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Lyr Req: Jean Jamieson's Ghost

Vin2 20 Aug 07 - 11:53 AM
Vin2 22 Aug 07 - 09:12 AM
Sorcha 22 Aug 07 - 09:13 AM
masato sakurai 22 Aug 07 - 09:23 AM
GUEST,Dave (Bridge Folk Club, Newcastle) 23 Aug 07 - 07:24 AM
GUEST,Dave (Bridge folk Club, Newcastle) 23 Aug 07 - 08:27 AM
masato sakurai 23 Aug 07 - 09:04 AM
GUEST 23 Aug 07 - 09:16 AM
masato sakurai 23 Aug 07 - 09:36 AM
GUEST,leeneia 23 Aug 07 - 09:50 AM
Tattie Bogle 29 May 13 - 06:44 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 29 May 13 - 08:19 AM
Tattie Bogle 29 May 13 - 12:18 PM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 29 May 13 - 12:21 PM
Jim Dixon 02 Jun 13 - 01:57 PM
GUEST,Katie Irvine 29 Nov 14 - 10:20 AM
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Subject: Lyr Req: Jean Jameson's ghost
From: Vin2
Date: 20 Aug 07 - 11:53 AM

Anyone have the lyrics to this song. Chorus is contains something like....cherry oranges, four for a penny, cherry ripe, cornberry, taste them and buy....or words to that effect.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jean Jameson's ghost
From: Vin2
Date: 22 Aug 07 - 09:12 AM


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jean Jameson's ghost
From: Sorcha
Date: 22 Aug 07 - 09:13 AM

I looked, didn't find anything.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE SANDGATE PANT/JANE JEMIESON'S GHOST
From: masato sakurai
Date: 22 Aug 07 - 09:23 AM

From Conrad Bladey's Beuk of Newcassel Sangs Part 5 Directory 2:
The Sandgate Pant;
Or, Jane Jemieson's Ghost


The Bell of St. Ann's tolld two in the morning,
As brave Skipper Johnson was gawn to the keel--
From the juice of the barley his poor brain was burning--
In search of relief he through Sandgate did reel;
The city was hush, save the keel-bullies snoring--
The moon faintly gleam'd through the sable-clad sky,
When lo! a poor female her hard fate deploring,
Appear'd near the pant, and thus loudly did cry:--
Ripe Chenee oranges four for a penny!
Cherry ripe cornberries- taste them and try!

O listen, ye hero of Sandgate and Stella,
Jim Jemieson kens that yor courage is trig.
Go tell Billy Elli to meet me, brave fellow--
Aw'll wait yor return on Newcassel Tyne Brig!--
Oh, marcy! cried Johnson, yor looks gar me shiver!
Maw canny lass, Jin, let me fetch him next tide;
The spectre then frown'd--and he vanish'd for ever,
While Sandgate did ring as she vengefully cried--
Fine Chenee oranges, four for a penny!
Cherry ripe cornberries--taste them and try!

She waits for her lover, each night adt this station,
And calls her ripe fruit with a voice loud and clear,
The keelbullies listen in great consternation--
Tho' snug in their huddocks, they tremble with fear!
She sports round the pant till the cock, in the mroning,
Announces the day--then away she does fly
Till midnight's dread hour--thus each maiden's peace scorning,
They start from their couch as they hear her loud cry--
Fine Chenee oranges, four for a penny!
Cherry ripe cornberries--taste them and try!

R. Emery-- In: The Newcastle Song Book or Tyne-Side Songster., W&T Fordyce
Newcastle Upon Tyne


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jean Jameson's ghost
From: GUEST,Dave (Bridge Folk Club, Newcastle)
Date: 23 Aug 07 - 07:24 AM

Actually JEAN Jamieson's Ghost
Jean Jamieson a street vendor of fruit, hanged March 7, 1829 on the Town moor for killing her mother with a poker in a fit of passion. The last person to be hanged on the Town moor


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jean Jameson's ghost
From: GUEST,Dave (Bridge folk Club, Newcastle)
Date: 23 Aug 07 - 08:27 AM

Oops that was of course the Town moor in Newcastle upon Tyne


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jean Jameson's ghost
From: masato sakurai
Date: 23 Aug 07 - 09:04 AM

From Newcastle Song Writers
Henry Robson

Born at Benwell near Newcastle. Resided in Newcastle in 1812 as recorded by Bell. Author of The Colier's Pay Week and other poems. He also wrote The Tyne, Hydrophobia, Jean Jamieson's Ghost, Colliere's Wedding Pitman's Pay and others. . A printer who worked with Angus who printed Bell's work. Not known as a dialect writer. Worked as printer with Mackenzie and Dent and at home. Died= Grenville Terrace Dec. 21, 1850 at age 785. Obituary- "he had workded 60 years as a printer, was the oldest member of the profession in the town, and was much respected by a numerous circle of friends."

Robert Emery

Born Edinburgh, Sept. 26,1794.
Wrote Sandgate Pant and Hydrophobie and others. Moved to Newcastle when young. Apprenticed as printer with Mr. Angus in the Side. Write children's nursery rhymes for penny and halfpenny books. Wrote about the great frost 1813 in a song with partner thomas Binney in 1814.. Emery wrote first two verses. Worked as a journeyman for many years in the town. His songs which became very popular wre written at this time. Around 1850 he started business on his own as a printer in Silver Street. He pursued this for about 20 years. A year before he died he moved to larger premises at the foot of Pilgrim Street. Died- March 20 1871 at age 77. Buried- All Saints' cemetary after a large funeral. Emery wrote a song each year for his fellow work mates at Lamberts in Grey Street for their anual trip. He worked at Lamberts before going out on his own. Hydrophobie was first published in "Original Local Songs" published by Edgar in 1825. Marshal in his 1827 edition of songs lists Emery as one of a trio of local bards who break into song concerning the removal of the fishwives from the Sandhill. His Jean Jamieson's Ghost appeared in Fordyce 1842.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jean Jameson's ghost
From: GUEST
Date: 23 Aug 07 - 09:16 AM

The Wilsons sing it and have recorded it on an album they made with Jim Mageean years ago.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SANDGATE PANT; OR, JEAN JAMIESON'S GHOST
From: masato sakurai
Date: 23 Aug 07 - 09:36 AM

From A Choice Collection of Tyneside Songs, by E. Corvan [and others] (1863, p. 70):

SANDGATE PANT; OR, JEAN JAMIESON'S GHOST.

By R. EMERY.
[Jean Jamieson, a street vendor of fruit. Executed March 7, 1829, on the Town Moor, Newcastle, for killing her mother with a poker, while in a fit of passion.]
Air--"I'd be a Butterfly."

The bell of St. Ann's toll'd two in the morning,
As brave Skipper Johnson was gaun to the keel,
From the juice o' the barley his poor brain was burning,
In search of relief he through Sandgate did reel.
The city was hush, save the keel bullies snoring.
The moon faintly gleamed through the sable-clad sky;
When, lo! a poor female, her hard fate deploring,
Appeared near the Pant, and thus loudly did cry,
Fine Chinee oranges, four for a penny,
Cherry ripe cornberries, taste them and try.

Oh, listen ye hero of Sandgate and Stella,
Jim Jemieson [sic] kens that your courage is trig;
Go tell Billy Elli to meet me, brave fellow,
Aw'll wait yor return on Newcassel Tyne Brig.
Oh, mercy! cried Johnson, yor looks gar me shiver,
Maw canny lass, Jin let me fetch him next tide.
The spectre then frowned, and she vanished for ever,
While Sandgate did ring as she vengefully cried,
Fine Chinee oranges, four for a penny,
Cherry ripe cornberries, taste them and try.

She waits for her lover each night at this station,
And calls her ripe fruit with a voice loud and clear;
The keel bullies listen in great consternation,
Tho' snug in their huddocks they tremble with fear.
She sports round the Pant till the cock in the morning,
Announces the day, then away she does fly
Till midnight's dread hour, thus each maiden's peace scorning,
They start from their couch as they hear her loud cry--
Fine Chinee oranges, four for a penny,
Cherry ripe cornberries, taste them and try.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jean Jameson's ghost
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 23 Aug 07 - 09:50 AM

Thank you, Masato, for posting this. You are so good at finding songs!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jean Jamieson's Ghost
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 29 May 13 - 06:44 AM

In a bit of thread drift (or maybe not?) anyone heard of a song called "Jean Jamieson's BONNET"?
It is mentioned in the annals of the Clan Macpherson in 1956 that a Niall Macpherson MP sang it as a rallying song. A Google search brings up no other results.
Jean Jamieson is a common enough name so probably NOT the same one: but any info gratefully received!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jean Jamieson's Ghost
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 29 May 13 - 08:19 AM

From The Literary Digest XII 1885/6:

  Did ye ever hear tell
  O' Jean Jamieson's bonnet?
  It was na itsel',
  But the ornaments on it!

It also appeared in Table Talk, vol 8, 1893. I can't see anything more than this quote

Mick


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jean Jamieson's Ghost
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 29 May 13 - 12:18 PM

Thanks a lot Mick! I'll pass that on to the friend who was asking about it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jean Jamieson's Ghost
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 29 May 13 - 12:21 PM

I just realise I put the wrong dates for the Literary Digest - it should be 1895/6. (I gave the second reference because it was the earliest I saw).

Mick


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Subject: Lyr Add: JEAN JEEMISON'S BANNET
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 02 Jun 13 - 01:57 PM

From Curling in Canada and the United States by John Kerr (Edinburgh: Geo. A. Morton, 1904), page 566:

Another song which was something of a favourite was, "Jean Jeemison's Bannet," which I sang ad nauseam, to the team at least. This outrageous song is without merit as regards words, but can be made amusing or grotesque by sufficient courage on the part of the singer.

Here is "Jean Jeemison" in puris.


[CHORUS] Did you ever hear tell o' Jean Jeemison's bannet?
Did you ever hear tell o' Jean Jeemison's bannet?
'Twas no' for itsel' but the ornaments on it,
Gar't a'body talk o' Jean Jeemison's bannet.

[1] The bannet was theekit frae summit to base
Wi' ribbands and feathers, surmounted wi' lace;
An' roon in the front, that her clan ye might know,
The Jeemison tartan was tied in a bow.

[2] Noo whaur it was made was a wunnerfu' plicht,
Some deemed it was magic and cam' in the nicht,
But o' a' the conjectures ae thing it was plain,
It wasna' the wark o' ae genius alane.

[3] The pearls o' the ocean were strung on a string,
An' they dangled aroon this extraordinary thing,
And that they might a' be secure frae a poo,
There were buckles o' goold that had come frae Peru.

[4] To croon the erection a Paradise bird
Quite a superior beauty conferred,
Wi' its wings spreading oot, that a'body micht see't,
An' it waggit aboot as she nodded her heid.

[5] At nicht no' a body wid be seen in the street,
The very policeman relinquished his beat,
For he swore that a' nicht it perambled the toon
An' stoppit the clocks and put oot the moon.

[6] At the curling the curlers had on their big match,
An' hunners cam' oot frae Paisley to watch,
An' Renfrew was winnin' on every rink
When the horrible bannet appeared on the brink.

[7] A' then indeed was a waefu' collection,
Na need for the skips to gie ony direction
To guard or to draw or brack an egg on it,
For they a' drew a bore on Jean Jeemison's bannet.

[8] The President in wrath through the crowd quickly cleared,
An' made for Jean wi' his besom upreared,
An' bringing it doon, when lo! in a trice
The bannet was playing a dance on the ice.

[9] Auld Bailie M'Nab, wha was comin' alang,
Happened to step whaur the bannet was gaun,
An' he houtet and coupet an' landed richt on it,
An' bang thro' the ice went the bailie and the bannet.

[10] Well, they rescued the bailie and put him to bed,
Wi' a pain in his chest and a bad daud on his head,
But the bannet—altho' they attempted the water to drain —
It never appeared in the parish again.

[11] An' noo 'mang the auld wives aboot Paisley the tale is
When they see the Rainbow or the 'Rora Boralis,
Or a cloud in the west wi' the sun setting on it,
They tell to the bairns "Yon's Jean Jeemison's bannet."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jean Jamieson's Ghost
From: GUEST,Katie Irvine
Date: 29 Nov 14 - 10:20 AM

According to a letter in a Dundee paper, "Jean Jamieson's Bonnet" was written by Walter Douglas Campbell.

I'm researching WDC, and was looking for a transcript of the song so thank you for posting!
-------

Dundee Courier - Thursday 01 August 1946

A NOTABLE BUILDING.

Sir, - I was interested to read the letter of "Scotus" in to-day's "Courier". It is a long time since I saw the church at Loch Awe, and I had forgotten that it was dedicated to St Conan.

From the description it must be the one built by the late Col. "Monty" Campbell and his brother Walter, brothers of the late Lord Blythswood. The present generation has doubtless never heard of them, but they were a notable and amusing pair, and Mr Walter was the author of the song "Jean Jamieson's Bonnet", which many of your older readers must have heard him sing at bazaars and fetes.

It was very funny, and if anyone could supply me with a copy I should be most grateful. The chorus ended:- "It was no' for itsel, but the oooor-nament on it,
Gar'd a'body talk o' the bonnet o' Jean.
- I am, &c., M.M.
July 30, 1946


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