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Online Songbook:Put's Original California Songster

DigiTrad:
JOE BOWERS
SWEET BETSY FROM PIKE
THE LOUSY MINER
THE NATIONAL MINER


Related threads:
Obit: John A. Stone -'Old Put' (Joe Bowers?) -1864 (25)
PermaThread: John A. Stone Songsters ('Old Put') (47)
Lyr Req/Add: Humbug Steamship Companies (Stone) (4)
(origins) ADD: Happy Miner/Unhappy Miner (Old Put) (21)
Lyr Req/Add: Prospecting Dream (John A. Stone) (3)
Lyr Add: Songs from Put's Songsters (7)


Joe Offer 10 Jan 08 - 02:11 PM
Joe Offer 10 Jan 08 - 02:12 PM
Joe Offer 10 Jan 08 - 02:21 PM
open mike 10 Jan 08 - 02:24 PM
Joe Offer 10 Jan 08 - 03:57 PM
Amos 10 Jan 08 - 04:01 PM
ClaireBear 10 Jan 08 - 04:05 PM
Joe Offer 10 Jan 08 - 04:18 PM
Joe Offer 10 Jan 08 - 04:25 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 10 Jan 08 - 05:40 PM
Joe Offer 10 Jan 08 - 09:15 PM
Joe Offer 10 Jan 08 - 09:43 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 10 Jan 08 - 10:09 PM
Joe Offer 10 Jan 08 - 11:04 PM
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Joe Offer 10 Jan 08 - 11:49 PM
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Jon Bartlett 11 Jan 08 - 04:14 AM
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Subject: Coming Soon: Put's California Songster
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 02:11 PM

I found a copy of Put's Original California Songster (4th edition, 1868) online, and I'd like to post all the songs from it. Q has volunteered to spearhead the project, but anyone is welcome to help. Please try to post the songs more-or-less in order, and try to ensure that they are exact trancriptions of Stone's text. If you have comments or background information on a song, please put it at the bottom of your message.
There's one good way to make this job easier - lyrics and tunes for many of these song are in to books complied by Richard E. Lingenfelter and Richard A. Dwyer: The Songs of the Gold Rush and Songs of the American West. If you can't read the original, note the illegible parts, and Q or I (or others who have the books) can add what we can find.

Q and I are working on a transcription of Put's Golden Songster in this thread (click). That should give you an idea about format. Oh, if there are jokes on the page you're transcribing please transcribe them, too. Note that all messages are subject to editing.

This is an edited PermaThread, to be used to post songs from Put's Original California Songster, by John A. Stone. Feel free to post to this thread, but be aware that all messages in this thread are subject to editing. Joe Offer and Q are the editors for this thread. Artful Codger has done a wonderful job of adding melodies in MIDI form in 2012.
Music of the Gold Rush & Civil War includes a facsimile of this songster, plus texts and MIDI tunes for most songs.

Click to jump to the table of contents in this thread.


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Subject: Preface: Put's Original California Songster
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 02:12 PM

Put's
Original
California Songster

Price 25 Cents


    Put's original California songster : giving in a few words what would occupy volumes, detailing the hopes, trials and joys of a miner's life. 4th ed., 18th thousand Publisher : San Francisco : D.E. Appleton, 1868. 64 pages.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1854, By JOHN A. STONE, In the Clerk‘s Office of the District Court of the United States for the Northern District of California.
In presenting the present edition of ‘PUT’S ORIGINAL CALIFORNIA SONGSTER,’ the Publishers have aimed to please, and spared no expense to render it more worthy of your support. Trusting it in the hands of its Dedicators ‘ California’s best and truest men’ We remain, Yours, respectfully, THE PUBLISHERS.
PREFACE.
In dedicating this little Book of Songs to the Miners of California, those hardy builders of California‘s prosperity and greatness, the author deems it his duty to offer a prefatory remark in regard to the origin of the work and the motive of its publication.
Having been a miner himself for a number of years, he has had ample opportunities of observing, as he has equally shared, the many trials and hardships to which his brethren of the pick and shovel have been exposed, and to which in general they have so patiently, so cheerfully, and even heroically submitted. Hence, ever since the time of his crossing the Plains, in the memorable year of ’50, he has been in the habit of noting down a few of the leading items of his experience, and clothing them in the garb of humorous, though not irreverent verse.
Many of his songs may show some hard edges, and he is free to confess, that they may fail to please the more aristocratic portion of the community, who have but little sympathy with the details, hopes, trials or joys of the toiling miner’s life; but he is confident that the class he addresses will not find them exaggerated, nothing extenuated, nor aught set down ‘in malice.$rsquo;
In conclusion, he would state, that after having sung them himself at various times and places, and latterly with the assistance of a few gentlemen, known by the name of Sierra Nevada Rangers, the songs have been published at the request of a number of friends; and if the author should thereby succeed in contributing to the amusement of those he is anxious to please, enlivening the long tedious hours of a miner's winter fireside, his pains will not be unrewarded.

San Francisco, Sept., 1855

Note: apparently, the University of California Bancroft Library does not have a first edition


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Subject: Index: Put's Original California Songster
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 02:21 PM

CONTENTS

Preface - 3
A Life by the Cabin Fire - 9
An Honest Miner - 29
Arrival of the Greenhorn - 31
Australia and the Amazon - 22
Away Up on the Yuba - 18
California as it Is and Was - 16
California Bloomer - 34
Coming Around the Horn - 37
Crossing the Plains - 13
Emigrant from Pike - 41
Gold Lake and Gold Bluff - 39
Honest John and William Relief - 51
Humbug Steamship Companies - 43
Hunting after Gold - 23
Joaquin, the Horse-Thief - 26
My Log Cabin Home - 45
Prospecting Dream - 11
Seeing the Elephant - 19
Striking a Lead - 28
The Fools of '49 - 7
The Gambler - 35
The Lousy Miner - 48
The Miner's Lament - 49
The National Miner - 40
The Sonora Filibusters - 50
When I went off to Prospect - 46
    Additional Songs.
An Oft-told Tale - 58
Backbone- 64
Gold—Parody - 60
Good News from Home - 52
Josh, John - 62
Life among the Miners - 54
Melting Accident - 53
Miners Ups and Downs - 63
Old Zenas - 61
Poker Jim - 56
The Abandoned Claim - 55


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Subject: RE: Coming Soon: Put's Original California Songste
From: open mike
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 02:24 PM

there is a fellow from nevada who has compiled songs of the gold rush, also. Chris Bayer did this for a master thesis project, i believe.
His website can be found at nevada muse .

your project is interesting. good luck, and i will contribute as i can.


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Subject: ADD: The Fools of '49 (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 03:57 PM

The Fools of '49
[Air - 'Commence, you Darkies all]

When gold was found in '48, the people said 'twas gas,
And some were fools enough to think the lumps were only brass;
But soon they all were satisfied, and started off to mine,
They bought their ships, came round the Horn, in the fall of '49.

Chorus:
Then they thought of what they had been told,
When they started after gold,
That they never in the world would make a pile.

The people all were crazy then, they didn't know what to do,
They sold their farms for just enough to pay their passage through;
They bid their friends a long farewell; said, "Dear wife, don't you cry,
I'll send you home the yellow lumps a piano for to buy."
Then they thought, etc.

The poor, the old and rotten scows, were advertised to sail
From New Orleans with passengers, but they must pump and bail;
The ship were crowded more than full, and some hung on behind,
And others dived off from the wharf, and swam till they were blind.
Then they thought, etc.

With rusty pork and stinking beef, and rotten, wormy bread,
And captains, too, that never were up as high as the main-mast head,
The steerage passengers would rave and swear that they'd paid their passage,
And wanted something more to eat besides Bologna sausage.
Then they thought. etc.

Then they began to cross the plains with oxen, hollowing "haw;"
And steamers they began to run as far as Panama,
And there for months the people staid that started after gold,
And some returned disgusted with the lies that had been told.
Then they thought, etc.

The people died on evry route, they sicken'd and died like sheep,
And those at sea, before they were dead, were launched into the deep;
And those that died while crossing the Plains fared not so well as that,
For a hole was dug and they thrown in, along the miserable Platte.
Then they thought, etc.

The ships at last began to arrive, and the people began to inquire:
"They say that flour is a dollar a pound, do you think it will be any higher?"
And then to carry their blankets and sleep out-doors, it seemed so droll,
Both tired and mad, without a cent, they d---d the lousy hole.
Then they thought, etc.


Put's Original California Songster, pp. 7-8

Lyrics (no tune) in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, p. 33
Notes from Q:
Put's Original California Songster, giving in a few words what would occupy volumes, detailing the Hopes, Trials and Joys of a Miner's Life.
pages 7-8
Lyrics (no tune) in Lingenfelter & Dwyer, Songs of the American West, p. 25

Music may be in Half-Dime Singer's Library, 1879 or Dime Song Book 1859, neither seen.

Click to play (joeweb)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
The MIDI was adapted from sheet music for "Commence, Ye Darkies All!" in the Lester S. Levy Collection (John Hopkins University).

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Subject: RE: Coming Soon: Put's Original California Songster
From: Amos
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 04:01 PM

The Choruus seems to create an infinite loop here, Joe...when does it end?


A


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Subject: RE: Coming Soon: Put's Original California Songster
From: ClaireBear
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 04:05 PM

Is there a missing line break between a three-line chorus and what should be the second verse?


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Subject: ADD: A Life by the Cabin Fire (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 04:18 PM

A Life by the Cabin Fire
[Air — A life on the ocean wave]

A life by the cabin fire,
A home in the northern mines,
We'll make a pile and retire,
Won't that be charming and fine?
We'll roam the Sierra Nevada
'Till we kill the grizzly bear,
And send the fur home to the ladies,
For pantalets — how it will wear!

CHORUS
A life by the cabin fire,
A home in the northern mines;
We'll make a pile and retire,
Won't that be charming and fine?

The city's no longer in view,
The ground is beginning to rise;
If stories they told us are true,
How the lumps will dazzle our eyes!
We built us a cabin so fine,
Got grub to last us a while,
Commenced in the morning to mine,
But at night fell short of a pile.
A life by the cabin fire, etc.

We soon had a row in the camp,
For no one was willing to cook,
We kicked out a miserable scamp,
We did it as neat as a book.
The rest of us could'nt agree,
On the manner of setting the tom;
'Twas just as I knew it would be
Before we started from home.
A life by the cabin fire, etc.

The doctor would give us advice,
And the lawyer would argue the point,
But we couldn't get rid of our lice,
No matter how often we'd oint,
The clerk, with his breeches worn out
Look'd more like a Panama ape,
That you'd see on the Chagres route—
What a change from needles and tape!
A life by the cabin fire, etc.

We hung on a kettle of beans,—
The diet we miners admire,—
The last of our grub and our means,
And they tipp'd o'er in the fire.
So then we divided the tools,
And each took a different route,
Concluded we'd acted like fools,
But none of us died of the gout.
A life by the cabin fire, etc.

The doctor and lawyer combined,
And agreed that the doctor should kill,
And the lawyer should come on behind,
And collect the exorbitant bill.
The preacher could not make a pile
At the gospel he came out to preach,
He fiddled and gambled awhile
But money kept out of his reach.
A life by the cabin fire. etc.

The cabin is now out of sight,
That stood on the western slope,
We left it for nothing but spite,
For that was our only hope.
The most of the party went home,
Disgusted with what they had seen,
And I left behind to roam,—
"Oh, wasn't I wonderful green!"
A life by the cabin fire, etc.


Put's Original California Songster, pp. 9-10

lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, pp. 95-96

That's what the text says, "could'nt agree."

Oh, and I can't figure out what "setting the tom" means. "Tom" is a bit blurred, so it could be another word - but Dwyer-Lingenfelter also has it "tom."

Click to play (pdmusic.org)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]

The song "A Life on the Ocean Wave" was written by Epes Sargent (text) and Henry Russell (music) in 1838. Sheet music may be found online in the Lester S. Levy Collection. [PDF]

Q posted the text and a few notes on the song here. See also this thread, among others.

Also visit this page for the song at The Contemplator site, with an automatically playing MIDI.

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Subject: RE: Coming Soon: Put's Original California Songster
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 04:25 PM

    Good eyes, Amos and Claire. I fixed the mistake.
    I found a way to OCR the original text [using Microsoft Office Document Imaging, a 'hidden' tool in most versions of Office], so I guess I won't ask for help with posting the songs in this book - BUT it really helps if you point out transcription errors and missing line breaks, and supply background information.


    And if somebody has Lingenfelter-Dwyer and wants to volunteer to transcribe tunes, let me know. It's nice to see that THREE California Mudcatters (open mike, Amos, and Claire Bear) have been watching this thread. There are some fascinating songs in this book.
    -Joe-


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Subject: RE: Coming Soon: Put's Original California Songster
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 05:40 PM

I guess mine was cross-posting, I didn't look after I started on the book. We should PM to avoid wasted effort. Mine looks OK but I didn't close italics after Songs of the American West


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Subject: RE: Coming Soon: Put's Original California Songster
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 09:15 PM

Hi, Q -
Give me a chance to see what I can do with posting lyrics from the California Songster over the next two days, since I have worked out a very efficient way of posting with OCR (and since I have finished my homeschooling duties for the week). The Golden Songster is much far more difficult for me, since I have photocopies of that book instead of the online scans that work so well with my OCR. If you'd like to post songs from the Golden Songster, that would be most efficient, since I have no technical advantage over you there.

In this thread, the best thing people can do to help is to go through the songs I've posted and post any corrections or additional information. As I've done with Q's post of "The Fools of '49," Iwill incorporate all corrections into the main text, and any notes or background information under a horizontal rule/line <hr>. Q, you have an editing button for this thread, so feel free to add background information at the end of each message. Thanks.

-Joe Offer-


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Subject: ADD: Prospecting Dream (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 09:43 PM

Prospecting Dream
[AIR—Susannah]

I dreamed a dream the other night, when everything was still,
I dreamed that I was carrying my long-tom down a hill;
My feet slipp'd out and I fell down, oh, how I jarr'd my liver,
I watched my long-tom till I saw it fetch up in the river,

Chorus:
Oh, what a miner, what a miner was I,
All swelled up with the scurvy, so I really thought I'd die.

My matches, flour, and Chile beans, lay scattered all around,
I felt so bad I wished to die, as I lay on the ground;
My coffee rolled down by a rock, my pepper I could not find,
'Twas then I thought of Angeline, the girl I left behind.
Oh, what a miner, what a miner was I,
All swelled up with the scurvy, so I really thought I'd die.

I took my shovel, pick and pan, to try a piece of ground,
I dream'd I struck the richest lead that ever had been found;
Then I wrote home that I had found a solid lead of gold,
And I'd be home in just a month, but what a lie I told!
Oh, what a miner, what a miner was I,
All swelled up with the scurvy, so I really thought I'd die.

I dug, I panned and tommed awhile, till I had but a dollar,
I struck it here, and right down there, I could not raise the color;
John Chinaman he bought me out, and pungled down the dust,
Then I had just an ounce in change to start in on a "bust,"
Oh, what a miner, etc.

I went to town and got drunk; in the morning, to my surprise,
I found that I had got a pair of roaring big black eyes.
And I was strapp'd, had not a cent, not, even pick or shovel,
My hair snarled up, my breeches torn, looked like the very d---l.
Oh, what a miner, etc.

I then took up a little farm, and got a señorita,
Grey-eyed, hump-backed, and black as tar—her name was Marguerita;
My pigs all died, hens flew away, Joaquin he stole my mules,
My ranch burnt "down," my blankets "up," likewise my farming tools.
Oh, what a miner, etc.

I left my farm, and hired out to be a hardware clerk,
I got kicked out, "cos" couldn't write, so again I went to work;
But when they caught me stealing grub, a few went in to boot him,
And others round were singing out, "Hang him, hang him, shoot him!"
Oh, what a miner, etc.


Put's Original California Songster, p. 11

Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, pp. 74-75


Anybody know what a "long-tom" is?
"Pungled"?


[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
"Susannah" is of course the Stephen Collins Foster song "Oh, Susanna!" (1848). There is a Mudcat MIDI hiding somewhere, but currently the links I find are all broken.

DigiTrad entry. There are numerous Mudcat threads as well.
Sheet music [
PDF] in the Lester S. Levy collection.
Text and MIDI (click to play) at pdmusic.org.
Text and auto-playing MIDI at The Contemplator site; click here.

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Subject: RE: Coming Soon: Put's Original California Songster
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 10:09 PM

In this case, 'longtom' means a trough for washing gold-bearing earth (Webster's Collegiate). Also see verse 4. (Also applied to a cannon, or long rifle, but that is not the meaning here.

Pungled- contributed, made a payment or money contribution. First appeared in 1851 (Webster's). Also means financially embarassed (OED). Other earlier meanings in UK, not pertinent.


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Subject: ADD: Crossing the Plains (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 11:04 PM

Crossing the Plains
[AIR—Caroline of Edinburgh]

Come all you Californians, I pray ope wide your ears,
If you are going across the Plains, with snotty mules or steers;
Remember beans before you start, likewise dried beef and ham.
Beware of ven'son, d––n the stuff, it's oftentimes a ram.

You must buy two revolvers, a bowie-knife and belt,
Says you, "Old feller, now stand off, or I will have your pelt;"
The greenhorn looks around about, but not a soul can see,
Says he, "There's not a man in town, but what's afraid of me."

You should'nt shave, but cultivate your down, and let it grow,
So when you do return, 'twill be as soft and white as snow;
Your lovely Jane will be surprised, your ma'll begin to cook;
The greenhorn to his mother'll say, "How savage I must look!"

"How do you like it overland?" his mother he will say,
"All right, excepting cooking, then the devil is to pay;
For some won't cook, and others can't, and then it's curse and damn,
The coffee-pot's, begun to leak, so has the frying-pan."

It's always about th eteams, and how we ought to do,

All hands get mad, and each one says, "I own as much as you:"
One of them says, "I'll buy or sell, I'm d––d if I care which;"
Another says, "Let's buy him out, the lousy son of a b–––."

You calculate on sixty days to take you over the Plains,
But there you lack for bread and meat, for coffee and for brains;
Your sixty days are a hundred or more, your grub you've got to divide,
Your steers and mules are alkalied, so foot it—you cannot ride.

You have to stand a watch at night, to keep the Indians off,
About sundown some heads will ache, and some begin to cough;
To be deprived of health we know is always very hard,
Though every night some one is sick, to get rid of standing guard.

Your canteens, they should be well filled, with poison alkali,
So when you get tired of traveling, you can cramp all up and die;
The best thing in the world to keep your bowels loose and free,
Is fight and quarrel among yourselves, and seldom if ever agree.

There's not a log to make a seat, along the river Platte,
So when you eat, you've got to sit or stand, or sit down square and flat;
It's fun to cook with buffalo wood, take some that's newly born,
If I knew once what I know now, I'd a gone around the Horn!

The desert's nearly death on corns, while walking in the sand,
And drive a jackass by the tail, it's d––n this overland;
I'd rather ride a raft at sea, and then at once be lost,
Says Bill, "Let's leave this poor old mule, we can't get him across."

The ladies have the hardest tine, that emigrate by land,
For when they cook with buffalo wood, they often burn a hand;
And then they jaw their husbands round, get mad and spill the tea,
Wish to the Lord they'd be taken down with a turn of the di-a-ree.

When you arrive at Placerville, or Sacramento City,
You've nothing in the world to eat, no money—what a pity!
Your striped pants are all worn out, which causes people to laugh,
When they see you gaping round the town like a great big brindle calf.

You're lazy, poor, and all broke down, such hardships you endure,
The post-office at Sacramento all such men will cure;
You'll find a line from ma' and pa', and one from lovely Sal,
If that don't physic you every mail, you never will get well.


Put's Original California Songster, pp. 13-15

Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, pp. 41-42


Click to play (joeweb)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
This MIDI tune was transcribed from Lingenfelter, Dwyer and Cohen's book Songs of the American West (p. 39); they found it in the Frank C. Brown collection. They print a different tune in The Songs of the Gold Rush (p. 41). This is a case where tune-wise we have an embarrassment of riches—quite a variety of tunes associated with "Caroline". For instance, see:

Mudcat thread on "Crossing the Plains"
Mudcat thread on "[Blooming] Caroline of Edinburgh Town"
DigiTrad entries for "Caroline of Edinburgh Town" and "Blooming Caroline of Edinburgh"

Malcolm Douglas believed that the tune most probably meant is now most popular as "[Come All You] Tramps and Hawkers". The Mudcat MIDI link for this ("Paddy West") is currently broken, but there are quite a few clips on YouTube, and a MIDI by Barry Taylor may be heard or downloaded here at The Contemplator site.

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Subject: ADD: California as It Is and Was (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 11:22 PM

California as It Is and Was.
[AIR—I remember.]

I remember, I remember, when once I used to mine,
My cabin still is standing beneath a sugar-pine;
From daylight in the morning, till the sun went out of sight,
Alone I used to dig for gold, and mend my clothes at night.
Alone I used to dig for gold, and mend my clothes at night.

I remember, I remember, when grub was very high,
We had to live on pork and beans, 'twas little pork indeed,
And miners were very poor, could not afford to buy;
With enough to grease the frying-pan, we thought we'd struck a lead.
With enough to grease the frying-pan, we thought we'd struck a lead.

I remember, I remember, when we flumed American river.
The floods came down, swept off our dam, and all hands d––d together;
We lost our time and mining tools, and everything we had,
Instead of leaving a pile we were left without a scad.
Instead of leaving a pile we were left without a scad.

I remember, I remember, when the Yuba used to pay,
With nothing but a rocker, five hundred dollars a day;
We used to think 't would always last, and would with perfect ease,
If Uncle Sam had only stopped the coming of Chinese.
If Uncle Sam had only stopped the coming of Chinese.

I remember, I remember, we're compelled to pay a tax,
Which people say is gambled off—I wonder if those are facts?
And certain ones are trying to give our mineral lands away,
To build a railroad from the States, to San Francisco Bay.
To build a railroad from the States, to San Francisco Bay.

I remember, I remember, when we hadn't any laws,
We then could live in peace among the diggers and their squaws;
But now it's Whigs and Democrats, and Know Nothings of late,
All fighting after office, with a chance to rob the State.
All fighting after office with a chance to rob the State.

I remember, I remember, when Captain Lynch was boss,
We had no use for prison brigs, we hadn't that, old hoss;
But now it's thieves on every side, political thieves in flocks,
All promised office if they wait till Frank Pierce buys more rocks.


Put's Original California Songster, pp. 16-17

Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, pp. 185-186


[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
Most of the "I Remember" poems appear to be derivations or parodies of Thomas Hood's poem "I Remember, I Remember" (by 1827), which was set to rather arty music in 1828 by Christopher Meinecke--other early settings also exist. But Stone's text seems patterned instead on a couple of early parodies beginning "I remember, I remember, when I was once a boy." And I suspect it was a simpler setting than Meinecke's that ended up being sung to various parodies. Nevertheless, his setting has the virtue of being among the first and of repeating the fourth line in the manner echoed by Stone's poem (not a feature of Hood's original). Meinecke's setting may be heard at pdmusic.org:

Click to play

The Lester S. Levy Collection has a couple partial copies of early settings, including Meinecke's. It also has a setting composed by Mrs. Elizabeth Fitzgerald of an entirely different poem by Winthrop Praed titled "I Remember How My Childhood Fleeted" (published in Praed's collected works in 1844). Oddly, Lingenfelter and Dwyer used this tune for Stone's text in The Songs of the Gold Rush (p. 185). Granted, Fitzgerald's setting is more regular and singable by the average moke, and would also have been more recent than the settings of Hood's poem, but it also has an extra melodic strain (albeit a repetition of the previous), and the text pattern reprises the first two lines instead of the last one (as in Stone). I doubt this would have been the tune Stone had in mind.

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Subject: ADD: Away Up on the Yuba (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 11:32 PM

Away Up on the Yuba.
[AIR—Old folks at home.]

Away up the Yuba river,
Far up in the mines,
There's where I've been mining, ever
Since we dug our rockers out of pines;
All up and down the digger nation,
Many times I've roamed,
All dirt and rags, besides starvation,
Hair that seemed it never had been combed.

Chorus:
All the mines look hard and dreary,
Everywhere I roam;
Oh, miners, how my heart grows weary,
Ne'er a cent, and far away from home.

All around the northern mines I've wander'd,
With my blankets on my back;
All I made for whisky then I squandered,
Never had a dollar in my sack.
When I was fluming on the Feather,
I was going to make a strike,
Till drove out by the rainy weather,
Such thund'rin' luck, I never saw the like.
All the mines look hard and dreary, Everywhere I roam, etc.

When I was mining with my partner,
He and I could not agree;
I made all the bread, did this, that and t'other
He got mad if he had to make the tea;
He was lazy as the very devil,
Swore with me he wouldn't work;
We divided, he took tent, pick and shovel,
Away he went, the lazy, lousy shirk.
All the mines look hard and dreary, Everywhere I roam, etc.


Put's Original California Songster, p. 18

Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, pp. 66-67


Click to play (pdmusic.org)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
"Old Folks at Home" (Swanee River) was written by Stephen Collins Foster in 1851.

Sheet music [PDF] in the Lester S. Levy Collection.
Digital Tradition: Old Folks at Home
Mudcat thread: Old Folks at Home
YouTube: Paul Robeson: Old Folks at Home
YouTube: Tome Roush: Old Folks at Home

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Subject: ADD: Seeing the Elephant (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Jan 08 - 11:49 PM

Seeing the Elephant
[AIR—Boatman Dance.]

When I left the States for gold,
Everything I had I sold:
A stove and bed, a fat old sow
Sixteen chickens and a cow.

Chorus:
So leave, you miners, leave, oh, leave, you miners, leave,
Take my advice, kill off your lice, or else go up in the mountains;
Oh no, lots of dust, I'm going to the city to get on a "bust,"
Oh no, lots of dust, I'm going to the city to get on a "bust."

Off I started, Yankee-like,
I soon fell in with a lot from Pike;
The next was, "D—n you, back, wo-haw,"
A right smart chance from Arkansaw.
So leave, you miners, etc.

On the Platte we couldn't agree,
Because I had the di-a-ree,
We there split up, I made a break,
With one old mule for the Great Salt Lake.
So leave, you miners, etc.

The Mormon girls were fat as hogs,
The chief production, cats and dogs;
Some had ten wives, others none,
Thirty-six had Brigham Young.
So leave, you miners, etc.

The d—d fool, like all the rest,
Supposed the thirty-six the best;
He soon found out his virgin dears
Had all been Mormons thirteen years.
So leave, you miners, etc.

Being brave, I cut and carved,
On the desert nearly starved;
My old mule laid down and died,
I had no blanket, took his hide.
So leave, you miners, leave, oh leave, you miners leave, etc.

The poor coyotes stole my meat,
Then I had nought but bread to cat;
It was not long till that gave out,
Then how I cursed the Truckee route!
So leave, you miners, leave, oh, leave, you leave, etc.

On I traveled through the pines,
At last I found the northern mines;
I stole a dog, got whipt like h—ll,
Then away I went to Marys'ville.
So leave, you miners, leave, oh, leave, you miners, leave, etc.

There I filled the town with lice,
And robbed the Chinese of their rice;
The people say, "You've got the itch,
Leave here, you lousy son of a b——."
So leave, you miners, leave, oh, leave, you miners, leave, etc.

Because I would not pay my bill,
They kicked me out of Downieville;
I stole a mule and lost the trail,
And then fetched up in Hangtown Jail.
So leave, you miners, leave, oh, leave, you miners, leave, etc.

Canvas roof and paper walls,
Twenty horse-thieves in the stalls;
I did as I had done before,
Coyoted out from 'neath the floor.
So leave, you miners, leave, oh, leave, you miners, leave, etc.

I robbed a nigger of a dollar,
And bought unguent to grease my collar;
I tried a pint, not one had gone,
Then it beat the d—l how I daubed it on,
So leave, you miners, leave, oh, leave, you miners, leave, etc.

The people threatened hard my life,
Because I stole a miner's wife;
They showed me a rope, to give me signs,
Then off I went to the southern mines.
So leave, you miners, leave, oh, leave, you miners, leave, etc.

I mined a while, got lean and lank,
And lastly stole a monte-bank;
Went to the city, got a gambler's name
And lost my bank at the thimble game.
So leave, you miners, leave, oh, leave, you miners, leave, etc.

I fell in love with a California girl;
Her eyes were gray, her hair did curl;
Her nose turned up to get rid of her chin—
Says she, "You're a miner, you can't come in."
So leave, you miners, leave, oh, leave, you miners leave, etc.

When the elephant I had seen,
I'm d—d if I thought I was green;
And others say, both night and morn,
They saw him coming round the Horn.
So leave, you miners, leave, oh, leave, you miners, leave, etc.

If I should make another raise,
In New York sure I'll spend my days;
I'll be a merchant, buy a saw,
So good-bye, mines and Panama.
So leave, you ininer. leave, oh, leave, you miners leave, etc.


Put's Original California SongsterThe Songs of the Gold Rush, pp. 53-55 (which attributes lyrics to D.G. Robinson)


Click to play (pdmusic.org): [version 1] [version 2]

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
"De Boatman Dance" was written by the famous minstrel Daniel Decatur Emmett in 1843.

Sheet music [PDF] in the Lester S. Levy Collection.
Digital Tradition: De Boatman Dance
Mudcat thread: The Boatmen (fiddle tune)
YouTube: The Huckleberry Brothers: [De Boatman Dance]
YouTube: locustvalleystring: Boatsman

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Subject: ADD: Australia and the Amazon (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 12:01 AM

Australia and the Amazon.
[AIR—Emma Snow.]

Farewell, old California, I'm going far away,
Where gold is found more plenty, in larger lumps they say;
And climate, too, that can't be beat, no matter where you go—
Australia, that's the land for me, where all have got a show.

Chorus:
But I found that good time over,
For all was grief and pain,
And I should never, never make
My ounce a day again.

I sold a claim that paid me just half an ounce a day,
Got robbed at Sacramento, and licked down at the Bay;
I took the Monumental, for Sydney she was bound
Her boilers bursted, she burnt up, and five hundred were drowned.
But I found, etc.

We soon found we were lousy, which did us much surprise.
To hear the cabin gentry say, "They're lousy, blast their eyes!"
But when our journey ended, and we had seen the mines,
Without a cent were shoved in jail, for taxes and for fines.
But I found, etc.

But give me California, where all have equal rights,
Or the Amazon with all her snakes, I'd run the risk of bites;
Such mean, infernal, theiving, outlandish lies are told;
The d—l will get the next poor whelp that does discover gold.
But I found, etc.




Put's Original California Songster, p. 22

Lyrics (no tune) in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, p. 80


Click to play (pdmusic.org)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
Sheet music for Emma Snow in the Library of Congress online collection Music for the Nation.

The DigiTrad entry for this song says that the tune for "[Charming] Emma Snow" is that of "Dearest Mae" and "No More the Moon Shines on Lorena"; while it's possible the text was later also sung to that tune, it is not the original tune for "Emma Snow", and cannot be the tune Stone meant: he set "Coming Around the Horm" to the tune "Dearest May".

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Subject: ADD: Hunting After Gold (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 12:59 AM

Hunting after Gold.
[AIR—Combo.]

When I left old New York, to go hunting after gold,
Chunks bigger than my head I could pick up, I was told;
I stopped at Sacramento, on a d––l of expense,
And they sent me to the mountains, where I've not been sober since.

Chorus:
Tang de di, de ding, de dang;
de diddle al de da.

The first man I saw in the Sacramento Valley,
Was his Honor lying drunk, on a ten-pin alley,
With half a dozen more, some whose names I dare not call,
If you'd rolled for the center you'd been sure to got them all.
Tang de di, etc.

The people in the mountains, they were all on a bust,
They were going through at Monte, though they pungled down the dust.
I went into a temperance house to get a bit segar,
And there laid the landlord drunk behind the bar.
Tang de di, etc.

I went to eat some oysters, along with Captain Sutter,
And he reared up on the table, and sat down in the butter;
The Mayor and Recorder, they were both drunk as ever,
So the next day they sent me up fluming on the river.
Tang de di, etc.

The river of a sudden, then began to rise,
But the d––l was coming, which did me surprise;
'Twas a big pine log, coming neat as a pin,
Which stove both ends of my long tom in.
Tang de di, etc.

I looked up the river, and the next thing I saw,
Was a rocker and a pail floating down towards me,
And when they got abreast of me, says I,
"Old rocker, you've earned me a pile, good bye."
Tang de di, etc.

It seemed too bad, 'twas a d––l of a shame,
To work all summer, and then to lose a claim,
With a bully little pick, and a long handled shovel,
And a chance for the flume left to go to the d––l.
Tang de di, etc.

So those that had money, they were bound to have a spree,
But they that had'nt any, said, "You can't fool me;
We know where you're going, or at least we mistrust,
You are going to Nevada, to get on another 'bust.'"
Tang de di, etc.

I bucked awhile at Monte, at a half dollar bank,
And the dealer he got trusted for the whisky that I drank;
I drank 'till my throat got so sore I could'nt swallow,
So I tapp'd him on the Jack, and I won half a dollar.
Tang de di, etc.

I hav'nt had a cent since I failed on the river,
Nor I hav'nt had clothes enough my nakedness to cover;
These breeches I got trusted for, but now I cannot pay;
This is the only shirt I've had since the 23d of May.
Tang de di, etc.

My hair pulled like the d––l, I was troubled with the shorts,
So, without a cent of money, I went hunting after quartz;
And I found as rich a lead as ever had been seen,
But the d––l of it was, I had no machine.
Tang de di, etc.

The people were surprised; when we told them, how they laughed,
That a dozen of our company had gone to sink a shaft,
And we'd all make a pile, around the Horn have a sail,
Then the Sheriff took the dozen, who were digging, off to jail.
Tang de di, etc.

The stories they were going, going very fast indeed,
And the miners going faster, to stake off the lead;
Among the rest a coming, that was going to make a strike,
On a spike-tail mule, was a man from Pike.
Tang de di, etc.

The excitement died away, there was nothing in the lead,
So tho that bought an interest, among themelves agreed,
For the flour they had bought, and a little gnarly ham,
They would never pay a cent, for the lead war'nt worth a d––n.
Tang de di, etc.



Put's Original California Songster, pp. 23-25



Lyrics (no tune) in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, pp. 60-61

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Subject: ADD: Joaquin the Horse-Thief (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 01:36 AM

Joaquin the Horse-Thief
[AIR—Now I Warn All You Darkies Not To Love Her]

I suppose you have heard all the talkin',
Of the very noted horse-thief Joaquin;
He was caught in Calaveras, but he could'nt stand the joke,
So the rangers cut his head off, and have got it now in soak.

Chorus:
Now I warn every body not to ramble,
Never drink, never fight, never gamble,
For you'll never have a cent, all your money will spent,
And you to Sacramento to the prison brig be sent.

They took three-fingered Jack, and cut his hand off.
Then the Rangers drove the rest of the band off;
Then they took the head and hand, and they had it well preserved,
And the Rangers got the credit, which they very much deserved.
Now I warn every body not to ramble,
Never drink, never fight, never gamble,
For you'll never have a cent, all your money will spent,
And you to Sacramento to the prison brig be sent.

Joaquin to the mountains was advancing,
When he saw Lola Montez a dancing;
When she danced the spider dance, he was bound to run her off,
And he'd feed her eggs and chickens, make her cackle, crow and cough.
Now I warn every body not to ramble,
Never drink, never fight, never gamble,
For you'll never have a cent, all your money will spent,
And you Sacramento to the prison brig be sent.

Joaquin, just before he was taken,
Killed a Chinaman, and then stole his bacon;
Then he went to Sonora, where he killed eleven more.
And a big Digger Indian, which made the twenty-four.
Now I warn every body not to ramble,
Never drink, never fight, never gamble,
For you'll never have a cent, all your money will be spent,
And you to Sacramento to the prison brig be sent.

You have heard of the steel he wore round him,
I will tell you what it was when they found him,
'Twas a long-tom iron, to protect him in his crimes,
And they swore by the holes he'd been shot a thousund times.
Now I warn every body not to ramble.
Never drink, never fight, never gamble,
For you'll never have a cent, all your money will be spent,
And you to Sacramento to the prison brig be sent.

Now the head it can be seen at Sacramento,
But to have it there, they never did intend to;
For they fought like the d—l, while they had half a show,
But the Rangers put an end to the terror of Mexico.
Now I warn every body not to ramble,
Never drink, never fight, never gamble,
For you'll never have a cent, all your money will be spent,
And you to Sacramento to the prison brig be sent.


Put's Original California Songster, pp. 26-27

Lyrics (no tune) in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, p. 147


"thousund" is the way it's spelled in the book.

I'm guessing this song refers to the legendary California bandit Joaquin Murrieta (pronounced wah-KEEN).
-Joe-


Click to play (pdmusic.org)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
The tune named is for the song "Julius' Bride" (sheet music from the Lester S. Levy Collection) "Arranged & Partly Composed By E.P. Christy."

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Subject: ADD: Striking a Lead (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 01:48 AM

Striking a Lead.
[AIR—Dan Tucker.]

I took my shovel, pick and pan,
And went to mining like a man;
I picked up chunks that weighed a pound,
That lay like lemons on the ground.

Chorus:
Get out of the way, I'm mad as fury,
Get out of the way, I'm mad as fury,
Get out of the way, I'm mad as fury,
I'm from Pike, in old Missoury.

I allowed the d—l was to pay,
For miners came from every way,
With stakes and tools to take a claim,
But the lead run out—war'nt that a shame.
Get out of the way, I'm mad as fury,
Get out of the way, I'm mad as fury,
Get out of the way, I'm mad as fury,
I'm from Pike, in old Missoury.

I laughed to see so many fools,
Come running with their mining tools,
When up a sign went, "Whisky cut,"
One bit per glass for good rot-gut.
Get out of the way, I'm mad as fury,
Get out of the way, I'm mad as fury,
Get out of the way, I'm mad as fury,
I'm from Pike, in old Missoury.

I'm going home, I've made my pile,
I'm going through in cabin style;
I'll get my money and life insured,
For fear I'd get knocked overboard.
Get out of the way, I'm mad as fury,
Get out of the way, I'm mad as fury,
Got out of the way, I'm mad as fury,
I'm from Pike, in old Missoury.

Put's Original California Songster, p. 28

Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, p. 73


Click to play (pdmusic)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
Sheet music [PDF] for "Old Dan Tucker" in the Lester S. Levy Collection. The words and possibly music were written by Daniel Decatur Emmett.
Mudcat thread: Old Dan Tucker
DigiTrad entry for "Old Dan Tucker"
YouTube: The Skillet Lickers: Old Dan Tucker

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Subject: ADD: An Honest Miner (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 02:09 AM

An Honest Miner.
[AIR—Low Back Car.]

When first I went to mining, I was uncommon green,
With a "gallus" rig I went to dig, and claimed a whole ravine;
But when I could not make my grub, with implements to gag,
An honest miner might have been seen at night with a pig in a bag.

Chorus
As he lugged it away from the pen,
Was thinking how lucky he'd been;
Went into a hole, dug deep after gold,
With pig in the bag tumbled in.

I wandered round from place to place, and no one did mistrust,
But what an honest miner had — most any amount of dust;
It seems a gang of theives had robbed a hen-roost neat and clean,
An honest miner wringing their necks, might possibly have been seen.

Chorus
As he thought of the elegant stew,
The rooster would make — but he flew;
But he'd cook up the hens and invite in his friends,
As the dog run him out of the roost.

No matter who was robbed or killed, 'twas all laid to Joaquin,
His band out in the chapparal not long ago was seen;
With pick and shovel on his back, as though out on a tramp,
An honest miner might have been seen, robbing a Chinese camp.

Chorus
As he pulled them around by the tails,
They scratched with their long finger nails;
A tom iron round his body was bound,
So of course it must be Joaquin.

A certain class will drink and fight, and gamble all the while,
And live among the prostitutes, in low, degraded style;
The people think it's with the few, but I for one will tell,
An honest miner's often seen crawling out of a Spanish corral.

Chorus
And pretend to respectable be
Will damn them from A to Z;
They're first in the shout of "Let's run 'em out,"
And the first to get round where they be.

An honest miner's like a pile — almighty hard to find;
So, what's a chicken among so few, when they are chicken inclined?
But if you'll give the d—l his due, there's not a cent to choose,
An honest miner's often round when pigs and chickens you lose.

Chorus
Though it's always a gang of thieves,
The lucky one laughs in his sleeves;
He looks with surprise, and seems to despise
Anything like a pig in a bag.

An honest miner'll drink and fight, and raise the very d—l;
But that's all right, if once a week he's seen with pick and shovel.
Of course he'll starve before he'll steal, but, try a trip and see,
I've mined too long to be deceived, I have that, yes-sir-ree.

Chorus
But we're all of us bound to live,
By mining though, without or with;
Though after awhile we'll all make a pile,
So, remember the pig in a bag.


Put's Original California Songster, p. 29-30



Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, p. 83


What's a "gallus rig"?


Click to play (pdmusic.org)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
"The Low Back'd Car" was written by Samuel Lover; the tune is reputedly "The Jolly Ploughboy".
Sheet music [PDF] (1846) in the Lester S. Levy Collection.
Mudcat thread, where Jim Dixon posted the lyrics (with chords) and Warsaw Ed posted an ABC of the melody.

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Subject: ADD: Arrival of the Greenhorn (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 02:42 AM

Arrival of the Greenhorn.
[AIR—Jeanette and Jeanot.]

I've just got in across the Plains, I'm poorer than a snail,
My mules all died, but poor old Clip I pulled in by the tail;
I fed him last at Chimney Rock, that's where the grass gave out,
I'm proud to tell, we stood it well, along the Truckee route.
But I'm very weak and lean, though I started plump and fat—
How I wish I had the gold machine, I left back on the Platte!
And a pair of striped bed-tick pants, my Sally made for me
To wear while digging after gold; and when I left says she,
"Here, take the laudanum with you, Sam, to check the di-a-ree."

When I left Missouri river, with my California rig,
I had a shovel, pick and pan, the tools they used to dig;
My mules gave out along the Platte, where they got alkalied,
And I sick with the "di-a-ree" my laudanum by my side.
When I reached the little Blue, I'd one boot and a shoe,
Which I thought by greasing once or twice, would last me nearly through;
I had needles, thread and pills, which my mammy did prescribe,
And a flint-lock musket full, to shoot the Digger tribe,
But I left them all on Goose Creek where I freely did imbibe.

I joined in with a train from Pike; at Independence Rock,
The Indians came in that night, stampeded all their stock;
They laughed at me, said, "Go a-foot," but soon they stopped their fun,
For my old mule was left behind so poor he could not run.
So I packed my fancy nag, for the rest I could not wait,
And I traveled up Sweet Water, till I came to Devil's Gate;
When my mule gave out in sight of where I started in the morn,
I'd have given all my boots and shoes if I had not been born,
Or I'd rather stripped at New Orleans, to swim around the Horn.

I arrived at Salt Lake City, on the 18th of July,
Old Brigham Young was on a "bust," he swore they'd never die;
I went to see the Jordan, with a lady, God forgive' her,
She took me to the water's edge, and shoved me in the river;
I crawled out and started on, and I managed very well,
Until I struck the Humboldt, which I thought was nearly h—l;
I traveled till I struck the sink where outlet can't be found,
The Lord got through late Saturday night, he'd finished all around,
But would not work on Sunday, so he run it in the ground.

The Peyouts stole what grub I had, they left me not a bite,
And now the d—l was to pay—the Desert was in sight;
And as the people passed along, they'd say to me, "You fool,
You'll never get through in the world, unless you leave that mule."
But I pushed, pulled and coaxed, till I finally made a start,
And his bones, they squeaked and rattled so, I thought he'd fall apart;
I killed a buzzard now and then, gave Clip the legs and head.
We crossed the Truckee thirty times, but not a tear was shed,
We crossed the summit, took the trail, that to Nevada led.

When I got to Sacramento, I got on a little tight,
I lodged aboard the Prison brig, one-half a day and night;
I vamosed when I got ashore, went to the Northern mines,
There found the saying very true, All is not gold that shines."
I dug, packed and chopped, and have drifted night and day,
But I havn't struck a single lead, that would me wages pay,
At home they think we ought to have gold on our cabin shelves,
Wear high-heeled boots, well blacked, instead of rubbers No. twelves;
But let them come and try it, 'till they satisfy themselves.

Put's Original California Songster, p. 31-33



Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, pp. 45-46


Click to play (joeweb)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
The song "Jeannette and Jeannot, or the Conscript's Departure" was written by Charles Jefferys (text) and Charles William Glover (music). Sheet music [PDF] in the Lester S. Levy Collection. I've been unable to establish a firm date, but certainly it was written between 1831 and 1849, with the latter 1840s being most probable, given the spate of J&J spinoffs which popped up from that time (the song actually involves the Napoleonic war). "Jeannette and Jeannot" may have developed into a song cycle or been extracted from a short theatrical production, since there are at least three songs the authors published together under the title: [PDF from the Levy collection].

Helen Kendrich Johnson, in the book Our familiar songs and those who made them (p. 338), wrote:
"Jeannette and Jeannot" was suggested by a little bronze group, which Mr. Jefferys afterward purchased, and which is still in the possession of the family. "The English copies of the song bear on the title-page an engraving representing this group.
The tune has been used for other songs, notably a parody "The Noodle", written by John Brodie Gilroy and published in The Tyneside Songster (early to mid-1880s) [lyrics]; also "The Northern Girl's Song (1863).

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Subject: ADD: California Bloomer (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 02:51 AM

California Bloomer
[AIR—Lucy Long.]

Miss Ella she is twenty-nine,
Has taken two degrees,
And torn her shirt-tail off behind.
So she can show her knees.

Chorus:
So take your time, Miss Ella, take your time, Miss Ella,do,
And I will rock the cradle, give the oro all to you.

Miss Ella is a gallus nag,
Miss Ella she is neat,
Her eyes look like a saffron bag,
And, Lord, what awful feet!
So take your time, etc.

I saw Miss Ella on the Platte
Wher she got alkalied,
Her jackass he was rolling fat,
And straddle she would ride.
So take your time, etc.

She's from Lumpkin County, Georgia,
I know her like a book;
I used to see her wash her feet
In Johnson's saw-mill brook
So take your time, etc.

Miss Ella has a claim, they say,
She works it all the while;
She creviced round the other day,
Panned out a little pile.
So take your time, etc.

She'll get it all after awhile,
If patiently she waits;
I'll leave her when I make a pile
And vamose for the States.
So take your time, etc.

Put's Original California Songster, p. 34





Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, p. 125


Click to play (pdmusic.org)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
"Miss Lucy Long" is a blackface minstrel song from ca. 1842, authorship apparently unknown.
Sheet music [PDF] in the Lester S. Levy Collection.
Mudcat thread
Wikipedia entry

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Subject: ADD: The Gambler (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 03:06 AM

The Gambler
[AIR—Bob-Tail Mare.]

A Gambler's life I do admire,
Du-da, du-da,
The best of rum they do require,
Du-da, du-da, da;
The poker sharps begin to pout,
Du-da, du-da,
I played all night and cleaned them out,
Du-da, du-da, da.

Chorus:
I'm bound to play all night,
I'm bound to play all day;
I bet my money on the ace and king,
Who dare bet on the trey

Monte's mighty hard to beat,
Du-da, du-da,
They say the dealer's bound to treat, Du-da, du-da, da;
Bar-keeper, give me a glass of porter, Du-da, du-da,
Gin for me, with a glass of water, Du-da, du-da, da.

Chorus:
I'm bound to play all night,
I'm bound to play all day;
I bet my money on the ace and king,
Who dare bet on the trey?

The king's a lay out from the top,
Du-da, du-da,
That's where I let my money drop,
Du-da, du-da, da;
I like to deal, and I like to buck,
Du-da, du-da,
I'm down on noisly chuck-aluck,
Du-da, du-da, da.

Chorus:
I'm bound to play all night,
I'm bound to play all day;
I bet my money on the ace and king.
Who dare bet on the trey?

There's faro, sledge, and twenty-one,
Du-da, du-da,
For me to beat 'tis only fun,
Du-da, du-da, da,
Gamblers, always hold your tongue,
Du-da, du-da,
French monte-dealers have, all been hung,
Du-da, du-da, da.

Chorus:
I'm bound to play all night,
I'm bound to play all day;
I bet my money on the ace and king.
Who dare bet on the trey?

What will we do these license times,
Du-da, du-da,
I'll steal before I'll work the mines,
Du-da, du-da, da;
The miners used to bet their dust,
Du-da, du-da,
But now they lay it away to rust,
Du-da, du-da, da.

Chorus:
I'm bound to play all night,
I'm bound to play all day;
I bet my money on the ace and king.
Who dare bet on the trey?

I used to wear a ruffled adurt,
Du-da, du-da,
But now I'm covered with rags and dirt,
Du-da, du-da, da;
A Colt's revolver and a Bowie-knife,
Du-da, du-da,
I'm bound to gamble all my life,
Du-da, du-da, da.

Chorus:
I'm bound to play all night,
I'm bound to play all day;
I bet my money on the ace and king.
Who dare bet on the trey?

Put's Original California Songster, pp. 35-36

Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, p. 110-111

(tune is better known as "De Camptown Races")
[AC: "Camptown Races", by Stephen Collins Foster, 1850. Sheet music (PDF) in the Levy Collection; Mudcat thread]

Click to play (pdmusic.org)

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Subject: ADD: Coming Around the Horn (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 03:22 AM

Coming Around the Horn.
[AIR—Dearest May.]

Now, miners, if you'll listen, I'll tell you quite a tale,
About the voyage around Cape Horn, They call a pleasant sail;
We bought a ship, and had her stowed with houses, tools and grub,
But cursed the day we ever sailed in the poor old rotten tub,

Chorus:
Oh, I remember well, the lies they used to tell,
Of gold so bright, it hurt the sight, and made the miners yell.

We left old New York city, with the weather very thick,
The second day we puked up boots, oh, wus'nt we all seasick!
I swallowed pork tied to a string, which made a dreadful shout,
I felt it strike the bottom, but I could not pull it out.
Oh, I remember, etc.

We all were owners in the ship, and soon began to growl,
Because we hadn't ham and eggs, and now and then a fowl;
We told the captain what to do, as him we had to pay,
The captain swore that he was boss, and we should him obey.
Oh, I remember, etc.

We lived like hogs, penned up to fat, our vessel was so small,
We had a "duff" but once a month, and twice a day a squall;
A meeting now and then was held, which kicked up quite a stink,
The captain d—d us fore and aft, and wished the box would sink.
Oh, I remember, etc.

Off Cape Horn, where we lay becalmed, kind Providence seemed to frown,
We had to stand up night and day, none of us dared sit down;
For some had half a dozen boils, 'twas awful, sure's you're born,
But some would try it on the sly, and got pricked by the Horn.
Oh, I remember, etc.

We stopped at Valparaiso, where the women are so loose.
And all got drunk as usual, got shoved in the Calaboose;
Our ragged, rotten sails were patched, the ship made ready for sea,
But every man, except the cook, was up town on a spree.
Oh, I remember, etc.

We sobered off set sail again, on short allowance, of course,
With water thick as castor oil, and stinking beef much worse;
We had the scurvy and the itch, and any amount of lice,
The medicine chest went overboard, with bluemass, cards and dice.
Oh, I remember, etc.

We arrived at San Francisco, and all went to the mines,
We left an agent back to sell our goods of various kinds;
A friend wrote up to let us know our agent, Mr. Gates,
Had sold the ship and cargo, sent the money to the States.
Oh, I remember, etc.


Put's Original California Songster, pp. 37-38



Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, pp. 29-30


What's a "duff"? "bluemass"?


Click to play

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
"Dearest Mae" was written by Frances Lynch (words) and James Power (music) ca. 1847. Sheet music can be found online in the Library of Congress Music for the Nation collection. (A correction to a common misattribution: although L.V.H. Crosby did prepare an arrangement for pianoforte, James Powers wrote the original music.)

Mudcat thread on "Coming Around the Horn," including an ABC.

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Subject: ADD: Gold Lake and Gold Bluff (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 03:31 AM

Gold Lake and Gold Bluff
[AIR—Fisherman's Daughter.]

In eighteen hundred fifty, when Gold Lake was in its prime,
The people swore the dirt would pay from three cents to a dime;
The merchants trusted out their goods, the miners ran away,
They soon returned, well satisfied that Gold Lake would not pay.
Lad el de fal, etc.

In eighteen hundred and fifty-one, Gold Bluff was all the go,
The ships, with passengers and grub, were full as they could stow;
They'd nothing in the world to do, but gather up the sand,
The fools that went without a cent, Gold Bluff tee-totally d--d.
Lad el de fal, etc.

They climbed up to the very top, where gold must surely be,
They laid down on their bellies, and peeped over in the sea;
They tied a rope unto a pail, dipped up a little sand,
But all the gold was in the sea, too far away from land.
Lad el de fal, etc.

They left their grub and blankets, and patent gold machines,
The fleas were thick, and body-lice were large as Chile beans;
They all returned, well satisfied they'd all been nicely fooled,
For nothing there was to be found, as speculators told.
Lad el de fal, etc.

Put's Original California Songster, p. 39

Lyrics (no tune) in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, p. 149


[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
This tune is a bit of a mystery. I found about four songs titled "[The] Fisherman's Daughter", plus a couple more called "Fisherman's Lassie", but none seem to correspond metrically to the present text. There are also a number of poems titled "Fisherman's Daughter" or (for example) "Katie, the Fisherman's Daughter", any of which could have been regionally popular in song form.

However, I think the most likely candidate to be a poem by Oliver Wendell Holmes titled "The Ballad of the Oysterman" (ca. 1833) which features a fisherman's daughter, fits metrically, and in some broadside versions includes a folderol section. It has been set to music a number of times, particularly in the 1840s. Of the renditions I found, I chose the melody I thought most similar to those Stone chose for his other songs: a setting by "Mr. Shaw" titled "The Tall Young Oysterman" (1842):

Click to play (joeweb)

Sheet music [PDF]in the Lester S. Levy Collection
Mudcat thread: [The Tall] Young Oysterman [with lyrics, ABCs, MIDIs]

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Subject: ADD: The National Miner (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 03:42 AM

The National Miner.
[AIR—Massa's in the cold ground.]

When gold was first discovered,
At Coloma, near the mill,
All the world at first endeavored
To get here, and they keep a coming still;
When our war was through with Mexico,
And we paid them for the land,
Those who had fought at Palo Alto
Were driven off by nations they had tanned.

Chorus:
Down in the deep ravines,
Hear that roaring sound,
There the miners are digging,
Digging in the cold, damp ground.

When our glorious Yankee nation
Sent her war-ships to the coast,
They left the mines for all creation—
Now, tell me, who is benefited most?
Here we're working like a swarm of bees,
Scarcely making enough to live,
And two hundred thousand Chinese
Are taking home the gold we ought to have.
Down in the deep ravines,
Hear that roaring sound, etc.

Here they make their Queen Victoria laws,
In spite of simple Uncle Sam,
And jump our diggings, say they'll break our jaws —
Our government, they say, ain't worth a d—n.
When I make enough to take me home,
I'll leave the mines well satisfied,
I'll give old Johnny Bull my long-tom.
To prospect where it never has been tried.
Down in the deep ravines,
Hear that roaring sound, etc.


Put's Original California Songster, p. 40

Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, pp. 89-90


Click to play (pdmusic.org)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
"Massa's in De Cold Ground", by Stephen Collins Foster, 1852.
Sheet music [PDF] in the Lester S. Levy Collection
Digital Tradition entry [no music]
Mudcat thread: Massa's in De Cold Ground (lyrics only, as of this writing)

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Subject: ADD: Emigrant from Pike (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 04:09 AM

Emigrant from Pike.
[AIR—Nelly was a Lady.]

I have just arrived across the Plains,
Oh, didn't I have awful times!
It makes the blood run greasy through my veins,
I'm so disappointed in the mines.

First Chorus:
[AIR—Dan Tucker.]
When I go home with an empty sack,
I'll show them where the Indians shot me in the back,
And how my mules laid down and died,
And I near starved to death beside.

Second Chorus:
[AIR—King of the Cannibal Islands.]
Hokey, pokey, winker wun,
We're all good fellows, we'll have some fun,
And all get married when we go home,
So what's the use of talking.

I was taken with the bilious cholera,
While I was traveling up the Platte;
All my friends they ran away and left me,
Then, to die contented, down I sat—

First Chorus:
Cramping, twisting, down I sat,
My inwards all tied up in a knot;
My old mule he began to bray,
I, scared to death, began to pray.
Hokey, pokey, winker wun,
We're all good fellows, we'll have some fun, etc.

When I reached the desert, I was starvin'
Surely thought I'd never get across;
Then I thought of my big brother, Marvin,
Then the bacon and the mule I'd lost.

First Chorus:
The times to reach the mines were past,
And I, poor d—l, was about the last;
And when I thought of my big brother,
I bid farewell to my kind old mother.
Hokey, pokey, winker wun,
We're all good fellows, we'll have some fun, etc.

I got through at last, and went to mining,
Stole myself a shovel and pick,
But could not raise the color big and shining,
Swore I'd never strike another lick.
First Chorus:
Then I went round among my friends
To see if I could raise some tens
To take me home, for I was scared,
My hair was all turning into beard.
Hokey, pokey, winker wun,
We're all good fellows, we'll have some fun, etc.

If I get home. I bet my life I'll stay there,
California'll trouble me no more;
I've tried my luck at everything and everywhere,
And never had been half so poor before.

First Chorus:
For I've nothing in the world but meat,
And that I really cannot eat;
Such times, I never saw the like,
Oh, Lord, I wish I was back in Pike!
Hokey, pokey, winker wun,
We're all good fellows, we'll have some fun, etc.


Put's Original California Songster, pp. 41-42

Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, pp. 49-50


[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
Nelly Was a Lady: written by Stephen Collins Foster in 1852. The MIDI link above is to pdmusic.org.
Sheet music [PDF] in the Lester S. Levy Collection.

[Old] Dan Tucker: see tune notes to Striking a Lead. The MIDI link above is to pdmusic.org.

King of the Cannibal Islands: published ca. 1832 (?), the tune was taken from a quadrille in "Les Deux Rivales" written by John Charles White ca. 1830. I regret that I can't re-locate the original source of the MIDI I've posted.
Digital Tradition:
Mudcat thread: King of the Cannibal Islands
Mudcat thread: King of the Cannibal Islands

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Subject: RE: Coming Soon: Put's Original California Songste
From: Jon Bartlett
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 04:14 AM

Joe - many, many thanks for this!

Jon Bartlett


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Subject: ADD: Humbug Steamship Companies (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 04:24 AM

Humbug Steamship Companies
[AIR—Uncle Sam's Farm]

The greatest imposition that the public ever saw,
Are the California steamships that run to Panama;
They're a perfect set of robbers, and accomplish their designs
By a general invitation of the people to the mines.

Chorus:
Then come along, come along, you that want to go,
The best accommodations, and the passage very low;
Our boats they are large enough, don't be afraid,
The Golden Gate is going down to beat the Yankee Blade.
Then come along, don't be afraid,
The Golden Gate is going down to beat the Yankee Blade.

They have opposition on the route, with cabins very nice,
And advertise to take you for half the usual price;
They get thousands from the mountains, and then deny their bills,
So you have to pay the prices, or go back into the hills.
Then come along, come along, you that want to go,
The best accommodations, and the passage very low;
Our boats they are large enough, don't be afraid,
The Golden Gate is going down to beat the Yankee Blade, etc.

When you start from San Francisco, they treat you like a dog,
The victuals you're compell'd to eat ain't fit to feed a hog;
And a drunken mate a cursing and damning you around,
And wishing that the boat would sink and every one be drowned.
Then come along, come along, you that want to go,
The best accommodations, and the passage very low;
Our boats they are large enough, don't be afraid,
The Golden Gate is going down to beat the Yankee Blade, etc.

The captain goes to dinner and begins to curse the waiter,
Knocks him out of hearing with a thundering big potato;
The cabin maid, half crazy, breaks the meat dish all to smash,
And the steward comes a running with a plate of mouldy hash.
Then come along, come along, you that want to go,
The best accommodations, and the passage very low;
Our boats they are large enough, don't be afraid,
The Golden Gate is going down to beat the Yankee Blade, etc.

You are driven round the steerage like a drove of hungry swine,
And kicked ashore at Panama by the Independent Line;
Your baggage is thrown overboard, the like you never saw,
A trip or two will sicken you of going to Panama.
Then come along, come along, you that want to go,
The best accommodations, and the passage very low;
Our boats they are large enough, don't be afraid,
The Golden Gate is going down to beat the Yankee Blade, etc.

Put's Original California Songster, pp. 43-44

Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, pp. 34-35


Click to play (pdmusic.org)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
"Uncle Sam's Farm", text by Jesse Hutchinson Jr., 1850; composer unidentified. Popularized by the Hutchinson Family Singers.

Sheet music [PDF] in the Lester S. Levy Collection
Mudcat thread: Humbug Steamship Companies
Digital Tradition: Uncle Sam's Farm (no music)
Wikipedia: Uncle Sam's Farm
YouTube: Truman Price (with fiddle): Uncle Sam's Farm

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Subject: ADD: My Log Cabin Home (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 04:50 AM

My Log Cabin Home
[AIR—Kentucky Home.]

The tall pines wave, and the winds loudly roar,
No matter, keep digging away;
The wild flowers blossom round the log cabin door,
Where we sit after mining all the day.
A few more days and our mining all will end,
The cañon so rich will be dry;
The tools on the bank shall be left for a friend,
Then, my Log Cabin Home, good-bye.

Chorus:
Mine no more, oh, never no more but play,
We will always remember
The Log Cabin Home,
The Log Cabin Home far away.

The weary may be glad for a shelter thro' the night,
Not knowing, perhaps, it may be,
By the old fireplace we are chatting with delight,
By the blaze of the sugar-pine tree.
The old cooking tools shall be left in the camp,
All ready to bake and to fry;
They all may be used by some miner on a tramp,
Then, my Log Cabin Home, good-bye.

Mine no more, oh, never no more but play,
We will always remember, &c.

We'll hunt no more for the grizzly in the nook,
The diggers, we'll soon leave behind,
We'll drink no more from the clear crystal brook,
As around the Log Cabin it winds.
The old oak tree, under which the Cabin stands,
All shady at noon where we lie;
A fond look at the old oak so grand,
Then, my Log Cabin Home, good-bye.

Mine no more, oh, never no more but play,
We will always remember, etc.

Put's Original California Songster, p. 45

Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, pp. 97-98


Click to play (pdmusic.org)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
"My Old Kentucky Home, Good Night!", written by Stephen Collins Foster, published in 1853.

Sheet music [PDF] in the Lester S. Levy Collection.
Digital Tradition: Old Kentucky Home (no music)
Mudcat thread: Kentucky Home Goodnight
YouTube: Edison Male Quartet (ca. 1895–1901; with words): My Old Kentucky Home
Wikipedia: My Old Kentucky Home

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Subject: RE: Coming Soon: Put's Original California Songster
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 04:58 AM

Thanks, Jon -

These songs are about my home, here in the beautiful Sierra Foothills - I see reminders of the Gold Rush every day, and I can see the Transcontinental Railroad out my window. I've wanted to post these two songbooks for a long, long time. Thanks to Q and to Debby McClatchy for all their help.
It's 2 AM, and I'm well over halfway done with this 63-page book. Guess I'll quit for the night.

-Joe Offer, Colfax, California-


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Subject: ADD: When I Went Off to Prospect (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 02:58 PM

When I went of to Prospect.
[AIR—King of the Cannibal Islands]

I heard of gold at Sutter's Mill,
At Michigan Bluff and Iowa Hill,
But never thought it was rich until
I started off to prospect.
At Yankee Jim's I bought a purse.
Inquired for Iowa Hill, of course,
And traveled on, but what was worse,
Fetched up in Shirt-tail Cañon.

Chorus:
A sicker miner every way
Had not been seen for many a day;
The devil it always was to pay,
When I went off to prospect.

When I got there, the mining ground
Was staked and claimed for miles around,
And not a bed was to be found,
When I went off to prospect,
The town was crowded full of folks,
Which made me think 'twas not a hoax;
At my expense they cracked their jokes,
When I was nearly starving.

Chorus:
A sicker miner evry way
Had not been seen for many a day;
The devil it always was to pay
When I went off to prospect.

I left my jackass on the road,
Because he wouldn't carry the load;
I'd sooner pack a big horn toad,
Whcn I went off to prospect.
My fancy shirt, with collar so nice,
I found was covered with body-lice;
I used unguentum once or twice,
But could not kill the grey-backs

Chorus:
A sicker miner every way
Had not been seen for many a day;
The devil it always was to pay,
When I went off to prospect.

At Deadwood I got on a tight—
At Groundhog Glory I had a fight;
They drove me away from Hell's Delight,
When I off to prospect.
From Bogus-Thunder I ran away—
At Devil's Basin I wouldn't stay;
My lousy shirt crawled off one day,
Which left me nearly naked.

Chorus:
A sicker miner every way
Had not been seen for many a day;
The devil it always was to pay,
When I went off to prospect.

Now all I got for running about,
Was two black eyes, and bloody snout;
And that's the way it did turn out,
When I went off to prospect.
And now I'm loafing around dead broke,
My pistol and tools are all in soak,
And whisky bills at me they poke—
But I'll make it right in the morning.

Chorus:
A sicker miner every way
Had not been seen for many a day;
The devil it always was to pay,
When I went off to prospect.



Put's Original California Songster, pp. 46-47

Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, pp. 71-72


Yankee Jim's and Iowa Hill are less than ten miles from my home here in Colfax, California. They were once booming Gold Rush towns, and now there's almost nothing left of them. This week's Sacramento Bee says that Iowa Hill will finally get landline telephone service this year, so residents will no longer have to walk to "Telephone Hill" to get cell phone reception. An acquaintance of mine is the teacher at Iowa Hill's one-room schoolhouse. He drives from Colfax every day, along a treacherous road that crosses the American River Canyon.
Can't say I've ever been to Yankee Jim's. It's a dot on the map, and I've been past where it's supposed to be, but I'm not sure anything's there. I saw seven waterfalls along Yankee Jim's Road one spring day, as I drove from Colfax to the North Fork of the American River - and I saw a bobcat at the bridge. Never did find the town, though.
I've been on Shirt-tail Canyon Road in the same area - but I never did find that town, either. There's one mine still operating on that road.
Coloma, where gold was discovered at Sutter's Mill, is on the Middle Fork of the American River, a long drive from here - but not far as the crow flies.
-Joe Offer-

Click here for photos of the American River Canyon.

Click to play (joeweb)

For music notes, see "Emigrant from Pike" —AC

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Subject: RE: Coming Soon: Put's Original California Songster
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 03:27 PM

The Lousy Miner.
[AIR—Dark-eyed Sailor.]

It's four long years since I reached this land,
In search of gold among the rocks and sand;
And yet I'm poor when the truth is told,
I'm a lousy miner,
I'm a lousy miner in search of shining gold.

I've lived on swine 'till I grunt and squeal,
No one can tell how my bowels feel,
With slapjacks swimming round in bacon grease,
I'm a lousy miner,
I'm a lousy miner; when will my troubles cease?

I was covered with lice coming on the boat,
I threw away my fancy swallow-tailed coat,
And now they crawl up and down my back,
I'm a lousy miner,
I'm a lousy miner, a pile is all I lack.

My sweetheart vowed she'd wait for me
'Till I returned; but don't you see'
She's married now, sure, so I am told,
Left her lousy miner,
Left her lousy miner, in search of shining gold.

Oh, land of gold, you did me deceive,
And I intend in thee my bones to leave;
So farewell, home, now my friends grow cold,
I'm a lousy miner,
I'm a lousy miner in search of shining gold

Put's Original California Songster, p. 48

Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, p. 155




Frugal Housewife— "Oh, Mr. Stickins, I see by the daily paper that meat has fallen two cents per pound, and I think you ought to make some reduction in your charges."
Butcher— "Very sorry ma'am; I don't take the paper, and so I can't see it."


Click to play (joeweb)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
In the thread "Gold Miners' Songs (American)", Joe posted an ABC for "The Lousy Miner" as printed in Songs of the Gold Rush; the corresponding MIDI is linked above. The authors got the tune from Green Mountain (Helen Hartness Flander &o.: The New Green Mountain Songster. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1939.) It is entirely unlike the tune most widely associated with "The Dark-Eyed Sailor" nowadays. I have no access to this book, so I can't cite those authors' source, possibly the original Green Mountain Songster (1823). A Pioneer Songster (p. 50) says that, according to Green Mountain, the tune belongs to another ballad, "The Female Smuggler"; early broadsides corroborate this.

A different, if more suspect, setting is given by Irwin Silber and Earl Robinson in Songs of the Great American West, pp. 117-9, adapted from "a traditional tune"—could they have been more vague?

In the Library of Congress online collections are two sound recordings made by Sidney Robertson Cowell in the late 1930s of singers in Central Valley and Columbia, CA (not far from the former gold fields) singing "Dark-Eyed Sailor". Both use the widely-known tune.

Digital Tradition: The Lousy Miner (no music)
Digital Tradition: The Dark-Eyed Sailor (no music)
Mudcat thread: Fair Phoebe and Her Dark-Eyed Sailor
YouTube: Alan Rosevear (unaccompanied): Dark Eyed Sailor

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Subject: ADD: The Miner's Lament (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 05:16 PM

The Miner's Lament.
[AIR—Lilly Dale.]

When the gold fever raged, I was doing very well,
With my friends all around, young and old;
'Twas a long time ago, and I bade them farewell,
And embarked for the land of gold.

CHORUS
Oh, miners! poor miners, hungry and cold,
Though poor, I'll return to my home far away;
So, farewell to the land of gold.

'Twas a hard thing to part from those little ones so gay,
That were playing in the yard round the door,
And my wife sobbed aloud as I started away,
Saying, "Farewell I'll see you no more!"
Oh, miners! poor miners, etc

Now the little gold locket my wife used to wear,
Seems to fade by disease every breath;
Onca happy and gay, now the picture of despair,
And those little ones all paler than death.
Oh, miners! poor miners, etc.

I dreamed I was at home in the old orchard tread,
With those loved ones so gay it did seem,
As I reached for the apples that hung o'er my head,
Disappointed I woke from my dream.
Oh, miners! poor miners, etc.

Cold, wet and hungry, I've slept on the ground,
When those visions of happiness came,
But sad and disheartened, awoke by the sound,
Of the screech-owl that lit on my claim.
Oh, miners! poor miners, etc.

I toil'd night and day with the hope of gaining wealth,
Through the cold winter's rain with delight;
But, alas! sad misfortune has ruined my health,
So, my fond friends friends at home, all, good night,
Oh, miners! poor miners, etc.


Put's Original California Songster, page 49

Tune and lyrics in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, pp. 158-159


Click to play (pdmusic.org)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
"Lilly Dale" was written and composed by Henry S. Thompson in 1852.
Sheet music [PDF] in the Lester S. Levy Collection.
Mudcat thread: Lyr/Tune Add: Lilly Dale (with lyrics and ABC)
Mudcat thread: Chord Req: Lilly Dale
YouTube: Billy Jack Wills (1951): Lilly Dale
YouTube: Aly Bain, Stuart Duncan & Jerry Douglas: Lilly Dale
YouTube: Dolly Parton: Billy Dale (gratuitously gender-reassigned)

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Subject: ADD: The Sonora Filibusters (John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 05:35 PM

The Sonora Filibusters.
[AIR—Ben Bolt.]

Oh, don't you remember Bill Walker, the great,
Bill Walker, the captain of the band,
That went to Sonora to clean out the State,
To take up and knee in the land?
They tore down the flag at the Enseñada Camp,
And hoisted the Star-Spangled Banner,
Which terrified the Greasers, though nothing but fun,
For Walker to scare Santa Anna.

Oh, don't you remember the town of Lopez,
Where Walker commenced his career,
And was shot in the back, so Fred. Emory says,
While stealing a poor Spanish steer?
Lopez still is standing, as filibuster dens,
And each hole and corner is full
Of filibuster thieves that were caught stealing hens,
And others their backs lined with wood.

Oh, don't you remember the ship-loads that went.
In spite of their friend, Uncle Sam,
With knives, guns and pistols, they started h—ll-bent,
For greasers they didn't care a d—n.
But warn't they astonish'd when they heard Sam had bought
Sonora, Chihuahua, and all,
And the "Portsmouth" was coming-to hang all she caught,
So Walker's Republic did fail.

Put's Original California Songster, page 50

Tune and lyrics in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, p. 148




Julius, can you tell me who am de wust folks in de world?
... No, who is de wust folks in de world?
... Why, de candle makers!
... Why so?
'Cause all ob deir works am wick-ed, and all ob deir wick-ed works am brought to light!


Click to play (pdmusic.org)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
"Ben Bolt, or Oh! Don't You Remember Sweet Alice", text by Dr. Thomas Dunn (1843), music by Nelson A. Kneass (1846). More Maritime Melodies (1894, p. 8) has this to say about it's composition:
It seems that, in 1843, Dr. Thomas Dunn English (now a member of Congress from New jersey) was asked by N. P. Willis to write a sea song for the "New Mirror," which Willis and George P. Morris had just galvanized into life from the corpse of the New York "Mirror." In 1846, a hanger-on of the Pittsburg Theatre gave one Nelson F. Kneass a garbled version of the words of the song, which he had found in an English newspaper, and Kneass set the thing to music and sang it in a play called "The Battle of Buena Vista." The piece traveled with him all over the country, "was picked up by all the minstrel troupes, went to Australia and the Sandwich Isles and wherever the English language was spoken, was sung in London, and had all kinds of parodies and replies among the street ballads of that city." It is said that sixty thousand copies of the music were sold by Peters. Half a dozen other settings were published, but none of them had the popularity of Kneass's air, which was adapted from a German melody, the original of which was afterward published with the same words. The song has had as many claimants as "Beautiful Snow." It is odd that the poem should have made such a tremendous sensation in its day, for the verse is by no means good, and the sentiment is hackneyed and commonplace.
I have not tried to track down the original German melody.

Sheet music [PDF] in the Lester S. Levy Collection.
Digital Tradition: Ben Bolt (chords, but no music)
Mudcat thread: Ben Bolt (includes an earlier setting, with ABC, and more extensive historical notes)
YouTube: unidentified performer with banjo: Ben Bolt
"The Sonora Filibusters" also appears with tune in Lingenfelter, Dwyer and Cohen: Songs of the American West, p. 286.

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Subject: ADD: Honest John and William Relief(John A. Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 05:45 PM

Honest John and William Relief.
[AIR—Oh, wasn't I glad!]

Honest John and William Relief
About the time of election,
Were thinking which was the biggest thief,
Or nearest to perfection;
When on the levee they chanced to meet,
They both were drunk as ever,
John pitched headlong in the street,
And William in the river.

Chorus—Oh, wasn't I glad, oh, yes;
Wasn't I glad, oh, yes!

William, he went to the mines,
Where he had been before,
His shirt-tail hanging out behind,
Where his breeches they were tore.
The Whigs' advice to him was, "Leave,
And never more be seen!"
So, shirt-tail out, as when he came,
He ran down Puke ravine.
Oh, etc.

William, he ran all that night,
Got back to Sacramento,
Swore with John he'd have a fight,
But sill he didn't intend to.
Then honest John came up behind,
To see what might befall him
And there, William made a speech,
He swore again he'd maul him.
Oh, etc.

William, he began to see,
His case it was a gonner—
So he got mad, went on a spree,
And fell down in a corner;
And there he lay so nicely curled,
And snoring so like fury,
Says he, "If beat, I'll leave the world,
And go back to Missouri!"
Oh, etc.


Put's Original California Songster, page 51



Lyrics (no tune) in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, p. 143

[AC: I was unable to track down a suitable candidate for the tune.]

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Subject: ADD: Good News from Home (from Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 06:03 PM

Additional Songs



Good News from Home.
Copied by permission of Firth, Pond & Co., Music Publishers, 54 Broadway, New York.

Good news from home, good news for me,
Has come across the deep, blue sea,
From friends that I have left in tears,
From friends that I've not seen for years;
And since we parted long ago,
My life has been a scene of woe,
But now a joyful hour has come,
For I have heard good news from home.

Chorus:
Good news from home, good news for me
Has come across the deep, blue sea,
From friends that I have left in tears,
From friends that I've not seen for years.

No father's near to guard me now,
No mother's tear to soothe my brow,
No sister's voice falls on mine ear,
Nor brother's smile to give me cheer;
But, though I wander far away,
My heart is full of joy to-day,
For friends across the ocean's foam
Have sent to me good news from home.
Good news from home, etc

When shall I see that cottage door,
Where I've spent years of joy before?
'Twas there I knew no grief nor care,
My heart was always happy there;
Though I may never see it more,
Nor stand upon my native shore,
Where'er on earth I'm doomed to roam,
My heart will be with those at home.

Chorus:
Good news from home, good news for me,
Has come across the deep blue sea,
From friends that I have left in tears,
From friends that I've not seen for years.


Put's Original California Songster, page 52

Not in Dwyer/Lingenfelter


Click to play (pdmusic.org)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
The song as given above, "Good News from Home", was written and composed by Patrick S. Gilmore in 1854.
Sheet music [PDF] in the Lester S. Levy Collection.

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Subject: ADD: Melting Accident (from Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 06:10 PM

Melting Accident.

He clasped his Juliana's form—
That form, the fairest under heaven;
His love, just like the day, was warm,
The mercury at ninety-seven.

"O! Juliana, dear!" he cried,
"My love its top degree is getting;
'Tis gold, in truth's alembic tried,
That never can grow less by sweatinig."

She bowed her head upon his breast,
As hotter grew the snmmer weather,
And as her form he warmly pressed,
They melted right away together.




When are soldiers not soldiers?
When they are mustered. (mustard.)

Why is a steam hatched hen like a bad child?
Because it comes without leave of its mother.


Put's Original California Songster, page 53

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Subject: ADD: Life Among the Miners (from Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 06:18 PM

Life Among the Miners.



Seen here are many changing scenes
Met with in a miner's life,
Some of his comforts and his joys,
Some of his toils and strife;
His life is one of hard, unceasing toil,
A truthful tale is told
Of joys and sorrows, incident
To those who dig for gold.

His cabin built of logs, and in
A quaint, primeval style,
Intended but to shelter him,
Until he makes his pile,
We see the miner hard at work,
As steady as a saint—
His ground is rich, and he has got
Poor ground to make complaint.

This washing dirt for gold is well,
When well they make it pay;
But few attractions unto them
Is the red shirt washing day.
Upon a bed of sickness, now,
No loving friend is there;
How much he needs a sister's aid,
A mother's anxious care!

Saturday night they weigh their dust,
All anxious faces there;
While waiting for the truthful scales,
To give to each his share,
Letters from home—there's nought can give
The miner joy like this—
Good news from loved ones, far away,
Is life, extasy, and bliss.




Why is a dandy like a venison steak?
Because he is a bit of a buck.


Put's Original California Songster, page 54

This looks like a recitation to me. It's not clear whether Stone wrote it or not.

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Subject: ADD: The Abandoned Claim (from Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 11 Jan 08 - 06:24 PM

The Abandoned Claim.
PARODY.

Not a doubt was heard, nor discouraging thought,
As to prospect our claim we hurried;
Not a partner but hoped, as he plnnted his foot
On the spot where our fortures lay buried.

We dug it down bravely from morning till night,
The dirt on our shovels uplifting,
By the scorching sunbeams' dazzling light
And the sands most blindly sifting.

No paying dirt we found on the ledge,
Not the color of prospect to cheer us,
As we sat on the bank looking over the edge,
With our idle tools lying near us.

We thought as we sadly picked up our tools,
And prepared for a leave in a hurry,
How that miners hereafter would say we were fools,
As the claim would tell them our story.

Lightly they'll speak of the work we have done
And o'er our ill fortune will joke us,
But little care we for their jeers or their fun,
For digging this claim has not broke us.

The whole of this fruitless task was just done,
As the sun down the west was retiring,
And we heard the welcome and well-known gun
That our cook was suddenly firing.

Slowly but surely we dug out our bounds
From the hill where't had rested for ages;
We threw out the dirt, and we rolled out the stones,
And left it all bare on the ledges.




Why are the United States like the sun?
Because their influence is felt all over the globe.

Put's Original California Songster, page 55

Not found in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush



[Text notes by Artful Codger]
This appears to be a parody of a poem written by the Rev. Charles Wolfe ca. 1809 titled "On the Burial of Sir John Moore, who fell at the Battle of Corunna, 1809". Lord Byron commented that it was "the most perfect ode in the language." According to Parodies of the works of English and American authors (1884, p. 105)
Reading in the Edinburgh Annual Register a description of the death and burial of Sir John Moore, the young poet turned it into verse with such sublime pathos, such taste and skill, that his poem has obtained imperishable fame in our literature.
It was thus a ripe target for parody, and it may be unfortunate that the parodies are now more well-known than the highly-lauded original. (Parodies provides further details on Wolfe's writing of the poem, as well as the full text.)

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Subject: ADD: Poker Jim (from Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Jan 08 - 12:48 AM

Poker Jim.
[AIR—Raging Canal]

Now I'll tell you of my history since eighteen forty-seven,
When I lived in old Missouri, and my home was like a heaven;
I had a buxom little wife, as purty as could be—
She said as how she loved me well, and I'm certain I loved she.

But there came a lot of news along, I shall ne'er forget the day,
About there being lots of gold in Cal-i-for-nia:
I said, "Goodbye" unto my wife, though my heart felt many pains,
But thought the road to fortune, sure, lay straight across the Plains.

The first place that I got into is now called Placerville,
In them days it was Hangtown, but they thought that ungenteel:
I went to work right willingly, with shovel, pick, and pan,
And every chunk of gold saved for my Mary Ann.

In about two years I made a pile, though things were awful dear,
And then I started home agaia, to fetch my wife out here;
I took passage by the steamer, just because it was so quick,
But I'll never travel so no more, for the darned thing made me sick.

I stayed at home for half a year, and then we left for good.
My wife and children all were well, I was in a merry mood:
I bought a right good ox-team, and a wagon for the trip,
And, when we started, Mary Ann said, "Joshua, let 'em rip!"

We had a very pleasant time, and all got safely through,
I went to work right willingly, and so did my wife, too:
To make my home a happy one, my Mary Ann did try,
But very shortly after that, began my mis-e-ry.

There was a noted gam-ba-lier a living in our camp,
They called him Poker Jim, and, oh! he was an awful scamp;
He used to come and talk to her, while I tried to make a strike,
And said she was a fool to love such an ugly d—d d—d Pike.

One night I felt almighty tired, I'd been at work all day,
When I got home the neighbors said my wife had run away:
My heart was nearly bursting, and my head began to swim,
She'd left a letter saying as how she'd eloped* with Poker Jim.

I tried to keep my dander up, but felt awful bad of course,
For the d—d d—d critter she commenced an action for divorce;
She got it, and with Poker Jim she went off and got wed,
And the only ground she got it on, was because I snored in bed!


Put's Original California Songster, pp. 56-57

Lyrics and tune in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, p. 58 - taken from Johnson's Comic Songs

*Stone's text says "sloped."


Click to play (pdmusic.org)

[Tune notes by Artful Codger]
"The Raging Canal" was written and composed by P. Morris in 1844.

Sheet music [PDF] in the Lester S. Levy Collection.
Digital Tradition: The Raging Canal (with score, MIDI; lyrics not from the original)
Mudcat thread: Origins: The Raging Canal
YouTube: giggletoot's fretless banjo instrumental: The Raging Canal

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Subject: ADD: An Oft-Told Tale (from Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Jan 08 - 01:04 AM

An Oft-told Tale.

Up in the mountain solitudes,
Beside a "pile" of clay,
A wight with shovel, pick and pan,
Stood at the close of day;
His shirt and sash were very red,
His nose was very blue,
And though the scene around was grand,
The prospect wouldn't do.

His hat—enough—'twas shocking bad,
His sunburnt neck was bare;
One eye looked droll, the other sad,
Beneath his unkempt hair;
His muddy jackboots, all of jet,
Were long ago bereft;
And unto them, like unto him,
But little sole was left.

From out his pale unsmiling lips,
With rank beard overgrown,
Outspake this lonely mining man,
In semi-growling tone,
Whilst restlessly his jackboot kept
The devil's tattoo drumming:
"I had no sense in coming here,
I've gained no cents by coming."

Fortune, 'tis written, smiles on fools
Wherever they may labor,
And surely I've been fool enough
To win her choicest favor;
But ever she eludes my grasp,
Despite the proofs I gave her;
That I'm an ass she turns from me
To wanton with my neighbor.

I have not sinned as some folks do;
I pick but not to steal,
And though my ways of life are hard,
My heart is soft to feel.
My neighbors' failings I let pass;
I covet not a shade
Of all his goods, nor ox, nor ass,
Nor man, nor servant-maid.

But for this last I claim no grace,
Though some may not approve it,
Because, in this infernal place
There are no maids to covet,
Nor sparkling eyes, nor beaming smiles,
That filled my dreams of yore:
Alas, alas! those days are past,
My day-dreams now are ore!

Oh, for one hour where early life
Flowed passing merrily,
Where youth still hung on low-toned words,
And not upon—a tree;
Where friends could wrangle and debate
About each passing trifle,
And meet a flash of wit, instead
Of bowie knife or rifle."

He paused, he sighed, he gazed about,
Then spake,—"'Tis all cursed fine!
Oh, for a pull of 'Double Stout,'
To cool this thirst of mine;
But never more I'll taste a pot
Of glorious 'Lager Beer.'"
N.B. The miner "turned and left the spot,
And wiped away a tear."


Put's Original California Songster, pp. 58-59

Text (no tune) in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush, pp. 64-65



SIMON.—If you'll have me, we'll happy be, the happiest ever seen.
KATE.—I can't. You see, the cholera's round— I'll venture nothing green.

What's a wight?



[Text notes by Artful Codger]
To answer Joe's question, a wight is a person of a specified kind, particularly one regarded as unfortunate. It may also refer to a spirit, ghost or other supernatural entity.

This poem is a parody of "Willy Gilliand", a long ballad written by Sir Samuel Ferguson (1810-1886) [Wikipedia], though mostly published uncredited, and often given the qualification "An Ulster Ballad." It dates back at least to 1836, when it was published in the Dublin University Review—to support himself, Ferguson had been writing for this magazine and for Blackwood's, so I presume this was the original publication.

To save you from slogging though the ballad itself, here's a recap from The Living Age, Volume 7 (1845, p. 108):
By far the finest composition of this collection is the ballad of " Willy Gilliland." It relates to the period when the Popish Charles II. was serving the interests of Mother Church with ingenious devotion, by persecuting the Protestant Church of Scotland in the name of the Protestant Church of England; trying to drive the people out of Presbytery, which he believed to be heresy, into Prelacy, which he equally believed to be heresy. "Willy Giljiland" was one of the persecuted followers of the Covenant, many of whom took refuge in the north of Ireland, after the gallant but unfortunate fight at Bothwell Brig, and made no unworthy addition to a population the most determined and warlike in the British empire. The persecution was carried into Ulster, and it is painful to reflect that bishops, known to posterity by lasting monuments of piety and learning, did not hesitate, in those dark days of Protestantism, to countenance the brutal persecution of the Kirk of Scotland:— [ballad follows]
See Charles Anderton Read: The Cabinet of Irish Literature (1880, pp. 58 & 62) for additional information.

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Subject: ADD: Gold (Parody) (from Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Jan 08 - 01:15 AM

Gold.
PARODY.

By Mrs. Mary Dunn.

Come listen to me, jolly 1ad,
A story I'll relate,
Which happened in the valley
Of the California State;
'Twas down the Feather River land
We hearties went so bold,
And worked like hungry tigers
For the bright and shining gold.

Chorus:
For gold, they say, is brighter than the day,
And when it's mine,
I'm bound to shine,
And drive dull care away.

My creditors gave me a year
To pay them what I owed,
I thanked them very kindly,
And was off for the land of gold;
And as we scraped the valleys dry,
Where the waters used to roll,
I filled my trousers' pockets full
Of the bright and shining gold. For, etc.

Beneath the hot and scorching sun,I worked for many a day,
Most happy, 'cause I got so rich,
I soon was going away;
A monstrous heap of gold I had,
Which from the sand I parted—
I got some boards and boxed it up,
And off for home I started. For, etc.

O, the mountains and the valleys there,
I tell you they're not slow,
And Nature's works in grandeur are,
Whichever way you go;
And there our glorious stars and stripes,
For evermore shall fly,
As each new day the rising sun
Shall gild the eastern sky. For, etc.


Put's Original California Songster, p. 60

Not found in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush


[Text notes by Artful Codger]
I suspect that the model for this parody was some song with the key phrase "drive dull care away". Of those I found, the most likely candidate is a song apparently of Irish origin (by 1819) called "Dull Care[s]" or "Drive Dull Care Away", beginning "Why should we at our lots complain / Or grieve at our distress?" Though most texts lack a chorus, some have one, in varying forms. For instance, there is a version (with score) in Edward D. Ives' Drive Dull Care Away: Folksongs from Prince Edward Island (pp. 81-2) which might serve the "Gold" parody with a little adaptation.

Digital Tradition: Drive Dull Care Away (with score and MIDIs)

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Subject: ADD: Old Zenas (from Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Jan 08 - 01:34 AM

Old Zenas

Away "deown east" there dwelt a man,
E'en over in the State of Maine,
Who had enough of tall pine trees
Himself and wife to well maintain.

But years rolled by, and children came
Around the little fireside,
And claimed a right to eat and drink,
- Nor could such wants be well denied.

The pine trees grew, and children, too,
Though in their manner far apart;
The trees grew thin, the children thick,
And thus from Maine were doomed to part.

Old Zenas to his wife did say,
"I'll move you all to Michigan,
And California I will seek,
And dig until a richer man."

Across the plains he bent his steps,
And passed large droves of buffalo,
Wild horses, turkeys very fine,
And tigers, jackalls, Indians, too,

At times he hadn't nary piece
Of meat whereby to feed upon,
Nor any water for his thirst,
And thus he saw the Old Lion.

At last his clothes in tatters hung
About his sore and weary form;
His "harp of hopes" was soon unstrung,
And fancied nigh the gathering storm,

He mourned his lot, and often wept
To think, he ever took the gaunt;
And then he'd rave, and swear he b'lieved
He'd soon to see the Elephant.


Put's Original California Songster, p. 61

Not found in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush


"deown east" - is what it says...

What's the Old Lion?

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Subject: ADD: Josh, John (from Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Jan 08 - 01:56 AM

Josh, John.

You have strayed away from your Josh, John,
You have strayed away from your Josh.
And between the spot where you stand
And your home in the flowery land,
The waves of an ocean dash, John,
The waves of an ocean dash.

Your "tail" is severed clean off, John
Your pig tail is clean cut off;
I should like to see you, John, sit* down,
Right in the midst of your native town—
Yah! wouldn't the Johnnies scoff, John,
"How can!" they would cry in scoff.

The hair now covers your head, John,
The hair now covers your head;
You have lost your nankin shirt of blue,
And a sorry coat of doubtful hue
Is seedily worn in its stead, John,
Is shabbily worn in its stead.

A boot of at least thirteen, John,
A boot of at least thirteen,
And made of cowhide, strong and good,
In the place of sole of solid wood,
On your elegant foot is seen, John,
On your sweet little foot is seen.

You have come, as it were, alone, John,
You have come, as it were, alone;
And you lead an unhappy kind of life,
Coming without a cheerful wife,
A cheerful wife of your own, John,
An almond-eyed wife of your own.

You've left your national god, John,
You've left your god and your land
You've left the dress of the land of flowers,
And in leaving these, haven't taken ours;
And you've friends upon neither hand, John,
You have friends upon neither hand.

Buffeted, beaten, and cursed, John,
Buffeted, beaten, and cursed,
I think your life had happier been
As the slave of a nine-tailed Mandarin -
This last state is worse than the first, John,
This last state is by far the worst!


Put's Original California Songster, p. 62

Not found in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush

Lingenfelter & Dwyer, Songs of the American West (page 300) has lyrics (no tune) from Johnson's New Comic Songs, No. 2 (1863), pp. 18-19.

*"set" in Lingenfelter & Dwyer
The final verse (in italics) is in Lingenfelter & Dwyer, but not in Put's Original California Songster.



"Josh" - I'm guessing this is a Chinese Joss house.

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Subject: ADD: Miners Ups and Downs (from Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Jan 08 - 02:05 AM

Miners Ups and Downs

A pilgrim from away down East
Stood on Nevada's strand,
A tear was in his troubled eye,
A pick-axe in his hand.

The pilgrim stood, and looking down,
As one who is in doubt,
He sighed to see how fast
His boots were wearing out.

"Thrice have I left this cursed spot,
But mine it was to learn
The fatal truth, that 'Dust we are,
To dust we shall return!'"

Once more returned, at close of day,
To a cheerless, dismal home,
He vows if he was back in Maine,
He never more would roam.

Now hunger makes his bowels yearn
For yams or Irish roots:
But these he looks in vain to find,
Then tries to fry his boots.

The night is passed in happy dreams
Of youth and childhood's joys,
Of times when he got flogged at school
For pinching smaller boys.

But morn dispels these fairy scenes,
And want arouses pluck;
He shoulders pick and pan once more,
Again to try his luck.

He digs in dark, secluded depths,
The spots where slugs abound,
And, oh! what rapture fills his breast-
His pile at last is found!

His wardrobe changed, behold him now
In affluence and pride,
Surrounded by the forms he loves,
With joy on every side.

Pressed closely to his heart, he holds
His wife and chdren dear,
The latter shouting gaily,
While the former drops a tear


Put's Original California Songster, pp. 63-64

Not found in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush

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Subject: ADD: Backbone (from Stone)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Jan 08 - 02:14 AM

Backbone.

To dress, and sit, and walk genteelly,
To bow with easy grace;
To speak in accents soft and mealy,
To wear a studied face;
These, and like goodly gifts and graces,
Are well enough, I own;
But what we want in this soft age,
Is bone, backbone!

A heart to feel, a mind to think,
Despite each base control;
A tongue to speak, a hand to work
The purpose of the soul:
By these and other goodly tokens
It may be surely known,
If this or that, within his body
Has* bone, backbone!

Give me a man that's all a man,
Who stands up straight and strong,
Who loves the plain and simple right,
And will not yield to wrong;
Who deals with firm, untrembling hand,
Gives every one his own—
O! a blessed thing in anybody,
Is bone, backbone!

Put's Original California Songster, p. 64

Not found in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush


*middle letter is illegible - could be "his bone," but "has" makes more sense to me.

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Subject: Put's Original California Songster, page 65
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Jan 08 - 02:21 AM

    D. E. APPLETON & Co..

    Publishers & Booksellers

    Nos. 508 and 510 Montgomery Street,

    EAST SIDE, Between Sacramento and Commercial Streets,

    SAN FRANCISCO,


    Publishers of all the

    California Song Books


    IMPORTERS OF
    FANCY STATIONERY FANCY GOODS,
    FINE POCKET CUTLERY AND GOLD PENS,

    AGENTS IN CALIFORNIA FOR THE

       Standard Drama,
          Acting Drama,
             Minor Drama;


    CONSTANTLY ON HAND,

    5,000 PLAYS & 20,000 SONG BOOKS,

    ALSO, BOOKS, NOVELS,
    Stationery, Letter Paper, Note Paper, Billet Paper;
    Envelopes, Pens, Ink, Mucilage;

    PORTMONNAIES, GOLD PENS, POCKET CUTLERY
    Toy Books, Play Books, Song Books;
    Engravings, Cards, Tissue Paper, Fancy Boxes, Indelible Ink,
    Pencils, Slates, Cribbage Boards, Dice Cups,
    Dice, Chess, Checker Boards, Playing Cards,
    Portfolios, Pocket Memorandum Books,
    School Books, Blank Books, etc.


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Subject: Put's Original California Songster, page 66
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Jan 08 - 02:40 AM

    Appleton's

    CELEBRATED

    LOTS

    OF

    VALENTINES

    $5.00 LOTS !
       $10.00 LOTS !
          $20.00 LOTS !
             $40.00 LOTS !

    Comic Valentines

    F1,755E

    DIFFERENT KINDS!!!

    ADDRESS ORDERS,

    D. E. APPLETON & Co..

    Nos. 508 and 510 Montgomery Street, San Francisco


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Subject: RE: Online Songbook:Put's Original California Songster
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Jan 08 - 04:03 AM

Whew!
All finished.
Tunes will be posted....slowly.
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Online Songbook:Put's Original California Song
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 18 Jan 08 - 05:54 PM

Thank you Mr. Offer. Obviously a real labor of love. WELL DONE!!

What format would you like to see the tunes in? Point to an example.

Another good source for material:
http://www.folk-network.com/directory/links/song-collections_books.html

Chico State, in your neck of the woods, also has a good collection on-line.

Sincerely,
Gargoyle


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Subject: RE: Online Songbook:Put's Original California Songster
From: Joe Offer
Date: 19 Jan 08 - 03:01 AM

Thanks for that link, Gargoyle. Malcom's index of online folk resources has grown a lot since I last saw it.

I'll be posting the tunes to the "Old Put" songs in MIDI format, mostly from the tunes in Dwyer & Lingenfelter, The Songs of the Gold Rush. You can see from the notes in this thread and the other Stone thread, that Dwyer & Lingenfelter have almost all the tunes from the two John A. Stone songsters, Put's Original California Songster and Put's Golden Songster. If you have the Dwyer-Lingenfelter book and would like to help transcribe tunes, let me know.

I'll post MIDIs for these and any other tune-less songs we have.
Send them to me by e-mail for posting.
-Joe Offer-
joe@mudcat.org


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Subject: RE: Online Songbook:Put's Original California Songster
From: MartinRyan
Date: 19 Jan 08 - 03:43 PM

In "Coming round the Horn", "duff" is probably plum-duff - suet pudding with currants. As close as sailors ever got to dessert! See Patrick O'Brian for example.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Online Songbook:Put's Original California Songster
From: MartinRyan
Date: 19 Jan 08 - 03:46 PM

My best guess on "bluemass" is an ointment used for treatment of syphillis. It's the "cards and dice" that puzzle me!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Online Songbook:Put's Original California Songster
From: MartinRyan
Date: 19 Jan 08 - 03:48 PM

Ha! Right idea - wrong disease! How about this?

Regards


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Subject: RE: Online Songbook:Put's Original California Songster
From: MartinRyan
Date: 19 Jan 08 - 04:21 PM

For "gallus" I can only think of "gallows" and "galluses" as starting points.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Online Songbook:Put's Original California Songster
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 19 Jan 08 - 05:14 PM

Gallus (galluses) is (are?) suspenders, in American since 1836, used both in singular and plural (see Webster's Collegiate Dictionary).

Blue mass was used for several ailments; during the Civil War, August Bondi (biography) was treated with bluemass and quinine for 'intermittent fever.' www2.ku.edu/~maxkade/bondi_and_index.pdf

In slavery days, slaves often were treated with bluemass, calomel or castor oil, regardless of ailment. Atlanta University Pub. No. 1, Mortality Among Negroes in Cities, 1896.
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bookres.fcg/history/pdf_chase.pdf


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Subject: RE: Online Songbook:Put's Original California Songster
From: MartinRyan
Date: 23 Jan 08 - 04:35 AM

The answer to "gallus rig" may be in this article . Can someone with library access check it out, please?

Regards


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Subject: RE: Online Songbook:Put's Original California Song
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 06 Apr 08 - 05:40 PM

Regarding:

gallus. adj. [colloq. pron. of obs. gallows 'fit for the gallows; wicked"] 1. splendid; attractive. Also adv. 1849 in Jackson Early Songs of Uncle Sam 56: They are "gallus" bloods indeed. ibid 57: My name is Jack Romaine, and bull dog I'm in grain/And a mighty gallus chap, well I am! 1854 in Calif Folk Qtly.I (1942) 276: When first I went to mining, I was uncommon green,/ With a "gallus" rig I went to dig, and claimed a whole ravine.

Mark Twain used it as peculiar; remarkable; in reference to camel's lips, a woman's walk.

Sixteen similar references from 1789 to 1946 are noted.

Lighter's - RHHDof Am. Slang vol. 1

Sincerely,
Gargoyle


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Subject: RE: Online Songbook:Put's Original California Song
From: Jon Bartlett
Date: 06 Apr 08 - 06:26 PM

This is a great piece of work, Joe. I want to read it word-for-word to check against the vocabulary used by miners on the Fraser River - 40,000 of whom came from California in the summer of 1858. We have one song in the vernacular here from that Gold Rush and a bunch more (though not in a vernacular voice - more a parody of Burns) from the Cariboo Rush of 1863-4.

I'll report my findings (if any!) on Mudcat.

Jon Bartlett


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Subject: RE: Online Songbook:Put's Original California Songster
From: GUEST,Mike Halloran
Date: 01 Sep 12 - 03:40 PM

"Note: apparently, the University of California Bancroft Library does not have a first edition"

I am pretty certain that they do - as much as anyone does. I believe that all copies are "Fourth Edition", as is mine. I have neither seen nor heard of a copy that wasn't.

I also have two copies of "Put's Golden Songster". Both are also "Fourth Edition".

The Golden Songster contains "Sweet Betsy from Pike". I am fairly convinced that this is a romanticized account of John Stone's brother Isaac and sister-in-law Elizabeth's emigration from Pike Co. Missouri.


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Subject: RE: Online Songbook:Put's Original California Songster
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Sep 12 - 08:58 PM

Martin Ryan, 23 Jan 08, asked for the meaning of "gallus" rig, in Put.

In "The Localized Vocabulary of California Verse," Grant defines:
gallus, corruption of gallows, an intensive, meaning either villainous or excellent.
It would seem that the greenhorn miner had an excellent rig, or setup, for mining.


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Subject: RE: Online Songbook:Put's Original California Songster
From: Artful Codger
Date: 02 Sep 12 - 02:35 AM

Cf. "Blue Mountain": "Yarn Gallus with shortened lope". He acquired his nickname because (see the "Blue Mountain" thread for more precise details; I'm going by memory) an aunt used to send him galluses that she'd knitted. Gallus pops up in other cowboy and western songs, with a more usual meaning of suspenders.

Although the excellence of the miner's rig is evident from what he'd accomplished, it's also possible that his rig was built on some suspension system that allowed him access through holes going straight down, and that accounted for the advantage enjoyed by this greenhorn. Those citing the song might not have known of (or personally favored) the "suspenders" interpretation, lacking knowledge in mining practice.

Compare also with another song above where it says "Miss Ella was a gallus nag", with no quotes around the word. There, the meaning is clearly "exceptional" (either excellent or strange, depending on your reading); Stone apparently felt his readers would know, and didn't draw special attention to the word. So having the same source mark it specially in relation to the rig makes me think the rig was of a particular sort, not merely excellent. This, of course, is all supposition on my part, but I think those who cited this song as evidence were supposing as well.


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Subject: RE: Online Songbook:Put's Original California Songster
From: MartinRyan
Date: 04 Sep 12 - 04:33 AM

Q

Thanks for checking that reference.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Online Songbook:Put's Original California Songster
From: GUEST,Autoharper
Date: 13 Oct 12 - 11:37 PM

Blue mass was recommended as a remedy for such widely varied complaints as tuberculosis, constipation, toothache, parasitic infestations, and the pains of childbirth. It was a magisterial preparation, compounded by pharmacists themselves based on their own recipes or on one of several widespread recipes. It was sold in the form of blue or gray pills, or syrup. Its name probably derives from the use of blue dye or blue chalk (used as a buffer) in some formulations.

The ingredients of blue mass varied, as each pharmacist prepared it himself, but they all included mercury in elemental or compound form (often as mercury chloride, also known as calomel). One recipe of the period included (for blue mass syrup):

    33 parts mercury
    5 parts licorice
    25 parts Althaea (possibly hollyhock or marshmallow)
    3 parts glycerol
    34 parts rose honey

Blue mass was also used to treat syphilis, in the form of ointments, gargles, and eye washes. Obviously it also poisoned the patient.

-Adam Miller
Folksinging.org


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