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Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat/I Went to the Market

CET 20 Jan 08 - 11:35 AM
GUEST,Monique 20 Jan 08 - 01:49 PM
CET 20 Jan 08 - 02:54 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 20 Jan 08 - 04:47 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 20 Jan 08 - 05:17 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 20 Jan 08 - 06:06 PM
Nerd 21 Jan 08 - 03:31 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 21 Jan 08 - 04:40 PM
Nerd 21 Jan 08 - 04:55 PM
The Borchester Echo 21 Jan 08 - 05:06 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 21 Jan 08 - 05:40 PM
The Borchester Echo 22 Jan 08 - 05:15 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 22 Jan 08 - 01:23 PM
The Borchester Echo 22 Jan 08 - 01:37 PM
CET 27 Jan 08 - 03:00 PM
big_roly 17 Apr 09 - 04:41 AM
CET 17 Apr 09 - 05:31 AM
GUEST,Dianna Inkster 15 May 11 - 11:06 AM
Mrrzy 15 May 11 - 12:00 PM
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Subject: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat
From: CET
Date: 20 Jan 08 - 11:35 AM

Does anyone know anything about the origins of this song. I've Googled it and most of the hits attribute the words to Gilles Vigneault. One site attributes the tune as well to Gilles Vigneault and Gaston Rochon. I had always thought the tune was trad. and the lyrics were anon. I knew Gilles Vigneault had recorded it, but I had assumed that he had simply taken a traditional song.


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Subject: RE: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat
From: GUEST,Monique
Date: 20 Jan 08 - 01:49 PM

It seems it's a traditional song from Quebec. See here http://www.phonotheque.org/search/details.php?id=1994-0017-2688&st=gp&dt=be-coll&lang=fr


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Subject: RE: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat
From: CET
Date: 20 Jan 08 - 02:54 PM

As I suspected. I'd like to know how much is trad. and how much is Vigneault in the version found here: http://www.frmusique.ru/texts/v/vigneault_gilles/iwenttothemarket.htm


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Subject: Lyr. Add: I Went to the market (Vigneault)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 20 Jan 08 - 04:47 PM

I WENT TO THE MARKET
(Paroles Gilles Vigneault, musique G. V., Gaston Rochon)

"A black comedy of franco-english relations in Québec."

I went to the market
Mon p'tit panier sous mon bras My little basket underarm
I went to the market
Mon p'tit panier sous mon bras
The first girl I met
C'est la fille d'un avocat Was an attorney's daughter

Chorus- (sung after each verse)
I love you vous n'm'entendez guère can you not hear me
I love you vous ne m'entendez pas   you cannot hear me

The first girl I met
C'est la fille d'un avocat
She said what have you got
Dans ce beau p'tit panier-là

Chorus

She said what have you got
Dans ce beau p'tit panier-là
I have got some eggs
N'en achèteriez-vous pas won't you buy some

I have got some eggs
N'en achèteriez-vous pas
I'll take two dozens
P'is l'bonhomme te paiera ça   my old man will pay you

I'll take two dozens
P'is l'bonhomme te paiera ça
I gave her two dozens
Mais l'bonhomme y payait pas   but the old man wouldn't pay

I gave her two dozens
Mais l'bonhomme y payait pas
Such is the business
Avec la fille d'un avocat   with an attorney's daughter


Such is the business
Avec la fille d'un avocat
But she hatched my eggs
Elle a fait tout couver ça    ?

But she hatched my eggs
Elle a fait tout couver ça
Should have seen the chickens
Qui sont sortis de l'làa

Should have seen the chickens
Qui sont sortis de l'là
To collect my money
Ils ont fondé un syndicat   they formed a union

To collect my money
Ils ont fondé un syndicat
And they fly like ducks
Qui parlent comme des avocats   and they speak like barristers

And they fly like ducks
Qui parlent comme des avocats
When they fly over the barn
Me reconnaissez-vous pas

When they flew over the barn
Me reconnaissez-vous pas
I took you to the market
Mon p'tit panier sous mon bras
I took you to the market
Mon p'tit panier sous mon bras

Comment vous me r'connaissez pas
Oh! ben sâcrement
Oh pis vous comprenez pas ce que je dis plus
Oh ben!
I go and get my gun
J'en vise un p'is je l'abats

I go and get my gun
J'en vise un p'is je l'abats
And just before he died
Il a l'temps de m'dire tout bas

And just before he died
Il a l'temps de m'dire tout bas
I must speak english
A partir de c'te hauteur-là

I must speak english
A partir de c'te hauteur-là
Un canard même à l'orange
ça fait pas tout un grand repas

Un canard même à l'orange
ça fait pas tout un grand repas
Never seen the girl again
J'pense que j'la marierai pas

I love you c'est d'valeur qu'on m'comprenne gu73232;re
I love you c'est d'valeur qu'on m'comprenne pas

[Some alternates-   a duck- even a l'orange
                      isn't much of a meal
                   don't think I'll marry her
                   what a shame she misunderstood me
                   What a shame she doesn't understand me]

I Went to Market

These lyrics with partial English also at an obviously Quebe231;ois website.
I went to market


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Subject: RE: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 20 Jan 08 - 05:17 PM

Background of the song partially explained here.
I think the 'bilingual' version as arranged by Patriquin is a fairly recent invention, but there could be a song about a girl at the market behind it. I couldn't find it in Fowke or Barbeau.

I Went to market


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Subject: Lyr. Add: I Went to the Market (folk)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 20 Jan 08 - 06:06 PM

Lyr. Add: I WENT TO THE MARKET ( Canadian folk)
(Smithsonian recording)

I went to the market mon panier pendu aux bras
I want some apples combien les vendez-vous?

Refrain-
I love you, non, Monsieur, vous m'aimez guère
I love you, non, Monsieur, vous m'aimez-pas

I want some apples combien les vendez-vous?
A dollar a dozen combien en voulez-vous?

A dollar a dozen combien en voulez-vous?
I'll take one dozen le bonhomme vous les paiera

I'll take one dozen le bonhomme vous les paiera
I went at home le bonhomme n'y était pas

I went at home le bonhomme n'y était pas
I went upstairs le bonhomme y était là

I went upstairs le bonhomme y était là
I want some money, non t'en auras pas

I looked in his pocketbook, de l'argent y en avait pas

I went to the market, my basket hanging from my arms
I want some apples, how much are you selling them for?

Refrain-
I love you, no sir, you hardly love me
I love you, no sir, you do not love me

I want some apples, how much are you selling them for?
A dollar a dozen, how many do you want?

A dollar a dozen, how many do you want?
I'll take one dozen, my husband will pay you for them

I'll take one dozen, my husband will pay you for them
I went home, my husband was not there

I went home, my husband was not there
I went upstairs, my husband was right there

I went upstairs, my husband was right there
I want some money, no you won't have any

I looked in his pocketbook, there was no money.

No information at the website.
http://www.Folkways.si.edu/resources/pdf/40116lyrics.pdf

pp. 22-24 of the pdf.


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Subject: RE: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat/I Went to the Ma
From: Nerd
Date: 21 Jan 08 - 03:31 PM

Q missed the performers' info, which was several pages before the song (the song is part of a long medley on the CD):

Michèle Choinière, lead vocal and piano (b. 1965)
Jeanne Begnoche, lead vocal (b. 1938)
Alberta Gagné, lead vocal (1908-1999)
Fabio Choinière, harmonica (b. 1928)
Maurice Paquette, accordion (b. 1934)
participants in soirée, antiphonal response.

Fabio is Michele's dad, and he's fabulous. I saw them play together a few times in Vermont...

The song The Orange Tree, as performed by Andre Marchand and Grey Larsen, on the album of the same name, is a variant of the "La fille de l'avocat" as well--in which the gender roles are reversed and it's a "fils d'un avocat." They simply credit it as a traditional Canadian song.


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Subject: RE: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat/I Went to the Market
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 21 Jan 08 - 04:40 PM

Thanks, Nerd, I skipped over the performers' credits.


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Subject: RE: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat/I Went to the Ma
From: Nerd
Date: 21 Jan 08 - 04:55 PM

I just looked in the CD booklet notes (which aren't on the website), and the version on the Smithsonian disc is a French-English macaronic version somewhat like the one credited to Vigneault. According to the notes, Alberta Gagné (1908-1999), the singer, moved from Quebec to Vermont in 1913. She didn't remember who had taught her the song, but suggested it came from her family. Certainly seems like we've got a traditional song here....


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Subject: RE: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat/I Went to the Market
From: The Borchester Echo
Date: 21 Jan 08 - 05:06 PM

I had this song (and others sung by Vigneault) on a tape in a machine which was stolen from my car in Amsterdam in 1981. I actually got back some items including my press pass some years later, thanks to the Dutch police. But sadly not the tape.

Can anyone point me to a replacement? Perhaps on CD?


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Subject: RE: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat/I Went to the Market
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 21 Jan 08 - 05:40 PM

Could not find anything. A book of his poems is available.


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Subject: RE: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat/I Went to the Market
From: The Borchester Echo
Date: 22 Jan 08 - 05:15 AM

I've identified the recording:

Gilles Vigneault à Bobino (1977) Le Nordet, GVN-1008/1009

Gens du pays
Les gens de mon pays
Il me reste un pays
J'ai planté un chêne
Jack Monoloy
Gros Pierre
Jean-du-sud
Monologue
Une branche à la fenêtre
I Went To The Market
Quand la tendresse vient
Faut que je me réveille
Zidor le prospecteur
Fer et titane
Tit-Nor
Quand nous partirons pour la Louisiane
La queste du pays
La danse à Saint-Dilon
Gens du pays

but not yet whether it's available and I can find no other reference to this recording company. He last released a CD only two years ago so presumably some of his recorded work is out there.


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Subject: RE: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat/I Went to the Market
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 22 Jan 08 - 01:23 PM

I went back to amazon.ca, and came up with a numner of his cds (must have mis-spelled the first try).
I Went to Market is on Mets Donc Plus Belles, 1997, Select Distributions; a few available.


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Subject: RE: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat/I Went to the Market
From: The Borchester Echo
Date: 22 Jan 08 - 01:37 PM

Thank you Q.
Found and ordered.
This is what Mudact is for.


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Subject: RE: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat/I Went to the Market
From: CET
Date: 27 Jan 08 - 03:00 PM

Thanks to everyone.

Edmund


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Subject: RE: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat/I Went to the Market
From: big_roly
Date: 17 Apr 09 - 04:41 AM

The song's not just limited to Quebec, but it has been found in various parts of France, and there is also a version of it collected from the singing of one Adolphus Le Ruez from Jersey, British Channel Islands(about 10 miles off the west coast of Normandy)in Peter Kennedy's "Folksongs of Britain and Ireland". I was listening to the field recording of it just last night, and I'm looking around for additional verses to amplify Adolphus' text.


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Subject: RE: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat/I Went to the Market
From: CET
Date: 17 Apr 09 - 05:31 AM

I will have to check my copy of Peter Kennedy's book. Am I right in assuming that the French versions don't have English in them?


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Subject: RE: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat/I Went to the Market
From: GUEST,Dianna Inkster
Date: 15 May 11 - 11:06 AM

The version I'm familiar with ends before the eggs are being hatched. I guess the rest is Vigneault's invention. The Gens de l'Air strike where the air traffic controllers were told to use English in Quebec air space and they refused and went out on strike in late June of 1976 is probably being referred to in final verses of the song. You may wonder why I know the precise date of the Gens de l'Air strike: I finished a French course in Riviere du Loup towards the end of June, 1976 and got a ride to Fredericton, New Brunswick and then,hitchhiked to the Newfoundland ferry at that time. The ferry was very crowded due to a lot of profs and university students having to use ground transportation rather than fly into St John's because of the Gens de l'Air strike. The lounge on board ship where people stretched out was jam backed rather than 3/4's empty. Quel chauchmar!


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Subject: RE: Origins: La Fille d'un Avocat/I Went to the Market
From: Mrrzy
Date: 15 May 11 - 12:00 PM

Love Gilles Vigneault. Hadn't this one, I have J'ai Vu Le Loup, Le Renard, le Lion.

Quebec has named a major highway after Felix LeClerc, with the same group. You'd think we'd have a Woody Guthrie Highway, or something...


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