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Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'

Related threads:
Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed In Blue (Holloway) (13)
Lyr Req: Little Girl Dressed in Blue (7)
Lyr Req: Dark Girl Dressed in Blue (H Clifton) (12)
Tune Req: Pretty Girl Dressed in Blue (17)


In Mudcat MIDIs:
The Dark Girl Dressed in Blue (full) [Harry Clifton (1862?)]
The Dark Girl Dressed in Blue (melody) [Harry Clifton (1862?)]


NormanD 17 Mar 08 - 07:12 PM
GUEST,Steve Gardham 17 Mar 08 - 07:35 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Mar 08 - 08:02 PM
Peace 17 Mar 08 - 08:45 PM
Peace 17 Mar 08 - 08:50 PM
NormanD 18 Mar 08 - 12:52 PM
The Borchester Echo 18 Mar 08 - 01:14 PM
The Borchester Echo 18 Mar 08 - 01:14 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 18 Mar 08 - 01:48 PM
Billy Weeks 19 Mar 08 - 01:41 PM
Malcolm Douglas 19 Mar 08 - 04:53 PM
Arkie 19 Mar 08 - 05:56 PM
Malcolm Douglas 20 Mar 08 - 03:33 AM
GUEST,Edthefolkie 20 Mar 08 - 07:15 AM
Billy Weeks 20 Mar 08 - 03:46 PM
GUEST,Steve Gardham 20 Mar 08 - 07:14 PM
Billy Weeks 21 Mar 08 - 06:17 AM
Folknacious 21 Mar 08 - 12:05 PM
The Borchester Echo 21 Mar 08 - 12:19 PM
NormanD 21 Mar 08 - 01:21 PM
GUEST,Steve Gardham 21 Mar 08 - 04:48 PM
NormanD 22 Mar 08 - 06:39 AM
Billy Weeks 22 Mar 08 - 07:14 AM
Billy Weeks 22 Mar 08 - 07:55 AM
Billy Weeks 24 Mar 08 - 05:16 AM
GUEST 24 Mar 08 - 07:32 PM
Billy Weeks 25 Mar 08 - 11:10 AM
GUEST,ChrisP. 25 Mar 08 - 05:36 PM
NormanD 25 Mar 08 - 07:16 PM
Greg B 26 Mar 08 - 06:44 PM
GUEST,jh 02 Apr 08 - 08:13 AM
GUEST,Michelle 11 May 10 - 03:12 PM
Steve Gardham 11 May 10 - 06:12 PM
Artful Codger 12 May 10 - 09:22 AM
Joe Offer 12 May 10 - 04:18 PM
Steve Gardham 12 May 10 - 05:05 PM
GUEST,sky 01 Feb 12 - 10:11 AM
GUEST,Nickthe bottlwasher 07 Apr 12 - 06:22 PM
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Subject: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: NormanD
Date: 17 Mar 08 - 07:12 PM

Does anyone know where to get hold of a copy of "Dark Girl Dressed In Blue" by Stanley Holloway? It was originally the 'B' side to Holloway's "Growing Old" (Decca F11140) released June 1959. Holloway's version is the one being sought, so any leads are welcomed.

Thanks in advance.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: GUEST,Steve Gardham
Date: 17 Mar 08 - 07:35 PM

Possibly not the same song, Norman, but prolific folk-song writer Harry Clifton who died in 1872 wrote a song of this title in 1862. I say folk-song writer because of all the music hall lyricists his songs more than anyone else's of the early music hall are still sung today as folk songs. Both Vance and Leybourne wrote spin-off songs to this one so it must have been very popular in its day. The Levy collection has a copy online. It must have entered oral tradition very quickly as different versions exist on broadsides.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Mar 08 - 08:02 PM

As Steve says, it was spread by penny broadsides by several printers. The Bodleian Library has copies, no date, no author.
Kilgarriff says there were several spin-offs, including "I'm the Dark Girl Dress'd in Blue," and "The Young Chap Dressed in Blue."
It is listed as one of Stanley Holloway's standards.

I couldn't find the song listed on any of the Holloway cds listed at amazon.com. Try amazon.co.uk


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Peace
Date: 17 Mar 08 - 08:45 PM

Winster Gallop/Four-Hand Reel/Dark Girl Dressed In Blue


This set of tunes was included on the band's first album 'No Reels' in 1977 and Dave Hunt adapted a dance for it, which we now know as "The Old Swan Gallop". It's changed a bit since then and shows the way the band has developed.
"Winster Gallop" is one of the traditional Morris tunes from Winster in Derbyshire, which was noted down by Cecil Sharp in his famous meeting with the team in 1908. The "Four-Hand Reel" with its odd number of bars in the A-music, was a tune played by Herbert Smith in 1952 to Peter Kennedy. Smith was a sexton from Blakeney in Norfolk.
"The Dark Girl Dressed In Blue" Decca F11140 coupled with "Growing Old" in 1959 by Stanley Holloway. Jack Warner (more famous as Dixon of Dock Green) was said to have used it as his theme song when he worked on the Music Halls, but, in fact, it's much older than that, with broadside versions having been issued around 1865. It's a humorous song where the chap (often up for the Great Exhibition) meets the Dark Girl, who asks him to get her change for her five-pound note. Of course, the note is forged, the girl disappears and he has to explain himself to "the large man dressed in blue". It was popular as a tune especially in England and Ireland, where the great fiddler Johnny Doherty had a fine version.

from

here.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Peace
Date: 17 Mar 08 - 08:50 PM

Maybe a search for "Growing Old". ?


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: NormanD
Date: 18 Mar 08 - 12:52 PM

"Growing Old"? Clearly I must be....

Here's a sheet music link Dark Girl Dressed In Blue I'm assuming this is the same song.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: The Borchester Echo
Date: 18 Mar 08 - 01:14 PM

Dark Girl (Duchess) Dressed In Blue is done (and recorded) famously at a fair lick and in the style of Chuck Berry by Tigermoth. And possibly even more famously when Spiers&Boden used the tune for Child Morris (Gil Morice Child #93).


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: The Borchester Echo
Date: 18 Mar 08 - 01:14 PM

Erm, #83. Cold fingers . . .


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Mar 08 - 01:48 PM

I have not been able to find Holloway's version.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Billy Weeks
Date: 19 Mar 08 - 01:41 PM

The Stanley Holloway version was recorded in 1959 for Decca and issued on a 45rpm disc. It is a magnificent performance and I can confirm that the song was,indeed the Harry Clifton number.

The original sheet music, published by B Williams in 1862 has a lithographed front with one of the finest representations of Clifton 'in character', with the cunning dark girl who conned him out of his money and nearly got him nicked for handling counterfeit notes (bills) at the Great Exhibition of '62.

I'm sure this has all been covered in detail in another thread, but I don't see it listed above.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 19 Mar 08 - 04:53 PM

Not of any help with the original question, but as a follow-up, sheet music (with that lithographed cover) is at the Lester Levy Collection:

The dark girl dress'd in blue

Broadside editions, localised to various places, can be seen at Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads:

The dark girl dress'd in blue

Note that the tune at 'http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/' was copied without permission (along with the entire contents of their tunebook) from the Lewes Arms Folk Club website; and without even the elementary courtesy of a link to the source site.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Arkie
Date: 19 Mar 08 - 05:56 PM

Is this song any relation to Blue Velvet Band?


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 20 Mar 08 - 03:33 AM

No.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: GUEST,Edthefolkie
Date: 20 Mar 08 - 07:15 AM

I think I remember Stanley's version on Children's Favourites around the time the record came out.

Interestingly, the song can be dated approximately (1860-ish) by the line:

"For I must go to Pimlico, to catch the Brighton train".

The Brighton line originally only got as far as Stewart's Lane (Battersea) and the railway bridge over the Thames came later, along with the railway to Victoria station. Until Victoria was completed, Pimlico was the terminus for Brighton.

Which just goes to show that folk and puffer trains are parallel lines.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Billy Weeks
Date: 20 Mar 08 - 03:46 PM

It is also dateable quite precisely by the reference in the first verse to 'the exhibition', meaning the 1862 exhibition in South Kensington. To remove any possible doubt,the 1862 building can be seen in the background to the Concanen & Lee lithograph attached to Malcolm's 19 March posting. Part of this building later got transported to Bethnal Green,where it houses the Museum of Childhood.

I find Clifton fascinating as character-singer and songwriter. One of the pre-sound-recording artistes I would have most liked to hear.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: GUEST,Steve Gardham
Date: 20 Mar 08 - 07:14 PM

Billy,
I too am a great fan of Harry Clifton. Do you have any of his sheets?
I came to him through 'My Rattling Old Black Mare' which I collected orally in the 60s and since have come across several of his songs in oral tradition, more than anybody else's from the early music hall.
Rocky Road to Dublin (Though he didn't write it)
Send back my Barney (The original of My Bonny)
Polly Perkins
Lannigan's Ball
Paddle your own Canoe
Where there's a will there's a way (Still sung round Sheffield)
Calico Printer's Clerk
I am one of the Olden Time (Mukram Wakes)
On Board of the Kangaroo
Water Cresses
Waterford Boys
The Weepin Willer

I paid the most I've ever paid for a piece of sheet music to get 'Rattling Old Black Mare'

I also have more than a passing interest in the early burlesques of trad ballads like Lord Lovel, Barbara Allen, Ah my Love's Dead, Villikins etc. and the songs of J B Geoghegan who wrote 'Hey John Barleycorn' and 'Ten thousand Miles away' among others we still sing.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Billy Weeks
Date: 21 Mar 08 - 06:17 AM

Steve

Good to hear from another Clifton aficianado. Yes, I have a number of pieces of sheet music of Clifton songs, mostly with portrait fronts, including 'Dark Girl d.i.b', Paddle Your Own Canoe', Polly Perkins', 'Weepin Willer', Pulling Hard Against the Stream', Jones's Musical Party' and others. He seems to have had a great facility for writing songs that immediately took on a feral existence. I think he must have done a great deal of listening as a young man to capture the common voice as he did.

I share your interest in the burlesque ballads that seemed to peak in (but were already established by) the 1850s/6Os. My collection contains a number of them, with Jack Sharp, Sam Cowell, Robson etc all represented. There is much more work to be done on these singers and their songs.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Folknacious
Date: 21 Mar 08 - 12:05 PM

Diane Easby wrote: "Dark Girl (Duchess) Dressed In Blue is done (and recorded) famously at a fair lick and in the style of Chuck Berry by Tigermoth."

I think you'll find that the style is Bo Diddley rather than Chuck Berry (hence The Duchess Dressed In Blue - she and Jerome were Bo Diddley's musical sidekicks). Tiger Moth's reworking seems to have become an English Ceilidh standard judging by the number of other bands I've heard do it that way at festivals over the years.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: The Borchester Echo
Date: 21 Mar 08 - 12:19 PM

I suppose it is a bit Not Fade Away-ish.
Amazing how well the tune works with Child Morris though.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: NormanD
Date: 21 Mar 08 - 01:21 PM

If you ever want to get from Stanley Holloway to Bo, Jerome and The Duchess in three moves, then look no further than this thread. As ever, great!

Info on tis old 45 / 78 still seems as elusive as ever......


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: GUEST,Steve Gardham
Date: 21 Mar 08 - 04:48 PM

Okay Billy, Malcolm's blown your cover.
We should get together sometime and put together a presentation on the Clifton and Cowell/Robson stuff for TSF. I've already done one on the burlesques, but I'd love to do one on the music hall stuff at one of the London meetings, nothing too heavy. Distance might prove a problem, me in Hull and you in Kent.
We probably have a pretty representative coverage of Clifton sheets between us. Have you got a copy of Harry Clifton's Death? I've got it on a broadside but haven't seen sheet music if it exists.

One thing that puzzles me is why were there several similar but different portraits on different issues of the sheets. I have several copies of such as 'Paddle your own canoe/Polly Perkins' with slightly different sketches on.

Another thing that amused me about his songs is I think 'Rattling Old Black Mare' is a parody of his 'My Old Wife and I' It actually says in the chorus of ROBM 'It's not my wife upon my life but my rattling old black mare. (That he now loves) Did he fall out with his wife at some point? He also had a song 'My Mother-in-law!

He seems to have incorporated the names of the main towns he sang in. Our local one is 'Faithless Maria or The Land of Green Ginger'


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: NormanD
Date: 22 Mar 08 - 06:39 AM

Thanks, Steve. You don't, by chance, know the whereabouts or availability of an old 45 by Stanley Holloway called.......?


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Billy Weeks
Date: 22 Mar 08 - 07:14 AM

Steve, I adopted my Mudcat name because I am not really part of the folk world - just dipping my toe in from time to time. But since you have managed to get so close (Kent? South East London actually - but it was once Kent) I'm glad of the contact to compare notes. It may be better by PM to avoid gross thread drift.

I have a collection of some hundreds of theatre and music hall song sheets covering a wide range of dates, types and origins, but (and I hasten to say this, to avoid inviting random inquiries) it is totally unindexed.

I think you must have more Clifton's than I do. Sorting mine out from the heap may take some time (never had reason to do it until now). And, no, I've not seen HC's Death.

I am currently collecting (very slowly) song sheets of the early nineteenth century actors, Mr & Mrs Fitzwilliam, whose songs and style seem to me anticipate music hall by twenty years or more.

With regard to lithographs, I have always assumed that, because the published life of a comic song was quite short, there was never any need to renew the fronts but, when a song enjoyed continuing heavy sales,the stones would eventually show signs of wear. They were often crudely retouched (which is why we don't like buying them) but sometimes, I think, a completely new front was commissioned. ther was also, of course, some piracy.

I mustn't go on!


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Billy Weeks
Date: 22 Mar 08 - 07:55 AM

Steve: I forgot to ask. What time of day are the TSF meetings? That may seem a strange question, but I am an ancient (and also a non-driver) and like to be home in the evenings at a reasonable hour.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Billy Weeks
Date: 24 Mar 08 - 05:16 AM

Refresh


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Mar 08 - 07:32 PM

Billy
TSF presentations are always in the afternoon.
Format. Round robin of current research in morning plus TSF business. Afternoon presentations followed by a bit of a sing. London mtgs are always at C#ho

Email gardhams?hotmail.com

I also have a pretty large collection of 19thc sheet music mostly related to trad, specialising in Clifton, Robson, Cowell, Geoghegan, burlesques and minstrel. Have you got any Geoghegan? Mine is indexed and the bulk is actually filed in title alphabetical order.

Cheers
Steve


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Billy Weeks
Date: 25 Mar 08 - 11:10 AM

Hi Steve

Afternoons suit my life pattern rather well.

My God, you are indexed! In my own defence, I am working on a system. 'Should be in that pile over there. Or possibly somewhere else'.

I haven't any Geoghegan. Not that I can be absolutely sure.

I'll be in touch by email today.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: GUEST,ChrisP.
Date: 25 Mar 08 - 05:36 PM

Steve, with regard to lithograph editions it has to be remembered that, as the name suggests, DRAWN ON STONE ! Even if the image didn't actually wear out and need redrawing, I suspect there would be little temptation to keep an archive of images in case another edition came along, simply on space grounds. These lumps of stone are typically over an inch thick and would take up too much room.
They would also be valuable and recycled as a matter of course. Much easier to do the drawing again from scratch if required, since it was a requirement to be able to do this sort of thing for every single image anyway.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: NormanD
Date: 25 Mar 08 - 07:16 PM

Great! Any chance of one of you technicians transferring an old 45 onto MP3 and sending it me?

Thought not.

Hope you don't mind me asking. Please excuse my thread drift.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Greg B
Date: 26 Mar 08 - 06:44 PM

Ask Bill Clinton.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: GUEST,jh
Date: 02 Apr 08 - 08:13 AM


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: GUEST,Michelle
Date: 11 May 10 - 03:12 PM

Does anyone have an MP3 of Stanley Holloway's   "Dark girl dressed in blue" ?    pleeeese.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 11 May 10 - 06:12 PM

Artful will shortly have a midi of the Clifton version. Is it the same song? We will be posting all the relevant ABC and background very shortly. Thanks for reviving the thread. An amazing coincidence seeing as the last posting was in April 08 and I've just sent Artful all the scores and background.

Artful, please see Billy Weekes' posting of 20th march 08 as it adds some clarity to what I put as description of the litho.


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Subject: Lyr/Tune Add: DARK GIRL DRESS'D IN BLUE (H Clifton
From: Artful Codger
Date: 12 May 10 - 09:22 AM

The Clifton version Steve Gardham sent me appears to be identical to the copy online at the Lester S. Levy site. The lyrics also tally nearly identically to a broadside in the online Bodleian Library Ballads collection: Harding B 11(795). Below, I've transcribed the lyrics from the sheet music, taking liberties with the punctuation to make the lyrics more readable. Another broadside version in the Bodley collection was previously transcribed by Joe Offer in this thread.


THE DARK GIRL DRESS'D IN BLUE
  Written and Sung by Harry Clifton [1862?]

1. From a village away in Leicester,
  To London here I came,
To see the Exhibition and
  All places of great fame.
But what I suffer'd since I came,
  I now will tell to you,
How I lost my heart and senses too,
  Thro' a dark girl dress'd in blue.

        CHORUS.
  She was a fine girl, fol de riddle I do
  A charmer, Fol de riddle oh.

2. 'Twas on a Friday morning
  The first day of August,
When of that day I ever think
  My heart feels ready to bust.
I went in a sixpenny omnibus,
  To the Exhibition of Sixty two;
On a seat by the right-hand side of the door,
  Sat a dark girl dress'd in blue.

3. When we arrived in the Brompton Road
  The lady look'd so strange.
The conductor he said, "Sixpence, ma'am!"
  Said she, "I have no change;
I've nothing less than a five pound note.
  Whatever shall I do?"
Said I, "Allow me to pay." "Oh, thank you, Sir,"
  Said the dark girl dress'd in blue.

4. We chatted and talk'd as we onward walk'd
  About one thing or the other;
She ask'd me, too--oh, wasn't it kind?--
  If I had a Father or Mother.
"Oh yes," says I, "and a grandmother too.
  But pray miss what are you?"
"Oh, I'm chief engineer in a Milliner's Shop,"
  Says the dark girl dress'd in blue.

5. We walk'd about for an hour or two
  Thro' the building near and far,
Till we came in the grand refreshment room;
  I went straight up to the bar.
She slipp'd in my hand a five pound note.
  I said, "What are you going to do?"
"Oh, don't think it strange, I must have change,"
  Said the dark girl dress'd in blue.

6. I call'd a waiter and handed him the note,
  And said, "Please change me that."
The waiter bow'd and touch'd his hair,
  For this waiter wore no hat.
In silver and gold five pounds he brought,
  I gave him coppers a few,
And the change of the note I then did hand
  To the dark girl dress'd in blue.

7. She thank'd me and said, "I must away,
  Farewell 'til we meet again,
For I've to go to Pimlico
  To catch the Brighton train."
She quickly glided from my sight
  And soon was lost to view.
I turn'd to leave, when by my side
  Stood a tall man dress'd in blue.

8. This tall man said, "Excuse me, sir,
  I'm one of the X division.
That note was bad; my duty is,
  To take you on suspicion."
Said I, "For a lady I obtain'd the change."
  He said, "Are you telling me true?
Where's she live, What's her name?" Says I, "I don't know,
  She was a dark girl dress'd in blue."

9. My story they believ'd, they thought I'd been deceive'd
  But they said I must hand back the cash;
I thought 'twas a sin [as] I gave them the tin
  And away went five pounds smash.
So all young men take my advice,
  Be careful what you do
When you make the acquaintance of ladies strange,
  Especially a dark girl dress'd in blue.


Notes by Steve Gardham:
Cover
The Dark Girl Dress'd in Blue
Sung by Kate Harley; and
Written and Sung by HARRY CLIFTON
At the London Music Halls
London,
Published by B Williams, 11, Paternoster Row

Litho of Clifton dressed very smartly in posh riding gear holding a whip and raising his top hat to a dark-haired girl in full crinoline, passing, who is giving him a 'sly glance'. It looks like it could be the Great Exhibition Hall in the background

Inside
Written by Harry Clifton
Stock number 4648 B.W.

Notes.
The chorus is reminiscent of the bawdy song 'She was a rum one'.
dating. Olis gives 1862 and this is about right as it mentions The Great Exhibition.
There is no mention of where the tune came from.

I have two quite different versions on broadsides, all on the same theme but different versions of the story. In one the offending girl is caught, the other she isn't.

And here's an ABC transcription of the melody:

X:1
T:The Dark Girl Dress'd in Blue
C:Written and Sung by Harry Clifton [1862?]
S:From period sheet music provided by Steve Gardham
Z:Transcribed by Artful Codger
M:C
L:1/4
Q:1/4=180 " Allegretto"
K:Bb
"_mf" D/ E/ | F/ F/ F G>E | F>D B,>A | B B c A |
w: From a vil-lage a-way to Lei-cester-shire, To Lon-don here I
%
B3 (D/E/) | F F G>E | F D C (D/E/) | F F E C | B,3 c |
w: came, To* see the Ex-hi-bi-tion and All* pla-ces of great fame. But
%
d d e c | B A F>c | d d e c | (B2 A) c/ c/ |
w: what I suf-fer'd since I came, I now will tell to you,_ How I
%
d d e (d/c/) | B A F F/ G/ | _A A G>D | E3 "<||" "^Chorus." D/E/ |
w: lost my heart and* sen-ses too, Thro' a dark girl dress'd in blue. She*
%
% Chorus
F F G E | F/ F/ D/ D/ B,/ B,/ (G/A/) | B B d/ B/ c/ A/ | B3 z |]
w: was a fine girl fol de rid-dle I do A char-mer Fol de rid-dle oh.

Also, the sheet music can be seen at The Levy Collection at Johns Hopkins University

As Steve mentioned, MIDIs will be appearing shortly. The first will present the melody only, generated from the ABC above. The second will render the relevant bits of the sheet music score: the piano introduction, first verse, four-part chorus and piano break/finale. The remainder of the sheet music is duplication of the verse section, with the melody adjusted to scan with the lyrics.

Click to play (melody)

Click to play (full)


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 May 10 - 04:18 PM

MIDIs posted, thanks to Artful Codger. See links above - it's a lovely tune.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 12 May 10 - 05:05 PM

Yes, a very folky tune. It reminds me of the polka 'The Leathering of the Wattle O'.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: GUEST,sky
Date: 01 Feb 12 - 10:11 AM

Thank you all for this, the Holloway version was a favourite of my late wife, even to read the words is uplifting, thank you 'Artful Codger'.


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Subject: RE: Looking for 'Dark Girl Dressed In Blue'
From: GUEST,Nickthe bottlwasher
Date: 07 Apr 12 - 06:22 PM

I have both sides of this record "cleaned up" and put onto a CD. I could let you have a copy if you are still looking for it.


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