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German-American Music Hall Songs

Rapparee 13 Jan 08 - 06:42 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Jan 08 - 08:40 PM
Rapparee 13 Jan 08 - 08:52 PM
GUEST,.gargoyle 13 Jan 08 - 10:37 PM
Rapparee 14 Jan 08 - 09:00 AM
dick greenhaus 14 Jan 08 - 11:03 AM
Goose Gander 14 Jan 08 - 11:55 AM
Rapparee 14 Jan 08 - 12:23 PM
Goose Gander 14 Jan 08 - 12:26 PM
Newport Boy 14 Jan 08 - 01:01 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 14 Jan 08 - 02:19 PM
Newport Boy 14 Jan 08 - 02:23 PM
Rapparee 14 Jan 08 - 03:11 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 14 Jan 08 - 03:48 PM
Ernest 15 Jan 08 - 02:11 AM
Rapparee 15 Jan 08 - 08:49 AM
Goose Gander 15 Jan 08 - 01:11 PM
Goose Gander 15 Jan 08 - 02:36 PM
Susanne (skw) 15 Jan 08 - 03:44 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 15 Jan 08 - 03:49 PM
Goose Gander 16 Jan 08 - 02:28 PM
GUEST,Bob Coltman 17 Jan 08 - 10:42 AM
GUEST,Bob Coltman 17 Jan 08 - 11:03 AM
GUEST,Bob Coltman 17 Jan 08 - 11:23 AM
Goose Gander 17 Jan 08 - 11:33 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Jan 08 - 01:15 PM
GUEST,.gargoyle 17 Jan 08 - 04:25 PM
Rapparee 17 Jan 08 - 09:22 PM
Rapparee 17 Jan 08 - 09:50 PM
Susanne (skw) 20 Jan 08 - 05:18 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 20 Jan 08 - 09:33 PM
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Subject: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Rapparee
Date: 13 Jan 08 - 06:42 PM

I'm familiar with Irish-American songs (e.g., "McNally's Row of Flats," "Finnegan's Wake," et.) of the music-hall genre. (I'm defining this as commercially written and performed, usually comic or bathetic, rather than springing from the "folk experience." They can be rooted in shared experiences, of course.)

But are there any similar songs "defining" German-Americans? Yes, there are some about the time of the US Civil War, such as "I Goes To Fight Mit Siegel" but are there others?


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Jan 08 - 08:40 PM

Harrigan and Hart, plus Braham, in the Mulligan's Guard sketches, presented German-American humour in the last half of the 19th c. See thread 76690 for some comments: Dunderbeck

See the link there to Musical Theatre. I searched for these songs but didn't have any luck.
Johnny Schmoker at American Memory; don't know its origin.

Much was destroyed or forgotten during WW1 when the Germans became enemy aliens.


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Rapparee
Date: 13 Jan 08 - 08:52 PM

Yes, including the original spelling of my last name. But being related by blood to Altgilbers, Ostermullers, Mullers, Mollers, Strunks, and many others I was brought up on stories of the 19th Century and the same sort of prejudices and sense of community confronted by the Irish.

"Dunderbeck" is good, but there must be more....


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 13 Jan 08 - 10:37 PM

German/Dutch?

or

Doorzoek/Deutsch?

IF you are serious about research into the root foundations....read a current book, Island at the Center of the World.

One man has spent half-a-lifetime....transcribing original manuscripts recently discovered in New York/New Amsterdam

Get past the first hundred pages and the book reads like a well-refined mystery. Get beyond two-hundred pages and it reads like a novel; complicated twists and turns and irony upon irony.

Dunderbreck parody, is in the well annoitated text.

Sincerely,
Gargoyle

Distaste for the British abounds - after reading, most will agree.


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Rapparee
Date: 14 Jan 08 - 09:00 AM

Thank you, I'll start there.


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 14 Jan 08 - 11:03 AM

There's a CD on the New World label titled "Don't Give the Name a Bad Place" that consists of dialect music hall songs. Sever of them are in a German dialect.

Probably the best-known of the German dialect songs was "Where, Oh Where Has My Little Dog Gone"


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Goose Gander
Date: 14 Jan 08 - 11:55 AM

I have a few books with some American stage songs in faux-German dialect. Is this what you're looking for? The lyrical content is usually fairly deroguatory, with observations about bossy wives and henpecked husbands, small businessmen whose lives center around their little shops, etc. Like blacks and Irish, German immigrants were figures of fun on the nineteenth-century stage, though it seems few people are aware of this these days.


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Rapparee
Date: 14 Jan 08 - 12:23 PM

Yes, it is. I'm just doing a little informal studying and find that while the Irish and African-American songs seem to have survived there isn't much about the Germans ("Dutch" as they were called) after the Civil War period.

WW1 really killed a lot of these songs with the propaganda generated (in the US) by the McKinley administration. Many German families, including my own, changed their names and/or called themselves "Dutch" -- which in our case wasn't so very far off, since at least part of the family came from a town near the Dutch border. German was no longer taught in the schools and families spoke it only when they were together.

Just digging and prodding in a mostly-forgotten area.


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Goose Gander
Date: 14 Jan 08 - 12:26 PM

Yes, I can look up some of this stuff and post anything that may be of interest to you. You are correct, this is an overlooked topic.


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Newport Boy
Date: 14 Jan 08 - 01:01 PM

Not quite music hall songs, but I remember two German-American songs in the "Sing Out" reprints. I can't recall the titles, but would probably recognise them. I think they were on facing pages. Which year is difficult, but I photocopied two year's editions in early 1964, so it's just before that. Most of the copies were lost in our 2002 move, so I can't add anything more.

Phil


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 14 Jan 08 - 02:19 PM

Rapaire, the Harrigan-Hart scripts and archive are held by the NY Public Library. A friend in NYC who is interested in music hall would be a great help, if you have one.
Dunderbeck is supposed to be from one of their scripts but no one volunteered help.

The German stereotype was reinforced in WW2, although not nearly to the extent prevalent during and after WW1.
German colonies settled in central Texas in the 1850s. In Austin, I remember the Saagerunde Hall, where descendants still gathered to sing when I was at University there. Walter Winchell had called the place a hotbed of Hitlerism, a gross lie. In the 1950s its members were still receiving some bigoted attention.


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Newport Boy
Date: 14 Jan 08 - 02:23 PM

It's amazing what happens if you cool your brain with a glass or two of wine! Over dinner, I've remembered the name of at least one of the songs - Hans Beimler - in the DT (2485 - but the link takes me round in a circle). I think the other was 'He Lies in the American Land', but I'm not certain.

Phil


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Rapparee
Date: 14 Jan 08 - 03:11 PM

The "American Memory" project of the Library of Congress has a half-dozen or so. But that's still not very many.


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 14 Jan 08 - 03:48 PM

Hans Beimler is a Spanish Civil War song, in the DT and see thread 26268, not pertinent here. Hans Beimler
The Dutch Warbler, an old one by Sep. Winner, is in the DT (little dog gone).
Schnitzelbank is Bavarian, although some sites call it German-American (in DT and threads).


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Ernest
Date: 15 Jan 08 - 02:11 AM

Since you already mentioned Civil war songs you are probably aware that "Corporal Schnapps" is in the DT?

Best
Ernest


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Rapparee
Date: 15 Jan 08 - 08:49 AM

Yes, I searched the DT and Forum before starting this thread.

I'll be posting some lyrics I've found when I get a chance -- right now I'm kinda busy at work and I have a meeting tomorrow night but I would like to get them up soon.


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Goose Gander
Date: 15 Jan 08 - 01:11 PM

I recall that 'My Mother-in-Law' in Vance Randolph's Ozark Folksongs, v.3 is done in faux-German dialect. I presume this song has music hall/vaudeville origins. The Roud Index, referencing Meade's Country Music Sources, shows Gus Williams to be the composer (1876).


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Goose Gander
Date: 15 Jan 08 - 02:36 PM

DIALECT SONGS AMONG THE DUTCH by James P. Leary, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Posted on the website of the Max Kade Institute for German-American Studies


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 15 Jan 08 - 03:44 PM

On a CD with German emigrant songs by the German duo Grenzgaenger I found a song called 'Down Where the Wurzburger Flows' by Vincent P. Bryan and Harry von Tilzer, in praise of beer, apparently. The sleevenotes say it's from the Broadway musical 'The Prince of Pilsen' (1902). If it's any good to you I'll post the lyrics soon (but not today).


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 15 Jan 08 - 03:49 PM

Sheet music for the Bryan-Von Tilzer song is in the Levy Collection of Sheet Music.


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Goose Gander
Date: 16 Jan 08 - 02:28 PM

Thread started for My Mother-in-Law by Gus Williams (1876).


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Subject: Lyr Add: DER DEITCHER'S DOG (Septimus Winner)
From: GUEST,Bob Coltman
Date: 17 Jan 08 - 10:42 AM

Everybody cites "Der Deitcher's Dog (Oh Where, Oh Where Is My Little Dog Gone?", but just try and find it on the web. The standard lyrics sites don't have it, and children's sites quote only the familiar refrain.

So here it is, as reprinted at
http://www.barrypopik.com/index.php/new_york_city/

DER DEITCHER'S DOG
By Septimus Winner, 1864

1860-1870s, Henry De Marsan's New Comic and Sentimental Singer's Journal, pg. 259:
Der Deitcher's Dog

Oh! Where, oh! Where ish mine little dog gone?
Oh! where, oh! Where can he be?
His ear's cut short, and his tail cut long:
Oh! Where, oh! where ish he?

Tra, la la, [etc.]

I loves mine lager, 'tish very goot beer
Oh! where, oh! where can he be?
But mit no money I cannot drink here:
Oh! where, oh! where ish he?

Tra, la la, [etc.]

Und sausage is goot: Baloney, of course,
Oh! where, oh! where can he be?
Dey makes 'em mit dog, und dey makes 'em mit horse:
I guess dey makes 'em mit he.


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: GUEST,Bob Coltman
Date: 17 Jan 08 - 11:03 AM

An additional verse to "Der Deitcher's Dog," from Frank Loesser's Humor in American Song. He places it before the last verse above:

Across der ocean in Germanie,
Oh where, oh where can he be?
Der Deitcher's dog is de best companie,
Oh where, oh where ish he?


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Subject: Lyr Add: JOHNNY SCHMOKER (George F. Root)
From: GUEST,Bob Coltman
Date: 17 Jan 08 - 11:23 AM

By the way Loesser (NY, Howell Soskin Publishers, 1942) calls "Der Deitcher's Dog" "The Dutch Warbler." He writes that it "is taken from a well-known German ditty called 'In Lauterbach hab' ich mein' Strumpf verloren.' There is a suggestion of a yodel in the chorus." I've also seen a claim that "Der Deitcher's Dog" is a parody of a song called "Der Deitcher," but I know no more than that.

Loesser also has two more ancient German-American popular songs. Here's the first one, a German-band novelty, no date given. (It's a cumulative song, long and repetitive, so I'll abbreviate.) I'll transcribe the other, The Teuton's Tribulation by A. Dodge, only if there's interest. Bob

JOHNNY SCHMOKER
By George F. Root

Johnny Schmoker, Johnny Schmoker, ich kan spielen, ich kan spielen,
Ich kan spiel' mein kleine Drummel,
Rub-a-dub-dub mein kleine Drummel.
Mein rub-a-dub-a-dub, mein kleine Drummel.

Johnny Schmoker, Johnny Schmoker, ich kan spielen, ich kan spielen,
Ich kan spiel' mein kleine Fifie,
Pilly-willy-wink mein kleine Fifie,
Rub-a-dub-a-dub mein kleine Drummel,
Mein pilly-willy-wink, mein kleine Fifie.

... subsequent verses add on the following:

Mein kleine Triangel / Tic toc knock das ist mein Triangel

Mein kleine Trombone / Boom boom boom mein kleine Trombone

Mein kleine Cymbal / Zoom zoom zoom mein kleine Cymbal

Mein kleine Viol / Fa la la mein kleine Viol

Mein kleine Toodle-Sach / Whack whack whack mein kleine Toodle-Sach


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Goose Gander
Date: 17 Jan 08 - 11:33 AM

Thanks, Bob. Those lyrics are better than I remembered them, especially the sausage and baloney lines.


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Jan 08 - 01:15 PM

"Oh Where, Oh, Where Has My Little Dog Gone- (Zu Lauterbach)

"The melody of this song was originally known as Zu Lauterbach Hab' Ich Mein Strumpf Verloren (At Lauterbach I Lost My Sock), the first known printing of the music (and words) of which were in Alte und Neue Volks-Lieder, arranged by L. Richter et al. (Leipzig, 1846), p. 46;... The words had previously appeared in two pamphlets...[1831; nd]...four towns in Germany with the name of Lauterbach, and it is not known which one is meant!"

"It seems clear that Sep. Winner is the author of the American words. On Sept. 9, 1864, [copyright records] there was deposited at the Library of Congress Der Deitscher's Dog with sole authorship credited to him and with himself as the publisher.... Of three known English editions (two entitled The Dutchman's Lee-tle Dog and the third The Little Wee Dog at JF, credit as to authorship is given Sep. Winner."

p. 406, James J. Fuld, 1966 and reprints, "The Book of World-Famous Music, Classical, Popular and Folk."


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 17 Jan 08 - 04:25 PM

Stuff along this sort line by Mortah?

Maria und de Lamb

Maria Habst de smallish lamb
Mit fleecen snowisch whiten;
Maria nicht ben travelen
Mitout der lamb inviten.

De faulein to das schoolenhaus
Der dumbisch lamb ben tooken.
Der youngishers is chucklen out,
Und gigglen mit der looken.

Das teacher-frau de dumbisch lamb
Ben sooner out-gethrowen,
Und vas is in der schoolenbooke
Der lamb is nicht ben knowen.

Das Arrow und der Song

Ein arrow Ich ben up-geshot;
Der fallen Ich ben knowen not.
Ist peepers keen und sharpisch bright,
Mit followen das speeden flight?

Ein song meinself ben singen out,
Der landen ben in deepisch doubt.
Ist peepers out ge-looken strong,
Mit tracken der departen song?

Der schtunken song is nicht ben found,
Der air ben still, mitout ein sound,
But, Ach! Das arrow met der end,
Upsticken in ein gooten friend!

Sincerely,
Gargoyle


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Rapparee
Date: 17 Jan 08 - 09:22 PM

We learned the "Johnny Schmoker" in grade school; it was under a different title and a different name was used. I'll see if I can either remember it or find out. As it was sung we mimicked the instruments named.


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Rapparee
Date: 17 Jan 08 - 09:50 PM

If my old memory serves, "Johnny Schmoker" is similar to the Yiddish song "The Rabbi Emelich." I remember only a little about the "Rabbi" but it appears on Theodore Bikel's LP of Yiddish folksongs.


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Subject: Lyr Add: DOWN WHERE THE WURZBURGER FLOWS
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 20 Jan 08 - 05:18 PM

DOWN WHERE THE WURZBURGER FLOWS
(lyrics: Vincent P. Bryan / tune: Harry von Tilzer)

Chorus:
Take me down, down, down
Where the Wurzburger flows, flows, flows
It will drown, drown, drown
All your troubles and cares and woes
Just order two seidels of lager or three
If I don't want to drink it, please force it on me
The Rhine may be fine but a cold stein for mine
Down where the Wurzburger flows

Now poets may sing of the dear Fatherland
And the soft flowing dreamy old Rhine
Beside the Blue Danube in fancy they stand
And they rave of its beauties divine
But there is a spot where the sun never shines
Where mirth and good fellowship reign
For dear old Bohemia my lonely heart pines
And I long to be there once again

The Rhine by moonlight's a beautiful sight
When the wind whispers low through the vines
But give me some good old Rathskellar at night
Where the brilliant electric light shines
The poets may think it's delightful to hear
The nightingale piping its lay
Give me a piano, a cold stein of beer
And a fellow who knows how to play


The only thing I haven't worked out is how a Bohemian beer came to be called Wurzburger. The only Wurzburg I know is quite far from Bohemia, in south west Germany.


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Subject: RE: German-American Music Hall Songs
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 20 Jan 08 - 09:33 PM

Würzburger Bier is imported from the Bavarian city in small quantities- a very good beer.

Around 1900 a 'Wurzburg' beer was produced in America. Don't know anything about it except for an old postcard.

The composer was apparently ignorant of German geography.


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