4
w:What had ye for sup-per, [Lord Ro-nald,_ my son?]What had ye for sup-per, [my jol-ly young man?]I hae been to the wild wood: [go make my bed soon]_[Sick at the heart, and fain would lie doon.]
|]

X:5
T:LORD RONALD
N:Campbell
N:Sung by Sophia Scott, the daughter of Sir Walter Scott
N:Bronson 12.31
I:abc2nwc
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:C
z4C2|D2E2G2|c4B2|c2E2-E D-|D2C2"^|"C2|D2E2G2|(c2B2)A2|G2E2-E D|C4"^|"c c|B3A d2|d2A2A B|c3E (E D)|E2D2"^|"c c|B3A d2|d2A2A2|G3E (E D)|D4
w:Oh where hae ye been, [Lord Ron-ald,_ my_ son?]Oh where hae ye been,_ [my hand-some_ young man?]I hae been to the wild_ wood: [mo-ther, make my_ bed soon][For I'm wea-ry wi hun-ting, and fain wald lie_ down.]
|]

X:6
T:LORD RONALD,MY SON
N:William Macmath
N:learned from his aunt Jane Webster
N:Learned from a nursemaid c. 1830
N:Bronson 12.33
I:abc2nwc
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:F
z4A2|B2A2G2|F2D2C2|D2G2G2|G4"^|"(G A)|B2A2G2|F2D2C2|D2G2G2|G4"^|"F F|B2c2d2|f2d2d c|B2c2f2|d4"^|"d c|B3A G F|D2C2C2|D2G2G2|G4
w:Where hae ye been a' day, Lord Ro-nald, my son?Where_ hae ye been a' day, my hand-some young one?I've been in the wood hun-ting; mo-ther, make my bed soon,For I'm wear-y, wear-y hunt-ing, and fain would lie doun
|]

X:7
T:LORD RANALD
N:Archive, School of Scottish Studies
N:Sung by Norman Kennedy
N:Collected by John MacInnes
N:Transcribed by Ailie Munro
N:Bronson 12.35_1
I:abc2nwc
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:G
z4A2|G2A3B|[M:4/4]d2(e e) f2B2|[M:3/4]g2f2e2|d (B B) z"^|"B2|G2A2B2|d e f3z|g f e|d4z2"^|"|d e g2=f e|d2B2zB-|B2(c d) c B|G2z2"^|"G E||G2A2B2|[M:4/4]d e3g2G2|c2G2A2|G4z2
w:Faur hae ye been all the_ day, [Lord Ran-ald, my ho-ney?]_Faur hae ye been all the day, my gentle-man son?I've been tae dine wi my wife -[mith_-er,_ mak my bed,For I'm seik un-til the hert, an fain wid I lie doon.]
|]

X:8
T:LORD RANDAL
N:Archive, School of Scottish Studies
N:Sung by Ewan McColl and his mother
N:Collected by Hamish Henderson and Alan Lomax
N:Transcribed by Francis M. Collinson
N:Bronson 12.35_2
I:abc2nwc
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:C
z4D2|G3(A B) c|d4(e ^f)|g2(f2e2)|(d B) G3"^|"D|G3(A B) c|d4(e ^f)|g3f e2|d4"^|"B2|d2d2d2|B2c2(d/2 B3/2)|G2A2B2|A2F2"^|"g g|g2f2g2|(d/2 c/2) _B- B2d d|(c/2 _B3/2) G2G2|G4
w:O whaur hae_ ye been, [Lord_ Ran-dal_ my_ son?]O whaur hae_ ye been, [my_ bon-nie young man?]I've been tae the wild wood, [mith_-er mak my bed suneFor I'm wae-ry wi' hun_-tin'_ and I fain_ would lie doon]
|]

X:9
T:LORD RONALD
N:Greig MSS
N:sung by A. Greig 1907
N:Bronson 12.43
I:abc2nwc
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:C
z4G2|G2B2B2|B2d2(d B)|A2G2G2|G4"^|"G2|G2g2g2|g2d2B2|c2d2e2|d4"^|"d2|d2g2g2|g2d2B B|c2d2e2|d4"^|"G A|B2B2B B|c2d2(d B)|A2G2G2|G4
w:Oh whaur hae ye been to Lord_ Ro-nald my son?O whaur hae ye been to my hand-some young man?I've been to the wild wood, moth-er mak my bed soon.For I'm wear-y, wear-y wand-'ring and_ fain wad lie doon
|]

X:10
T:LORD DONALD
N:School of Scottish Studies
N:Sung by Jeannie Robertson
N:Collected by Hamish Henderson
N:Transcribed by James Porter
N:Bronson 12.43_2
I:abc2nwc
L:1/8
K:C
C2|E4-E/2 D C/2 E3D|(D/2 C3/2-) C2z2(E G3)|(A/2 c2)(e4e/2 d/2)|(d/2 c3/2) c2-c7/4 z"^|"(c A)|G3z(E D) E3D|D/2 C3/2- C2z2(E G2)A3|A (G3E) (E/4 F/4 E/2|D3/2 C/2-) C3"^|"C2D|E3D (E2D)|D C3z3c2|e4d c|(c c3)"^|"(G/2 c)|c2-(c A/2) (A/2 B/2) (A G)|G E2-E2(D|D C2-)C3E (G A)|(A G2-)G E2D4|C4
w:Whaur hae_ ye been all the day__[Lord_ Don_-ald,__ my_ son?]_Whaur_ hae ye_ been all the day,_[My_ jol-ly young_ man?]_____A_ -wa cour-tin,___ [mi-therMak my bed soon,For_ I__ am_ seik_ at the_ hairt___An I_ fain__ wud lie doon]
|]

X:11
T:LORD RANDAL
N:Creighton and Senior
N:Sung by Ben Henneberry
N:Bronson 12.48
I:abc2nwc
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:C
z4zC|C E G c c (F|G/2) G3/2 G G G "^|"C|C E G c c2(B c)|(d B) G G G3"^|"(G|A) G A (B c) d e G|G (A G) E E D "^|"(E D)|(C E) G c A G (E C)|D E C2C3
w:O what is the mat-ter [Hen_-er-ey my son]O what is the mat-ter [my_ own_ dear-est one?]I've_ been to my_ sweet-heart, [mo-ther, make_ my bed soon,][I_ feel_ sick at the heart, and_ fain would lie down]
|]

X:12
T:LORD RANDAL
N:Sharp
N:Sung by Mrs Ada Maddox 1918
I:abc2nwc
N:Bronson 12.53
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:G
D2A4F2|[M:3/4]G A3D2|D G3E2|[M:2/4][L:1/16]D8"^|"|[M:4/4][L:1/8]D2A4F2|[M:3/4]G A3c2|(B G3)B2|A4"^|"G2|(A d3)(B A)|c A3(A G)|F D3E2|C4z2"^|"D G2E F/2 F/2 G|A4(A G)|F D3E2|D4z2
w:What was for your supper? John Ran-dolph, my sonWhat was for your Supper? My dar_-ling one.Eel soup_ and_ vin-'gar has_ made my bed soon, Mo-therI'm sick at the heart and_ want to lie down.
|]

X:13
T:WHERE WERE YOU ALL THE DAY, MY OWN PRETTY BOY?
N:Joyce
N:Sung by Peggy Cudmore 1848
N:Bronson 12.60
I:abc2nwc
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:G
z4(d c)|B2(A G) G2|A2d2c2|A2G2G2|G4"^|"(B c)|d2g2e2|d2G2B2|c2c2e2|f4"^|"(B c)|d2g2(g e)|d2G2(G/2 A/2) B|c2c (d e) f|d4"^|"(d c)|B2(A G) G2|A2d2d3/2 c/2|A2G2G2|G4
w:Where_ were you_ all the day, [my own pre-tty boy?]Where_ were you all the day [my true love and joy?]I_ was fish-ing_ and fowl-ing:_ [Mo-ther, dress my_ bed soon;][There's_ a pain_ in my heart, and I want to lie down]
|]

X:14
T:WHERE WERE YOU ALL THE DAY, MY OWN PRETTY BOY?
N:Petrie
N:From P. W. Joyce
N:No lyrics in bronson
N:Bronson 12.61
I:abc2nwc
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:Bb
z4(d c)|B2(A G) F2|A2d2(d c)|B2G2(G B/2 A/2)|G4"^|"(B d)|e2g2(f e)|d2G2(G =B)|c2(c d) (e c)|d4"^|"(B c)|d2f2(f e)|d2G2(G A/2 =B/2)|c2c d e f|d4"^|"(d c)|B2(A G) G2|A2d2d c|B2G2(G B/2 A/2)|G4
w:Where_ were you_ all the day, [my_ own pre-tty__ boy?]Where_ were you all_ the day [my_ true love_ and_ joy?]I_ was fish-ing_ and fowl-ing:__ [Mo-ther, dress my bed soon;][There's_ a pain_ in my heart, and I want to lie__ down]
|]

X:15
T:LORD RONALD MY SON
N:Barry, Eckstorm and Smyth
N:Sung by Mrs. James McGill 1928
N:Learned from her mother
N:Melody recorded by George Herzog
N:Bronson 12.72
I:abc2nwc
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:G
z4(D E)|"^a"F2F2D2|E2A2(A G)|E2D2D2|[M:4/4]D4z2"^|"(A B)|[M:3/4]c2c2A2|(B d) d2(d B)|A2A2G2|[M:4/4]F4z2"^|"(A B)|[M:3/4]c2c2A2|[M:4/4]B2d2z2e c|[M:3/4]A2A2G2|[M:4/4]F4z2"^|"D E|[M:3/4]F2F2D2|E2A2(A G)|E2D2D2|D4z2:|"^a"F2F2F2|F G A2A G
w:Whaur_ hae ye been a' day [Lord_ Ron-ald my son?]Whaur_ hae ye been a'_ day, [my_ jol-ly young man?]I've_ been a-wa hun-tin', [mith-er mak my bed sune,][for I'm wea-ry wi' hun-tin' an'_ fain wad lie doon]
|]

X:16
T:LORD RENDAL
N:Sharp
N:Sung by Mrs. Pike
N:Transmited by Mrs. Snow, 1906
N:Bronson 12.84
I:abc2nwc
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:G
B2B B A G F2|B3/2 B/2 d B A4"^|"|G2G G F E D2|B3/2 B/2 d/2 B/2 A4"^|"|A3/2 A/2 A B c B A B|d2G F (G F) "^|"E D|G2A F G2A c|(B A) G F G4
w:Where have you been to day Hen-e-ry my sonWhere have you been to day Hen-er-y my oneCourt-ing mo-ther cour-ting mo-ther make my bed soon_For I'm sick to my heart and I want_ to lie down.
|]

X:17
T:Lord Rendal
N:Sharp
N:Sung by Mrs. Perry 1904
N: Bronson 12.90
I:abc2nwc
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:G
B B/2 B/2 B B B B G2|d d d d d4"^|"|B B/2 B/2 B B B B G2|B B A G A2z"^|"d|g3g e2g2|f d3z2"^|"d2|g3g e2g2|f d3-d2z2"^|"|[M:6/4]B2B2B2B4B B|B2c2A2G4"^|"B B|c2A2F2G6
w:Where have you been to all the day, [Hen-er-y my son?]Where have you been to all the day? [You're a pre-tty one]Out in the green fields, mo-therOut in the green fields, mo-ther_[Make my bed quick, I've a pain in my heart][and I wants to lie down]
|]

X:18
T:HENRY, MY SON
N:Eddy
N:Sung by William Lavey
N:Learned from Russian Jewish children in Winnipeg
N:Bronson 12.94
I:abc2nwc
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:G
B2B A G4|d2e B d4"^|"|B2B A G4|A3/2 A/2 A3/2 B/2 A4"^|"|[B4B2-]B2A G3|[d4d2-]d2c B3"^|"|e2e2d2G A|B B2B A2"^|"G A|B B2G A2A2|G4
w:Where have you been, [Hen-ry, my son]Where have you been [my be-lov-ed one?]_At sis_-ter'sAt sis-ter's[Make my bed for the pain at my side][for I want to lie down
|]

X:19
T:KING HENRY, MY SON
N:Nicholson 1907
N:Sung by Mr. Lattimer
N:Learned as a boy
N:Bronson 12.97
I:abc2nwc
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:F
z6z(F/2 G/2)|A A F A G F D C|D G E C D3"^|"(F/2 G/2)|A A F A G F D2|(D G) E C D2"^|"(F G)|A2F A G F D G|D2B, A, B, "^|"B, C|D2(E/2 F/2) G A2G A|F2D E D2
w:Oh,_ where have you been wan-der-ing, [King Hen-er-y, my son]Oh,_ where have you been wan-der-ing, [my_ pre-tty one?]I've_ been to my sweet-heart's [mo-ther make my bed soon][for I'm sick to_ the heart, and would fain lay me down]
|]

X:20
T:WILLIE DOO
N:Moffat 1933
N:Bronson 12.98
I:abc2nwc
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:F
z4zD|D E F3A|B B A4"^|"|G F D4|G F D3"^|"E|E F G3B|c c A4"^|"|c2A2(G F)|D4z
w:O where hae ye been a' the day[Will-ie Doo, Will-ie Doo?]I've been to see my step-mi-ther,[Die shall I_ now!]
|]

X:21
T:THE WEE LITTLE CROODIN' DOO
N:Broadwood 1915
N:Sung by Henry Fowler Broadwood (d. 1893)
N:Bronson 12.99
I:abc2nwc
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:G
G3A G2|G4G2|B d- d2d2|d2z2"^|"d2|e3f g2|(g2f2)e2|d6-|d2z2"^|"g2|d3e B2|(d c-) c2A2|G G4z|z8"^|"|e e4z|d2c2A2|G6-|G6
w:Where hae ye been the live__ -long day,[My wee lit-tle croo_-din' doo?]_I've been to see my__ step-mo-ther,[Mam-my, mak' my bed noo]_
|]

X:22
T:MY BOY TOMMY, O!
N:O'Sullivan
N:Sung by Bat Riordan
N:Bronson 12 appendix 2
I:abc2nwc
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:C
D3/2 E/2 F3/2 G/2 A3/2 G/2 c2|G2G2E3/2 D/2 C2"^|"|D3/2 E/2 F3/2 G/2 A3/2 G/2 c3/2 A/2|A3/2 d/2 d3/2 c/2 A3/2 d/2 d2"^|"|c3/2 d/2 e3/2 d/2 c3/2 A/2 d2|c3/2 A/2 G3/2 F/2 E3/2 D/2 C2"^|"|D3/2 E/2 F3/2 G/2 A2A3/2 E/2|E3/2 G/2 G3/2 E/2 E3/2 D/2 D2
w:Where have you been all the day,[My boy Tom-my, o?]Where have you been all the day,[My bon-ny blue-eyed Tom-my, O?]I've been rol-ling in the hay,With a las-sie young and gay[Was-n't she the young thing][That lat-ely left her mam-my, O?]
|]

X:23
T:BILLY BOY
N:Bronson 12ap.6
N:Terry, 1921
N:Northumbrian capstan shanty
I:abc2nwc
M:6/8
L:1/8
K:G
B2c d2d|c2B A3|B2A G3|A2F G3"^|"|B2c d2d|^c2d e2d|^c2d A3-|A3"^|"d2d d|e2(d e2)f|(g2f) g2e|d2B (c B) A|(G2F) "^|"E2D|G2G B A G|d2d e2g|B2G A2F|G6
w:Where hev ye been all the day,[Bil-ly Boy, Bil-ly boy]Where hev ye been all the day [me Bil-ly Boy]_I've been wal-kin' all_ the day_With me char-min' Nan_-cy Grey_[And me Nan-cy kit-tl'd me fan-cy][Oh me char-min' Bil-ly Boy]
|]

X:24
T:MY BOY WILLY
N:Bronson 12_ap_15
N:Sharp
N:Sung by John Bradley 1911
I:abc2nwc
M:6/8
L:1/8
K:G
z4zD|G2G G2G|F2E D3|G3A3|B d2-d2"^|"d|G2G G2G|F2E D2d|d2e d2c|B2c d3"^|"|c3c3|B2B B3|A2B c2A|G2F D3"^|"|G2A B2G|E3A2A|G2G F2F|G G2-G2
w:O Where have you been all the day [my boy Wil-ly]_O Where have you been all the day[O Wil-lie wont you tell me now]I've been all the day court-ing of a la-dy gay[But she is too young to be tak-en from her mam-my]_
|]

X:25
T:BILLY BOY
N:Bronson 12ap.20
N:Creighton and Senior 1950
N:Sung by Mrs. Dennis Greenough
I:abc2nwc
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:C
z6B3/2 c/2|d3/2 d/2 d3/2 d/2 g2B3/2 c/2|d2d3/2 B/2 d4"^|"|d2d3/2 d/2 g2A3/2 B/2|B/2 A3/2 z2z2"^|"c3/2 c/2|c3/2 B/2 c3/2 d/2 c2d3/2 c/2|(B3/2 A/2) B3/2 c/2 d2"^|"g3/2 e/2|d2B3/2 d/2 d/2 d3/2 A3/2 B/2|A3/2 A3/4- A2z2
w:Where have you been all the day [bil-ly boy, bil-ly boy]Where are you going [char-ming bil-ly?]I've been gone to seek a wife, she's the joy_ of my life,[she's a young thing and can-not leave her mam-my]_
|]


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 16 Jul 03 - 12:09 PM

MMario, useful to those who have neither Child nor Bronson.
Several entries must be made into Search to bring up a few versions- to see what is there, I tried lord randal, lord randall, rendel, 12 and @child 12 but the threads contain more, plus some from other collections, and some from modern balladeers. A comprehensive search would be impossible. 12, of course, brings up many unrelated to Child no. 12.

Perhaps the best way to get the Child ballads, though, is through the complete text on the University of Hawai'i website. It is very easy to highlight and copy using file, print and 'selection' on Internet Explorer (haven't found the key to copying with Netscape yet).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: GUEST,MMario
Date: 16 Jul 03 - 12:24 PM

I thought so Q - which is why I posted them....

in netscape - highlight, rightclick, copy - then paste into another application to print.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 16 Jul 03 - 08:02 PM

Unfortunately, they come without the vital source information or notes, so are more likely to confuse the issue than throw light on it. Sorry, Leo. You know what I'm like!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 16 Jul 03 - 08:29 PM

If Antaine is still around, I would like to know where his "Song of the Eel" came from.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 16 Jul 03 - 08:38 PM

From Joe Heaney, probably:  Mustrad: Joe Heaney Interview transcript - parts 5 to 7.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: LORD RANDALL (from Maddy Prior)
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Jul 03 - 09:33 PM

Well, that's enough versions of Lord Randal to feed an army (and poison 'em all). The version I always sing is Maddy Prior's, which is short and bitter but lovely.

Oh, what had you for your supper, my own darling boy?
Oh, what had you for supper, my comfort and my joy?
I had fish all from the Irish Sea, mother. Make my bed soon.
I have a faining in my heart and wouldn't I long to lie down.

Oh, what will you leave your son, my own darling boy?
Oh, what will you leave your son, now, my comfort and my joy?
I will leave him my job at Sellafield, so he won't need to sign on.
I have a faining in my heart and wouldn't I long to lie down.

Oh, what will you leave your wife, my own darling boy?
Oh, what will you leave your wife, now, my comfort and my joy?
I will leave her with compensation. She can fight for it when I'm gone.
I have a faining in my heart and wouldn't I long to lie down.

I used to know an Appalachian version in which the mother asks her son what he had for supper and he replies "a cup of cold poison." And later, when asked what he'll leave his sweetheart, he says "a cup of cold poison." Concise and to the point, eh?

Cheers,
Anais


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: LORD RANDALL (North Carolina version)
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 17 Jul 03 - 01:10 AM

The Irish Sea is that polluted, eh? (a member of the Maddy Prior fan club.

Brown (North Carolina Folklore) has one where the son ate fried eels and fried onions. Add fried bread and---
My stomach is churning and I fain would lie down.

I like this short one from West Virginia: It's an "all in the family one."

LORD RANDALL

"Where have you been all day, Henry, my son?
Where have you been all day, my loving one?"
"Up sister's, up sister's; make my bed soon,
For there's a pain in my side, and I must lie down and die."

"What did she give you there?"
"Poison, poison."

"What color was the poison?"
"Red, black, yellow, red, black, yellow."

"What will you leave for father?"
"Watch and chain, watch and chain."

What will you leave for mother?"
"Silk and satin, silk and satin."

What will you leave for brother?"
"Toys, toys."

"What will you leave for baby?"
"A kiss from Henry, a kiss from Henry."

"What will you leave for sister?"
"Ropes to hang her, ropes to hang her."

I can imagine Maddy Prior doing that one too.

J. H. Cox, 1925 (1967), "Folk-Songs of the South," pp. 26-27, from Mr. W. H. S. White, Piedmont, West Virginia, 1916, obtained from Miss Gertrude Shapiro, who got it from her mother.

Cox mentions another, but doesn't give lyrics- "Fried seals in butter."

In another one, done in by his sweetheart, Johnnie Randal leaves her:
"Hell's fire and brimstone, dear mother, to scorch her bones brown;
She's the cause of this pain at my heart, and I want to lie down."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: GUEST,MMario
Date: 17 Jul 03 - 09:03 AM

Malcolm - you will note that I've included the sources and singers names on the Bronson tunes...

The notes on each tune - are under copyright - so whereas I feel comfortable posting tunes that professional collectors have deemed as coming from the tradition - I don't feel at all comfortable posting their notes about those tunes!!!!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: LORD RANDALL
From: GUEST,The Half
Date: 12 Oct 03 - 11:03 PM

The one I know is:

Where have you been, Lord Randall my son?
Where have you been, my sweet pretty one?
I've been to my sweetheart's. Oh, make my bed soon.
For I'm sick to my heart, and fain would lie down.

What did she give you, Lord Randall my son?
What did she give you, my sweet pretty one?
She gave me some eels. Oh, make my bed soon,
For I'm sick to my heart, and fain would lie down.

Where did she get them, Randall my son?
Where did she get them, my sweet pretty one?
From the hedges and the ditches. Oh, make my bed soon,
For I'm sick to my heart, and fain would lie down.

What color were they, Randall my son?
What color were they, my sweet pretty one?
They were speckled and spotted. Oh, make my bed soon,
For I'm sick to my heart, and fain would lie down.

They were strong poisons, Lord Randall my son.
They were strong poisons, my sweet pretty one.
You'll die you'll die. Oh, make my bed soon,
For I'm sick to my heart, and fain would lie down.

What will you leave your father, Lord Randall my son?
What will you leave your father, my sweet pretty one?
My land and my houses. Oh, make my bed soon,
For I'm sick to my heart, and fain would like down.

What will you leave your mother, Lord Randall my son?
What will you leave your mother, my sweet pretty one?
My gold and my silver. Oh, make my bed soon,
For I'm sick to my heart, and fain would lie down.

What will you leave your sweetheart, Lord Randall my son?
What will you leave your sweetheart, my sweet pretty one?
A rope to hang her. Oh, make my bed soon,
For I'm sick to my heart, and fain would like down.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 12 Oct 03 - 11:39 PM

I think my favourite "fun" version is "Green and Yellar"...

The chorus responds "Green and Yellar, Green and Yellar" to each new verse idea... :-)

Yellar - yellow

Robin


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 12 Oct 03 - 11:49 PM

Green and yaller? That's Georgia Tech.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: GREEN AND YELLA / GREEN AND YELLOW
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 13 Oct 03 - 03:47 PM

For best effect this should be sung with great passion, with much groaning, face pulling and holding of the stomach.
The line "Greeeeeeen and Yella" should conjure up pictures of snot & slime.



Green and Yella

Where have you been all day, Henry my son?
Where have you been all day, my current bun?
To the woods dear Mother
To the woods dear Mother
Oh Mother be quick
For I wannn'a be sick
Gonn'a lay me down and die

What did you do there, Henry my boy ?
What did you do there, my pride and joy ?
Ate dear Mother
Ate dear Mother
        Oh Mother be quick ...........

What did you eat there, Henry my son ?
What did you eat there, my current bun ?
Eels dear Mother,
Eels dear Mother
        Oh Mother be quick ...........

What colour were they, Henry my boy ?
What colour were they, my pride and joy ?
Greeeeeeen and Yella ,
Greeeeeeen and Yella
        Oh Mother be quick ...........        

Them eels were snakes, Henry my son
Them eels were snakes, my current bun
(holding stomach in pain and groaning)
Oooooooooooooh Mother,
Oooooooooooooh Mother
        Oh Mother be quick ...........

What did you have with 'em, Henry my boy ?
What did you have with 'em, my pride and joy ?
Mushrooms dear Mother,        
Mushrooms dear Mother
        Oh Mother be quick ...........

What colour were they, Henry my son ?
What colour were they, my current bun ?
Greeeeeeen and Yella ,
Greeeeeeen and Yella
        Oh Mother be quick ...........
        
Them mushrooms were toadstools, Henry my boy
Them mushrooms were toadstools, my pride and joy
Oooooooooooooh Mother,
Oooooooooooooh Mother
        Oh Mother be quick ...........

What colour flowers d'ya want on your grave, Henry my son ?
What colour flowers d'ya want on your grave, my current bun ?
Greeeeeeen and Yella ,
Greeeeeeen and Yella
        Oh Mother be quick ...........




Doug C


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Snuffy
Date: 13 Oct 03 - 07:43 PM

As well as "my currant bun" and "my pride and joy", we also use "my darling one" and "my saveloy"

And we add a couple of verses:

How did you get to them woods ....
On the Bus, dear mother

What colour was that bus ....
Green and yeller .....

WassaiL! V


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lord Randall
From: Joe_F
Date: 13 Oct 03 - 08:47 PM

I judge a "Lord Randall" version chiefly by whether the refrain changes from "For I'm weary wi hunting" to "I'm sick at the heart" at the point in the story when he confesses.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: LORD RANDALL
From: GUEST,Bob Coltman
Date: 08 Feb 07 - 11:27 AM

I never found a "Lord Randall" I felt at home singing until this one, to a slow, swinging tune. I particularly love the ending.

LORD RANDALL

As sung by Ben Moomaw, Roanoke VA, 1954.

Where have you been roving, Lord Randall my son?
Where have you been roving, my beautiful one?
Oh, I have been courting, Mother, make my bed soon,
My heart's feeling bad and I want to lie down.

What did she feed you ...
Fried eels and fresh butter ...

I fear you're poisoned ...
Oh yes I am poisoned ...

What will you leave your mother? ...
My lands and my houses ...

What will you leave your brother? ...
My horn and my hounds ...

What will you leave your sweetheart? ...
Bulrushes and brimstones for to burn her bones brown,
For she is the reason of my lying down.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Lord Randall
From: A Wandering Minstrel
Date: 09 Feb 07 - 08:30 AM

I do the theatrical version of Green and Yellar meself, I like the addition of the bus chorus :)

For HuwG, Carters and Bambers (Balmborough's - also mentioned in Blaydon Races) were large saloons / music halls at the bottom of Newcastle's Bigg Market, a location favoured for heavy drinking to this day.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Lord Randall
From: Richie
Date: 28 Nov 11 - 02:10 PM

The version from Mary Humphreys above has a different source:http://bluegrassmessengers.com/the-little-wee-croodin-doo-2-broadwood-pre1893.aspx

Title: THE WEE LITTLE CROODIN' DOO
SECOND VERSION.
SUNG BY MR. HENRY FOWLER BROADWOOD,
Noted by Lucy Broadwood. (BORN 1811, DIED 1893), OF LYNE, SUSSEX.

There is another version by Cremer but it's slightly different.

Richie


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins: Lord Randall
From: GUEST,banjopicker
Date: 28 Nov 11 - 07:15 PM

Bob Dylan borrowed the the melody for his " a hard rains gonna fall"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 25 May 7:14 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.