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Obfuscatory vocabulary.

DigiTrad:
COUNTRY BOY (2)
COUNTRY LIFE


Related threads:
Lyr Add: Old Cock Crows (12)
Lyr Req: Country Life/Hurrah for the Country Life (61)
Folklore: Country Life lyric meaning? (16)
Lyr Req: Country Life parody 'I hate to rise....' (3)


The_one_and_only_Dai 14 May 99 - 05:37 AM
Banjer 14 May 99 - 05:44 AM
Harald 14 May 99 - 06:25 AM
Frank Howe 14 May 99 - 07:39 AM
Steve Parkes 14 May 99 - 07:48 AM
The_one_and_only_Dai 14 May 99 - 08:57 AM
Tony Burns 14 May 99 - 09:19 AM
MMario 14 May 99 - 09:29 AM
katlaughing 14 May 99 - 09:34 AM
Steve Parkes 14 May 99 - 09:37 AM
Steve Parkes 14 May 99 - 09:43 AM
Jeri 14 May 99 - 09:53 AM
The_one_and_only_Dai 14 May 99 - 09:57 AM
Steve Parkes 14 May 99 - 09:58 AM
The_one_and_only_Dai 14 May 99 - 10:01 AM
katlaughing 14 May 99 - 10:41 AM
The_one_and_only_Dai 14 May 99 - 11:04 AM
katlaughing 14 May 99 - 11:19 AM
The_one_and_only_Dai 14 May 99 - 11:30 AM
Bert 14 May 99 - 11:44 AM
RedFez (inactive) 14 May 99 - 03:39 PM
katlaughing 14 May 99 - 04:04 PM
Mark Cohen 15 May 99 - 04:39 AM
Richard Bridge 15 May 99 - 07:49 PM
Sapper_RE 16 May 99 - 11:57 AM
Art Thieme 16 May 99 - 12:15 PM
WyoWoman 16 May 99 - 02:46 PM
Steve Parkes 17 May 99 - 03:41 AM
Bert 17 May 99 - 11:32 AM
Art Thieme 17 May 99 - 11:44 AM
northfolk/al cholger 17 May 99 - 12:33 PM
bseed(charleskratz) 18 May 99 - 10:30 PM
Susanne (skw) 26 May 99 - 07:41 PM
CapriUni 13 May 02 - 01:05 AM
Dicho (Frank Staplin) 13 May 02 - 01:14 AM
Dead Horse 13 May 02 - 02:11 AM
Troll 13 May 02 - 02:27 AM
GUEST,macca 13 May 02 - 02:39 AM
Escamillo 13 May 02 - 03:36 AM
Haruo 13 May 02 - 03:46 AM
Micca 13 May 02 - 02:28 PM
weepiper 13 May 02 - 02:59 PM
GUEST,ozmacca 13 May 02 - 07:30 PM
Troll 13 May 02 - 10:22 PM
Mr Happy 29 Jan 10 - 08:11 AM
An Buachaill Caol Dubh 29 Jan 10 - 08:41 AM
Mr Happy 29 Jan 10 - 08:59 AM
An Buachaill Caol Dubh 29 Jan 10 - 09:33 AM
Young Buchan 29 Jan 10 - 10:29 AM
GUEST,leeneia 29 Jan 10 - 10:57 AM
Dave MacKenzie 29 Jan 10 - 05:51 PM
katlaughing 29 Jan 10 - 06:39 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 29 Jan 10 - 06:42 PM
Bloke from Poole 18 Feb 10 - 07:25 AM
Howard Jones 18 Feb 10 - 08:24 AM
IanC 18 Feb 10 - 08:30 AM
GUEST,leeneia 18 Feb 10 - 10:41 AM
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Subject: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: The_one_and_only_Dai
Date: 14 May 99 - 05:37 AM

A problem (laughable to old hands, I'm sure).

I just can't bring myself to sing a song if I don't know, for sure, the lyric and all its foibles. Not that I might not change it subsequently, but there you go.

The Watersons used to do a fine rendition of 'A Country Life', with Mike warbling on like a trooper. However, I'd love to 'do' this song, but can't bring myself to do so, and all because I don't know what a 'laylum' is.

Some transcripts have 'layland', which is a fallow field, and also doesn't make any sense in context... Any light to shed on this??


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Banjer
Date: 14 May 99 - 05:44 AM

No, and while yer at it try working on whatinthehellis OBFUSCATORY....Inquiring, banjo playing minds (not to be confused with normal ones) want to know.....


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Harald
Date: 14 May 99 - 06:25 AM

Hm, the translation I found in my dictionary (dark) doesn´t seem to fit very properly. But beside of that I feel the same like TOAODai, complicated by being not a native english speaker at all. I can´t understand how most people, even in my surrounding sing songs they don´t understand. Getting worse when we started doing Oro se do beatha baile, with everyone laughing at me when I sat there all evening trying to translate it. But how can one sing a song with political significance and thereby expressing a certain attidute without knowing which attitude it is at all ?! I know, most people only listen to the music completely disregarding the lyrics. This may be alright with silly pop songs, but folk mostly deals with serious topics and I think everyone singing these songs should owe some attention to the lyrics. Of course, that´s up to everyone himself, but disregarding lyrics in folk songs would downgrade them to just music and therefore in my eyes to just something like pop songs. And that´s not what they are.

Greetings, Harald

(ps: Joe Offer, did you notice: I did not abbreviate "something" - especially for you !)


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Subject: Lyr Add: ORO, SE DO BHEATHA ABHAILE (WELCOME HOME)
From: Frank Howe
Date: 14 May 99 - 07:39 AM

I agree about wanting to know what you are singing. It makes a real difference. I can't help you with "laylum" but here is my not so literal translation of Oro:

ORO, SE DO BHEATHA ABHAILE (OH WELCOME HOME)

Se do bheatha, a bhean ba leanmhar
B'e ar gcreach tu bheith i ngeibhinn
Do dhuiche bhrea i seilbh meirleach
'S tu diolta leis na ghallaibh

Welcome, lady of great sorrow.
We share the grief of your internment,
Your fair land in the hands of brigands
And you in bondage to strangers.

Oro, se do bheatha abhaile
Oro, se do bheatha abhaile
Oro, se do bheatha abhaile
Anois ar theacht an tsamhraidh

Oh, welcome home.
Oh, welcome home.
Oh, welcome home.
Now the summer is coming.

Ta grannie mhoal ag teacht thar saile
Oglaigh armtha lei mar gharda
Gaeil iad fein is ni gaill na spainnigh
Is cuirfidh ruaig ar ghallaibh

Grannie mhoal (Grace O'Malley) will cross the ocean
With armed warriors as her guard.
Gaels are they, not French nor Spaniards.
They will overwhelm to the foreigners.

Oro...

A bhui le ri na bhfeart go bhfeiceam
Muna mbeam beo ina dhiaidh ach seachtain
Grannie mhoal agus mile gaiscioch
Ag fogairt fain ar ghallaibh

Thank Heaven's King that we shall see
Even though we die soon after (the next week).
Grannie Mhoal and a thousand warriors
Herald the stranger's retreat

Oro...

Changed from all caps. --JoeClone, 13-May-02.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 14 May 99 - 07:48 AM

In the England, "Leyland" (with an "e") probably refers to a truck (they're now called "LDV", standing for "Leyland Daf Vehicles"; parts are made in factories all over my native Midlands). "Country Life" is a magazine for the Huntin' Shootin' and Fishin' set (or people who think they belong to it). I expect they have their own names for these things in Wales?

Glad to have been able to clear that up for you, Dai.

Steve


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: The_one_and_only_Dai
Date: 14 May 99 - 08:57 AM

So therefore, the lyric runs:

I like to rise when the sun she rises,
Early in the morning,
I like to hear them small birds singing,
Merrily upon their commercial vehicles,
And hurrah for the life of a green-welly wearer
And a ramble in the Land Rover.

Thanks Steve, you're -er- indispensible.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Tony Burns
Date: 14 May 99 - 09:19 AM

Laylum has been explained to me as land lying fallow. It makes sense to me. The birds are out there on the fallow field feasting away on all the things birds like and singing about it.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: MMario
Date: 14 May 99 - 09:29 AM

layland, ie: fallow field, makes plenty of sense. the small birds are singing there because:

there is less activity there to scare them away and/or silence them

there is a more diverse cover crop, more insects, more seeds for them to eat, thus attracting them

nesting birds often nested in the fallow fields

MMario


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: katlaughing
Date: 14 May 99 - 09:34 AM

Obfuscate: to confuse, obscure, bewilder


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 14 May 99 - 09:37 AM

Thanks Dai! That looks quite promising - can you work up the rest?

(Almost) on a serious note, it occurs to me that we don't have flaaow land nowadays, but under the CAP* we do have set-aside. Anyone find a rhyme for that?

Steve

*The Common Agricultural Policy, if you live outside Europe.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 14 May 99 - 09:43 AM

Er ... and we don't have type it slowly, Parkes fallow land, either ...


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Jeri
Date: 14 May 99 - 09:53 AM

From A Folkie's Dictionary:

"lea (UK, also "ley", "lee") a meadow or cropland. Also "leyland", which may be the origin of the mysterious word "laylum" that is sometimes found in English country folk songs."


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: The_one_and_only_Dai
Date: 14 May 99 - 09:57 AM

Well done lads, and ta. I can now give forth in confidence...


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 14 May 99 - 09:58 AM

Following up Harald's point (and then I'm gong to stop, honest), It's usually the way with "art" songs that the lyric isn't usually the most important element of the song; it is a vehicle for the voice, which is considered as another instrument. Folk song, generally speaking, is a form of story-telling: the content of the lyric is the most important element, and would still work if you recited the words instead of singing them. You can often find extra syllables in a song, where the tune is alterd or extended to fit. The Blacksmith has an example: I fear the scorching sun may shine and burn his beauty ... In conventional (what a wonderful undertone of sneering and condecension in that word!) music, the extra bit would be dropped: look what happens when a poem that doesn't scan too well (and why should it?). Can't think of an example!

Ok, lecture over!

Steve


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: The_one_and_only_Dai
Date: 14 May 99 - 10:01 AM

Incidentally Steve, you may wish to examine this blue clicky thing.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: katlaughing
Date: 14 May 99 - 10:41 AM

The old leyland turned "set aside" The cultivated fields lie beside; Fallow turning away the man-tide Of progress far and wide.

AArrggghhhhh! Well, you did ask for rhymes!

katlaughing


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: The_one_and_only_Dai
Date: 14 May 99 - 11:04 AM

I am humbled into silence, Kat.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: katlaughing
Date: 14 May 99 - 11:19 AM

Oh, no, Dai, this Kat never "gets anyone's tongue"! Thank you all the same or is that your tongue in cheek I see?

Sorry I didn't put in the breaks command.

kat


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: The_one_and_only_Dai
Date: 14 May 99 - 11:30 AM

Genuine, Kat, that was 64 minutes elapsed between Steve's post and yours, and yours looks like, good to me.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Bert
Date: 14 May 99 - 11:44 AM

Following Jeri's link I think someone needs to write a song entitled "404 Not Found"


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: RedFez (inactive)
Date: 14 May 99 - 03:39 PM

On an slight different topic...but still obfuscatorily inclined, does anyone know the old Scottish song The Yew Tree? I listen to it over and over and I SWEAR that the singer says "...under fallopian skies...." but that CAN'T be right.....

RedFez


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: katlaughing
Date: 14 May 99 - 04:04 PM

RedFez, or (Shriner?) could it be "full open" skies? I think your version sounds a lot funnier, though!

O&ODai: thank you very much.

Kat


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 15 May 99 - 04:39 AM

For a song like "Country Life" if you're not sure what all the words mean you can always change a couple of them, although it might change the meaning a tiny bit, too:

I hates to rise when the sun she rises
Earlye in the morning
And I hates to hear the small birds singing
Merrily upon the Leyland
And a pox on the life of a country boy
Who's allergic to the new-mown hay (from Redmond O'Connell)

Oh, bother, that damn Land Rover is still in there. I guess whoever did this knew what it meant.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 15 May 99 - 07:49 PM

Two things.

Now we know what a "laylum" is, is anyone going to have a go at the chorus from one of the version (I gues smaybe the oldest version) of "The Ram of Derby", which said chorus goes (phonetically - and I have heard variants)

"Laylum, Laylum, Bidefum Laylum Lay".

And so to small birds singing I have heard that sung as "merrily upon his lay" - which I thought was a musical lay or tune.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Sapper_RE
Date: 16 May 99 - 11:57 AM

I always thought the line went; I love to hear the sweet birds singing, Merrily across the lea-o! Bob


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Art Thieme
Date: 16 May 99 - 12:15 PM

"Laylum" is a song by Eric Clapton. Also, in my local gas station's men's room, a brand of condom.

Art


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: WyoWoman
Date: 16 May 99 - 02:46 PM

Ah, the issue is now un-obfuscated. Ancient brand of condoms. Case closed.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 17 May 99 - 03:41 AM

Thanks Art - the rest of us obviously aren't old enough to remember them!

Steve



Actually, there's nothing worse than getting a condom obfuscated, is there?


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Bert
Date: 17 May 99 - 11:32 AM

Art,

I DONT BELEIVE YOU!!!! :-)

Bert.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Art Thieme
Date: 17 May 99 - 11:44 AM

I wouldn't lie!

Art


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: northfolk/al cholger
Date: 17 May 99 - 12:33 PM

Art, I think that may be Lay-Um,(the brand name)

the title of the thread reminds me of an excerpt from "The Compleat Folk Singer" does, "Sesquipedelian terminology obfuscate rumination?"

pretty sure it does....


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: bseed(charleskratz)
Date: 18 May 99 - 10:30 PM

A bumper sticker I saw today: ESCHEW OBFUSCATION --seedkratz


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 26 May 99 - 07:41 PM

RedFez - sorry I'm late again, but - in order not to leave you obfuscated for life, may I add that the words in The Yew Tree are 'under the Lothian sky'. Incidentally, the song isn't that old, it was written by Brian McNeill a few years ago, and he says, 'it was one of those songs that write themselves'. I love it. - Susanne


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: CapriUni
Date: 13 May 02 - 01:05 AM

And what, pray tell, is "Lothian"?


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Dicho (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 May 02 - 01:14 AM

Lothian is the region on the south side of the Firth of Forth (Scotland)


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Dead Horse
Date: 13 May 02 - 02:11 AM

I like to rise when the son he rises,
Quite late in the morning,
I like to shoot them small birds singing,
Merrily upon the set aside
And hurrah for the life of a country gent
And a tumble with the gamekeepers bride.

A colleague told me that a laylum is a sunken lane or track, with all pretty trees and stuff, but I aint too sure myself. Fallow land sounds plausible. As for not sure what you're singing about, try being a landlubber wot gets sea sick on the Woolwich ferry and warbling out shanties all night! Hoist yer clew garnets and stand by yer shank stoppers, all hands to the braces 'cos me pants are falling down!!!


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Troll
Date: 13 May 02 - 02:27 AM

AVOID AND ESCHEW POMPOUS PROLIXITY.
Bit of thread creep, my Mothers maiden name was "Leland" which is a variant of "Leyland" and Lealand". It's apparently Norman. I haven't a clue as to its' meaning tho.

troll


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: GUEST,macca
Date: 13 May 02 - 02:39 AM

Can anybody throw in a spanner or other misleading implement in here.... And why not?

Being from Lothian when at least one bit of it was WEST, I wonder why a Yew Tree has anything to do Lothian skies (or fallopian skies for that matter). I don't recall any yew trees around our way, and way back before that a bit, aren't yews traditionally associated with the english longbow? In which case the only connection with any bit of Scottish sky should be the darkening of said skies with the feared and dreaded arrow-storm.... Those English tourists on their package holidays back with Edward the 1 have a lot to answer for.

As you'll gather, I don't know the song at all, but am willing to criticise on the grounds that I don't know the song at all... but then I am a folkie so that's quite natural.

PS, back at the coalface, we even hear the old "I Like to Rise" at our local session Down Under, although many of the participants wouldn't know a laylan/laylun/laylum/leyland/ley-line/lay-down/lay-about from a mangle-wurzle.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Escamillo
Date: 13 May 02 - 03:36 AM

Some weeks ago, a gentle Mudcatter revealed what was a mystery for me (and for many others). "Love song" from the movie Sanders of the River (1930), sung by Paul Robeson, included an undecipherable word, and it was impossible to get the lyrics sheet. I love that song so much, that some times I did it in public, daring to mumble (!) the word more or less close to the original, in front of an audience where no English-speaking person was present (I hope).

The word was LILLONGO. It was the name of the (African) character of a woman with whom Robeson's character was in love in the movie. This Mudcatter was a Robeson fan and had watched the movie many times. (Not even a Cambridge graduate would have imagined)

So, when something is impossible, come to the Mudcat. Someone will know.

Un abrazo - Andrés


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Haruo
Date: 13 May 02 - 03:46 AM

Liland is of course a respelling of Leland [which is what it says on my birth certificate], and I can tell you, Troll, that basically it means "meadowland".

Liland


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Subject: Lyr Add: COUNTRY BOY (Parody)
From: Micca
Date: 13 May 02 - 02:28 PM

For Mark and anyone else, here is the amended version I use from the DT and with addons

Country Boy
Cat Fox?, Holly Tannen?additional verses by Micca (V3-5 inc)

I hates to rise when the sun she rises
Early in the morning.
I hates to hear them small birds singing
Merrily upon the lyelam
And a pox on the life of a country boy
Who's allergic to the new-mown hay.

I hate larks and I hate thrushes
I hate birds of every size
And when they start their bloody song
I want to poke them in their little eyes
And a pox on the life of a country boy
Who's allergic to the new-mown hay.

We get pollen from trees and grasses
Sticks to skin and sticks to clothes
And it gives me streaming eyes
And green stuff running from my nose
And a pox on the life of a country boy
Who's allergic to the new-mown hay.

I went to see an alternative therapist
Truth is a felt a bit of a prat
she prescribed oil of evening primrose
now I'm bloody allergic to that
And a pox on the life of a country boy
Who's allergic to the new-mown hay.

Acute seasonal rhinitis
is just another fancy name
for this bloody awful condition
but its hay fever just the same
And a pox on the life of a country boy
Who's allergic to the new-mown hay.

In winter when the sky is grey
We sit and watch TV all day
But in summer when the sky is gay
We sit and watch TV all day
And a pox on the life of a country boy
Who's allergic to the new-mown hay


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: weepiper
Date: 13 May 02 - 02:59 PM

Hi Macca,
It's ok, the yew tree reference is entirely legit. The song is about a tree near Ormiston (East Lothian) which is supposed to be 800 years old or so. There are also two old yew trees in the courtyard of Craigmillar Castle (Edinburgh). I can't think of any in West Lothian offhand!


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: GUEST,ozmacca
Date: 13 May 02 - 07:30 PM

Oh well, EAST Lothian... that explains it all. Thanks weepiper. AND I get to be the first one to say... Yew'll be sorry.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Troll
Date: 13 May 02 - 10:22 PM

Liland, do you have family in South Carolina?

troll


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Mr Happy
Date: 29 Jan 10 - 08:11 AM

.........reminds me of singing 'The Wild Rover' in a bar in Tokyo, when I reached the chorus, all the Japanese audience cheered wildly.

Turns out that in their language '..........no more' means 'Have another beer!!'


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: An Buachaill Caol Dubh
Date: 29 Jan 10 - 08:41 AM

Mr Happy, how did you get to this thread after so long? Did you try for "vocabulary" in the Search/Browse/Filter function, perhaps?


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Mr Happy
Date: 29 Jan 10 - 08:59 AM

An Buachaill Caol Dubh,

No, I was curious if RedFez (inactive) had made any more posts


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: An Buachaill Caol Dubh
Date: 29 Jan 10 - 09:33 AM

Ah - Thanks for satisfying the poor little idle curious!


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Young Buchan
Date: 29 Jan 10 - 10:29 AM

The birds were singing in the evergreen hedge; the original words were 'merrily upon the Leylandii Cupressocyparis - but someone tried to cut the bloody thing back.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 29 Jan 10 - 10:57 AM

When a good song has some old word that's died a natural death, I change the word. It's the story that's important, and you can't tell a story with words that have no meaning.

I consider this a legit part of the folk process.

In this case, you could easily change 'leyland' to 'fallow' 'empty' or 'resting.'


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Dave MacKenzie
Date: 29 Jan 10 - 05:51 PM

Now obfuscatalogical vocabulary is a different matter. Amazing what you can get away with.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: katlaughing
Date: 29 Jan 10 - 06:39 PM

...but someone tried to cut the bloody thing back.

The hedge or the word?**bg**


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 29 Jan 10 - 06:42 PM

Thread 47543. All gone over at least once before.
Country Life


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Bloke from Poole
Date: 18 Feb 10 - 07:25 AM

<<"Laylum" is a song by Eric Clapton. ...>>

I guess that would be the masculine form of Layla, then.

which is, of course, entirely consistent with the remainder of the quote:


<>


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: Howard Jones
Date: 18 Feb 10 - 08:24 AM

Leeneia, it's not an old word which has lost its meaning, it's still in use today. It's meaning may be obscure if you're not involved in agriculture, but the same applies to many words specific to particular activities. Folk song, and our language generally, would be much poorer if we tried to substitute all the words we don't understand - that's what dictionaries are for.

In this particular case, I think much of the problem derives from the original source for "Country Life", which for most people is the Watersons' version. The combination of an unfamilar word, Mike Waterson's broad Yorkshire accent, and slightly unclear diction at that point caused a lot of people to mishear.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: IanC
Date: 18 Feb 10 - 08:30 AM

Thanks, Howard.


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Subject: RE: Obfuscatory vocabulary.
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 18 Feb 10 - 10:41 AM

I still disagree. There's too much palaver in this world and not enough singing.


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Mudcat time: 18 July 4:27 PM EDT

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