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Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs

Azizi 23 Mar 08 - 11:44 AM
GUEST,Guest 23 Mar 08 - 11:49 AM
Azizi 23 Mar 08 - 12:05 PM
Azizi 23 Mar 08 - 12:10 PM
Azizi 23 Mar 08 - 12:20 PM
Azizi 23 Mar 08 - 12:28 PM
Azizi 23 Mar 08 - 12:32 PM
Jeri 23 Mar 08 - 04:21 PM
Tattie Bogle 23 Mar 08 - 08:47 PM
Sorcha 23 Mar 08 - 09:21 PM
open mike 23 Mar 08 - 11:43 PM
DMcG 24 Mar 08 - 04:33 AM
Folkiedave 24 Mar 08 - 05:59 AM
Uncle Phil 24 Mar 08 - 08:21 AM
Azizi 24 Mar 08 - 08:41 AM
Azizi 24 Mar 08 - 08:49 AM
Azizi 24 Mar 08 - 09:06 AM
Azizi 24 Mar 08 - 09:10 AM
Mrrzy 24 Mar 08 - 03:50 PM
GUEST,Volgadon 24 Mar 08 - 05:09 PM
Uncle Phil 24 Mar 08 - 08:40 PM
Azizi 24 Mar 08 - 09:36 PM
Dave the Gnome 25 Mar 08 - 04:28 AM
freda underhill 25 Mar 08 - 05:20 AM
GUEST, Sminky 25 Mar 08 - 06:14 AM
GUEST,George Henderson 25 Mar 08 - 06:58 AM
GUEST, Sminky 25 Mar 08 - 07:39 AM
GUEST,Henryp 25 Mar 08 - 07:59 AM
IanC 25 Mar 08 - 08:23 AM
open mike 25 Mar 08 - 01:26 PM
GUEST,keberoxu 11 Apr 17 - 08:38 PM
Mr Red 12 Apr 17 - 03:30 AM
FreddyHeadey 12 Apr 17 - 01:17 PM
GUEST,keberoxu 12 Apr 17 - 02:54 PM
Mr Red 13 Apr 17 - 07:22 AM
GUEST 15 Apr 17 - 09:36 PM
GUEST,pauperback 16 Apr 17 - 08:52 PM
Bill D 16 Apr 17 - 10:17 PM
GUEST,henryp 17 Apr 17 - 03:57 AM
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Subject: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Azizi
Date: 23 Mar 08 - 11:44 AM

The purpose of this thread is to share information about Easter customs throughout the United States, the United Kingdom, and elsewhere in the world.

I've found a number of archived Mudcat threads on Easter customs. Unfortunately, several of those threads are closed to additional comments. I wanted to post a comment to one of those threads about my childhood remembrances of making Easter baskets out of paper, dying Easter eggs, participating in Easter egg hunts, attending church service on Easter Sunday morning, and then showing off my newly bought Easter clothes, shoes, and hat by strolling down the Boardwalk in Atlantic City, New Jersey. After that walk, my sisters and I would go home and would sit down to a special Easter Sunday dinner that featured a number of dishes, but always included ham.

I apologize for starting this thread if there are recent threads on this subject that I'm not aware of. Because of the glitch that occurred to {with?} Mudcat's internal search engine, it appears that that seach engine [still} doesn't list threads from a certain date on. Before I started this thread, I waited to see if anyone else would start a general thread on this subject. Since no one else has done so, I'm taking this opportunity to start a discussion on Easter customs-or actually, to revive a discussion that was started on several other Mudcat threads. In subsequent posts to this thread, I'll list the customs that I've read about in several archived Mudcat threads and I'll provide the links to those threads.

Please feel free to post to this thread and thanks in advance for your post/s.


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: GUEST,Guest
Date: 23 Mar 08 - 11:49 AM

http://www.ragandbone.com/blog/?p=710


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Azizi
Date: 23 Mar 08 - 12:05 PM

Here's a list of the Easter customs that I'm aware of from my personal experiences, and that I've identified from reading archived Mudcat threads:

1. dying eggs
2. hiding eggs and hunting for them
3. rolling eggs down hills and/or on the [USA] White House lawn
4. making Easter baskets out of paper
5. purchasing Easter baskets {plastic or otherwise; filled with
   candy, small toys, and/or other items}
6. placing homemade Easter baskets anonymously on doorsteps as an
   act of kindness, or as a way a young boy signaled his affection
   for a certain girl [UK only?]
7. attending church on Easter Sunday {special church service/special
   songs}
8. purchasing or {less often nowadays} making "dress-up" clothes,
   shoes, and {for females} hats {bonnets}; wearing these clothes to
   church on Easter Sunday [with special emphasis on the females
   wearing usually wide brimmed hats with artificial flowers]
9. participating in or attending an Easter Parade which featured
   women showing off their fancy hats
10.attending a special meal with family and/or friends on Easter
   Sunday
11.attending a Pace Egg play {similar to the Mummers play}? UK only?
12.going door to door with clappers (bits of wood that you slap
   together, sort of) and recite a poem asking for eggs {Wales
   only}?
13."japing"-two people bashing hard boiled & dyed eggs together,
    for good luck [UK only?]
14. bringing hard boiled eggs dyed red to church and, after the
    church service breaking them and greeting folks with the
    saying "Christ has risen" [Greece only?]


Addition and corrections to this list are welcomed!


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Azizi
Date: 23 Mar 08 - 12:10 PM

Thanks, GUEST Guest. Here's that link to photos of beautiful, intrically hand decorated Easter eggs:

http://www.ragandbone.com/blog/?p=710


**

Btw: that's an Easter custom that should also be added to that list}:

**

Here's a comment that was posted on that site:

"[…] Take a look at these eggs made by Franc Grom of Slovenia. He uses a tiny electric drill to bore THOUSANDS of holes in every egg in intricate patterns. The finished pieces are incredible to look at, and probably incredibly delicate. His work is apparently inspired by traditional Slovenian designs, but there are a few eggs that look a bit more modern as well. This has to require an incredibly steady hand and an enormous amount of patience."


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Azizi
Date: 23 Mar 08 - 12:20 PM

I'm taking the liberty to repost a several comments from the Mudcat thread "Help: Pace Egging"


Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: sian, west wales - PM
Date: 15 Nov 00 - 05:09 AM

There's a version of this at Easter in parts of Wales, notably Anglesey. It's now a (dying) children's custom - going door to door with clappers (bits of wood that you slap together, sort of) and recite a poem asking for eggs…

thread.cfm?threadid=27721#340964

**

Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: Malcolm Douglas - PM
Date: 15 Nov 00 - 09:18 AM

The following is taken from Charles Kightly's The Customs and Ceremonies of Britain (Thames and Hudson, 1986); not the best reference available, but the only one I have to hand:

Paste (Pasch: Easter) or Pace Egging was ... popular throughout Northern England and Scotland…In earlier generations, [the song} would have been sung by young men - doubtless more interested in money and "small beer" than eggs - as part of a Pace-Egg Play, a regional variant of the Mumming Play: …

"…Once collected (or, in recent times, bought) "real" Easter eggs are still often painted, decorated or dyed either by boiling in a coloured cloth or with some natural dye like onion skins (for a golden-brown egg); furze-blossom (yellow); "Pasque flower" (bright green) or cochineal (for the favourite red). Then (if not eaten for breakfast) they may be concealed about the garden for an egg hunt: or, especially in northern Britain, hard-boiled for egg rolling down a hill or slope - the winner being, according to local preference, the one which rolls furthest, survives most rolls, or is successfully aimed between two pegs

"Alternatively, the eggs may be "dumped" (another northern habit) by being clasped firmly in the hand and smashed against that of an opponent until one or other breaks: or (as in parts of south-western England) a number may be marked and "shackled" (shaken) together in a sieve, the last to crack being the winner. All such old egg customs, however, are now in acute danger from the 20th century's principal contribution to the Easter canon, namely the chocolate Easter egg."

**

Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: TheBigPinkLad - PM
Date: 22 Apr 03 - 03:59 PM

Like Bill, I too hail from County Durham (Witton Park) and we used to either roll the eggs down a bank (called appropriately the Rolly Bank) or bash them together, called 'jarping.' We dyed the eggs by boiling with onion skins or with crepe paper left over from Christmas decorations.

**

Subject: RE: Help: Pace Egging?
From: GUEST,Roger the skiffler - PM
Date: 15 Nov 00 - 05:55 AM

In Alderney in the Channel Isles they have a ceremony on "Milk-a-Punch Sunday" * when by tradition you could help yourself to an egg from anyone's henhouse and a jug of milk from their cow to be turned with rum and spices into a creamy punch. Each pub has its own recipe and devotees travel round the pubs trying them all (though they don't steal the ingredients anymore) until they collapse!
In Greece on Easter Sunday people take boiled eggs dyed red to church and after the marathon Easter service (being Greeks they break it up by popping out for a smoke and a chat while the poor priest carries on)they greet each other: "Christos Anestis" "Anestis Eleftheros" (pardon my poor transliteration) Meaning "Christ is risen" "He is risen indeed". Then you bang your egg against theirs for good luck for the year. Probably your good luck if theirs break. Probably same idea of egg =life, mixture of pagan and Christian tradition.
RtS

* the poster corrected this reference from "jug 'o punch Sunday" to
"Milk-a-Punch Sunday" in a subsequent post to that thread.


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Azizi
Date: 23 Mar 08 - 12:28 PM

Here are three other Mudcat threads on Easter customs:

thread.cfm?threadid=45698#676712
"BS: Easter Eggs query"

Subject: Easter egg hunt; rolling Easter eggs

**
thread.cfm?threadid=68713#1159949
"RE: Folklore: May baskets"

Subject: making paper May baskets and anonymously leaving them on neighbors' doorknobs, knocked and ran {acts of kindness}; or a boy leaving a May basket on a certain girl's doorknob to signal his affection for that girl

**
thread.cfm?threadid=58651#933190
"RE: BS: Easter Dinner... Mmmmmmmmmmmm."

Subject: having special meal on Easter Sunday with family and/or friends


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Azizi
Date: 23 Mar 08 - 12:32 PM

And here's an excerpt from an online article about the custom of wearing Easter bonnets:

"The hat comes back: Donning your Easter Bonnet ---- with all the frills upon it"
By Ruth Marvin Webster - Staff Writer | Saturday, March 22, 2008 10:04 PM PDT [North County Times}


In your Easter bonnet, with all the frills upon it

You'll be the grandest gal in the Easter parade.

I'll be all in clover, and when they look us over

We'll be the proudest couple in the Easter parade.

--- From Irving Berlin's 1948 song, "Easter Parade"

As the youngest of nine children growing up in Iowa, Del Mar resident Carol Bader said she vividly remembers the excitement of shopping with her mother for her new Easter outfit, complete with hat. She will never forget one special dress with a white eyelet top and blue crushed velvet skirt that she wore with Mary Janes ---- and a perfect white Easter bonnet to match…

The tradition of the Easter bonnet goes back centuries, probably even before Easter, when people wore wreaths of leaves and flowers to celebrate the coming of spring. With the advent of early Christianity came the custom of new clothes for Easter, which was known as white week. Just after the Civil War, Easter was known as "Sunday of Joy," when mothers and daughters who had worn dark colors for mourning the war dead decided to splash out in colorful clothes and hats decorated in flowers, ribbon and fabric.

Then, in the 1870s, the Easter bonnet was really put on the map when the Easter Parade began in New York. Still an extremely popular event, people come out for a short parade up Fifth Avenue from Madison Square to Central Park decked out in their new spring fashions, which usually includes a hat ---- the larger and more decorated the better ---- just like the famous Irving Berlin song featured in the MGM musical "Easter Parade."...


http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2008/03/23/lifeandtimes/8db4dfa9fd5ac2c38825740b007c0547.txt


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Jeri
Date: 23 Mar 08 - 04:21 PM

I woke up Easter morning and looked for hidden goodies (colored eggs, chocolate eggs, chocolate malt eggs, a chocolate easter bunny, jelly beans and some chocolate. After breakfast (I snuck some candy, but we had real food too), my mom and I got dressed and went to church. (Dad didn't do church) Here is the church's stained glass window. I grew up to be non-religious, but I still remember this window and how much I loved it and it still brings up lots of good memories.

I normally had a new pastel-hued Easter dress, white patent leather shoes, white cotton gloves, and a brand new spring coat. It seemed like although one wasn't supposed to show off, especially not in church, most of us girls and (I'd bet) the adult women felt pretty good about the new clothes, and it was a rebirth and revival of sorts. We'd generally come home and have a big dinner, often ham.


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 23 Mar 08 - 08:47 PM

Remember this song?
They still make chocolate rabbits too!

Chocolate Rabbit
I got a chocolate rabbit
For an Easter treat,
A great big chocolate rabbit,
Good enough to eat.
So I ate his ears on Sunday,
his nose I finished Monday,
Tuesday I nibbled on his feet.
I ate his tail on Wednesday,
Thursday I kept on,
By Friday he was going,
Saturday he was gone.
Oh, I loved that chocolate rabbit,
From the moment that he came,
And if I get another one,
I'll love him just the same.


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Sorcha
Date: 23 Mar 08 - 09:21 PM

Yes, Jeri, the 'finding the Easter Basket' full of chocolate and gooies was a big deal for me too. Had to wait for the brother and sister to actually hunt for the eggs hidden in the house.

There was often a community or church sponsored egg hunt too. The 'hunt' for the littlest kids was easy, more like a 'scramble'. The hiding places got more difficult as the age group got older too.

Nothing quite like a sugar high first thing in the Morning!

Did everybody get a hollow milk chocolate rabbit? The first thing we did was bite off the ears. Eyes next, then nose.

And we shall never forget PEEPS! LOL


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: open mike
Date: 23 Mar 08 - 11:43 PM

I thought i posted some Ukranian easter egg links...Pysanky
but do not see them so will add them here.
i have an araucana hen who lays eggs
that are already colored!

here are some intricate eggs...Pysanky from the Ukrane
http://users.frii.com/sos/Eggs/index.html
http://www.learnpysanky.com/designs.html
http://www.cs.unc.edu/~yakowenk/pysanky/

the Ukranians believe that making these eggs each year
assures the continuation of the world..

i also saw a site this morn that had the winners of a PEEPS
diorama contest...they dressed their peeps up and staged them
in different sets...hilarious!


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: DMcG
Date: 24 Mar 08 - 04:33 AM

I attended a church service this year that included the Swieconka blessing. The link explains it more fully, but in short it is a tradition of blessing the food that is used to mark the end of the Lenten fast - the mirror image of Shrove Tuesday, if you like.


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Folkiedave
Date: 24 Mar 08 - 05:59 AM

And I am off to Hallaton in Leicestershire to watch the Bottle Kicking and Hare Pie event.

http://www.hallaton.org/bottlekicking.html

Easter Saturday we went to Bacup to watch the Coconut Dancers.....

http://www.coconutters.co.uk/index.htm


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Uncle Phil
Date: 24 Mar 08 - 08:21 AM

In Texas and the American Southwest some of us celebrate Easter by breaking cascarones – colored blown eggs filled with confetti – over each other's heads, a custom borrowed from Mexico.
- Phil


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Azizi
Date: 24 Mar 08 - 08:41 AM

open mike, here's the hyperlinks to those websites that you posted:

http://users.frii.com/sos/Eggs/index.html
Here's the hyper-links to those threads that you posted, open mike:

http://www.learnpysanky.com/designs.html

http://www.cs.unc.edu/~yakowenk/pysanky/


**

Thanks to all who have posted on this thread thus far.

This is such interesting reading!


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Azizi
Date: 24 Mar 08 - 08:49 AM

Here's an excerpt from an online page about cascarones:

"Many cultures have a tradition of colored eggs, especially around Easter. In Mexico it's common to see colored eggs thrown at fiestas during carnaval, just before lent. They're not hard boiled like the eggs in the US Easter egg tradition. Instead they're eggs that have been hollowed out and have a surprise filling - called cascarones. It's a tradition that's said to originate in Italy, when men would toss hollow eggs filled with perfume at women they were attracted to. In Mexico, you can still see this behavior among young men and women."

http://www.lasculturas.com/articles/hispanic-culture-and-identity/14-culture-a-identity/27-cascarones

This article also includes instructions about how to make cascarones.

**

Here's the complete entry from the wikipedia page about cascarones:

"Cascarones or confetti eggs are festive, hollow chicken egg shells, filled with confetti, meant to be thrown or broken over someone's head (usually as a surprise from behind), scattering confetti all over the person. Breaking the eggs over someone's head can be quite painful if done hard enough, however, this is most often done between friends, usually teenagers. Cascarones derived from Mexico and have recently regained popularity in the southwestern United States. They are used for many different occasions but, especially Easter. Having one broken over your head is said to bring good luck."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cascarones


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Azizi
Date: 24 Mar 08 - 09:06 AM

I'm wondering if the "hollow chicken egg shells" used for cascarones have given way yet to the two sided colored plastic eggs that are sold in the USA around Easter time.

I knew nothing aboout cascarones in the late 1980s/early 1990s when I switched from hard boiled eggs to plastic eggs. For my family's Easter egg hunt I filled some of these eggs with different denominations of coins, and put jelly beans in the others. When all the eggs were found, my children had to count the pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters that were in their eggs. The one who had the most money was the "winner" of the Easter egg hunt. Their "prize" was the applause that they received.

Part of the reason why I changed to plastic eggs was that I thought it was so wasteful to throw away real eggs since people are starving overseas {and in this country too}. Not to mention that finding well hidden hard boiled eggs weeks and maybe months after Easter can be such a downer.

:o)


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Azizi
Date: 24 Mar 08 - 09:10 AM

Correction-I mistyped. I started that custom in the early 1980s through the early 1990s. Not that this matters a hill of jelly beans.

:o}}


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Mrrzy
Date: 24 Mar 08 - 03:50 PM

All we do is eat chocolate - this is one of the 2 times in the year you are allowed all the chocolate you want!


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: GUEST,Volgadon
Date: 24 Mar 08 - 05:09 PM

Easter is THE holiday in Eastern Orthodox countries. Can't be bothered to type anything in detail just right now, but the traditional greeting is Khristos Voskryess (Christ has risen). To be answered with Voistinno voskryess (He has verily risen).


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Uncle Phil
Date: 24 Mar 08 - 08:40 PM

Oh no, no plastic egg cascarones. That would hurt when someone broke one on your head! I've no idea what happens to the original contents of the egg, though. I'd be surprized they were just thrown away.
- PPhil


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Azizi
Date: 24 Mar 08 - 09:36 PM

Uncle Phil, I think that there might be any number of reasons to continue to use hollow chicken shells for cascarones instead of going modern and using plastic Easter eggs.

But the little plastic Easter eggs that I'm talking about wouldn't hurt a fly. Well maybe they would hurt a fly. But I don't think they would hurt a person if someone broke them over a person's head.

Click here for
photos of plastic Easter eggs.


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 25 Mar 08 - 04:28 AM

There is the Easter Saturday 'Coconut' dance at Bacup - I think I may have sent your some footage of that Azizi. There is also the Simnel Cake - although I believe at one time that was given to Mothers on Mothering Sunday rather than at Easter. It is eaten at Easter though and has the Good Friday connection (11 marzipan balls = 12 apostles less Judas)

D.


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: freda underhill
Date: 25 Mar 08 - 05:20 AM

the greek goddess of fertility was married to a hare. Once a year, at the spring equinox, she allowed him to give birth - to eggs. her name? Oestre, also spelt Eostre, also known as as Ostara in what is now Germany.


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: GUEST, Sminky
Date: 25 Mar 08 - 06:14 AM

In Lancashire, the egg shells must be crushed after rolling - otherwise the witches steal them and turn them into boats.

Lancashire pace egging


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: GUEST,George Henderson
Date: 25 Mar 08 - 06:58 AM

In Newcastle we were always told that rolling the eggs symbolised the rolling of the stone away from the tomb.


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: GUEST, Sminky
Date: 25 Mar 08 - 07:39 AM

There was an interesting programme on UK TV at the weekend (BBC2 I think) called 'The way we useds to worship'. It had some fascinating footage of Hebden Bridge pace egging taken in the early 60's.


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: GUEST,Henryp
Date: 25 Mar 08 - 07:59 AM

I spent this Easter at the Maritime Festival at Glasson, Lancaster, in Lancashire, England. I therefore missed the egg-rolling in Avenham Park in Preston on Easter Monday.

I did attend the talks by Roy Palmer in the little church in Glasson. On Easter Monday, there was a basket of eggs dyed purple for children to take.

The Abram Mummers were not present this year, but they did tour Westhoughton and Abram on Wednesday and Thursday last week to present their play.


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: IanC
Date: 25 Mar 08 - 08:23 AM

Apart from all the other Easter customs in England, there's bell ringing. Traditionally, church bells aren't rung at all during holy week (the week before Easter). On Easter Sunday, though, the bellringers seem to want to make up for this.

When I was 17 (37 years ago), I was in Cambridge on Easter Sunday. The city centre has a church every 100 yards or so. At 12 noon, the whole lot erupted and I was left reeling with the physical shock of all that vibration. Believe me, the earth does move.


This year, as usual, the bell ringers in my village rang for Easter Sunday, though a little earlier than noon.

:-)
Ian


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: open mike
Date: 25 Mar 08 - 01:26 PM

http://featherlandeggfarm.com/cascarones.aspx
i do remember making cascarones once, and we put bird seed inside them.
so when they broke they would leave behind something that could be used.
on the Las Culturas site there are recipes: With the egg you emptied out, you can make Migas, Flan or another dish .


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: GUEST,keberoxu
Date: 11 Apr 17 - 08:38 PM

This one is above the line....kind of relevant to both sides of the line.
Maybe some newer members would care to update.


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Mr Red
Date: 12 Apr 17 - 03:30 AM

My granny did Easter eggs for us on year. Wrapped in oninion skins and boiled. It coloured them in brown swirls, though she said they used to paint them in her day.

Joe Hurley from Church & Oswoldtwistle (think Accrington, Lancs) told me about pace-egging song he used to sing. It was more like another carol singing/ penny for the guy season. Door to door.

songs.mister.red - number 47 is a recording of him singing one. "I'm a Paper Lad" & "I'm a Navvy". There is text explanation and lyrics.


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: FreddyHeadey
Date: 12 Apr 17 - 01:17 PM

Another thread mentions Ukranian decorated eggs,
borscht and beer for Easter dinner & golumbeki.
thread.cfm?threadid=128569

Heptonstall has its Pace Egging Play
https://heptonstall.org/pace-egg-2/


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: GUEST,keberoxu
Date: 12 Apr 17 - 02:54 PM

Sorry, this is going to be thread drift-topic-change. But I want to thank Mudcat, once again, for translating for me a bit of English humour that went clear over my USA head.

I had never heard of hare pie.

Then I was looking at a journalist's encounter with the English, positively-not-folk-music P. J. Harvey. This English journalist drew cartoon sketches as well as writing verbally. The journalist, much earlier, had read a P. J. Harvey interview in which P. J. described her counter-cultural upbringing, with a sculptor for a mother who was partial to Captain Beefheart.

So the journalist drew a cartoon with several panels, in which P. J. Harvey looks like a rejected Cubist sketch by Picasso. She is sitting at the kitchen table speaking a rant like one of her more aggressive lyrics.
Off to the side of the table, stands her counter-cultural mother, saying:
"Now, Polly, eat your hair pie and laser beans." Spelling exactly as in the comic strip.

Eventually P. J. Harvey met with this journalist and complimented her/him on the comic strip: "Me and my mum, we'd never laughed so much! Do more!"

And all the time, I'm sitting there with the periodical in hand, scratching my head:
Okay, I get laser-beam to laser-bean, but who makes pie out of hair?!

Thanks again, O Mighty Mudcat.


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Mr Red
Date: 13 Apr 17 - 07:22 AM

did you google for hair pie? slang dictionary

But - I know where you weigh a pie -
all together......



Somewhwere over the rainbow, way.........


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Apr 17 - 09:36 PM

refresh


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: GUEST,pauperback
Date: 16 Apr 17 - 08:52 PM

Easter custom of having ham, I thought, maybe was since ham is exclusive (of the abrahamic faiths) to Christianity it was a sort of remembrance of the fulfilling of the Law. I'm convinced thought taht pork makes you slow.

My dad's WWII Jewish service buddy, so I was told,

was fond of saying,"I'm so mad i could eat pork!"


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: Bill D
Date: 16 Apr 17 - 10:17 PM

Some stuff about Easter

Some more


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Subject: RE: Easter Eggs, Bonnets, & Other Customs
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 17 Apr 17 - 03:57 AM

It's Easter Monday today.

And we're off to the egg-rolling in Avenham Park, Preston.

Sports report; Downies hail goal at Workington harbour in Good Friday mass football game. Next game is tomorrow.


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