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Cajun Translation anyone

Mr Red 15 Jan 08 - 07:54 AM
GUEST,redhorse at work 15 Jan 08 - 07:58 AM
Mr Happy 15 Jan 08 - 08:03 AM
BanjoRay 15 Jan 08 - 10:58 AM
GUEST,Monique 15 Jan 08 - 11:18 AM
open mike 15 Jan 08 - 04:08 PM
bankley 15 Jan 08 - 04:16 PM
Mr Red 16 Jan 08 - 07:55 AM
bankley 16 Jan 08 - 08:19 AM
GUEST,George 24 Feb 08 - 10:55 AM
melodeonboy 24 Feb 08 - 02:35 PM
peregrina 24 Feb 08 - 02:41 PM
peregrina 24 Feb 08 - 02:51 PM
GUEST,George 24 Feb 08 - 03:03 PM
peregrina 24 Feb 08 - 03:07 PM
Suzy T. 24 Feb 08 - 03:27 PM
GUEST,George 24 Feb 08 - 04:21 PM
GUEST,George 24 Feb 08 - 05:03 PM
Dead Horse 25 Feb 08 - 10:17 AM
Mr Happy 25 Feb 08 - 11:47 AM
Suzy T. 03 Mar 08 - 09:45 PM
GUEST,Robin 03 Apr 08 - 11:37 PM
GUEST,heid 26 Apr 09 - 01:27 AM
GUEST,JohnnyBeezer 26 Apr 09 - 09:49 AM
GUEST,Johnny Beezer 26 Apr 09 - 09:51 AM
GUEST 09 Jan 12 - 05:11 PM
GUEST,Morgana 10 Jan 12 - 02:46 PM
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Subject: Cajun Translation anyone
From: Mr Red
Date: 15 Jan 08 - 07:54 AM

Just booked tickets for a Cajun dance at Gloucester Guildhall (Festival Jan 25-27). Mamou mia!

The Band is from France and go by the name of Pain d'Mais which translates as "bread of but" OK thats the obvious bit and might mean "merely bread" - now:

Is it a French / Franco-American / or Creole expression shortened from something longer and more explanatory? or What?


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: GUEST,redhorse at work
Date: 15 Jan 08 - 07:58 AM

Corn Bread (Bread of Maize)

nick


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: Mr Happy
Date: 15 Jan 08 - 08:03 AM

..........or - don't use Babelfish!


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: BanjoRay
Date: 15 Jan 08 - 10:58 AM

If I had a cajun band I'd call it Pain d'Monium
Ray


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: GUEST,Monique
Date: 15 Jan 08 - 11:18 AM

Pain d'Maïs: there's a dieresis on the i. Maïs = corn, maize. Mais = but


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: open mike
Date: 15 Jan 08 - 04:08 PM

dieresis? can't you take something to cure that?


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: bankley
Date: 15 Jan 08 - 04:16 PM

May-Isss    ......'s' as 's' not as 'z'

then there's 'ble d'inde' which is another term for corn meaning "Indian wheat"

Pain d'Ble d'Inde has more of a ryhme to it... but is also more North American... merci buckets....


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: Mr Red
Date: 16 Jan 08 - 07:55 AM

And here me thing it was bread of butt(er)


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: bankley
Date: 16 Jan 08 - 08:19 AM

that would be 'pain de cul' ( L not pronounced) or 'pain des fesses'

only sliced once...

. or how about 'troue de beigne' (doughnut hole)
......... maybe good for a Cajun cop band...


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: GUEST,George
Date: 24 Feb 08 - 10:55 AM

I am looking for a slight variation to "LAISSEZ LES BON TEMPS ROULET" which means "Let The Good Times Roll". What I want to do is simply say "but let the good times roll", using the word "but" like "however, let the good times roll".


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: melodeonboy
Date: 24 Feb 08 - 02:35 PM

Is "roulet" a cajun variation of "rouler"? Surely, as an infinitive form, in standard French it would have to be "rouler".

As for your question, George, couldn't you just use "mais"? "However" is only different from "but" stylistically; it's identical semantically.

Please note that I speak as an Anglophone and am more than willing to be corrected.


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: peregrina
Date: 24 Feb 08 - 02:41 PM

what about

Mais allez-y les bons temps!   ?


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: peregrina
Date: 24 Feb 08 - 02:51 PM

Or

quand-même, allez-y les bon temps


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: GUEST,George
Date: 24 Feb 08 - 03:03 PM

Thank you! This is a BIG help.


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: peregrina
Date: 24 Feb 08 - 03:07 PM

Alors, vas-y bonheur (the translation a little loose, but...)


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: Suzy T.
Date: 24 Feb 08 - 03:27 PM

That would be "mais laisse les bon temps rouler". In Cajun French, "quand meme" usually means "even though" rather than "but".

"Pain d'mais" is indeed corn bread -- think "maize" for "mais", and I think there could be an umlaut over the letter i, the word "mais" meaning "maize" or "corn" usually has two syllables in Cajun French.

Cajun French has mainly been a spoken language, not written very much til relatively recently (i.e. mid-to late-20th century), and the rules of grammar are much much more relaxed than in France. There are fewer different tenses, for example. And there are some odd ways of expressing things which might be archaic or might have come from crossover from another language, for example, one way of using present tense is to say "Le soleil apres se coucher" which means "the sun is setting" (the Irish sometimes use "after" in this way).

I've seen "roulet" and "rouler". One time in Louisiana, years ago, we amused ourselves by counting all the different ways we saw "boudin" (the sausage) spelled: boo-dan, boodin, bo-dan, boodin, and other variations.

Anyway how you spell rouler doesn't matter. Letting the good times roll is what counts!
Suzy T.


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: GUEST,George
Date: 24 Feb 08 - 04:21 PM

Thank you Suzy T. The use of mais is what I need.


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: GUEST,George
Date: 24 Feb 08 - 05:03 PM

To Suzy....

One more last question. Can you check this pronunciation on the phrase "mais laisse les bon temps rouler". I'm assuming it may goe something like this:

may LAYsay leh bone tone rooLAY

And if this is sung, would a very slight pause after "les" be awkward?


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: Dead Horse
Date: 25 Feb 08 - 10:17 AM

A-mai-sing.
I have also noted Roule and Roulez, and of course the word petit is never spelled out in full. Its either 'tit or even just plain old 't.
Now that is my kind of folks, no time or energy wasted on the unimportant.
The music however, that IS very important, and has as many twiddly bits in it as you can comfortably fit in.
The rule seems to be to never play one note or one string, when two or three can do just as well :-)


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: Mr Happy
Date: 25 Feb 08 - 11:47 AM

.........perhaps a mishearing of 'pain dans m'asse?'


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: Suzy T.
Date: 03 Mar 08 - 09:45 PM

Pronunciation goes like this (in the Cajun waltz version):
May less lay bo to roo-lay

"laisse" is only one syllable.
Suzy


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: GUEST,Robin
Date: 03 Apr 08 - 11:37 PM

My brother was nicknamed TaNootsie.... our mother told us that it meant "Little One"   not sure of the spelling. Can anyone clarify what she meant? 'T or tee + (what sounded like) Nootsie.


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: GUEST,heid
Date: 26 Apr 09 - 01:27 AM

can anyone translate this "mauvias du l'osse" thank you


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: GUEST,JohnnyBeezer
Date: 26 Apr 09 - 09:49 AM

You have misspelt Mauvais. However, in the Black Country UK this means a bad horse!


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: GUEST,Johnny Beezer
Date: 26 Apr 09 - 09:51 AM

Sorry, couldn't resist. Snigger.


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: GUEST
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 05:11 PM

can you please translate
don't back up from safety to cajun for me. Thanks!


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Subject: RE: Cajun Translation anyone
From: GUEST,Morgana
Date: 10 Jan 12 - 02:46 PM

Literally "mauvais de l'osse" is "bad of the bone" (I think). Does this mean a bone sickness, or an expression (like "bad to the bone")?


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