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Lyr Add: Clun Malla (Cluain Meala, field of honey)

In Mudcat MIDIs:
The Gaol of Clonmel


AlistairUK 13 Apr 99 - 02:36 PM
Philippa 13 Apr 99 - 06:01 PM
AlistairUK 13 Apr 99 - 06:22 PM
14 Apr 99 - 05:53 AM
Philippa 14 Apr 99 - 07:34 AM
Philippa 14 Apr 99 - 01:54 PM
AlistairUK 14 Apr 99 - 02:10 PM
alison 15 Apr 99 - 06:14 AM
Annraoi 11 May 99 - 11:59 AM
Annraoi 11 May 99 - 02:40 PM
Philippa 12 May 99 - 02:26 PM
Philippa 12 May 99 - 02:50 PM
Philippa 03 Jun 99 - 10:46 AM
Philippa 26 Nov 99 - 02:42 PM
Philippa 08 Dec 99 - 01:50 PM
GUEST,Philippa 24 Jun 02 - 06:26 AM
An Pluiméir Ceolmhar 25 Jun 02 - 07:15 AM
greg stephens 25 Jun 02 - 07:33 AM
An Pluiméir Ceolmhar 25 Jun 02 - 07:35 AM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 27 Jun 02 - 05:56 AM
Fiolar 27 Jun 02 - 10:31 AM
GUEST,Philippa 10 Nov 02 - 02:51 PM
GUEST,PHilippa 20 Nov 02 - 08:12 AM
Dennis the Elder 31 Dec 04 - 05:34 PM
Brían 01 Jan 05 - 02:32 PM
Dennis the Elder 01 Jan 05 - 03:01 PM
Brían 01 Jan 05 - 05:28 PM
GUEST,caoimhinodonnchu@eircom.net 29 Mar 06 - 05:04 PM
MartinRyan 29 Mar 06 - 06:14 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: CLÛN MALLA^^
From: AlistairUK
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 02:36 PM

Couldn't find it in the DT.

CLÛN MALLA

How hard is my fortune
How vain my repining
The strong rope of fate
For my young neck is twining
My strength has departed
My cheeks sunk and sallow
As I languish in chains
In the gaol of Clûn Malla

No boy in the village
Was ever yet milder
I could play with a child
And my sport be no wilder
I could dance without tiring
From morning til evening
And my goal ball I'd strike
To the lightning of heaven

At my bedfoot decaying
My hurley is lying
Through the lads of the village
My goal ball is flying
My horse 'mongst the neighbours
Neglected may fallow
While this heart young and gay
Lies cold in Clûn Malla

Next sunday the pattern
At home will be keeping
The lads of the village
The fields will be sweeping
And the dance of fair maidens
The evening will hallow
While this heart
Young and gay
lies cold in Clûn Malla

Repeat First Verse.


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Subject: RE: ADD LYR: Cluain Meala
From: Philippa
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 06:01 PM

Cluain Meala, field of honey. English lyrics by Sigerson? Liam Clancy did a nice recording of it. I hope to get round to adding the Irish language lyrics later. The English poetic translation is close enough, except rather than being milder than a child (verse 2) the Irish mentions the "White Boys" who took revenge on landlords - after all, why is the hurler being hung?


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Subject: RE: ADD LYR: Clûn Malla
From: AlistairUK
Date: 13 Apr 99 - 06:22 PM

Thank you Philippa, for the correction on the name but also for why the song. I have been singing it for years because of the poetry and the tune and it still seems as fresh to me now as the day when I learnt it, and I still get the same emotions too.


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Subject: Lyr Add: PRÍOSÚN CHLUAIN MEALA
From:
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 05:53 AM

Cluain Meala = Clonmel( as in Co. Tipperary)
Can any Mudcatter say for sure who composed the English version? I think it's published in Kathleen Hoagland's "1000 Years of Irish Poetry".

PRÍOSÚN CHLUAIN MEALA

Ó, bliain is lá amárach
Sea d'fhágas an baile
A' dul go hArd Pádraig,
'Cur lásaí le m' hata.
Bhí Buachaillí Bána ann
Is rás acu ar Eallaibh,
Is mé go dubhach uaigneach
I bpríosún Chluain Meala

Tá mo shrian is mo dhiallait
Ar iasacht le fada.
Mo chamán ar fiaradh
Faoi iarthar mo leapa,
Mo liatróid dá bualadh
Ag buachaillí an ghleanna -
Is go mbuailfinn poc báire
Chomh hard leis na fearaibh!

A Chiarraigh bígí ' guí liom,
Is bog binn liom bhur nglórtha,
Is beag a shíleas-sa choíche
Ná béarfainnse beo oraibh:
Go mbeidh ár dtrí cinn-ne
Ar trí spící mar sheó acu,
Faoi schneachta na hoíche,
Is gach síon eile á ngeobhaidh chugainn!


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Subject: misplaced aiches
From: Philippa
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 07:34 AM

corrections to the lyrics above (typos):
verse 2 "liathróid" (ball)
verse 3 "Faoi shneachta" (under snow)

The English is not a literal translation, but it IS the same song


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Subject: RE: ADD LYR: Cluain Meala
From: Philippa
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 01:54 PM

I've just had a look at Donal O'Sullivan. "Songs of the Irish", Dublin: Brown and Nolan, 1960. Príosún Chluain Meala is included, with musical notation, Irish Gaelic words, literal translation, poetic translation - which is attributed to J.J. Callanan and background notes. From the evidence of the song, it is the story of a lad named O'Donnell, thought to be one of the Whiteboys, of Iveragh Co Kerry hung at Clonmel Gaol.


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Subject: RE: ADD LYR: Clûn Malla
From: AlistairUK
Date: 14 Apr 99 - 02:10 PM

This is grand Philippa...all I need to know now is ...who were the whiteboys exactly?


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Subject: Tune Add: THE GAOL OF CLONMEL
From: alison
Date: 15 Apr 99 - 06:14 AM

Hi,

thanks to a GIF from Philippa...... here's the tune (it said andantino.. so I've guessed the tempo.. hope its about right...)

MIDI file: GAOLOF~1.MID

Timebase: 480

Name: THE GAOL OF CLONMEL
TimeSig: 3/4 24 8
Tempo: 089 (666667 microsec/crotchet)
Key: F
Start
1200 1 69 096 0118 0 69 096 0002 1 70 083 0120 1 72 092 0003 0 70 083 0475 0 72 092 0002 1 70 080 0478 0 70 080 0002 1 69 086 0478 0 69 086 0002 1 70 088 0478 0 70 088 0002 1 72 088 0718 0 72 088 0002 1 65 079 0238 0 65 079 0002 1 69 081 0478 0 69 081 0002 1 67 089 0478 0 67 089 0002 1 65 077 0478 0 65 077 0002 1 69 085 0478 0 69 085 0002 1 67 082 0718 0 67 082 0002 1 60 073 0080 1 62 077 0006 0 60 073 0074 1 64 077 0006 0 62 077 0074 1 65 097 0002 0 64 077 0476 0 65 097 0002 1 67 097 0478 0 67 097 0002 1 69 086 0238 0 69 086 0002 1 70 085 0238 0 70 085 0002 1 72 098 0238 0 72 098 0002 1 77 082 0238 0 77 082 0002 1 72 082 0718 0 72 082 0002 1 70 095 0238 0 70 095 0002 1 69 092 0478 0 69 092 0002 1 67 081 0478 0 67 081 0002 1 64 079 0478 0 64 079 0002 1 67 092 0478 0 67 092 0002 1 65 081 0720 1 69 097 0018 0 65 081 0100 0 69 097 0002 1 70 092 0120 1 72 100 0009 0 70 092 0469 0 72 100 0002 1 70 086 0478 0 70 086 0002 1 69 090 0478 0 69 090 0002 1 70 084 0478 0 70 084 0002 1 72 096 0718 0 72 096 0002 1 65 081 0238 0 65 081 0002 1 69 093 0478 0 69 093 0002 1 67 082 0478 0 67 082 0002 1 65 078 0478 0 65 078 0002 1 69 092 0478 0 69 092 0002 1 67 098 0720 1 60 086 0007 0 67 098 0033 1 62 083 0040 0 60 086 0027 0 62 083 0053 1 64 089 0080 1 65 085 0011 0 64 089 0467 0 65 085 0002 1 67 098 0478 0 67 098 0002 1 69 090 0238 0 69 090 0002 1 70 077 0238 0 70 077 0002 1 72 087 0238 0 72 087 0002 1 77 080 0238 0 77 080 0002 1 72 092 0718 0 72 092 0002 1 70 081 0238 0 70 081 0002 1 69 084 0478 0 69 084 0002 1 67 086 0478 0 67 086 0002 1 64 096 0478 0 64 096 0002 1 67 090 0478 0 67 090 0002 1 65 083 0718 0 65 083 0002 1 69 098 0120 1 70 088 0016 0 69 098 0104 1 72 089 0003 0 70 088 0475 0 72 089 0002 1 70 088 0478 0 70 088 0002 1 69 091 0478 0 69 091 0002 1 70 088 0478 0 70 088 0002 1 72 087 0718 0 72 087 0002 1 65 081 0238 0 65 081 0002 1 69 086 0478 0 69 086 0002 1 67 076 0478 0 67 076 0002 1 65 077 0478 0 65 077 0002 1 69 086 0478 0 69 086 0002 1 67 090 0707 0 67 090 0013 1 60 087 0061 0 60 087 0019 1 62 086 0067 0 62 086 0013 1 64 084 0075 0 64 084 0005 1 65 096 0478 0 65 096 0002 1 67 075 0478 0 67 075 0002 1 69 103 0240 1 70 100 0025 0 69 103 0205 0 70 100 0010 1 72 104 0238 0 72 104 0002 1 77 087 0238 0 77 087 0002 1 72 087 0718 0 72 087 0002 1 70 096 0238 0 70 096 0002 1 69 102 0238 0 69 102 0002 1 60 081 0238 0 60 081 0002 1 64 087 0478 0 64 087 0002 1 67 089 0478 0 67 089 0002 1 67 086 0478 0 67 086 0002 1 65 086 0741 0 65 086
End

This program is worth the effort of learning it.

To download the March 10 MIDItext 98 software and get instructions on how to use it click here

ABC format:

X:1
T:The Gaol of Clonmel
M:3/4
Q:1/4=89
K:F
A11/2B/2|c2B2A2|B2c3F|A2G2F2|A2G3C/4D/2E/4|
F2G2AB|cfc3B|A2G2E2|G2F3A/2B/2|c2B2A2|B2c3F|
A2G2F2|A2G3C/4D/2E/4|F2G2AB|cfc3B|A2G2E2|
G2F3A/2B/2|c2B2A2|B2c3F|A2G2F2|A2G3C/4D/2E/4|
F2G2AB|cfc3B|ACE2G2|G2F4||

Slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: ADD LYR: Clûn Malla
From: Annraoi
Date: 11 May 99 - 11:59 AM

Refresh this thread


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Subject: RE: ADD LYR: Clûn Malla
From: Annraoi
Date: 11 May 99 - 02:40 PM

Haigh, a Philippa. Creidim go raibh tú ag caint le cairde de mo chuid ag Sabhail Mór Ostaig ar na mallaibh. Nach ar achan duine abhí an t-iontas !! Ach, mar ba ghnách le mao mháthair a rá faoim, "Cluinfear d'ainm i n-áiteacha nach leagfaidh tú do chos ionntu." Whiteboys or "Buachaillí Bána were gangs of vigilantes operating in the Irish countryside during the C18. Their favourite punishment for those who fell foul of them was to "card" them i.e. to rip their naked backs with wool cards. these were wooden implements used to tease out the fibres of wool to prepare it for spinning. The cards were flat "bats" of wood studded with scores of sharply pointed steel needles. One can imagine the agony produced by "carding" someone. Annraoi


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Subject: RE: ADD LYRCluain Meala
From: Philippa
Date: 12 May 99 - 02:26 PM

The hero of the song doesn't actually say he was a Whiteboy, only that they were present. On the other hand, he doesn't declare his innocence.
When you the word "buachaill bán" or "buachaillín bán" in other songs, you can't assume a reference to a rural guerilla. The term might just mean a fair (handsome) lad or refer to Bonnie Prince Charlie. I wonder if the Whiteboys chose their name to indicate support for the Jacobites?? It's not implausible. There was certainly a sectarian element in the fighting; most of these societies had Catholic membership, but the Protestant Orange Order derived from "The Peep o' Day" boys. Jim Smyth wrote that the Whiteboys got their name for the white linen shirts they wore. And I think I read somehere that they disguised their faces with flour or covered them with sheets or something like that? Similar secret societies went under other names such as the Ribbonmen and the Hearts of Oak. and the Hearts of Steel.
The most significant gains for tenants rights (including acts which enabled them to become small proprietors) were won in the second half of the 19th century (i.e., after the famine years). I think it fair to say that the rights were won by the civil disobedience campaigh of the Land League, though historians might argue about the relative importance of rent nonpayment and boycotts (Capt. Boycott was a landlord), of parliamentary activity (Charles Stuart Parnell), and of sporadic acts of violence. Land League leader Michael Davitt had previously been involved in the Fenians, a physical force movement, and decided a new approach was needed.
There are two articles from an Irish nationalist perspective, about the famine, with some reference to the Land League at http://inac.org/history/hunger.html


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Subject: RE: ADD LYR: Cluain Meala
From: Philippa
Date: 12 May 99 - 02:50 PM

I did some surfing. "Carders" are referred to as a specific group, known for using that punishment described by Annraoi, in the discussion of agrarian societies at the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) site early policing in Ireland

The Great Famine by Karis Wright is introduced with history of pre-famine agrarian conflict.

The most information can be found at AGRARIAN REBELS, SECRET SOCIETIES AND DEFENDERS, 1761-91 from the book, "The Men of No Property, Irish Radicals and Popular Politics in the Late Eighteenth Century", by Jim Smyth, 1992.

other sites include:
Engels' correspondence fromIreland
Daniel O'ConnellJackie Dana's Irish sistory pages
short history of Ireland in the 19th century
Cahir O'Doherty's site


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Subject: RE: ADD LYR: Cluain Meala
From: Philippa
Date: 03 Jun 99 - 10:46 AM

There is also a literal translation published in Thomas Kinsella and Seán Ó Tuama , ed. "An DuanaireAn Duanaire, 1600-1900: Songs of the Dispossessed" Dolmen Press/Bord na Gaeilge, Dublin 1981


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Subject: Príosún Chluain Meala
From: Philippa
Date: 26 Nov 99 - 02:42 PM

Callanan did a better translation job on Príosún Chluain Meala. There is another version of the song published in Maighréad Ní Annagáin and Séamus de Chlanndiolúin, "Londubh an Chairn" and An Roinn Oideachais (Dept of Education) "Cuisle an Cheoil" (Dublin, 1976) with the following verse about being the gentlest lad in the village:
O do bhí mé im' bhuachaill chomh stuama's 'bhí sa bhaile,
Dhéanfainn súgradh nó gáire nó pléaráca ar faiche,
Do bhualifinn poc báire chomh hard leis na fearaibh,
Is a dhaoine na n-árann, nach cás libh mo mhealladh

This version makes no mention of the Buachaillí Bána. Instead it suggests that the singer had enlisted in the British army and deserted. The above verse is the last of three.The first verse goes:

Ar maidin Lae 'le Pádraig, is mé ag fágail an bhaile,
Is mé ag dul go hArd Pádraig 'cur lásaí lem hata,
Bhí Briainín 'us Máirín á shíorá liomsa casadh,
Agus mé go socair sásta ' bhfochair sáirsint ag ól leanna.

The second verse is very similar to the version published in O Baoill, in O'Sullivan and in Abair Amhrán which I contributed to this thread earlier:

Tá mo shrian is mo dhiallait ar iasacht as baile,
Is mo chapall ag fiach aige buachaillí an airm,
Tá mo chamán ag fiaradh is ag liathadh faoi mo leaba,
Agus mé go dubhach diachrach i bpríosún Chluain Meala.


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Subject: The Convict of Clonmel
From: Philippa
Date: 08 Dec 99 - 01:50 PM

- in case someone does a lyrics search under the title 'The Convict of Clonmel' which is also used for the English language version of Príosún Chluain Meala


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Subject: RE: J J Callanan
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 24 Jun 02 - 06:26 AM

JJ Callanan also translated The Outlaw of Loch Lene. Kathleen Hoagland's "1000 Years of Irish Poetry" includes five poetic translations by Callanan and this biographical information:
""Callanan, James Joseph (Jeremiah) - was born in Cork, May 1795; died in Lisbon, Portugal, September 19, 1829. His parents wished him to become a priest and he entered Maynooth at the age of 17; but after two years left and entered Trinity College, Dublin, to study medicine. At Trinity he won two prizes for poetry. Leaving Trinity, he enlisted an after buying a release, gained a scant livelihood by teaching. Later, Callanan wandered through Ireland, gathering its legends and poetry. He died of tuberculosis in Portugal where he had gone as a tutor. His poetry was published in Cork in 1861. He was the first to give adequate versions of Irish Gaelic poems, and also among the first to introduce a Gaelic refrain into English poetry."

I find the last comment about Gaelic refrains in English poetry and would be interested in seeing some documentation; if anybody has any information on the topic, maybe they could start an appropriate discussion thread.


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Subject: RE: ADD LYR: Clûn Malla
From: An Pluiméir Ceolmhar
Date: 25 Jun 02 - 07:15 AM

Slight drift, but can anyone explain how the name of "tories" came to be associated with the British Conservative Party? I'm sure most members of that party would be very upset to find out who the name originally referred to!


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Subject: RE: ADD LYR: Clûn Malla
From: greg stephens
Date: 25 Jun 02 - 07:33 AM

I would gladly answer the question in your first sentence, except the second sentence implies you already know the answer.


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Subject: RE: ADD LYR: Clûn Malla
From: An Pluiméir Ceolmhar
Date: 25 Jun 02 - 07:35 AM

Only in general terms. What was the particular parliamentary context that led the true-blue Conservatives to be assimilated to the whiteboys?


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Subject: RE: ADD LYR: Clûn Malla
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 05:56 AM

Philippa

Mention of Callanan reminds me. I recently came across a book called "History of verse translation from Irish 17??-189?" (not sure of the dates but it basically covers 19C.) by a man called Welch, around 1988. It started life as a Ph.D. thesis - so its not light reading. But it seems to have a lot of info on the various published collections of translations of poetry/song and good critical analysis. Seems to be still available e.g. at Kenny's Bookshop of Galway, who have a website.

Regards


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Subject: RE: ADD LYR: Clûn Malla
From: Fiolar
Date: 27 Jun 02 - 10:31 AM

Regarding "Tories": The following is an extract from "The Oxford Companion to Irish History."
"The word 'tory' from the Irish 'toraidhe'(raider) has been traced back to 1646.....The original tories of the Restoration period were perceived as dispossessed Catholics waging a war of revenge against the new social order created by the land confiscations of the 1640 and 1650s. Yet it remains unclear how far all toryism, even in the Restoration period, was of this character, and how far some at least of what was so described should be seen as representing banditry of the kind found in remote and underpoliced regions throughout early modern Europe.
The use of 'Tory' in English politics goes back to the exclusion crisis of 1679-81. The Whigs who sought to exclude the future James II, as a Catholic, from the throne, applied the term derisively to James' supporters. After the revolution of 1688 'Tory' re-emerged as the generally accepted name for one of the two sides in an increasingly bitter party conflict."
As a kid growing up in Ireland, pine cones were called "tory tops." Don't know where the term arose and can only surmise that it meant the dried heads of executed individuals in early times and over the years the meaning was lost. Canon O'Leary in his autobiography "Mo Sgeal Fein" describes what he thought were three black balls over Macroom castle. Later he learned that they were three skulls on spikes. He was born in 1839 and if he was in his teens when he saw them, the habit must have continued well into the 19th century.
Regarding "Whiteboys", and again referring to the Oxford Companion, it states that there were two outbreaks of agrarian protest. One began in Co. Tipperary in 1761 and spread to counties Limerick, Waterford, Cork and Kilkenny and continued until 1765. A second wave in 1769 to 1775 affected Kilkenny, Tipperary, Queen's County (Laois),Carlow and Wexford. The term arose from the practise of wearing white shirts over everyday clothing.


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Subject: LYR ADD: Príosún Chluain Meala
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 10 Nov 02 - 02:51 PM

Príosún Chluain Meala

Although this song as we are most familiar with it is from the mid-18th century, that version appears to be a reworking of a song composed about a century earlier.

Here is a version published in Tomás Ó Concheanainn, "Nua-dhuanaire III". Dublin, 1981.
In this version, the narrator is in prison for deserting the army. The last few verses are similar to the newer song. I don't know whether this version has been sung to the same tune that we now use for Príosún Chluain Meala/The Gaol of Clonmel.
Ó Concheanainn doesn't date this version, only stating that the song now available is a fragmented and polluted version. Sources given are the periodicals "Gaodhal", May, 1890 and "Fáinne an Lae", 12 June 1926. ú

PRÍOSÚN CHLUAIN MEALA

D'imíos óm mhuintir le hard-intinn gan chiall,
Liostáil mé san arm 's níor fhanas ach bliain,
D'ealaíos i ganfhios, 's ar an mbaile bhí mo thriall.
'S gur i bpriosún Chluain Meala tá mo leaba le bliain.

Istoíche Dé hAoine is mé gabháilt síos 'gesna barracks
Casadh light-horse saighdiúirí orm ; 's iad líonta dá gcuid arm,
Gheit mé is bhiog mé is níor fhan brí ionam ná tapa
Agus rith mé naoi míle gan bhríste ná hata.

Cuireadh ar athchúirt mé ó Phort Láirge go Cluain Meala,
Ní raibh duine gheobhadh páirt liom ná cairde im aice,
Dúirt Bagwell ag siúl na sraide go raibh an chnáib dom á smearadh,
Is má chuirid chun báis mé na grása go bhfaighe m'anam.

Bíonn rinnce ar chrosbhóithre gach Domhnach 'ge baile
Bíonn cluiche ar bhánta, poc báire is dibheairsean,
Bíonn cailíní óga ann, mná pósta is a bhfearaibh,
'Gus Mallaí dubh deorach 's a hóigfhear faoi ghlasaibh.

Tá fhios ag Dia dílis 's ag Rí geal na bhFlaitheas
Go rabhas ar an mbuachaill b'fhearr tuairisc 'ge baile,
Ar shúgradh is ar gháire nó iomáint ar an bhfaiche
Is go mbuailfinn poc báire chomh hard leis an ngealaigh.

Tá mo shrian is mo dhiallait ar iasacht le fada,
Is mo chamán ag fiaradh is ag liathadh fén leaba,
Tá mo liathróid á bhualadh 'ge buachaillí an bhaile,
Is mar bharr ar gach scéal táinse daortha i gCluain Meala.

The 19th c. version with trans. from Kinsella "An Duanaire" can be seen a www.irishpage.com/poems/jail.htm
Oddly the background music is Cill Cais, not Cluan Meala


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Príosúin Chluain Meala
From: GUEST,PHilippa
Date: 20 Nov 02 - 08:12 AM

see the verses from Lonndubh an Chairn and Cuisle an Cheoil: which I posted 26 Nov.99. Like the one version I added to the thread just recently, this version is about someone imprisoned for deserting the army, rather than for being a Whiteboy.

summary/translation of notes in Cuisle an Cheoil:
"One story is that the prisoner who narrates the song was visiting Ard Pádraig (County Limerick?) where he was enticed to enlist in the English army. After a year he got fed up with army life and deserted. He was arrested and sentenced to death. That is the story associated with these verses.

"There are othr verses, however, (see songs of the Irish, Donal O'Sullivan), in which we understand that the prisoner was a member of the White Boys by the name of O'Donnell from Uíbh Ráthach in County Cork"

Other sources given are Ó Caoimh, "Fáinne an Lae", 12 June 1926; Ó Foghludha, Cois na Ruachtaighe; Ó Síothcháin, Seanchas Chléire

--yes, I know some of the info. repeats what has been said earlier

--Can anyone correct the spelling of the thread title and of the associated DigiTrad entries?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Clun Malla (Cluain Meala, field of honey)
From: Dennis the Elder
Date: 31 Dec 04 - 05:34 PM

I have read the majority of this Thread and have learnt a lot but can any one tell me what the following line means please.

At my bedfoot decaying my hurley is lying

Denn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Clun Malla (Cluain Meala, field of honey)
From: Brían
Date: 01 Jan 05 - 02:32 PM

A hurley is a stick made of ash used for knocking a ball about. Some may remember the character Dónal from the B,B.C. series Ballykissangel using one to knock a golf ball on the green instead of a driver. I believe the word originates from the Irish word tuirling, to descend, alight.

Brían


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Clun Malla (Cluain Meala, field of honey)
From: Dennis the Elder
Date: 01 Jan 05 - 03:01 PM

Cheers Brian

Denn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Clun Malla (Cluain Meala, field of honey)
From: Brían
Date: 01 Jan 05 - 05:28 PM

You are welcome.

Brían


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Clun Malla (Cluain Meala, field of honey)
From: GUEST,caoimhinodonnchu@eircom.net
Date: 29 Mar 06 - 05:04 PM

Is aoibhinn an suíomh seo; is aoibhinn an t-amhrán 'Priosún Cluan Meala'.
Mór-chuid eolas ar cheann des na h-amhrán Gaelach is fearr atá againn.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Clun Malla (Cluain Meala, field of honey)
From: MartinRyan
Date: 29 Mar 06 - 06:14 PM

Fáilte romhat, a Chaoimhín! Ná bí cúthalalach - tá neart eolais agus suime thart timpeall anseo.

Regards


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