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Colloquialisms II - for faster loading

katlaughing 11 Apr 99 - 06:11 PM
Mo 11 Apr 99 - 06:44 PM
katlaughing 11 Apr 99 - 08:19 PM
catspaw49 11 Apr 99 - 08:46 PM
Barbara 11 Apr 99 - 08:58 PM
Banjer 11 Apr 99 - 09:03 PM
katlaughing 11 Apr 99 - 09:21 PM
Mo 11 Apr 99 - 09:25 PM
Susan A-R 11 Apr 99 - 09:45 PM
Banjer 11 Apr 99 - 10:37 PM
catspaw49 11 Apr 99 - 11:32 PM
Pete M 11 Apr 99 - 11:47 PM
rich r 12 Apr 99 - 12:30 AM
JB3 12 Apr 99 - 12:31 AM
catspaw49 12 Apr 99 - 03:02 AM
Steve Parkes 12 Apr 99 - 04:01 AM
AlistairUK 12 Apr 99 - 06:05 AM
Tucker 12 Apr 99 - 06:18 AM
katlaughing 12 Apr 99 - 09:34 AM
AlistairUK 12 Apr 99 - 09:40 AM
The_one_and_only_Dai 12 Apr 99 - 10:12 AM
Steve Parkes 12 Apr 99 - 10:42 AM
AlistairUK 12 Apr 99 - 11:29 AM
catspaw49 12 Apr 99 - 11:48 AM
AlistairUK 12 Apr 99 - 11:53 AM
Bert 12 Apr 99 - 05:28 PM
Penny 12 Apr 99 - 05:50 PM
AlistairUK 12 Apr 99 - 05:54 PM
Penny 12 Apr 99 - 05:58 PM
Penny 12 Apr 99 - 06:25 PM
AlistairUK 12 Apr 99 - 06:34 PM
Bert 12 Apr 99 - 06:59 PM
Penny 12 Apr 99 - 07:10 PM
Cuilionn 12 Apr 99 - 09:02 PM
alison 13 Apr 99 - 12:20 AM
dick greenhaus 13 Apr 99 - 12:30 AM
Penny 13 Apr 99 - 03:10 AM
Steve Parkes 13 Apr 99 - 03:32 AM
The_one_and_only_Dai 13 Apr 99 - 03:41 AM
AlistairUK 13 Apr 99 - 06:03 AM
Penny 13 Apr 99 - 06:52 AM
Bert 13 Apr 99 - 09:41 AM
Steve Parkes 13 Apr 99 - 11:57 AM
AlistairUK 13 Apr 99 - 12:22 PM
Bert 13 Apr 99 - 01:21 PM
AlistairUK 13 Apr 99 - 02:42 PM
Bert 13 Apr 99 - 03:50 PM
Mo 13 Apr 99 - 06:41 PM
Den 13 Apr 99 - 07:26 PM
Penny 13 Apr 99 - 07:32 PM
Paul G. 13 Apr 99 - 08:54 PM
Barbara 13 Apr 99 - 11:13 PM
katlaughing 14 Apr 99 - 01:43 AM
bseed(charleskratz) 14 Apr 99 - 02:33 AM
bseed(charleskratz) 14 Apr 99 - 02:47 AM
catspaw49 14 Apr 99 - 03:54 AM
alison 14 Apr 99 - 04:08 AM
AlistairUK 14 Apr 99 - 05:16 AM
Bert 14 Apr 99 - 09:19 AM
Cara 14 Apr 99 - 12:39 PM
catspaw49 14 Apr 99 - 01:20 PM
AlistairUK 14 Apr 99 - 02:08 PM
Barbara 14 Apr 99 - 02:15 PM
katlaughing 14 Apr 99 - 03:51 PM
Bert 14 Apr 99 - 04:00 PM
LEJ 14 Apr 99 - 06:34 PM
bseed(charleskratz) 14 Apr 99 - 09:15 PM
JB3 26 Apr 99 - 04:09 AM
Tucker 26 Apr 99 - 04:32 AM
Metchosin 14 Apr 00 - 05:51 PM
katlaughing 14 Apr 00 - 06:19 PM
Metchosin 14 Apr 00 - 06:24 PM
Metchosin 14 Apr 00 - 06:24 PM
Mbo 14 Apr 00 - 07:14 PM
kendall 14 Apr 00 - 07:33 PM
Sorcha 14 Apr 00 - 07:41 PM
Mbo 14 Apr 00 - 07:54 PM
katlaughing 14 Apr 00 - 09:04 PM
Hollowfox 15 Apr 00 - 11:36 AM
Richard Bridge 15 Apr 00 - 01:28 PM
wysiwyg 15 Apr 00 - 01:58 PM
catspaw49 15 Apr 00 - 02:02 PM
Gary T 15 Apr 00 - 02:38 PM
catspaw49 15 Apr 00 - 02:45 PM
Gary T 15 Apr 00 - 02:58 PM
Bill D 15 Apr 00 - 05:31 PM
Sorcha 15 Apr 00 - 05:55 PM
catspaw49 15 Apr 00 - 06:38 PM
Uncle_DaveO 15 Apr 00 - 11:45 PM
Gary T 16 Apr 00 - 12:45 AM
Billy the Bus 16 Apr 00 - 03:09 AM
Kelida 16 Apr 00 - 03:30 AM
Uncle_DaveO 16 Apr 00 - 10:36 AM
Caitrin 16 Apr 00 - 11:44 AM
Mbo 16 Apr 00 - 12:10 PM
Sorcha 16 Apr 00 - 12:33 PM
Metchosin 16 Apr 00 - 02:02 PM
wysiwyg 16 Apr 00 - 02:10 PM
Metchosin 16 Apr 00 - 02:22 PM
Mbo 16 Apr 00 - 02:48 PM
Caitrin 16 Apr 00 - 02:52 PM
wysiwyg 16 Apr 00 - 04:16 PM
Uncle_DaveO 16 Apr 00 - 04:44 PM
Bill D 16 Apr 00 - 05:21 PM
Metchosin 16 Apr 00 - 07:55 PM
Caitrin 16 Apr 00 - 09:39 PM
wysiwyg 05 Sep 01 - 12:42 PM
GUEST,pauperback 05 Aug 17 - 08:28 PM
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Subject: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: katlaughing
Date: 11 Apr 99 - 06:11 PM

Just figured maybe we should start another generation of these, as the other is getting so long, it takes quite a bit of time to load and I know some on here have said they may not have the capacity of time for a long one.

So, anymore? I've really, really enjoyed everyone's postings.

BTW, whenever I read an English novel and read the word "plimsoll", I thought they were refering to a delicate ladies' slipper? Could that have been where the word originated from?

Over here in the US, rubber-soled gym shoes would be that or sneaks or sneakers and well as tennies or tennis shoes. Women's high heels are called pumps.I have a girlfriend who says any high heels over 3 inches are called "F*#& me, heels"! Mainly because ya' can't walk in 'em, so that's about all they are good for. **NOI**

For those of you in OZ: saw my first robin last weekend, in the middle of a wet, wet snowstorm which left a three & a half foot drift at our front door. Crazy bird! Happy autumn to you all.

katlaughing


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Mo
Date: 11 Apr 99 - 06:44 PM

No Kat, a plimsoll is the same over here - that rubber soled gym shoe. Can't remember why, but there is also the Plimsoll line on a ship which is it's loading levels - named after someone called Plimsoll who worked out all the mathematics of it - maybe a connection? We also call them sandshoes (abbreviated to sannies or saunies) in Scotland.

I've heard heeled shoes called pumps too - but in the UK they're more typically called court shoes. Pumps to me suggests flat shoes. Three inches?? ALL my court shoes are over three inches! It's when they get over five....!! What about flip-flops do you have them over there? Those flat rubbery beach shoes which are held on by a thong between your big toe and the rest? And just to add to the confusion bedroom slippers are sometimes called baffies here - or maybe thats just my family... Shoeless Mo from soggy Glasgow.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: katlaughing
Date: 11 Apr 99 - 08:19 PM

Flip-flops or thongs, over here, as well as Tivas (tee-vahz) for the brand most popular.

baffies? That's good, I'll have to start using that one! I love it! Is it derived from "baffled"?**Smile**

katl


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: catspaw49
Date: 11 Apr 99 - 08:46 PM

Since y'all are on the subject, why are those slide-in shoes caled "MULES?"

catspaw


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Barbara
Date: 11 Apr 99 - 08:58 PM

The thingie to hold your hair back, or in a pincurl in US of A is called a bobby pin, but my M'in-law, who hails from Godalming(sp?)in the UK calls them 'curvy grips'. I thought for the longest time she was saying "Kirby grip" and it was a brand name.

Joe, guess my folks who were born and raised in Highland Park(in the middle of Detroit) are relative newcomers compared to your kin, but mine say "Lasher", I'm pretty sure. I WILL double check it.
Where do you suppose "cattywampus" comes from (meaning skewed, or messed up)? Is it related to cattycorner? And is rapscallion related either to skallywag(scamp) or scallion (an onion)? Blessings,
Barbara, taking a break from making tree masks.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Banjer
Date: 11 Apr 99 - 09:03 PM

Lord now we're talkin' bout foot wear..and while we're on the subject what are "trainers" in the UK? I've seen references to that term several times and can only assume some form of sneakers. Just to keep this thread "music oriented".....

Beans, beans the musical fruit,
They produce a smell not unlike my boot!

Surely you see the connection?


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: katlaughing
Date: 11 Apr 99 - 09:21 PM

rubber bands, for the hair, are refered to, at least by everyone I met, as "elastics" in New England.

Were "mules" originally made from muleskin?

cattywampus sounds related to some of the New england Indian names, such as Misquamicut (a beach in RI)


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Mo
Date: 11 Apr 99 - 09:25 PM

Banjer - trainers are indeed sneakers - short for training shoes, usually your more heavy duty footwear than the aforementioned plimsolls. Frequently worn with a pair of trackie bums/bottoms (tracksuit bottoms). Barbara - you were right first time - it is a Kirby grip! Your spelling is spot on too, pronounced, as I'm sure you are well aware, "Goddle-ming".

Appropos of absolutely nothing there is a great saying in the RN "Thats life in a blue suit" - basically it means in life you gotta take the rough with the smooth and just get on with without whingeing. Actually there's loads of stuff to do with sailing as I think Bert mentioned in the other thread like doing your washing is called "Dhobeying" which you do with "Dhobey dust" - washing powder. I love colloqialisms, 'specially other peoples - you get so used to your own you end up not noticing them.

Mo


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Susan A-R
Date: 11 Apr 99 - 09:45 PM

How about soda or "pop, or as some Boston area New Englanders say "tonic"

Then there's those big fat sandwiches, Hogies, heroes, subs, dagwoods, . . .

Back on food again, guess it's my obsession and signature. (can you believe that I'm one of those relatively skinny cooks that I never thought I'd trust,)


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Banjer
Date: 11 Apr 99 - 10:37 PM

If were going to go to food, add the ongoing confusion of GYROS, is it a gIro or a Hero? Have heard so many different pronunciations of that word. Tarpon Springs, a predominately Greek community not far from here is no help, they call them by both names there and both sides claim they are using the original version.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: catspaw49
Date: 11 Apr 99 - 11:32 PM

That's exactly why all the Geerow,Jeerow,Gearrow,Jeerrow,Heerow,Highrow joints fold up. Nobody can say it and everybody's too embarassed to ask, so they have a Big Mac instead. What a gawdawful sandwich that is.....the only times I've ever had a "Big Mac Attack" is about 20 minutes AFTER I've eaten one!!!

Ah, Tarpon Springs....very Greek and very fishing oriented, and a "quaint" little place to boot. There is however an odd smell in the air of deadfish and nutmeg.

catspaw


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Pete M
Date: 11 Apr 99 - 11:47 PM

Well I thought Giro's was how you were sent your dole money.

Since Mo mentioned it, two RN ones I still find myself using are: "Different ship different cap tally." = the same thing may be done differently in differnt places; and its obverse, frequently said as a rejoinder to the above: "Yeh, but they're all painted the same shade of grey." ie differences are only superficial.

Pete M


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: rich r
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 12:30 AM

I beg forgiveness if this was already mentioned in the massive prequel thread, but there is a very similar discussion going on at www.salonmagazine.com in the "table talk" section. Theirs began March 24 with the basic "pop" vs "soda" dichotomy and has diverged. When I last looked there were over 180 posts to that one. It is a bit more manageable because you only get 10 or so at a time and reload as you go. that also means you can quit any time without feeling guilty about waiting half a day for the whole thing to load. I don't know how much duplication there is because I haven't plunged deeply into either the Mudcat or the Salon series.

rich r


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: JB3
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 12:31 AM

When I first moved to Kentucky (Somerset is somewhat south and east of Berea, I went to college there, too), there were several turns of phrase that surprised me. I asked for a lift to the store and my cousin said, "I don't care to," meaning she didn't mind. They also use the term "stove-up", as in she fell up the stairs and stove up her fingers, or my back is all stove up. I guess this is because a stovepipe collapses on itself? I especially like the way they call Chevys "shivvys" or "shiver-lays" and motorcycles "sickles". Athens Ky is pronounced with a long A. Versailles is ver-sales.

June


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: catspaw49
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 03:02 AM

Hi JB3....Lived myself for a couple years in Someset, actually Bronstan, across the Lake from Burnside. Best thing was that my home was exactly on the point where Big South Fork bends into the Lake; only time I ever lived in a house you could literally pinpoint on a National map!

You're into dance aren't you? Were you around Berea during the time of Ethel Capps? Just wonderin'? And close bt Somerset you left out another town, Monticello...pronounced Monta-sella.

catspaw


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 04:01 AM

I always thought it was the French who spell better than they pronounce? Or was Bugs just trying to divert attention?

Steve


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: AlistairUK
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 06:05 AM

Okay, food especially sandwiches were called Sarnies where I come from. Then you had filled baps...which I mentioned to a friend of mine from the north of england and he thought I was talking about a "well stacked bird".

just to bring the tone down I saw Tarpon in the thread and thought it was tampon so here are the "colloquialisms" I know for female hygenic products. Tammies...jamrags. I am sure that I have just offended someone...but for condoms ( take note Art) there's skins...overcoats and macs...also wellies...johnnies.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Tucker
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 06:18 AM

Catspaw and Alistar, you have made my morning. Alistar you win but by a .........sorry I can't use it here. LMAO. jammies....did you make that up?? Some colloq's from here in southern ohio. Soddie for Scioto turned around.......lost sauce.......chili dog cock.......female genitilia ( explain that to me!!!)


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: katlaughing
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 09:34 AM

My girldfriend calls hers a "twidgett". She and her boyfriend came up with that, so that they could joke about it in "polite company" and none the wiser. They felt there were plenty euphemisms for the male appendage, but not much that wasn't considerd vulgar and was easily recognizable for the female.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: AlistairUK
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 09:40 AM

kat: I was thinking more along the lines about why you guys where at certain times of the month...but twidget has now become part of my sexual lexicon :o). A male appendage was colourfuly known as a todger where I come from.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: The_one_and_only_Dai
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 10:12 AM

Training shoes/plimsolls. Hm. Known as 'daps' where I come from, never worked that one out. Miners' overshoes?
Mr. Plimsoll was an MP or something, he suggested that ships have a line painted around them so that one could tell if they were overloaded. My understanding was that somebody noticed the line around the sole on the shoes, and remarked upon the similarity.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 10:42 AM

Samuel Plimsoll. He was very concerned about working conditions for merchant sailors in the nineteenth century. I think he published a book called "The Sailor's Friend". At any rate, he introduced a lot of reforms which were unpopular with ship owners, including the Plimsoll line. This was orignally a single line (with a circle through it) painted on the side of a ship, showing the deepest safe loading the ship could take. The idea was to stop insurance scams, where the ship was overloaded so it sank (with loss of hands, officers and any passengers!), so the owners could claim the insurance. It became law after long and bitter arguments between the interested lobbies in Parliament; but the bad guys got it amended so they could paint the line where they wanted, instead of where the Board of Trade would have put it.

Er ... what was the question?!

Talking of alternative names for naughty bits, A. P. Herbert wrote a very amusing (and not offensive) poem on the subject, which I can't for the life of me remember, except it refers to "such a short and unattrctive little word". Any offers?

Steve


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: AlistairUK
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 11:29 AM

Thank you Steve, I always wanted to know the origin of the name of the plimmies I used to wear when I was tearing about the freezing jim in my vest and shorts in infants school. My mum used to by us plimsolls thinking that they were okay and it was bloody years before I could persuade her to buy me a nice trendy pair of trainers from Tesco's.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: catspaw49
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 11:48 AM

One of the guys at the local radio station was searching for a different word (the station I gave you the website to kat) and they all agreed on Hoozhee. This was about the time the subject came up with our youngest, so a Hoozhee he had. This could have worked out better as when he started school he evidently told another boy he was wrong about having a penis...it was a hoozhee!!!(Yeah, that's my boy alright) This conversation took place while they were going to the restroom before lunch. We get a call that evening from an irate mother who explains that she has always been medically accurate with her children and we should be too, and that her son was somehow traumatized by all this! I stood in the kitchen listening to Karen take this for 15 minutes and finally took the phone and asked her what we were expected to do. She launched into a long harangue and I stopped her and asked again. She said that we should teach our children proper medical terminology. SO (catspaw goes over the top in his real life too) I asked which she would prefer, Dick or Cock? At this point I still don't know as she hung up on me.

catspaw


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: AlistairUK
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 11:53 AM

Sounds to me like you were making an offer there 'Paw.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Bert
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 05:28 PM

Penny, continuing place names in England. How does one pronounce "Meopham"??

Bert.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Penny
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 05:50 PM

Tricky, like trying to transcribe Sahrf Lun'on. Nearest is Mep'm, but I've just noticed there's almost a short 'o' between the p and the m instead of the usual uh vowel as in Peck'm. It is supposed to be the longest village in England, and has one of the oldest cricket clubs. Also incomers who buy houses by the cricket ground and then try to stop matches because of the threat to their windows. And a very good old fashioned baker.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: AlistairUK
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 05:54 PM

the úh'sound is called a schwa Penny and it does come into Mep'm but in a very flattened form.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Penny
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 05:58 PM

Good, I can leave that sort of thing to you instead of sitting here thinking "do I really say it like that?", and after a while thinking I can't do. Then there was the time I dialled a Meopham number and was answered, in a beautiful soft Gaelic voice, "Machrihanish?" and she really was there, not Meopham.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Penny
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 06:25 PM

And now I know what to call the thing that determined the whole shape of my teaching life. At college I had a difference of opinion with tutors from the Initial teaching Alphabet people, who were very convincing until we were required to write the story of Cinderella in ITA, and I got stuck on the name. Given that the premise of ITA was that each symbol represented a single definite sound (although that sound might vary from accent to accent), and there was no ambiguity, I couldn't get past representing the schwa as an e after the d, and an a after the l. So given a choice between an ITA school and a non-ITA school, I wasn't going where I would constantly have to monitor my spelling for disguised schwas. What would my life have been if the ITA had included a sign for it? Who can tell?


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: AlistairUK
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 06:34 PM

lord olord..I remeber ITA when I was at infants school. I could never understand it because I had learned to read and write normally before I got to school. So all those Paul and Sally books made no sense to me, though I liked the pictures. They had to get my mother in because they thought I had some learning disability. She had to explain to my teachers that i already nknew how to read and write. Did they evr have this nonsense in the U.S. ?


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Bert
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 06:59 PM

Thanks Penny & Alistair.

I'd forgotten about the ITA disaster. I remember a kid down our street who flat out refused to learn it because it wasn't 'real' reading.

My own daughter had a similar problem. She was way ahead in arithmetic and went to a new school where they used Cusenaire Rods. She came home and said "These teachers have the stupid idea that a pink rod and a yellow rod equals a green rod" (Or whatever the colors are).

Do teachers still use these *%^$&# gimmicks to bring everyone down to the 'idiot level'?

Bert.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Penny
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 07:10 PM

I haven't met ITA for years and years. Cuisenaire and Colorfactor rods still have a use, but need to be used judicially, where needed. I find that looking at the proportions, rather than the colours, helps children who have a weak grasp of number relationships. And I always use number words, not colours. Research shows that at least some children do need the physical prompt of handling things to reinforce number sense, and apparently (this is my sister's field of work) even adults can need to revisit concrete expressions of mathematical concepts. I think the problem was, as you hinted, that things which were needed by some children, and at different times, were imposed on all, all the time.

If imposed on all, one usually finds that there are a lot of small log cabins, towers, seesaws and catapults about where one isn't, and all the lower value rods are oin top of the cupboards or behind the radiators!


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Cuilionn
Date: 12 Apr 99 - 09:02 PM

Back tae th' wee sandwich debate... I wis recently visitin' a friend on th' Amurrican East Coast, an' noticed a wee shop advertisin' "Hot Italians Here." I askit ma friend what sairt o' folk th' locals were, tae think they cuid get awa' wi' sic ethnic slurs an' sic... turns oot that an "Italian" is th' same thing as th' "Hoagy" I grew up enjoyin' in th' Amurrican Northwest: a delicatessen sandwich, usually made on a "hoagy roll" or "french roll", laden wi' meat an' cheese. 'Minds me o' th' puir Oregon lad whae went tae study in London for hauf a year, an' went intae a shop tae ask for "a ham and cheese sandwich." He cuidnae understand why th' lady ahint th' coonter keppit hollerin' "BAP!" at him!!!

--Cuilionn, whae disnae want her soda breid confused wi' "pop" breid or "tonic" breid ava'!


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: alison
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 12:20 AM

hi,

Yeah try asking an Aussie what they want on their bap, or in their piece... and they look at you as if you're mad.

Jammies..... were always pyjamas (or PJ's, or jimjams).... ""go and get yer jammies on" Slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 12:30 AM

Steve Parkes- The poem you refer to is in the database--Search for [Doctor's Lament]. Are you sure of the authorship?


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Penny
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 03:10 AM

Used to be able to buy huffkins at Kentish bakers, there was a good one in Dover market square. Now its always baps, which are similar, but not the same.

I like stotty cakes, when in Northumbria, which are again similar, but much bigger. They do filled ones like sarnies.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 03:32 AM

Dick, I'm never really sure about anything (after all, isn't everything merely an illusion?), but I find if I say something boldly and with confidence, people will believe it!

Seriously, I heard the first part, The Doctor's Lament, quoted by Anna Raeburn, a British agony aunt, on BBC Radio 4 a few years ago. She attributed it to A. P. Herbert, which was a little bit of a surprise; I know his humorous short stories, but I've never come across any poetry by him. Maybe I should get put more!

Steve


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: The_one_and_only_Dai
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 03:41 AM

Mo: Dhobi is Hindi (or something) for laundry. See Steve Parkes' entries in the other thread about the 'wallah' suffix. It's in use in the army as well as the RN.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: AlistairUK
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 06:03 AM

I use cuisinaire rods in teaching english as a foreign language, they're great to show how a sentence works.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Penny
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 06:52 AM

I see how that would work - I have known colour used with words on blocks - I'll pass the idea on to our language unit. Not EFL, or ESL, but language processing problems.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Bert
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 09:41 AM

Arithmetic is a game that goes "Let's pretend that we can have numbers without quantities". All that those $*%&# rods do is re-associate the quantities. They miss the whole point of what arithmetic is trying to do in the first place - separate number and quantity.

Bert.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 11:57 AM

If we're going to discus number theory, I think we should have a separate thread. Well, don't look at me! I do know the ancient Greeks were unable to develop algebra, since they reasoned "x2 + x" is adding an area to a length, which is silly. Didn't bother the Babylonians, though: they invented the formula for solving quadratic equations by geometry.

Steve

P.S. If you want to know more, there's a site called "Ask Dr Math" somewhere, but you have to be still at school (or a liar!) to qualify.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: AlistairUK
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 12:22 PM

So Steve, you still at school then? Which form?


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Bert
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 01:21 PM

Sorry Steve, that's thread drift for you, or should we say Mudcattywampus.

Bert.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: AlistairUK
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 02:42 PM

Names for abodes: I know gaff, pad,


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Bert
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 03:50 PM

Give me a key and I'll play in any flat.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Mo
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 06:41 PM

Anyone fancy a fly's graveyard after their piece? It's a small cake made up of two squares of pastry - flaky, I think, with a currant mixture in between. It's posh name (now there's an old colloquialism for you - Port Out Starboard Home) is a fruit square. Fly's graveyard is more graphic though.....

Mo


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Den
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 07:26 PM

Nothing but shocked faces, in a bar with a bunch of guys from the building site, not long after arriving in Canada, after my announcement that I would like to be knocked up at 7 am. What ever happened to the English language.


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From: Penny
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 07:32 PM

Mo, we had something similar at school, called dry fly pie.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Paul G.
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 08:54 PM

I heard this one today and had to drop it in here...when the outcome isn't worth the effort expended, "the juice ain't worth the squeezin'"...only in Florida.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Barbara
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 11:13 PM

How 'bout, "Thet ain't worth siccum"? meaning not worth the trouble of siccing your dog on whom or whatever? Or "don't that just rot your socks?"


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: katlaughing
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 01:43 AM

Went to see the old son of the old and now deceased fiddlemaker who made my dad's fiddle and did a hairsbreadth repair on the "f" holes on mine years ago, before dad let me have it. The son is 78 and still following in his dad's footsteps, using his dad's old tools even.

Anyway, he's an old Coloradoan, too, so had to spin a few yarns while I was there. And I heard something I'd forgotten about some of the old-timers. He was a railraod man and started telling me a story about when he worked for the Rio Grande RR, only he didn't pronounce it "ree-oh"; he said "rye-oh". I knew I'd heard it before as soon as he said it, just had been a long time!

katlaughing


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: bseed(charleskratz)
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 02:33 AM

I know there are many colorful expressions for a male's "amusing himself by abusing himself":


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: bseed(charleskratz)
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 02:47 AM

WARNING: Some of you may find the following post mildly offensive; some may, indeed, find it extremely offensive. If you feel this might apply to you, please scroll past. If you read it and are offended, then "it's your bad," to use a contemporary African-American idiom.

I know there are colorful expressions for a male's "amusing himself by abusing himself": "choking the monkey," "wrestling the one-eyed snake," "beating the meat," as well as the more mundane: "jacking off," "whacking off," "beating off," etc. Are there similar expressions for female masturbation? --seed


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: catspaw49
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 03:54 AM

How about I just add a few to the male side there Seed Ol' Buddy...............First, a personal favorite, Whip the Bishop.

Spank the Monkey, Choke your Chicken, Bop your Baloney, Pound your Pud, Have a Date with Ma Thumb and Her 2 (3 or 4) Fingers, Wind your Crank, Polish the Knob, Have a Wank, Watch Willie Spit..........

catspaw


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: alison
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 04:08 AM

On the above subject, the Macarena parody "Hey Masturbator".. mentions most of them

slainte

alison


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From: AlistairUK
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 05:16 AM

I don't know why I know this but there is a web site devoted entirely to this at www.masturbation.com. On the subject of slightly off colour colloquailisms...for doing..ahem...number 2s.

Laying a log....having a dump...taking a load off.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Bert
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 09:19 AM

OF COURSE you would know it Alistair!

You layed yourself wide open for that one.

Bert.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Cara
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 12:39 PM

How about "having a date with Rosie Palmer and her 5 sisters"

There was a pop song a few years back called "Turning Japanese" (Turning Japanese I think I'm turning Japanese I really think so) It's quite catchy and it took me a while to realize that it was about masturbation.


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From: catspaw49
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 01:20 PM

Ah yes, Rosie Palmer.....makes me think of all those "National Lampoon" names that I'd use to send junk mail to friends. Surprisingly enough, they're still friends.

Ray D. Ader, Clark Barr, Ben Dover, Peter Guzzinia, Jack Mahogoff, Red Ruffinsor, Phil Addio, Connie Lingus,and her sister Anna Lingus, Dwight Mannsburden, and of course Hugh G. Reckshon. There's no end to these turkeys.

catspaw


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From: AlistairUK
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 02:08 PM

I actually went to school with a Master Bates.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Barbara
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 02:15 PM

Last time we had this discussion we ended up here too (surprise, surprise), and I think I posted a song from a SoCal group called the Foremen, now defunct. One of them wrote a song called "Firing the Surgeon General" that was chockablock with euphemisms for masturbation -- including the title (remember the Surgeon General that got fired for mentioning the M word?)
It's highly educational and contains a number of phrases I'd never heard, including some that they've added to the lexicon like "Free the Willy" and "Pat the Roberston" (catspaw, you can say "Patterson", instead). I can't find it right now, the Forum Search must be down...
If I can't find it, I'll post it again...
Blessings,
Barbara


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: katlaughing
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 03:51 PM

My dad worked with a guy whose last name was Kat - he really and truly named his son Thomas.

As for female mastrubation and euphemisms, there must be some about "secret joy" or something Asian related to ben-wa balls. In that feudal and restictive society of ancient Japan, there had to be something to make the girls smile! I've read of older women, gently rocking back and forth in their chairs, very contented and they weren't contemplating their navels!

Titrivate your twidget?

katlaf


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Bert
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 04:00 PM

Or as Ken Dodd says "Do you tickle die ham, Missus?"


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: LEJ
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 06:34 PM

Cara-you mean "Turning Japanese" was about masturbation? No wonder I kept mixing up my L's and R's in my teen years.

Ever heard Jackson Brown's poignant tribute to masturbation on his "Running on Empty" album? It was called "Rosie" and I listened many times before realizing it was about "Rosie Palm."

" Rosie you're alright ( you wear my ring)

when you hold me tight (Rosie that's my thing)

When you turn out the light, I got to hand it to me

Looks like it's me & you again tonight, Rosie"

Quite ..ahem..touching.

For all you old hippies out there- I was thinking of all the hip terms we used, how some are still in use, others date us immediately. STILL HIP- flashback, trip or tripping,bummer,"psych" as in psych someone out,joint, reefer,acid,freak-out DATED- Freak(hippie),Far out!, Groovy!,pad and crash-pad,heavy(serious),and for the Brits- fab and gear, and birds(girls). Of course, Mike Meyers may resurrect some of these with his Austin Powers movies.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: bseed(charleskratz)
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 09:15 PM

Thongs (aside from the bikini type) are most frequently called "rubber zoriis" here in California, I think. --seed


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: JB3
Date: 26 Apr 99 - 04:09 AM

Hey, Catspaw, Yes, I knew Ethel Capps thru Christmas School, but I was a freshman the year John Ramsay took over the Berea Country Dancers. When were you at Berea? Did they have the Shoe Library then, too? It was a standing joke that us poor hillbillies had to go check out a pair of shoes when we first got to campus. June


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Tucker
Date: 26 Apr 99 - 04:32 AM

Maybe just me, but I like to call my cordless phone the "walkabout". Sounds a wee bit less technical than all the other things you could call it.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Metchosin
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 05:51 PM

Well kat, there is the term here about "getting a wide on".


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: katlaughing
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 06:19 PM

Thanks for finding this one, Mets! I looked all over for it to refresh yesterday and it just wouldn't come up! Now, I have to go back and read what in the aitch you are referring to!**BG**

kat


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Metchosin
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 06:24 PM

well if you can't find it I'm afraid it's a little to late for you kat, and as far as it coming up, I think your also out of luck there. It is the female equivalent of a "hard on"


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Metchosin
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 06:24 PM

well if you can't find it I'm afraid it's a little to late for you kat, and as far as it coming up, I think your also out of luck there. It is the female equivalent of a "hard on"


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Mbo
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 07:14 PM

CAITRIN! How dare you know that?! I though only my family said "Jebip"--except we say "East Jebip" which is even MORE backwoodsy! My Mom & Dad used to know a guy from West Virginia who used to say that something looked or smelled like "20 miles of what-the-hell."

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: kendall
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 07:33 PM

Sorry Kat, but, I heard "twidgit" when I was a boy. also, "twitchit"


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Sorcha
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 07:41 PM

Scatalogical one at our house: petting Miss Kitty, others"
Piss up a rope--don't bother me, or too stupid to "piss...", cattle gaurd/auto gate=bars in the road to keep the cows from crossing, for flip-flops also shower shoes, cockroach killers=western/cowboy boots with pointed toes.
Will probably think of others, looks like we might need to start #3.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Mbo
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 07:54 PM

Oh yeah, big goofy shoes kids wear today we call "ant-mashers" and "gunboats."

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: katlaughing
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 09:04 PM

LOL! my words come back ta haunt me!


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Hollowfox
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 11:36 AM

Here's one I've only heard in my family: When someone looked vaguely ill, someone would remark "You look like the owl that ate a bad mouse." This evolved to the self-diagnosis of "I'm feeling a little bit owly."


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 01:28 PM

Meopham is pronounced Mep'm. Like Igtham is Eye-t'm, and Wrotham is Roo-t'm. And Trottiscliffe is Trosley. I don't know why a question about the pronunciation of Kent placenames is in this thread, but there's the answer.


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From: wysiwyg
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 01:58 PM

Feeling a little brown around the edges. (just past being crunchy and not as far as burned out/overwhelmed)

Bein' puny (sick).


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From: catspaw49
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 02:02 PM

Hmmmm......yeah, that one describes me today Praise, but Karen is more "Green around the gills"...one of my family's favorites.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Gary T
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 02:38 PM

Feeling or looking "like death warmed over"--feeling/looking quite sick. And for those considered not-so-good-looking, looks "like 40 miles of bad road" or "like the north end of a southbound horse".


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From: catspaw49
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 02:45 PM

We always used 'mule' Gary..LOL.

One of my favorites for feeling lousy came from an east Tennesse boy I was in college with.....

"Feelin' like I bin et by a bar an shit oer a cliff."

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Gary T
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 02:58 PM

I'll try to remember that one, Spaw. I love it!


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Bill D
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 05:31 PM

"I feel like I been shot at and missed and shit at and hit"

"Some folks ain't got the sense God give a retarded rubber duck"

"It were rainin' like a cow pissin' on a flat rock"

"If it don't go, don't force it, get a bigger hammer"

....from sayings pronounced by the Wichita State Univ. buildings & grounds crew, circa 1970


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From: Sorcha
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 05:55 PM

"been hit with a ugly stick forty-'leven times"


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: catspaw49
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 06:38 PM

I asked this one before, but I haven't received any real answers. Many years ago, this friend's father was perturbed about something my friend was or wasn't doing and said:

"You act like a man with a rubber butt plug."

Exactly what does that mean and how is it that a man with said device acts?

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 11:45 PM

Place names: The classic to me is Cholmondeley.

Of course it's pronounced "Chumley".

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Gary T
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 12:45 AM

I don't have an authoritative answer to your question about the rubber butt plug, Spaw, but I think I can make a strong case for this interpretation:

It literally means having a rubber plug, like a cork, inserted into the terminal orifice of the alimentary canal (pretty fancy way to say it, huh?). Between the hard to ignore sensation, like having one's undies wedged in there but much more intense, and the implication of constipation, one's mind would be hard pressed to focus on anything else. This would tend to make one act rather goofy, unable to pursue a coherent line of thinking for more than a few seconds at a time. Thus, one would act like an ass (donkey) due to a mass in his ass (butt/bum).

That's my opinion, which reminds me, opinions are like alimentary canal terminal orifices, everyone's got one.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Billy the Bus
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 03:09 AM

Feeling/looking crook (=sick)

"I feel/look like a sackful of arseholes" "I feel/look like someting the cat dragged in"

Or, for death..

"he went to sleep and woke up dead" - way to go. "oh, he's dead just now"

The other day, a punter on a bus tour asked about "Arkright", who happened to be on the mainland at the time. "Oh, he's on the other side" I said. "I didn't know he'd died" came the stunned reply "I was just talking to him on the phone a few days back". I cracked up.

Well, bauck to Mudcat Wireless (Radio)

Cheers - Sam


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Kelida
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 03:30 AM

Here in Cincinnati, people ask "Please?" as in "Huh?" or "What?"

People from out of town always look at me a bit strangely, but in a fairly conservative town you should expect a bit of politeness.

Peace--Keli


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 10:36 AM

Saying "Please?" for "What?" or "Huh" sounds to me like a direct transliteration from German. They'll say, "Bitte?" which is "Please" in that situation.

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Caitrin
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 11:44 AM

We occasionally say someone "doesn't have the sense God gave animal crackers."
If there's a whole lot of something, there's forty-leven-dozen of it.
My younger brother created several of his own little phrases as a child that have been appropriated into family lingo:
If things are really crazy, they are "Holy Cow in the Radio Shack."
Annoying people are "weasel-rats."
And, if someone is being irritable, they will be asked "Who burned your cookie?"


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Mbo
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 12:10 PM

Sounds like a bit of my own inventions:
Go eat a cookie
Go step on a sausage
Go stuff Play-Doh up your nose


--Mbo


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Sorcha
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 12:33 PM

Put a pickle in it--shut up
My own "sensatory"--where made up words come from
kill rats--do errands
busy as a one-armed paper hanger


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Metchosin
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 02:02 PM

I've heard Saskatchewan as being described as "so flat you can watch your dog run away for three days."

crummy - a truck with a roofed box for transporting logging crews to and from work.

The name is derived from the fact that in the "old days" of logging, the loggers outer clothing was usually lice infested and a "crumb" was a body louse.

Further the term "antsy" is used here and refers to an agitated person or one having "ants in his pants" derived from the loggers habit of putting his louse-infested (crummy) clothing on ant hills, to have them "dry-cleaned".


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: wysiwyg
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 02:10 PM

She was so ugly she couldn't sneak up on a stump; she'd got hit with the ugly stick but they used the whole tree. But don't get yer panties in a wad over it. (all from Alabama)

Being up to your crotch in crocodiles, in some places, is just like being up to your ass in alligators (way busy).

Speaking of stumps, do y'all know what it means for a man's mare (female horse) to be stump broke? Wyoming sheep would probably get that one, it's quite beastly.

~Susan~


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Metchosin
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 02:22 PM

oh yeah, I should probably cite my reference, regarding logging terms, from "Wetcoast Words, A Dictionary of British Columbia Words and Phrases by Tom Parkin, published 1989 by Orca Books"

There are enough in it to make this thread inoperable and quite a few are now universal in the English language.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Mbo
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 02:48 PM

We have a rather funny saying....when some says something, trying to explain, and you don't want to hear it, you say "ahh...bep bep bep!"

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Caitrin
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 02:52 PM

Antsy's used here, too. Along with referring to someone having "ants in his/her pants" to mean that he/she is fidgety.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: wysiwyg
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 04:16 PM

Mbo, in Hardiman's family, it's pur-ka-pur-ka-pur, either to mean what you described above or to say something that you're pretty sure will get that response...

We'll have to watch and see if these become standard Mudcat Threadlingo!

If so, then we could also have:

CatMutterings

CatMuds

CatMouth

LargeMouth Cats

~S~


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 04:44 PM

My mother, faced with something unexpected, shocking, or exasperating, would say, "If that don't cap the climax!"

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Bill D
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 05:21 PM

VERY local saying, as in only our family, and maybe a few people we have told it to...

My wife's mother used to have a boarder, very nice fellow, except for an 'interesting' habit...when there was shared food in the refrigerator (i.e.,ice cream), he would never want to eat the last serving, so he would take half of it...which led to some VERY small portions. It has become a joke in our family in refering to a bit of stuff almost too small to matter, but still put back in the ('fridge'), that there is only a "Weiseger" left, after his last name. Has kind of a ring to it..I can imagine 100 years from now scholars arguing over the origin and spelling.."Weissiger"..."Wiesiger".."wissiger"..etc..

"There any of that chawklet pie left, Maw?"
"Wal, Juniors been at it...only about a Weiseger left"


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Metchosin
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 07:55 PM

Caitrin, now you know how you got those "ants in your pants".


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: Caitrin
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 09:39 PM

Hehheh...I suppose after you get antsy, they crawl in your pants. Or maybe one who has ants in his pants can be described as antsy. *bg*


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: wysiwyg
Date: 05 Sep 01 - 12:42 PM

refresh for new members-- enjoy!


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms II - for faster loading
From: GUEST,pauperback
Date: 05 Aug 17 - 08:28 PM

Community colloquialisms:
The spot on British quip: Arrse flounce

{cernunnos said: ↑

I've enjoyed my time on this site and I'm sorry to disapoint my lezzer readership, but in the now lame PC atmosphere on arrse I see no point in continuing. In short I am gone!
Goodbye all!}

Moderator's reply...

"I just saw the post above, and it led me to think about the various types of Arrse flounce we see so regularly.

1. The genuine flounce. This poster has genuinely had enough of Arrse, but feels the need to tell everyone so rather than just stop logging in anymore. Rarely seen again.

2. The Bounce flounce. Most frequently seen from those who spend time in the depression/cats/dogs threads. They get their knickers in a knot about something and make lengthy and repeated posts about how they can no longer stand the tyranny/bulling etc but then slide back in to contribute yet another post of their mutt with its legs in the air. Guaranteed to be seen again using the same ID, with no evidence of shame about the flounce (may occasionally have a sock puppet so they don't actually have to stay away in the interim). Repeat ad infinitum.

3. The Lazarus flounce. Generally get all excited about some internet slur or hardship and make a great noise about the COs deleting their accounts. Usually seen a few days later in a new ID, clearly identifiable, but without any open admission of being a reincarnation to allow them to continue using the site they were so adamant they were never going to use again just days before."

https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/types-of-arrse-flounce.219540/ 


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Mudcat time: 20 October 11:23 AM EDT

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