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Origins: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin

Related threads:
Quiet Lands of Erin...public domain? (6) (closed)
Tune Req: Quiet Land o' Erin (2) (closed)


In Mudcat MIDIs:
ardaigh cuain


Felipa 04 Dec 21 - 05:41 PM
Felipa 04 Dec 21 - 05:38 PM
Thompson 28 Nov 21 - 04:59 AM
Felipa 27 Nov 21 - 05:54 PM
GUEST,Guest 16 Nov 21 - 05:25 PM
Felipa 10 Oct 21 - 06:18 PM
Felipa 26 Jun 16 - 02:40 PM
keberoxu 28 Apr 16 - 08:31 PM
GUEST 06 Jan 14 - 10:15 AM
GUEST 05 Jan 14 - 07:03 PM
GUEST 18 Aug 10 - 06:33 AM
GUEST,Don Meixner 29 Dec 09 - 01:17 PM
GUEST,LoL 29 Dec 09 - 08:15 AM
Suegorgeous 08 Dec 08 - 08:34 PM
GUEST,Philippa 08 Dec 08 - 10:19 AM
Suegorgeous 05 Dec 08 - 11:56 AM
GUEST,Philippa 05 Dec 08 - 09:47 AM
GUEST,cronan.sr@wanadoo.fr 17 Apr 04 - 01:03 PM
GUEST 10 Mar 03 - 12:35 PM
Puffenkinty 06 Mar 03 - 08:44 PM
Felipa 29 Jan 03 - 02:08 PM
Alice 16 Jan 03 - 10:43 AM
Áine 16 Jan 03 - 07:16 AM
GUEST,Philippa 16 Jan 03 - 05:55 AM
GUEST,Philippa 18 Jun 02 - 08:55 AM
GUEST,archivist 09 Jun 02 - 03:43 PM
Willa 09 Jun 02 - 02:04 PM
GUEST,Philippa 09 Jun 02 - 09:13 AM
Willa 09 Jun 02 - 08:41 AM
Willa 09 Jun 02 - 08:32 AM
GUEST,ianmacintyre@syd.eastlink.ca 09 Jun 02 - 08:22 AM
GUEST,Guest,guest 18 Jan 01 - 04:15 PM
GUEST,menzze@web.de 17 Jan 01 - 03:58 PM
GUEST,Philippa 16 Jan 01 - 06:07 PM
GUEST,Guest 16 Jan 01 - 04:25 PM
GUEST,JTT 16 Jan 01 - 03:48 PM
GUEST,T.S. Lewes England 16 Jan 01 - 03:46 PM
Annraoi & Philippa 05 Jun 99 - 04:49 PM
Martin _Ryan 27 May 99 - 07:04 AM
John Moulden 26 May 99 - 02:03 PM
Alice 26 May 99 - 01:46 PM
Philippa 26 May 99 - 01:18 PM
Philippa 26 May 99 - 01:09 PM
Philippa 26 May 99 - 12:19 PM
John Moulden 26 May 99 - 06:54 AM
Alice 25 May 99 - 07:45 PM
PJ Curtis. Record Producer, Ireland 25 May 99 - 06:26 PM
katlaughing 24 May 99 - 11:53 PM
Rita64 24 May 99 - 11:24 PM
Joe Offer 24 May 99 - 05:19 AM
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Subject: RE: Origins: Ardaigh Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: Felipa
Date: 04 Dec 21 - 05:41 PM

from https://www.donal-kearney.com/blog/airdi-cuan

The townland of Ardicoan is a mile west of Cushendun, rising north from the River Dun to a height of about 500 feet. There is a multiplicity of Gaelic versions of the placename, and an equal multiplicity of interpretations: Airdí Cúing, Ard a’ Chúíng, Aird an Chúmhaing, Ard a’ Chuain, Airdí Chuain, Ard Uí Choinn. The first element, no matter how it is spelt, probably means a height. Dr Pat McKay of the Placenames Project in Queens University Belfast says that there is no authoritative version of the name, but tentatively recommends Ard a’ Chuain – the height of the harbour, or the height of the bay (Cuan in Scottish Gaelic also means the sea). Seán Mac Maoláin argues for Áird a’ Chum[h]aing (= the height of the narrow strip of land) because the townland is well back from the sea, and follows the narrow defile at the head of the glen, reminds us that the noun ‘cúng’ also means a narrow defile between two heights. The townland itself is long and narrow, and there is an Alticoan in the next glen.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Aird a' Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: Felipa
Date: 04 Dec 21 - 05:38 PM

from https://antrimhistory.net/long-forgotten-gaelic-songs-of-rathlin-and-the-glens-by-sorcha-nic-lochlainn/

Finally, the most famous song to have been composed in this area is called ‘Aird a’ Chuain’. ‘Aird a’ Chuain’ is a townland about a mile to the west of Cushendun; the placename has been anglicized as Ardicoan. The earliest surviving written copy of the song is to be found in Robert MacAdam’s manuscript which dates from between 1830 and 1850 and the song is about the homesickness and loneliness of a man who emigrated from the area. The following is one of the verses from MacAdam’s manuscript [with the original spelling]:

‘Aird a’ Chuain’

Dam beidhin féin a nAirde-Chuain
If only I were in Ardicoan
A n-aice an tsléibh’ atá i bhfad bhuaim
By yon far-off hill
Gheabhainn ól ann, ceol is imirt
I would get drink there, music and sport
Is chan fhuighinn bás a n-uaigneas
And I wouldn’t die in loneliness.

The song also refers to the tradition of emigrants returning home to die, which was quite a common phenomenon, as most Irish emigrants wanted to die in their homeland:

Dam beidh agam ach coite ‘s ramh
If only I had a boat and an oar
Is gom beidhin ag iomram ar an rámh
And if only I were rowing with the oar
Dúil leis an Rígh is ruigean slán
Hoping to God to reach my destination safely
Is go bhfuighinn-se bás in Éirinn
So that I would die in Ireland.

There is no question about the theme of the song. It is obviously a song about exile and homesickness. There is, however, a question mark over the identity of the person who composed the song. It has been generally assumed that John McCambridge from Cushendall was the composer; the first person to ascribe the song’s authorship to McCambridge was Eoin MacNeill from Glenarm. McCambridge’s name certainly appears at the top of the earliest written copy of the song but recent research has cast some doubt on the assumption that McCambridge was the author.

As mentioned above, Robert MacAdam collected the earliest written version of the song in the nineteenth century and he wrote McCambridge’s name at the top of it. Robert MacAdam was in the habit of writing the name of the informant at the top of each piece of material he collected. So this manuscript does not state for certain that McCambridge was the author of the song; all it means is that McCambridge was Robert MacAdam’s informant for the song. If we look at the manuscript copy of the song ‘Squire Boyd’, we see McCambridge’s name written at the top of it as well. McCambridge certainly did not write ‘Squire Boyd’ — Hugh Boyd was dead long before McCambridge was born — so this suggests that MacAdam collected both songs from McCambridge, and that McCambridge was just the informant and not the author of both these songs.

As well as being collected from John McCambridge, MacAdam’s manuscript copies of the two songs ‘Squire Boyd’ and ‘Aird a’ Chuain` also share another common feature. Both songs contain a series of asterisks within the body of the song-text. What this means is that part of the song was corrupted or garbled — so much so, that the collector was unable to make any sense of it. I would suggest that if McCambridge had composed either of these songs, he would surely have been able to provide the full, uncorrupted text for the collector. It is also worth noting that the song ‘Aird a’ Chuain’ was collected from a number of local native Gaelic speakers in the early twentieth century and none of these people ever said that McCambridge was the author. If he had been the author, local people would surely have remembered that fact. McCambridge only died in 1873, which places him well within the lifetimes of many people who knew the song. It is inconceivable that the identity of an author could have been forgotten so quickly.

There is also some evidence that the song was actually composed about a hundred years before it was ever collected from John McCambridge. One woman in Glenariffe in the early 1920s said that ‘Aird a’ Chuain’ was composed about a man who was forced to flee the country rather than emigrating voluntarily. She said about this man:

Ba lon dubh é, agus b’eigean dó teitheadh as a’ tír

He was a ‘blackbird’ [i.e. a Jacobite], and he had to flee the country.23

‘Lon dubh’ is literally a blackbird, but the interesting thing about this description is that in Gaelic tradition this description ‘lon dubh’ was used to describe a supporter of the Jacobite cause — that is, a supporter of Bonnie Prince Charlie or his father, James, who were the pretenders to the English throne. There is actually a mention of Bonnie Prince Charlie in MacAdam’s manuscript which is the earliest known written version of the song:

S iomdha amharc a bh’agam pféin
Many times I have looked out
Ó Shruan Ghearráin go dtí an Mhaoil
From Garron Point to the Mull of Kintyre
Ar loingeas mór a’ caith ar ghaoith
At a great ship being driven by the wind
Agus cabhlach an Rígh Seorlaidh
And King Charlie’s fleet.

This mention of Bonnie Prince Charlie, together with the use of the description ‘Ion dubh’, means that there is a strong possibility that the song is actually connected with eighteenth-century Jacobitism. The Jacobite movement was active all over Gaelic Ireland and Hector MacDonnell has previously written in The Glynns about the strong Jacobite tradition among his own ancestors in this area.24 So if this evidence is taken into account, it looks as though the song may well have been composed in the mid-eighteenth century, perhaps around the time of the Jacobite rebellion of 1745. This means that John McCambridge could not possibly have composed it. The Jacobite cause had long since been defeated by the time McCambridge was born in 1793.

There is one other important local tradition about the author of the song ‘Aird a’ Chuain’. In local folklore, there is an account of a Cushendun shepherd called Cormac O’Neill having composed the song. He was supposed to have been working in Dieskirt when he composed it and he is reputed to have lived in ‘the house presently owned by Mrs Doran’.25 This information appears in Robert Sharpe and Charles McAllister’s book, A Glimpse at Glenariffe, and I am told that the information was noted down from two of the last Irish speakers in the Glens, Jim Bhriain McAuley and Anna McAllister. Unfortunately, records from this period are very sparse, and I have not been able to find out any more about this Cormac O’Neill but I would suggest that he is quite likely to have been the composer of the song since local knowledge is usually fairly reliable in cases like these.

One final word about ‘Aird a’ Chuain’. It seems to have been a song that everybody in the area knew whether they were singers or not. There is quite a lot of evidence that people who were not singers recited the words as a poem. Sean Mac Maolain, the great Gaelic scholar from Glenariffe, wrote that the Glens people had a particular respect for the song. Even in an area that was once so rich in songs, this song was particularly important to the people. For this reason, ‘Aird a’ Chuain’ lasted right up until the Irish language was lost altogether. Jim Bhriain McAuley, the last native speaker in the Glens, knew the song and recited it for a collector as late as 1981, a couple of years before he died.26 It is clear, therefore, that ‘Aird a’ Chuain’ was a very important part of the culture of this area, and it is still well known in Gaelic-speaking areas throughout Ireland.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: Thompson
Date: 28 Nov 21 - 04:59 AM

Or londubh, a blackbird?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: Felipa
Date: 27 Nov 21 - 05:54 PM

every time you see "leanndubh" in the chorus, it should be "lionndubh"

leann dubh is black beer, i.e. porter, stout

lionn dubh is depression, melancholy

The pronunciation of leann and lionn is fairly similar, hard to make the distinction. This database can help sometimes
https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fuaim/ but it doesn't have an entry for lionn!


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Subject: RE: Origins: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: GUEST,Guest
Date: 16 Nov 21 - 05:25 PM

would anyone have a phonetic pronunciation guide to the gaelic lyrics of this song please


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Subject: RE: Origins: Ardaigh Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: Felipa
Date: 10 Oct 21 - 06:18 PM

I just looked up Ardicoan on logainm.ie and the official Irish spelling for the place is Ardaigh Chuain

see what Guest posted in 2014
The song "Áird a' Chumhaing" (one plausible spelling!) was first written down by Robert McAdam about 1830 from John McCambridge. These words were not published until 1940.
• Words for the song were first published in print by Eoin Mac Néill in 1895, from oral versions he obtained. He believed McCambridge was the author of the song, but I don't think the evidence supports this.

I have found in recent years that texts are no longer attributing the text to McCambridge. The thinking seems to be that it is more likely that McCambridge collected (and perhaps adapted)the lyrics rather than writing the original.


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Subject: Aird a' Chuain - Eamonn O Faogáin
From: Felipa
Date: 26 Jun 16 - 02:40 PM

Aird a' Chuain sung by the late Eamonn O Faogáin of Belfast / Béal Feirste who died 22 June 2016 after a brief illness

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSnhzI3DWVQ


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Subject: Ard Ti Chuain
From: keberoxu
Date: 28 Apr 16 - 08:31 PM

Mary O'Hara recorded this air more than once.

"Amhráin Ghrá," a CD anthology released in the past five years and still available online, comes from Gael-Linn records; the songs selected for the CD were all recorded in the past for the Gael-Linn label, and most, though not all, were published on recordings released earlier on the same label.

Gael-Linn published the recording of a live concert which Mary O'Hara presented in the National Gallery, this was I believe in the 1980's, so she was all grown up by then. Two tracks from that recording appear on the "Amhráin Ghrá" album. One of them is "Róisín Dubh," sung without accompaniment. The other is "Ard Tí Chuain," sung with the harp, in the Gaelic of origin.

Ms. O'Hara no longer had, by this time, an unearthly-sounding voice; she sounds like a woman made of flesh and blood, who knows rather a lot about singing a tune like this, which is a rather demanding one, exposing the voice in long-breathed passages. She is very closely miked, as well; the audience must have heard a lot of echo and reverberation sitting there (you can hear the discreet coughs), but both singing voice and harp are clean, clear, and up-front in this production.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: GUEST
Date: 06 Jan 14 - 10:15 AM

To expand slightly on the previous post:
• The song "Áird a' Chumhaing" (one plausible spelling!) was first written down by Robert McAdam about 1830 from John McCambridge. These words were not published until 1940.
• Words for the song were first published in print by Eoin Mac Néill in 1895, from oral versions he obtained. He believed McCambridge was the author of the song, but I don't think the evidence supports this.
• An English translation of Mac Néill's version was made before 1912 by the Celtic scholar Eleanor Hull, but hardly intended for singing (here at pp 208–9)
• Glenariffe tradition attributes the song to one Cormac Ó Néill, a native of Glendun but living in Glenariffe.
• Versions of the song continued to be collected orally and published, up to around 1940.
• John McCambridge was a Protestant (Church of Ireland, not Presbyterian) farmer, a native of Mullarts, born about 1793, who could trace his descent back to settlers from Kintyre in 1625.
• McCambridge lived at Glenarm and ran a tannery in Larne. Died 1873, buried at Layde, where the family tomb has an extensive inscription.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Jan 14 - 07:03 PM

Some info here (in Irish)
about John McCambridge
and here
about the song.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Aug 10 - 06:33 AM

Frank Hall

Philippa on 22 Apr 99 gave the words she remembered from Jean Redpath's English version. Philippa's remembered words are nice, but differ in some points from Jean's actual version. For those who are interested, here are the words Jean sings for this song on her CD, 'First Flight':


THE QUIET LAND OF ERIN

By myself I'd be in Orshiecoon*
Where the mountains stand away
And 'tis there I'd let the Sundays go
In the cuckoo's glen above the bay

(chorus)
agus och och Eire lig is o
Eire leanndubh agus o
Ah, the quiet land of Erin

But my heart is weary all alone
And it sends a lonely cry
To the land that sings beyond my dreams
And the lonely Sundays pass me by.

I would ravel back the twisted years
and the bitter wasted winds
If the God above would let me lie
In a quiet place above the whins.


[* Philippa thinks Jean sings 'Orshiecoon' rather than the original 'Ard Ti Chuain' -- I do not know Gaelic so cannot add to that.]


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Subject: RE: Origins: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: GUEST,Don Meixner
Date: 29 Dec 09 - 01:17 PM

My only experience with this song is on a CD by The Corries. I remember it as a haunting and beautiful tune.


Don


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Subject: RE: Origins: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: GUEST,LoL
Date: 29 Dec 09 - 08:15 AM

there's an excelent version here : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AcOT2s-2A0Q

Thanks to this video i've discovered your forum. Thanks to all for sharing your knowledge


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Subject: RE: Origins: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: Suegorgeous
Date: 08 Dec 08 - 08:34 PM

thanks Philippa


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Subject: RE: Origins: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 08 Dec 08 - 10:19 AM

verse 3 in the Irish language lyrics I posted at Mudcat 22 Apr 1999 is not translated by Seán, but if you look again at my old message you will see that I did give a rough translation of the verses.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: Suegorgeous
Date: 05 Dec 08 - 11:56 AM

hi Philippa

Looking at the Irish version you gave earlier in the thread, there are 5 verses in that - but in the English you give only 4 verses. Is there one missing?

For anyone interested - here's a link to Micheal Ui Domhnaill singing it:
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=P7mkca4e-y4&feature=related

...and apparently someone's about to release a new album by Micheal Ui Domhnaill - I have some details if anyone wants to know.

Sue


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Subject: RE: Origins: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 05 Dec 08 - 09:47 AM

see the very first message on this thread. Here is Seán Ó Gallochoir's translation for Davy Hammond (Seán and Davy and Joan O'Hara, who did the other English language version, are all departed now). One of Seán's daughters, Siun sang this song at Tinney's monthly singing session in Derry last night, while her partner John McCormack sang the verses in Irish.

I wish I were in Ardti Cuan
Near yon mountain far away.
I would seldom let the Sunday go
From the Cuckoo's glen across the bay.

It is many a Christmas Day I had
In Cushendun while still a lad;
Hurling on the White Shore Strand
With my good ash hurley in my hand.

But the grave is waiting for us all;
The whole wide world must heed its call.
It steals the mother from her brood
As it stole away my boyhood.

If I only had a boat and oar,
I would row to Erin's shore
Trusting God to see me o'er
In time to die in Ireland.

Chorus:

And it's oh dear Ireland, you're my home!
Far from you I had to roam
And so my heart is sore and heavy.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: GUEST,cronan.sr@wanadoo.fr
Date: 17 Apr 04 - 01:03 PM

Bonjour,

I was looking for the words of this song from long time ago "Airde Cuan". Merci


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Subject: RE: Origins: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Mar 03 - 12:35 PM

Useless trivia: It might be of interest that the author Of Aird a'Chumhaing wrote the song in Ireland and the writing of it made him so homesick that he decided not to bother emigrating at all. So the story has a happy ending agus fuair se bas in Eirinn.


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Subject: Translation Chorus Quiet Land of Erin
From: Puffenkinty
Date: 06 Mar 03 - 08:44 PM

I have an English translation of the verses of
"Quiet land of Erin" but not of the words
in the refrain, the part that goes:

"agus och och Eire lig is o
Eire leanndubh agus o"...

As a non-speaker of the Irish I'd like to know what
these words mean.

Thanks
I moved this message here from another thread on the same topic.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Origins: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: Felipa
Date: 29 Jan 03 - 02:08 PM

Seminar in Derry, N Ireland 22 Feb 2003
"Swinging Shoulders, Dancing Feet - music traditions among protestant people in Ireland"
organised by Fintan Vallely, Academy for Irish Cultural Heritages, Magee College, University of Ulster.
for details of this and other events see:
www.arts.ulst.ac.uk/academy/events.htmor http://www.arts.ulst.ac.uk/academy/ssdf.htm


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Subject: RE: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: Alice
Date: 16 Jan 03 - 10:43 AM

Philippa, thanks for the additional information about the history of this song.

Alice


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Subject: RE: Ard Ti Chuain/Quiet Land of Erin
From: Áine
Date: 16 Jan 03 - 07:16 AM

As always, great information from very good sources, Philippa.

Thank you.

Le meas is mise Áine


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Subject: RE: ÁIRD A' CHUAIN/Chumhaing & McCambridge
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 16 Jan 03 - 05:55 AM

I read an interesting but rather sad tale of McCambridge in an essay about involvement of Protestants in the Irish language revival in the north of Ireland in the 18th and 19th century (when there were still a number of native speakers in northern counties such as Antrim and Down).
from Aodán Mac Póilín, "The Protestant Gaelic Tradition" (part 2: "The Gaelic Revival in the North of Ireland"), published by the Ultach Trust:

"John McCambridge, an ancestor of Major James Chichester-Clarke, was the last Gaelic poet of the Glens of Antrim. 'My mother knew him well', wrote Eoin McNeill, 'and says that on every possible occasion he tried to interest people in the Irish language and would rather talk about it than anything else'. McCambridge wrote the beautiful song, 'Aird a' Chumhaing'. He had been intending to emigrate to Scotland: according to the story, he imagined himself in Kintyre, looking back on the Antrim Coast, and wrote this song of exile. It is said that the song made him so homesick that he decided not to go.

"Unfortunately, McCambridge's religion was a drawback for an Irish enthusiast in the [Antrim] Glens. Before the famine, there had been a sustained attempt to proselytise Irish-speaking Catholics, then numbering about three and a half million. The movement was based on the theory that the Catholic peasantry regarded the Bible in English as the work of Satan, but would read the Irish version, 'believing the devil is dumb in that language'. The teaching of Irish at [Belfast Academical] Inst., which had ceased with the death of William Neilson, was revived again in 1833, largely for proselytising purposes. No church survived this number-crunching Christianity with much dignity; in the Glens, Catholic clergy encouraged their flocks to speak English rather than Irish, and in other parts of the country scribes were forced to burn Gaelic manuscripts. All Protestants promoting Irish in the Glens of Antrim were therefore suspect, and McCambridge's efforts to check the decline of the language failed."

Chichester-Clarke and Eoin McNeill were both important political figures; Unionist Chichester-Clarke was N.Ireland Prime Minister 1969-71 (between O'Neill and Faulker) and Nationalist Eoin McNeill founded the Irish Volunteers in 1913.


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Subject: Lyr Add: ÁIRD A' CHUAIN / CEOL DÁIBHÍ
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 18 Jun 02 - 08:55 AM

In verse 4 above [April 1999], "an choraíocht" – struggle - could be "an churaíocht" – planting, or in this case interment

I never did get a-hold of Seán Ó Gallchobair's translation … a relative did write out the words for me and passed them on to someone else who mislaid the document. I was told Seán did the translation as a request for singer and TV producer Davy Hammond.
According to Éinrí Ó Muirgheasa, writing in the early 1930s, there was an earlier translation published in the "Poem Book of the Gael" (p 208-9 if you have the right edition) … I'd be very interested if someone with good library resources could look that one up.

More information from Ó Muirgheasa's "Dhá Chéad de Cheoltaibh Uladh" (1934):

Ardicoan / Áirdí Chuain is in the parish of the Grange of Inispollen, in the barony of Glenarm, a mile due west of Cushendun (Bun Abhann Duinne). From his description of high ground overlooking the bay, the place name is very appropriate. Ó Muirgheasa would prefer "Áirdí a' Chuain" as the proper place name. Although there is no townland now called "Gleann na gCuach", Ó Muirgheasa is certain that this is the same place as Glendun. Dr Eó in MacNeill wrote the song down from Séamus Mac Amhlaidh of Bun na hAbhanna, Co Antrim and published it in "Irisleabhar na Gaedhilge" , Oct. 1895. According to Dr Mac Neill, the words were the work of Seán Mac Ambrois. If Seán Mac Ambrois was born in Áirdí Chuain, the only glen close to it is Gleann Abhann Duinne / Glendun – and there are plenty of cuckoos (cuach) in that glen.

Ó Muirgheasa collected the song about 10 years after Mac Neill did, taking it down from an old woman in Gleann Áirimh (Glenariff, I presume) Co. Antrim. She had a verse which MacNeill had not taken down, the verse that begins with "'S é seo an churaíocht/curaidheacht 'tá buan …". According to Ó Muirgheasa, this line means that the poet had buried his wife; that explains why he is looking lonely across at the view of Antrim from Scotland and wants to return home and die in his native land.

I was interested to see a version published under the title "Ceol Dhá ibhí " in Breandán Ó Buachalla "Nua-Dhuanaire II" (1976). The source is a ms held in Belfast Public Library, XXXI, 56 (1831). In verse 3 the poet says he would get drink, sport and music if he were back in Antrim, in verse 4 he says speaks of the view that he had from Srón Ghearrá in (Garron Point, I believe) to the Moyle, a large ship battling/sailing the wind, and King George's fleet.
I wondered if this could mean King Charles but George IV (1762-1830) seems about right.

Re. "Dam beinn" and "gom beadh mé" - we would now write the 'm' just before the b, "dá mbeinn". I don't know why both "beinn" and "beadh mé" are used for "I would", "bha" is the same as "bhí " in standard Irish, and the verb "ruigsinn" ("ruigean") like "sroicheadh" means "to reach, to arrive at"

CEOL DHÁIBHÍ

Is iomdha Nollaig a bh'agam féin
Nuair a bha mé ar bheagán céill'
Ag rith, ag iomáin chun an trá
Is an camán bán im' dhorn.

Dam beadh agam ach coite is rámh,
Is gom beadh mé ag iomradh ar an rámh,
Dúil leis an Rí agus ruigean slán
Is chan fhaighinn bás in uaigneas.

Is é m'amharc a bh'agam féin
Ó Shró n Ghearráin go dtí an Mhaoil,
Ar loingeas mór ar cáith ar ghaoith,
Agus cabhlach an Rí Seorlaí .

As well as the publications already cited in this posting, Ó Buachalla lists É. Ó Tuathail, "Féil-Sgríbhinn Eó in Mhic Néill" (ed by E Ua Riain, Dublin, 1940) and "Irisleabhar Muighe Nuadhad" 1914, 87.


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Subject: RE: Quiet Land of Erin
From: GUEST,archivist
Date: 09 Jun 02 - 03:43 PM

please click on blue links to see more background information
Messages below are from a new thread.


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Subject: RE: Quiet Land of Erin
From: Willa
Date: 09 Jun 02 - 02:04 PM

Sorry, Philippa; I was dashing out to a singaround when I saw Ian's request. I had the words in my file, but no time to copy them out. I should have put quotes around the piece I cut and pasted!


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Subject: RE: Quiet Land of Erin
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 09 Jun 02 - 09:13 AM

What are you at, Willa - quoting me from one of the other threads (for which I see links have been provided), as if you were going to look for the other translation? One of Seán's relatives did write the words out for me, gave them to someone else to give to me ... they got mislaid. so I didn't get that other translation...I think Seán did his translation as a request for singer and media producer Davy Hammond. The translation posted above is by Mary O'Hara's sister Joan. I think 'leanndubh' should be 'lionndubh', a black mood.


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Subject: Lyr Add: QUIET LAND OF ERIN
From: Willa
Date: 09 Jun 02 - 08:41 AM

Here you are, just in case you are not used to finding your way around the site.
Alice requested this song in the macarónachas thread. I used to have a recording of Jean Redpath singing "The Quiet Land of Erin" and here's how I remember it:

By myself I'd be in Ard Ti Chuain*
Where the mountains stand away
And 'tis there I'd let the Sundays pass
In a quiet glen above the bay
(chorus)
agus och och Eire lig is o
Eire leanndubh agus o
The quiet land of Erin

But my heart is weary all alone
And it sends a lonely cry
To the land that sings above my dreams
And the lonely Sundays pass me by.

I would ravel back the twisted years
and the bitter wasted winds
If the Lord above would let me lie
In a quiet place above the whins.

[*í is a long 'e' sound. 'ch' as in 'loch' or 'chanukah', but it's more a 'c' than an'h', I think Redpath sang 'Orshiecoon']

The late Sean Ò Gallochóir of Derry didn't like this version much. He made his own translation. If I see any of his progeny about when next I'm in Derry, I'll ask if they have the words.
I'll add Irish lyrics when I have more time. The original mentions place names in County Antrim; the singer is looking across from Scotland. He's also nostalgic about his 'caman', his hurley stick. They play camogie in Scotland too, but not on Sundays, could that have been a source of the lament?!


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Subject: RE: Quiet Land of Erin
From: Willa
Date: 09 Jun 02 - 08:32 AM

Hi, Ianmacintyre. I agree that it is a beautiful song; I have the CD.
You'll find the words and a discussion on the thread 'Ard ti Chuain/Quiet land of Erin'


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Subject: Quiet Land of Erin
From: GUEST,ianmacintyre@syd.eastlink.ca
Date: 09 Jun 02 - 08:22 AM

Good Day, Folks: Mary O'Hara sings a beautiful song called: The Quiet Land of Erin. Would anyone have the words? Thanks.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: quiet land of Erin
From: GUEST,Guest,guest
Date: 18 Jan 01 - 04:15 PM

Thanks for the words; no wonder I couldn't make them out from the recording I have.
Messages below are from a new thread.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: quiet land of Erin
From: GUEST,menzze@web.de
Date: 17 Jan 01 - 03:58 PM

Try some old recordings of the Fureys from Ireland. They recorded a song called The Quiet Lands of Eirin in the late seventies/early eighties. Hope this can help you a bit.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: quiet land of Erin
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 16 Jan 01 - 06:07 PM

click here or words, info, midi and abc on another thread. If you search you can also find info via Mudcat on how to transpose ABCs to sheet music. Also the tune, as Ardaidh Cuain, is published in O hEidhin, "Cás Amhrán" and this book is available from Cló Iar-Chonnachta http://www.cic.ie/


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: quiet land of Erin
From: GUEST,Guest
Date: 16 Jan 01 - 04:25 PM

Haven't got the dots , but there is a version by Grace Notes on their CD Red Wine and Promises. I've got the tune off by heart now, but still can't make out all the words; anyone out there know them?


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: quiet land of Erin
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 16 Jan 01 - 03:48 PM

Try for An Ti Cuan, which is the name of the song in Irish.


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Subject: quiet land of Erin
From: GUEST,T.S. Lewes England
Date: 16 Jan 01 - 03:46 PM

Iwould like the dots for the tune of the song The Quiet Land of Erin (Not by the Hush) a completly different songHope someone can help. T


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Subject: RE: Ard Tí Chuain/Quiet land of Erin
From: Annraoi & Philippa
Date: 05 Jun 99 - 04:49 PM

vis a vis Mac Ambróis. Tá leabhar amuigh ag Derek Bell agus Liam "Ólta le Ceolta" ina ndéantar tagairt don fhile. Ní cuimhneach liom ainm an leabhair, ach tháinig sí amach ar na mallaibh. Tá mé ag déanamh go dtearn Ruairí Ó Bléine tagairt dó fosta ina leabhar "Presbyterians and the Irish Language." Tá dhá scéal i dtaobh an amhráin "Aird a' Chumhaing". 1) Bhí an file in Albain ag obair. Lá amháin, bhí sé ina shuí ar bheanna na hAlban ag amharc siar ar chósta Aontroma abhí le feiceáil ag bun na spéire. Bhuail taom cumhaí é agus scríobh sé an dán fán a áit dhúchais. Bhí sé chomh tógtha sin go dtáinig sé arais 'na' bhaile. 2) Bhí an file ar tí a dhul anonn go hAlbain, ach nuair a smaointigh sé ar an tsaol a bheadh aige thall, i bhfad óna mhuintir is óna áit féin, shocraigh sé ar gan imeacht ar chor ar bith agus scríobh sé an dán.Tá sé mar "amhrán náisiúnta" ag Glinntí Aontroma ó shoin. Annraoi

Annraoi put this message in the wrong thread, so I'm taking the liberty of repasting it here. A translation isn't really necessary because stories 1) and 2) are as Roddy told us on 23 April.


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Subject: RE: the quiet land of erin
From: Martin _Ryan
Date: 27 May 99 - 07:04 AM

Philippa

I share your scepticism!

Regards


Messages below are from a new thread.


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Subject: RE: Ard Tí Chuain/Quiet land of Erin
From: John Moulden
Date: 26 May 99 - 02:03 PM

The trouble about this song is that there is little known about it or its author. Seán Quinn's remarks about Seán MacAmbrois dying in Ayrshire and quoted by Philippa above have no foundation that I know of.


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Subject: RE: Ard Tí Chuain/Quiet land of Erin
From: Alice
Date: 26 May 99 - 01:46 PM

Phillipa, thanks for bringing more info to the surface on this subject. I combed through O'Hara's autobiography and found more on the song, particularly this:

"When I left school, Joan [Mary's sister] was established at the Abbey Theatre as a promising young actress.... While acting at the Abbey Theatre, she also did occasional radio work on commercial programmes (there was no television in Ireland until 1962). One day she mentioned to the radio producer that her youngest sister sang and played the harp. He expressed interest, and it was arranged that Joan should bring me along for an audition. I sang my entire repertoire: a handful of songs which included Joan's "The Quiet Land of Erin"...."

Apparently, her older sister Joan wrote the English version lyrics to Sean Mac Ambrois' song.

alice


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Subject: Aird a' chumhaing/Quiet land of Erin
From: Philippa
Date: 26 May 99 - 01:18 PM

from http://dialspace.dial.pipex.com/s.quinn/music/gtrad.htm:

In Northern Ireland terms, this has always been 'a place apart' - indeed the building of the picturesque Coast Road from Glenarm to Ballycastle in the last century was a final attempt to bring the region under effective Government control. In many ways they look towards Scotland as much as the rest of Ireland. The Scottish connection is emphasised in local surnames such as McAlister, McKay, McNeill and common forenames like Alasdair, Randal and Archie. One of the finest ballads in Irish Gaelic, Airde Cuan, written about these Glens, by Sean Mac Ambrois in the middle of the last century. Mac Ambrois' song tells how he left his native Glendun, perhaps to escape the potato famine, and settled in Ayrshire where he ultimately died pining for the hills of home, which he could still see on the western horizon. His song tells of his love for the 'cuckoo glen'; (Glendun) and of playing hurling at Christmas on the 'white strand' (the beach at Cushendun).

Is iomai Nollaig bhi me fein
I mBun Abahnn Doinne is me gan cheill
Ag iomain ar an tra bhan
Mo chaman ban in mo dhorn liom

The other relevant item I found on the internet was a bit of a laugh, a Living Tradition review of a recording by "Anam" saying the album includes a songs by a band member and one "written by Sean Mac Ambrois which sounds more traditional than contemporary"


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Subject: RE:Aird a' Chumhaing/Quiet land of Erin
From: Philippa
Date: 26 May 99 - 01:09 PM

questions about the age of the song arose on the related thread - can Roddy (or John M or Annraoi or anyone else) give us more biographical info. on S Mac Ambróis?


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Subject: RE: the quiet land of erin
From: Philippa
Date: 26 May 99 - 12:19 PM

I thought Mary O'Hara's sister Joan translated "Aird a' Chumhaing" as "The Quiet Land of Erin"? Both lyrics can be found at the earlier thread (above). Is that really PJ Curtis -- I am very surprised!


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Subject: RE: the quiet land of erin
From: John Moulden
Date: 26 May 99 - 06:54 AM

Seán Davey may have arranged the tune of "The quiet land of Erin" for its television presentation but it was published in the Gaelic Journal as early as 1895 and by Sam Henry in the 1930s as Och, och Eire Oh.


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Subject: RE: the quiet land of erin
From: Alice
Date: 25 May 99 - 07:45 PM

PJ Curtis, the song is older than the '70s.

Mary O'Hara writes in her autobiography, The Scent of The Roses, regarding her recording around the time of her husband's death in 1957..."In those days the Clancy Brothers had not yet become famous. They had started their own recording company: Tradition, and wanted me to make a long playing record for them. Being under contract to Decca, whose records in the USA were issued under the "London" label, I felt I could not do so. But when they persisted, Richard approached Decca and persuaded them to allow me to make the one album for Tradition. By the time I came to make this record, 'Songs of Ireland', Richard had been dead a few weeks.....About a month after Richard's death, I was ready to leave the Long Island apartment. Before doing so I burnt all my letters to Richard.
It was more convenient for me to stay in the city while I was recording 'Songs of Ireland'...
While the Tradition album, 'Songs of Ireland', was available only in the United States, the two Decca albums, 'Songs of Érin' and 'Love Songs of Ireland', were being manufactured and released in half a dozen countries in Europe, as well as South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. ...
With plans for going into a monastery firmly established in my own mind, I decided to record a few more long-playing albums before finally giving up singing forever. My repertoire of songs in English and Gaelic was comparatively large and I hoped, if possible, to make one album of Scottish songs because of my attachment to that country..."
She goes on to describe a concert tour of Australia, recording a number of programs on Radio Éireann, an appearance on the Ed Sullivan show with the Clancy Brothers and Brendan O'Dowda, and the final recording of tapes before entering the convent she had chosen at Stanbrook.
..."Towards the end of 1961 Ireland was preparing to set up its own television station. It opened for the New Year on 31 December. I was asked to take part in the opening night, which I did, doing a number of songs accompanying myself on the harp. I never saw that programme, as I was in Africa that night visiting my brother..."
The next time she saw her brother was in 1978, when he appeared in the television studio that surprised her with "This Is Your Life".

The Quiet Land of Erin was recorded in those sessions before entering the convent. It is available on the current CD called 'A Song For Ireland' on Shanachie.

Mary explains how she entered Stanbook in 1962, starting a new chapter of her life, leaving singing behind with no regrets..."Over the next few years, beyond the walls of my sequestered world, the saga of the "Mount Street tapes" dragged quietly on, puncutuated by long intervals of silence. Eventually, it was decided at Stanbrook that I had to listen to the tapes and judge for myself. As they could not be played at the monastery I had to go to London to hear them under proper studio conditions. Sister Raphael accompanied me and the result of the trip was that in 1972 I signed a contract with Emerald Records of Belfast, whose records were manufactured and distributed by Decca. All the songs on the original "Mount Street" master tapes have been included on three albums, now available in many countries."

She spent 12 years in the monastery, and, after illness, in 1974, was advised that she should leave the order so that she could regain her health and vigor. She was then invited to appear on the Late Late Show on Irish Television.
"... I sang 'The Quiet Land of Erin', which had become my theme song before I went into the monastery. I had not planned to return to singing so soon... Several times during the next two or three years I recorded songs for inclusion in his [Ciarín MacMathúna] tremendously popular Sunday morning programme, 'Mo Cheól Thuú'. There is now a long playing album of that title on the Gael-linn label."
--------

alice in montana


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Subject: RE: the quiet land of erin
From: PJ Curtis. Record Producer, Ireland
Date: 25 May 99 - 06:26 PM

Dear Fair young maid,I think I dont know the mary O'hara version, but 'the Q.L.o Erin' was writtenback in the late 1970's by Shawn Davey(The Brendan Voyage etc) and becane famous as a Irish TV ad for Erin Foods. Its still a great melody...orig. sung by Rita Connely. PJC


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Subject: RE: the quiet land of erin
From: katlaughing
Date: 24 May 99 - 11:53 PM

Fair Youngmaid:

Ya did just fine. No need to apologise. Welcome and hope you come back often.

katlaughing


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Subject: RE: the quiet land of erin
From: Rita64
Date: 24 May 99 - 11:24 PM

Thanks for the link Joe - message received. I am only new to this forum so please forgive my inexperience.


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Subject: RE: the quiet land of erin
From: Joe Offer
Date: 24 May 99 - 05:19 AM

Hi - we had a thread on that just last month. It's probably better to post any additional comments to that thread instead of creating a new thread and splitting the information.
The other thread is above (threads combined).
-Joe Offer-


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