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Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy

DigiTrad:
WILD COLONIAL BOY
WILD COLONIAL BOY (2)


Related threads:
(origins) Wild Colonial Boy: any history? (20)
new tune for wild colonial boy (34)
Lyr Req: Wild Colonial Boy (Margaret Barry) (20)


Roberto 22 Apr 07 - 04:14 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 22 Apr 07 - 05:35 PM
Stewie 22 Apr 07 - 07:47 PM
kendall 22 Apr 07 - 08:23 PM
Muttley 22 Apr 07 - 09:51 PM
GUEST 22 Apr 07 - 10:58 PM
Stewie 22 Apr 07 - 11:01 PM
Bob Bolton 22 Apr 07 - 11:19 PM
Roberto 23 Apr 07 - 03:28 AM
Stewie 23 Apr 07 - 03:44 AM
Roberto 23 Apr 07 - 06:12 AM
Mr Happy 23 Apr 07 - 06:32 AM
Roberto 23 Apr 07 - 06:36 AM
Muttley 23 Apr 07 - 10:53 AM
Stewie 23 Apr 07 - 11:15 AM
Joybell 23 Apr 07 - 06:27 PM
Muttley 23 Apr 07 - 08:40 PM
Bob Bolton 23 Apr 07 - 09:10 PM
Marc Bernier 23 Apr 07 - 09:57 PM
Muttley 24 Apr 07 - 04:38 AM
Jim McLean 24 Apr 07 - 11:32 AM
Joybell 24 Apr 07 - 08:15 PM
Bob Bolton 25 Apr 07 - 08:30 AM
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Subject: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Roberto
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 04:14 PM

A. L. Lloyd in The Old Bush Songs: I can't get what he says before Victoria. Please, help. Later on, I'll try to post the whole songs (and ask for help whe needed). R

It's of a Wild Colonial Boy, Jack Doolan was his name
From the … of Victoria, not so far from Castlemaine
He was his father's only son, his mother's pride and joy
So dearly did his parents love the Wild Colonial Boy


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 05:35 PM

I've always sung it From the State of Victoria. Don't mean it's right... I love Lloyd's version.

Jerry


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Stewie
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 07:47 PM

'From the colony of Victoria'.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: kendall
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 08:23 PM

Here's the one I recorded:


There was a wild colonial boy Jack Duggan was his name,
He was born and raised in Ireland a place called Castlemain
He was his Father's only son, his Mother's pride and joy
And dearly did his parents love the wild colonial boy.

At the early age of 16 years he left his native home,
And to Australia's sunny shore he was inclined to roam
He robbed the rich he helped the poor he shot James McEvoy
A terror to Australia was the wild colonial boy.

One morning on the prairie as Jack he rode along
Listening to the Mockingbirds singing a cheerful song,
Up rode a band of troopers, Kelly, Davis and Fitzroy
They all set out to capture him the wild colonial boy.

"Surrender now Jack Duggan for you see we're three to one
Surrender in the King's high name you are a plundering son"
Jack drew two pistols from his belt and proudly waved them high,
"I'll fight, but not surrender" cried the wild colonial boy.

He fired a shot at Kelly which drove him to the ground
Then turning round to Davis he received a fatal wound
a bullet pierced his fierce young heart from the pistol of Fitzroy
And that was how they captured him the wild colonial boy.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Muttley
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 09:51 PM

To Jerry Rasmussen & Stewie

It would be the COLONY of Port Phillip or the STATE of Victoria.

Victoria was never a colony: The colony of Port Phillip became the State of Victoria when the boundaries were officially set between New South Wales and Victoria along the Murray River. Prior to this Port Phillip was a small colony surrounding Port Phillip Bay and Port Jackson Colony encompassed Sydney Town along the shores of Port Jackson. Everything between them was the territory of New South Wales - the Name changes came with statehood around 1851 (+/-)

Now to the heart of the matter:

The Wild Colonial Boy was not even born here. He was born in Castlemaine, Ireland, but grew up around Dublin. His name, in song, variously given as Duggan, Dougan, Duigan, Donahue and Doolan (to name but a few) was, in fact - according to historical sources - DONAHOE.

The original version of the song - which originated from the Colony of Port Jackson - was sung to the tune of "The Wearing of the Green" (if you can't recall it, the Irish Rovers did a parody in the 70's called "The Orange and the Green").

The song was actually called "Bold Jack Donahoe", and the reason why the tune, the lyrics and the "hero's" name were changed was to preserve life.
Convicts caught singing (or even whistling or humming the tune to) Bold Jack Donahoe were liable to summary execution by hanging. Just as Irish in Ireland and Irish convicts here were for singing "The Wearing of the Green". Ex-convicts, Ticket-of-Leavers and even Ordinary Settlers could be imprisoned or fined and usually flogged for doing so! Itn was een as seditious and treasonable.

It is believed that "Bold Jack Donahoe" to the tune of "The Wearing of the Green" was actually the version of 'he Wild Colonial Boy' which was being sung with such passion by Ned Kelly and the locals in Jones's Tavern, Glenrowan on the night before the siege.

Below are the words to the original "Wild Colonial Boy" as it was sung in Colonial Times:


BOLD JACK DONAHOE

In Dublin Town I wqas brought up in that city of great fame
My decent friends and parents, they will tell you just the same
T'was for the sake of five-hundred pounds I was sent across the main
For seven long years in New South Wales to wear the convict's chain

I'd scarce been there twelve months or more upon the Australian shore
When I took to the highways as I'd oft times done before
There was me and Darky Underwood and Webber and Webster too
These were the true associates of Bold Jack Donahoe

Now Donahoe was taken all for a notorious crime
And sentenced to be hanged upon the gallows-tree so high
But when they arrived at Sydney Gaol he left them in a stew
For whwn they came to call the roll they missed Bold Donahoe

As Donahoe made his escape, to the bush he went straight way
The squatters were all afraid to travel by night or day
For ev'ry week in the newspapers there was published something new
Concerning the dauntless hero: The Bold Jack Donahoe

As Donahoe was cruising one summer afternoon
Little was his notion; his death was near so soon
When a sergeant of the horse police discharged his carabine
And called aloud on Donahoe to fight or to resign

"Resign to you? You Cowardly dogs!" A thing i ne'er will do
"For I'll fight this night with all my might" cried Bold Jack Donahoe
"I'd rather roam these hills and dales like a wolf or kangaroo,
Than work one night for the government", cried Bold Jack Donahoe

He fought six rounds with the horse police until the fatal ball
Which pierced his heart and made him start, caused Donahoe to fall
And as he closed his mournful eyes he bade the world Adieu
Saying "Convicts all both great and small say prayers for Donahoe"

Mind you - though I love the Donahoe version - and it's the version I prefer to sing; I also quite like (and frequently also sing) the 'traditional' version to the more familiar tune.

Muttley


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: GUEST
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 10:58 PM

Muttley, you are quite correct. However, Roberto asked for what A.L Lloyd sings. I took it direct from the Lloyd's booklet accompanying 'The Great Australian Legend' and 'colony of Victoria' is what he has - it's too late now to get him to change it!

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Stewie
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 11:01 PM

Why does my cookie keep disappearing for no apparent reason?

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 11:19 PM

G'day Muttley (and Jerry & Stewie),

The problem with the folk tales about punishment (I hadn't heard it elevated to execution ... until now ...) for singing / whistling / whatever "The Wearing of the Green" is that Dion Boucicault composed the song for his musical play Arrah-na-Pogue - and pinched the existing tune from a Scottish song. The play was first performed at the Theatre Royal, Dublin on 7 November 1864 - so "The Wearing of the Green" first appears after all but the last remnants of convict servitude - only remaining in West Australia.

The old tale has had currency for many years - sometimes not far from my area of concern - but it doesn't match the facts.

Regards,

Bob


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Roberto
Date: 23 Apr 07 - 03:28 AM

With Stewie's help for the word "colony", this should be the whole text of A. L. Lloyd's recording. I've put a question mark where I'd like a check.

It's of a Wild Colonial Boy, Jack Doolan was his name
From the colony of Victoria, not so far from Castlemaine
He was his father's only son, his mother's pride and joy
And so dearly did his parents love The Wild Colonial Boy

When he was sixteen years of age, he left his native home
All through the bush of Australia as an outlaw to roam
He robbed the wealthy squatters and their stock he did destroy
And a terror to Australia was The Wild Colonial Boy

In 1861 he commenced his wild career
His courage been undaunted and no danger he did fear
He piled (?) up the Beechworth mail-coach and he robbed Judge MacEvoy
Who, trembling cold, gave up his gold to the Wild Colonial Boy

He bade the Judge good morning and he told him to beware
He'd never rob a poor man or one that acted square
But a Judge that would rob a mother of her only pride and joy
Well, he was a worse outlaw than The Wild Colonial Boy

One day as he was riding the mountainside along
Listening to the kookaburra's pleasant laughing song
He spied three mounted troopers, Kelly, Davis and Fitzroy
With a warrant for the capture of the Wild Colonial Boy

Surrender now, John Doolan, you see we're three to one
Surrender in the Queen's name, for you're a plundering son
Jack drew his pistol from his belt and he waved the little toy:
I'll fight but never surrender – said The Wild Colonial Boy

He fired at trooper Kelly and he brought him to the ground
But in return Bob Davis gave him his mortal wound
All shattered through the jaws he lay still firing at Fitzroy
And that's the way they captured him, The Wild Colonial Boy


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Stewie
Date: 23 Apr 07 - 03:44 AM

Roberto, from Lloyd's booklet:

Stanza 3, line 2 'His courage being undaunted ...'

Stanza 3, line 3 'He baled up the ...'

Stanza 4, line 2 'He'd never robbed a poor man ...'

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Roberto
Date: 23 Apr 07 - 06:12 AM

Thanks Stewie. R


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Mr Happy
Date: 23 Apr 07 - 06:32 AM

To the same tune:




THE NORLEY GATE [Reg Holmes of Norley, Cheshire.]


There was a Norley fellow
Who owned some small estate
And sought to make it bigger
With padlock, fence and gate.
He knew the land was common
But didn't give a toss,
[And so he] Thought he'd try it on
And fence the people's moss.


On the 10th day of February
1966
His minions there arrived
This shameful fence to fix.
The locals grinned discreetly
And many the bet was cast
Just how long the time would be
That ruddy fence would last.

Some told the County Council,
The Parish council too,
Which soon 'twas amply evident
There was nought at all they'd do.
The Norley lads then did combine
To shift that fence to hell,
But sad it is I must decline
Their name or ranks to tell.

On a moonless night
They made a start,
And likely lads were they,
They ripped that ruddy fence apart
And bore the gate away.
Fifty quid he must have blewed
To fix that fence so stout
But Norley lads in generous mood
Shifted it for nought.

The police they came enquiring
As to who the deed had done
But no informer could they find
Nor where the gate had gone.
Gale Moss now lies open wide
With sweet gale scented still
And people there may came and bide,
And of its beauty drink their fill.

The sequel now I can relate
How a joiner with his tools
From the oaken gate he did create
Some lovely little stools.
And now my story's really done
Though t'is strange I do declare
How Norley folk still sit upon
A gate that isn't there.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Roberto
Date: 23 Apr 07 - 06:36 AM

Mr Happy posted another song to be sung "to the same tune". But A. L. Lloyd's recording is not sung to the tune commonly associated with The Wild Colonial Boy, but to a different version of it, that I find beautiful (while I'm not particularly fond of the usual tune). R


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Muttley
Date: 23 Apr 07 - 10:53 AM

G'day in return Bob

I'll paste part of your reply to me so mine makes sense (I have difficulty doing that from time to time - actually the making sense bits are the few and far between moments!)

You wrote:
".....performed at the Theatre Royal, Dublin on 7 November 1864 - so "The Wearing of the Green" first appears after all but the last remnants of convict servitude - only remaining in West Australia."

Quite correct: However, That date coincides with the latter days of the Potato Famine when over a million had died and over two million had emigrated or been forced to - hence the words "She's the most distressful country".

The song itself was referring to a law passed many many years before after a spate of unrest which saw the transportation of large numbers of "Irish Rebels" to the Colonies of Port Jackson, Port Phillip, Hobart Town and Port Arthur - as well as Norfolk Island for political crimes.
Under this law, the wearing of a sash, ribbon, cockade, pocket or neck kerchief, cap (caubeen) band etc was punishable by immediate incarceration in the case of children and so carried an immediate sentence of Transportation. For adult males or females - depending on the magistrates disposition it could be anything from 14 - 30 years Transportation or the gibbet. ; Hundreds were executed (if not thousands - the numbers are not exact as many "executions" were quite summary in nature) or transported with the latter being the "softer" sentence (and least applied).
Even the act of placing a Shamrock in one's button-hole or hatband was cause for arrest and judgement.

I'm a "potato famine" convict descendant and my info comes from a book a good friend loaned me about the famine days and the decades preceding. It touched on the issues around the 'Wearing of the Green' law and the penalties for disobedience (or rebellion). The Irish were told in no uncertain terms that if they were to wear ANY colour as an 'accessory' it HAD to be RED - hence Foucicault's reference to "Irish Blood".


I too have the Lloyd version in my song book - but it differs fromn the one Roberto has posted:

My version - which I learned first at High School - Irish Christian Brothers!!!! Is as follows:

There was a Wild Colonial Boy, Jack Doolan was his name
Of poor, but honest parents, he was born in Castlemaine
He was his father's only hope, his mother's pride and joy
And dearly did his parents love their Wild Colonial Boy

He was barely sixteen years of age when he left his father's home
And through Australia's sunny climes; a bushranger did roam
He robbed those wealthy squatters, their flocks he did destroy
And a terror to the 'Rich Man' was The Wild Colonial Boy

In 'Sixty-one this daring youth began his wild career
With heart that knew no danger, no foeman he did fear
He bailed up the Beechworth mail-coach and robbed Judge MacEvoy
Who, trembling cold, gave up his gold to the Wild Colonial Boy

He bade the Judge good morning and he told him to beware
He'd never rob an honest man that acted 'on the square'
He'd never rob a mother of her son and only joy
Or you're a far worse outlaw than a Wild Colonial Boy

One day as he was riding the mountainside along
A-listening to the kookaburra's pleasant laughing song
Three mounted troopers came in view: Kelly, Davis and Fitzroy
And thought that they would capture him; the Wild Colonial Boy

Surrender now, Jack Doolan, you see we're three to one
Surrender in the Queen's High Name, you daring highwayman
He drew his pistol from his belt and he waved it like a toy:
I'll fight but ne'er surrender – cried The Wild Colonial Boy

He fired at trooper Kelly and he brought him to the ground
And in return from Davis received his mortal wound
All shattered through the jaws he lay, still firing at Fitzroy
And that's the way they captured him, The Wild Colonial Boy


I have a further verse used as a chorus if preferred


So come along me hearties; we'll range the mountain-sides
Together we will plunder. Together we will ride
We'll gallop through the valleys and thunder o'er the plains
We'll scorn the life of slavery; bound down by iron chains


Following is a quote from a book I have in my library; "BAIL UP!: A Pictorial History of Australia's Most Notorious Bushrangers; Featuring The Ned Kelly Story"

"This version of the unofficial anthem of Australia of the Nineteeth Century was so changed that the real events were hardly recognised in the lyrics. Rendering this boisterous tune would not land the singer in gaol, as was the case following the time of Donahoe's reign. [sic] meaning the "Bold Jack Donahoe" version I posted earlier.

This book has a third version of Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy (or the one he derived it from) - I think my version in this posting is also a derivative as the text states that this was the original variant rendered to prevent arrest in lieu of 'Bold Jack'


THE WILD COLONIAL BOY   (again)

There was a Wild Colonial Boy, Jack Doolan was his name
Of poor, but honest parents, he was born in Castlemaine
He was his father's only hope, his mother's pride and joy
And dearly did his parents love their Wild Colonial Boy

CHORUS:
       So come away me hearties; we'll range the mountains high
       Together we will plunder. Together we will ride
       We'll scour along the valleys and we'll gallop o'er the plains
       We'll scorn the life of slavery; bound down by iron chains


At the age of sixteen years he left his native home
And to Australia's sunny shores; a bushranger did roam
They put him in an iron gang in the government employ
But never an iron on earth could hold The Wild Colonial Boy

In 'Sixty-one this daring youth commenced his wild career
With heart that knew no danger, no foeman he did fear
He bailed up the Beechworth mail-coach and robbed Judge MacEvoy
Who, trembling cold, gave up his gold to the Wild Colonial Boy

One day as he was riding the mountainside along
A-listening to the little birds; their happy laughing song
Three mounted troopers came in view: Kelly, Davis and Fitzroy
With a warrant for the capture of the Wild Colonial Boy

Surrender now, Jack Doolan, you see we're three to one
Surrender in the Queen's Own Name, you are a highwayman
He drew his pistol from his belt and he waved it like a toy:
I'll fight but not surrender – cried The Wild Colonial Boy

He fired at trooper Kelly and he brought him to the ground
And in return from Davis received a mortal wound
All shattered through the jaws he lay, still firing at Fitzroy
And that's the way they captured him, The Wild Colonial Boy


Interestingly - no shot fired by police in the ambush that killed him hit him in the jaw. He was felled by a single musket ball to the forehead. The shot was fired by trooper John Muggleton and there was no trooper Kelly, Davis OR Fitzroy in the police party. The fact that he was killed by a shot to the head also suggests he probably didn't gey much of a chance to say "Convicts all, both great and small say prayers for Donahoe"

Slainte

Muttley


So come along me hearties; we'll range the mountain-sides
Together we will plunder. Together we will ride
We'll gallop through the valleys and thunder o'er the plains
We'll scorn the life of slavery; bound down by iron chains


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Stewie
Date: 23 Apr 07 - 11:15 AM

My apologies for my misspelling of 'bailed'. My excuse is that the Lloyd booklet had it as 'baled' twice - once in the text and again in an explanatory note ('held up at pistol point') - and I accepted it without thinking.

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Joybell
Date: 23 Apr 07 - 06:27 PM

Now that the original question has been answered - a little side issue.
My family came from Castlemaine in Victoria -(same place as A. L. Lloyd uses). I once spoke to a respected folklorist who asked me which words my family used for this song. Seems both Victoria and New South Wales claimed "the wild colonial boy" as their own and claimed the song was about an actual person (whose identity has never actually been established). There are towns called Castlemaine in both states - as well as in Ireland and several other places.
Cheers, Joy
To be honest my family sang "...born and raised in Ireland in a place called Castlemaine...."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Muttley
Date: 23 Apr 07 - 08:40 PM

G'day Joybell - still singing "Bears" to the oldies??

You're right, of course. There are Castlemaines in Victoria, NSW AND Ireland (County Kerry ~ SW corner of Ireland and sits at the head of Castlemaine Harbour!)

However, the Wild Colonial Boy WAS, in fact, a true identity - his name was John (Jack) Donahoe. He was born in Castlemaine, County Kerry sometime between 1805 and 1808 - He was said to have been either 17 or 19 when he arrived in Port Jackson on January 2nd, 1825 on board the Transport Barque "Ann and Amelia".

He quickly took to the bush after escaping a chain gang / work group and returned to highway robbery. He was said to have been a bit of a Robin Hood (weren't they all?) - but in Donahoe's case it was actually true. He refused to 'bail up' "ordinary folk" and robbed only wealthy settlers on their properties and rich-appearing travellers: He then 'fenced' his takings through the poorer settlers and even distributed the takings from a tax collector on at least one occasion.

He collected a small band of like-minded abscondees among whom were William "Darky" Underwood, Jack Walmsey and Bill Webber. (Walmsey never made it into the song though - wonder how his shade feels about that?)

One of his more memorable exploits (apart from his penchant for very high quality clothes and boots) was at the height of his notoriety. Knowing full well the Troopers were hunting him with every resource, he calmly rode INTO Sydney Town, tied up his horse at a hotel and sat on the front porch in full view of the passing populace (and police), drank several (accounts vary from 2 to 5) bottles of Ginger Beer / Sarsaparilla (again - depending on the source - the hotelier/publican stated categorically he ordered ONLY Ginger Beer) and as dusk approached, he calmly mounted his horse and bidding "Good Day" to all, he returned to his base in the bush.

The police had word he was in the city and despite many of them riding past the hotel in the course of the day; they missed him.

Ultimately it was his "friend" Walmsey who betrayed him to police and who helped set up the ambush in which he was killed by trooper Muggleton - who was, according to police "As fine a shot as could be found".
Maybe the betrayal was the reason for his omission from the song (Gee! Do Ya Think????????)

Anyway - that's an account of the man who is historically regarded as THE Wild Colonial Boy - irrespective of Victoria's and NSW's claims. Victoria's would be the weakest as bushrangers tnded to remain in the regions they grew up in ie Frank Power, Ned Kelly, Dan Morgan (he only ventured into Vic after a challenge from the Vic Police and for revenge) and so on. So it is HIGHLY unlikely that a Victorian-born bushranger would operate in the unfamiliar territory around Sydney - especially as Castlemaine Victoria was not even in existence in 1825 - 30 (the year he was killed). Not sure when Castlemaine NSW was established - but it was probably post 1820's.

Muttley


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 23 Apr 07 - 09:10 PM

G'day again Muttley,

I wasn't dealing with any repressive laws, banning displays patriotic in Ireland ... just this statement:

Convicts caught singing (or even whistling or humming the tune to) Bold Jack Donahoe were liable to summary execution by hanging. Just as Irish in Ireland and Irish convicts here were for singing "The Wearing of the Green". Ex-convicts, Ticket-of-Leavers and even Ordinary Settlers could be imprisoned or fined and usually flogged for doing so! Itn was een as seditious and treasonable.

I'm taking it that the use of "convict" here equals "transported convict" as the term 'convict' doesn't appear to be the usual term for those interned as 'rebels', but not transported (but I'm not in Ireland, nor reading accounts from that period). My point was that the Irish appropriation of the Scots tune (a setting of another of the poems of Tannahill) was after the main (eastern states of Australia)convict era. It may be true that "old lags" were threatened with reprisals for singing "a seditious song" after 1865 ... when the musical play's song Wearing of the Green appeared in Australian song books, but it's not on the Statute books.

In respect of: It is believed that "Bold Jack Donahoe" to the tune of "The Wearing of the Green" was actually the version of 'he Wild Colonial Boy' which was being sung with such passion by Ned Kelly and the locals in Jones's Tavern, Glenrowan on the night before the siege. I'll grant that G-G-Great-uncle Ned* might well have defiantly sung the song ... by 1880, as it would have been published in popular collections for some 15 years.

* Ned's mother, neé Ellen Quinn, appears to have been sister to my G-G-Great-Grandmother, neé Jane-Anne Quinn (married Jan van Kampen in the Bathurst Catholic Cathedral, 1854).

Regards,

Bob


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Marc Bernier
Date: 23 Apr 07 - 09:57 PM

Great background information guys. Keep it up. This is the stuff I enjoy most on Mudcat.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Muttley
Date: 24 Apr 07 - 04:38 AM

Interesting stuff Bob - I have a bit of a soft spot for Ned - having first stayed with family virtually every holiday period (for the whole holiday period more often than not) and then lived in Kelly Country myself from birth until about 12 years ago.

I have even visited the original homestead - though there are only couple of chimney-stacks left. I found out where it was by one of the Greta West locals as I taught in the region and got friendly with a few (Quinns and - - - bugger, I can't remember the other bloke whose surname was different).

According to local lore (Glenrowan District - Quinns etc) and later corroborated by the Bushranger text I own plus another I loaned and never got back (gotta stop doing that!) it was, in fact, the "Bold Jack Donahoe" version which was sung at Jones's Inn - so I tend to believe that part.

As for the executions for singing 'The Wearing of the Green' that source was from an archaeology group I am part of as well as the book my mate loaned me (must get in contact and borrow it again).

However the execution of convicts - more specifically Irish Convicts for singing the Wearing of the Green or Bold Jack is somewhat anecdotal. I've heard it from any number of sources but not in print and took it as "probable" fact due to the Ireland/Irish persecution factor - so you are probably right.

Quick question for you (and how many times have you fobbed this one off - the folk around Greta say it's "true" but generally with a twinkle in the eye and and sideways look!)

The rumour goes that only Steve Hart died in the fire and the other body was another local and that it was Dan that was captured and hanged in Melbourne while Ned actually escaped and went to New South Wales and "settled down" apparently with his half-brother Joseph. The rationale behind the rumour is that, on the scaffold, Ellen was supposed to have told the condemned "Mind ye die like a Kelly, son" and that she said it to Dan to bolster his courage - - - something she wouldn't have had to do if it was truly Ned!

One of our locals married a Kelly as well. His name was Griffith and he farmed just outside of town at a place called Mt.Bruno. He married (I think it was Grace - the younger sister). Legend has it that she used to drive her horse-and-trap to Wangaratta regularly but disdained going back around to the main roads and made her own track across the Warby Ranges - her track shortened the trip by about 4 or 5 miles. The track actually still exists and is still called - officially - Griffiths Track: and if you happen to be in the Mt.Bruna area, it STILL cuts about 4 or 5 mile off the trip!

Muttley


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Jim McLean
Date: 24 Apr 07 - 11:32 AM

Bob, which Tannahill tune are you referring to?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Joybell
Date: 24 Apr 07 - 08:15 PM

I think the versions of this song sung in Victoria (maybe even all the Aus versions) might have just been a case of aquisition of a colourful character. An opportunistic act because of the name of the town mentioned -- much like claiming to have the "real" Robin Hood.

Bob -- re your connection with Ned Kelly. I can't help mentioning that Moondyne Joe (Western Australia's only "convict bushranger") is somewhere on my family tree. We don't have the actual proof of where he fits because of a missing birth certificate.

Cheers, Joy


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A. L. Lloyd's Wild Colonial Boy
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 25 Apr 07 - 08:30 AM

G'day,

Jim McLean,

I'm having to cast my mind back somewhere in 9 years and 3633 postings for information that came up when I was looking at the sources for the tune Dion Boucicault borrowed for his song. I only remember noting that it was another of the tunes set to one of Tannahill's verses - as was Bonny Wood of Craigielea, the ancestral tune to Waltzing Matilda. This time round, I find quite a few counter claims for the tune itself ... suggesting it had already done service for several other Scottish songs.

If I troll through enough of those old posts ... I might remember which of Tannahill's songs is associated ... or not ...

Joybell & Muttley:

My Quinn ancestor seems to have moved north ... by the Goldrush era Jane-Anne was around the NSW Turon field, since she married a Dutch sailor in Bathurst, 1854 ... and 20 years later, around the time of the "Kelly Outbreak", she and her husband were in Sydney - running an "hostel for Merchant Navy officers". There are no first-hand family secrets passed down, at this end of the family, about Ned and his clan!

Regard(les)s,

Bob


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