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Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs

quokka 05 May 08 - 11:39 AM
MartinRyan 05 May 08 - 01:49 PM
Jim Dixon 07 May 08 - 11:32 PM
MartinRyan 08 May 08 - 03:32 AM
quokka 09 May 08 - 11:03 PM
GUEST,Elizabeth McCrowe,Goulds, Nl.,Canada 04 Jul 13 - 08:05 AM
Jim Dixon 11 Jul 13 - 11:12 AM
Jim Dixon 13 Jul 13 - 01:22 AM
Jim Carroll 13 Jul 13 - 04:03 AM
Jim Carroll 13 Jul 13 - 07:10 AM
Jim Dixon 17 Jul 13 - 06:48 PM
Jim Dixon 17 Jul 13 - 07:48 PM
Jim Dixon 18 Jul 13 - 02:20 PM
MartinRyan 18 Jul 13 - 07:29 PM
Jim Dixon 21 Jul 13 - 11:03 PM
Seamus Kennedy 21 Jul 13 - 11:45 PM
Jim Dixon 23 Jul 13 - 07:50 AM
Jim Dixon 24 Jul 13 - 01:13 PM
GUEST 24 Jul 13 - 02:27 PM
GUEST,GuestMartinRyan 24 Jul 13 - 02:29 PM
GUEST,MartinRyan 24 Jul 13 - 02:43 PM
Ron Davies 25 Jul 13 - 10:22 AM
Jim Dixon 25 Jul 13 - 08:07 PM
Jim Dixon 25 Jul 13 - 11:00 PM
akenaton 26 Jul 13 - 06:24 PM
Jim Dixon 26 Jul 13 - 08:51 PM
Jim Dixon 27 Jul 13 - 09:44 AM
Jim Dixon 27 Jul 13 - 01:14 PM
Jim Dixon 28 Jul 13 - 08:08 AM
Jim Dixon 28 Jul 13 - 11:36 AM
Jim Dixon 28 Jul 13 - 12:38 PM
Jim Dixon 28 Jul 13 - 06:19 PM
quokka 19 Sep 13 - 08:29 AM
GUEST 03 Mar 14 - 10:23 AM
MartinRyan 03 Mar 14 - 11:42 AM
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Subject: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: quokka
Date: 05 May 08 - 11:39 AM

Hi all, I am looking for lyrics by the McNulty Family, having not much luck. The songs are:

Christmas in Exile
Down by the River Moy
Dungloe Fair

Any info appreciated,
Cheers
Quokka


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: MartinRyan
Date: 05 May 08 - 01:49 PM

Contact Declan Coyne at:
declan {at} dhalonproductions.ie

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 May 08 - 11:32 PM

Funny, I don't remember ever hearing of the McNulty Family, but they have quite an impressive discography.

It seems there has never been a Mudcat thread specifically about them, but they have been mentioned here in connection with several songs.

The Online 78-rpm Discography Project lists these songs, all recorded by the McNulty Family on the Decca (USA) label between 1936 and 1947:

This list shows the title, Decca (American) catalog number, and recording date.

A Mother's Lament; 12107B; 27-May-1937
A Mother's Love Song; 12254B; 6-Jun-1941
Amber Tresses Tied in Blue; 12222B; 4-May-1939
At the Close of an Irish Day; 12241B; 2-Apr-1940
Back to Donegal; 12089B; 18-Feb-1937
Barney Brannigan; 12155A; 15-Apr-1938
Biddy Donahue; 12197A; 21-Oct-1938
Black Berry Blossom; 12258; 11-Jun-1942
Chasing the Chicken / Maid on the Green – Jigs; 12255B; 6-Jun-1941
Christmas in Exile; 12183A; 21-Oct-1938
Come in Out of the Cold, Barney McShaw; 12126A; 6-Aug-1937
Daisy Bell; 12246B; 9-Dec-1940
Denny McCall; 12210A; 4-May-1939
Drum Colliher; 12270; 26-Mar-1947
Dunloe Fair; 12210B; 4-May-1939
Eileen; 12274; 30-Dec-1947
Eileen McMahon; 12271; 30-Dec-1947
Erin's Green Shore; 12155B; 15-Apr-1938
Far Away in Australia; 12256; 11-Jun-1942
Flowery Dell / Miss Drury's Reels; 12255A; 6-Jun-1941
Golden Jubilee Song; 12246A; 9-Dec-1940
Good-Bye, Johnny Dear; 12197B; 4-Apr-1939
Grandfather Brian; 12189B; 1-Jun-1938
Haste to the Wedding; 12195B; 21-Oct-1938
Highland Mary; 12100B; 27-May-1937
Hills of Glenwilly; 12270; 26-Mar-1947
I Don't Care If I Do; 12119B; 6-Aug-1937
I Don't Work for a Living; 12222A; 4-May-1939
I Have a Bonnet Trimmed in Blue / Maggie Polka; 12253A; 6-Jun-1941
I Never Loved Another but You; 12217A; 4-May-1939
I'll Forgive and I'll Try to Forget; 12274; 25-Mar-1947
I'm Sighing Tonight for Killarney and You; 12089A; 18-Feb-1937
If She'd Only Have an Eye for Me; 12127B; 6-Aug-1937
If You Ever Go Over; 12196B; 21-Oct-1938
in Ould Ballymore; 12240A; 2-Apr-1940
Ireland, Boys, Hurrah!; 12099A; 27-May-1937
Irish Greens and Bacon; 12127A; 6-Aug-1937
Irish Soldier Boy; 12263; 26-Mar-1947
John Mitchell; 12217B; 4-May-1939
Kelly the Boy from Killan; 12236B; 2-Apr-1940
Kerry Long Ago; 12189A; 1-Jun-1938
Kielrow; 12273; 30-Dec-1947
Knock at My Window Tonight, Love; 12198B; 21-Oct-1938
Let Mr McGuire Sit Down; 12100A; 27-May-1937
Let Ye All Be Irish Tonight; 12169B; 1-Jun-1938
Little House under the Hill; 12208A; 4-Apr-1939
Maid of the Sweet Knowe; 12148B; 15-Apr-1938
Master McGraw; 12071A; 10-Nov-1936
McDonnell’s Old Tin Roof; 12209B; 4-Apr-1939
McNulty's Irish Showboat; 12087B; 18-Feb-1937
Mickey Mickey's Band; 12257; 11-Jun-1942
Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake; 12254A; 6-Jun-1941
Molly Brown; 12257; 11-Jun-1942
Moon Behind the Hill; 12108A; 27-May-1937
Moriarty the Happy Cop; 12088A; 18-Feb-1937
Mother Malone; 12195A; 21-Oct-1938
Mother's Silver Curl; 12073B; 10-Nov-1936
My Beauty of Limerick; 12161B; 1-Jun-1938
My Old Home Town; 12272; 25-Mar-1947
My Own Dear Galway Bay; 12272; 28-Mar-1947
My Sweetheart; 12259; 25-Mar-1947
O Son, Remember My Love Today; 12196A; 21-Oct-1938
O'Bryan Has No Place to Go; 12236A; 2-Apr-1940
Over the Hills Far Away; 12126B; 6-Aug-1937
Polly of the Automat; 12073A; 10-Nov-1936
Rollicking Skipper (Hap o' Me Thumb); 12099B; 27-May-1937
Rolling Rocks of Glan / River Meadow Reel; 12253B; 6-Jun-1941
Shall My Soul Pass through Old Ireland; 12154A; 15-Apr-1938
Shamus O’Brien; 12247B; 9-Dec-1940
Slippin' the Jig; 12119A; 6-Aug-1937
Song of the 32 Counties; 12107A; 27-May-1937
Stack of Barley; 12273; 30-Dec-1947
Star of the County Down; 12108B; 27-May-1937
Susie O'Malley; 12256; 11-Jun-1942
The Blandon Blarney Stone; 12118B; 6-Aug-1937
The Boys of County Cork; 12087A; 18-Feb-1937
The Dawning of the Morning; 12154B; 15-Apr-1938
The Foggy Dew; 12259; 28-Mar-1947
The Groves of Kilteevan; 12240B; 2-Apr-1940
The Half Door; 12072A; 10-Nov-1936
The Hills of Donegal; 12071B; 10-Nov-1936
The Kelly's; 12209A; 4-May-1939
The Limerick Races; 12252B; 9-Dec-1940
The Old House Far Away; 12088B; 18-Feb-1937
The Old Potato Cake; 12169A; 1-Jun-1938
The Real Old Mountain Dew; 12161A; 1-Jun-1938
The River Moy; 12183B; 1-Jun-1938
The Rose of Aranmore; 12252A; 9-Dec-1940
The Stone outside Dan Murphy's Door; 12072B; 10-Nov-1936
The Thief of the World; 12198A; 4-Apr-1939
There's a Sweetheart Waiting for You; 12241A; 2-Apr-1940
They Sailed Away from Dublin Bay; 12208B; 4-Apr-1939
Three Little Drummers; 12258; 11-Jun-1942
Tipperary Daisy; 12247A; 9-Dec-1940
Walker Walked Away; 12176B; 15-Apr-1938
Waltz Me Around Again Willie; 12176A; 15-Apr-1938
We'll Take You Back to Ireland; 12148A; 15-Apr-1938
When It's Teatime in the Meadows; 12263; 26-Mar-1947
When Rafferty Brought the Rhumba; 12118A; 6-Aug-1937


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: MartinRyan
Date: 08 May 08 - 03:32 AM

Originally from Roscommon, they were very popular among the American Irish community from the late 1920's to '50, really. Last days of vaudeville. Declan Coyne, mentioned above, has done some research on their career - and uses their name in an award presented at the annual South Roscommon Singers festival.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: quokka
Date: 09 May 08 - 11:03 PM

Thanks for that information, Jim and Martin. The search continues!
Cheers,
Quokka


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: GUEST,Elizabeth McCrowe,Goulds, Nl.,Canada
Date: 04 Jul 13 - 08:05 AM

When a young girl growing up in the small fishing community of Conche,Northern Peninsula, Newfoundland, they had some program called THE Big 6", have no clue why it was called that, but the McNulty Family always graced our lives, via radio,on a Saturday morning. Us old folks long for some of that music and here in Newfoundland, there are many Irish connections and much of their music can be heard, played by our local musicians,specially accordion music. Oh Sweet Memories!


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Subject: Lyr Add: AT THE CLOSE OF AN IRISH DAY (McNulty Fam
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 11 Jul 13 - 11:12 AM

My transcription from YouTube:


AT THE CLOSE OF AN IRISH DAY
As recorded by The McNulty Family, 2 Apr 1940, [UK] Decca 67451, [US] Decca 12241B.

1. Oh, tonight in fancy come and take a trip across the sea,
And meet our old companions in the place we long to be,
For stamped upon our mem'ry are the friends we used to know,
So just tonight we'll revel in the thoughts of long ago.

2. Through little lanes and meadows we will take a stroll once more,
And meet the laughing boys and girls we met in days of yore.
The rivers, woods, and moonlight nights have the same old charrums [charms] still,
And the whistler on a summer's eve comes rambling o'er the hill.

3. And it's oft we rove to yon green grove with our young hearts light and gay,
'Mid the golden rays of the setting sun at the close of an Irish day.
The music from the hills around reechoes clear and true
As down the path we wander 'mid the fragrance and the dew.

4. Don't you recall, sweetheart of mine, this place where I met you?
Like a rosy bower of happiness where love's young dream came true,
The air was full of love's sweet song as I promised to be thine,
And you forever pledged your word that you'd be always mine.

5. Oh, I'll ne'er forget when I set sail across the ocean blue.
We stood on deck and watched the mountains slowly fade from view.
At the last glimpse of old Erin, sure our hearts went up in prayer.
Oh, God forbid we'd e'er forget our dear little isle so fair!


[The same song, under the title THE THOUGHTS OF LONG AGO (Roud 2954), and with minor differences in wording, appears on the album "The Hardy Sons of Dan: Football, hunting and other traditional songs from around Lough Erne's shore," a collection of field recordings published by Musical Traditions Records. It was sung by James McDermott in McGrath's pub, Brookeborough, Co Fermanagh, in 1980. The liner notes say: "Hugh Shields recorded this song from Charlie Begley, of Magilligan, Co Londonderry, in 1961, and published it in his Shamrock Rose & Thistle, p.58. That is Roud's only sighting of the song. Strangely, we can't find any reference to Eddie Butcher recording it; if it was sung in Magilligan, he was bound to have known it."

[The Irish Traditional Music Archive has a recording of this song sung by Jimmy Doherty in 1984, plus 2 recordings under the title DEAR LITTLE ISLE SO FAIR, sung by Dan McGonigle in 1989, and by Bill Cassidy in 1991.]


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Subject: Lyr Add: SUSIE O'MALLEY:(McNulty Family)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 13 Jul 13 - 01:22 AM

My transcription from YouTube:


SUSIE O'MALLEY
As recorded by the McNulty Family, June 11, 1942, DECCA (American) 12256.

1. If you listen, I'll tell you a story
Of a girl who I think is just grand.
She's the most captivating young lady.
She's my joy and delight of the land.

2. Her name it is Susie O'Malley.
She has talent and beauty galore,
And not one word of mine can describe her,
But her roguish blue eyes I adore.

3. Oh ,Susie O'Malley, I love you.
You're a darling; what more can I say?
And I'm waiting to hear you say, "Sweetheart,
Sure I'm loving you more ev'ry day."

4. Now I might as well try to describe her,
Although it's not easy to do,
For she's bright as the beautiful sunrise
And as sweet as the cool morning dew.

5. She's small and she's cute and beguiling.
Her smile is forever a joy.
She's my own dear colleen and I love her,
And I know she wants no other boy.

[REPEAT #3]

6.Jolly(?) then I'd be ever so happy
To know that on some sunny day
We'd run over to church and be married
For it's then you'll be ...(?)

[REPEAT #3]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 13 Jul 13 - 04:03 AM

The 11th South Roscommon Singing Weekend (Incorporating the Annie McNulty Award) at Knockcroghery, a few miles out of Roscommon Town, will take place on 25th-28th October - highly enjoyable.
Last year's participants included Tim and John Lyons, Sara Grey and Travellers Tom McCarthy and Kitty Cassidy - wonderful weekend.
Annie 'Ma' McNulty, the driving force behind the McNulty Family was born about 7km north of Knockcroghery
I'm sure Declan Coyne will supply any information necessary "declan {at} dhalonproductions.ie"
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 13 Jul 13 - 07:10 AM

Missing from the list of their songs is (possibly) 'Old Ballymoe' - recorded by them and probably written by Annie NcNulty.
This is the version we recorded from Wexford Traveller 'Pop's' Johnny Connors.


County Roscommon In Hailstones And Rain.   (Roud 10687)
Rec from "Pop's" Johnny Connors

Well, in the county Roscommon there's hailstones and rain.
I was crossing the fields on my way to the train.
I met this colleen, and says she, do you know
Ah, the shortest short cut out to old Ballymow.

Says I, Colleen oh, who led you astray.
I think I'll walk with you, I'll show you the way.
But says she, I'm afraid, because you I don't know,
You might court me between here and old Ballymow.

Says I, colleen oh, I've seldom been kissed.
Ah, for luck you poor lad, for a lot you had missed.
Dear knows you're willing, and god knows your slow,
We can practise between here and ould Ballymow.

(dowdled verse).
      
Do you think I'd walk with you, ye Mullingar rogue,
I don't like your looks or your suitable brogue.
Ah but if you say yes, to be married we'll go,
And forever live happy in old Ballymow.

Do you think I' d walk with you, you Mullingar rogue,
I don't like your looks nor your suitable brogue.
But you're young, and you're handsome, but dear knows you're slow.
But we don't want no dead men round old Ballymow.

She started to laugh till I thought she would choke,
Step out of me way, let me pass you a joke.
Step out of me way, for 'tis now I must go,
Sure, I've a husband and twenty-eight kids in old Ballymow.

This was first issued on a gramophone record sung by The McNulty Family in 1940.   According to traditional music archivist Nicholas Carolan, it was possibly written by Mrs Ann McNulty, though he says there is no firm evidence for this.
"Pop's" Johnny says he learned it from other Travellers, but admits he was aware of the McNulty Family's recording.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SOMEONE'S WAITING FOR ME BACK IN IRELAND
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 17 Jul 13 - 06:48 PM

You can hear this song at The Internet Archive; it's item #5 on the menu on that page.


SOMEONE'S WAITING FOR ME BACK IN IRELAND
As recorded by the McNulty Family on an LP: "The McNulty Family Entertains with Irish Songs" (Copley DWL 9-6044, 1957)

CHORUS: Oh, there's someone waitin' for me back in Ireland,
In Ireland, in Ireland,
With a jaunty Irish style and a roguish winning smile.
Sure divil a one I think about me darlin' all the while,
And I'll soon be sailin' home again to Ireland,
To one who's waitin', waitin' all alone.
Faith, me love is drivin' me crazy
And I know she'll never be aisy
Back in Ireland till her boy comes home.

VERSE: You can sing your songs of kisses, songs of smiles and girlies, too,
In the moonlight when your heart they go a-stealin',
But to me they're only foolin', and I don't mind tellin' you,
I've a plan that fairly sets me brain a-reelin'.
In a little spot in Ireland where the pretty shamrocks grow,
I'll have Irish smiles and kisses in an Irish bungalow.

CHORUS

INSTRUMENTAL BREAK

CHORUS


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Subject: Lyr Add: BEDELIA (Jerome/Schwartz)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 17 Jul 13 - 07:48 PM

Lyrics below are from the sheet music at Indiana University. You can also hear a recording by the McNulty Family—with lyrics only slightly different—at The Internet Archive, where it is item #6 (called "Track 16") on the menu.


NOVELTY SONG OF THE CENTURY
BEDELIA
THE IRISH COON* SONG SERENADE
Words by William Jerome; music by Jean Schwartz.
New York: Shapiro, Bernstein & Co., ©1903.

1. There's a charming Irish lady with a roguish winning way
Who has kept my heart a-bumpin' and a-jumpin' night and day.
She's a flower from Killarney with a Tipperary smile.
She's the best that ever came from Erin's isle,
And I find myself a-singing all the while.

CHORUS: Bedelia, I want to steal ye.
Bedelia, I love you so.
I'll be your Chauncey Olcott if you'll be my Molly O'.
Say something, sweet Bedelia.
Your voice I like to hear.
Oh Bedelia, elia, elia,
I've made up my mind to steal ye, steal ye, steal ye,
Bedelia dear.

2. If you love me, Bedelia, half as much as I love you,
There is nothing in this world can ever cut our love in two,
For I'll give you all my money on the day that we are wed.
I will cook for you and even bake the bread,
And I'll even bring your breakfast up to bed.


[* I don't see any justification for calling this a "coon song," but that's what it says on the cover.]


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE BOYS FROM THE COUNTY ARMAGH
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 18 Jul 13 - 02:20 PM

You can hear this song at The Internet Archive, or more directly, click for an MP3 file.


THE BOYS FROM THE COUNTY ARMAGH
As sung by the McNulty Family (but see footnotes)

1. There's one fair county in Ireland with memories so glorious and grand,
Where nature has lavished its bounty; it's the orchard of Erin's green land.
I love the cathedral and city once founded by Patrick so true,
And it bears in the heart of its bosom the ashes of Brian Boru.

CHORUS: It's my own Irish home far across the foam.
Although I've often left it in foreign lands to roam,
No matter where I wander in cities near or far,
My heart's at home in old Ireland in the county of Armagh.

2. I've traveled that part of the country through Newtown, Forkhill, Crossmaglen,*
And around by the gap of Mountnorris** and home by Blackwater again
Where the girls are so gay and so pretty, non fairer in Erin's green isle
But where are the boys who can court them like the boys from the county Armagh.


[* In the recording, it sounds like the singer is singing "from Newtown to Kilcrossmaglen." However, I can find no such place as Kilcrossmaglen, so I have substituted "through Newtown, Forkhill, Crossmaglen" which I found at several places on the internet, for example, here. (No website I found cited a source.) At least those are real places in County Armagh. I assume the McNultys, being from Canada, were not familiar with Irish place names, and having no internet for research, simply committed a mondegreen.

[** Likewise, it sounds like "MacMorris" or "MacNorris" but I can find no such place; Mountnorris, at least, exists.]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: MartinRyan
Date: 18 Jul 13 - 07:29 PM

A very well known song.
Click here for the standard version, with lyrics.

The Mc Nulty's were from Roscommon and would have gotten it right, I reckon!

Regards


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Subject: Lyr Add: DREAMING OF DORA (The McNulty Family)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 21 Jul 13 - 11:03 PM

You can hear this song at The Internet Archive, where it is item #13 on the menu—or click here for an MP3.


DREAMING OF DORA
As sung by The McNulty Family

She's dear as the shamrock of Ireland that grows in the fields o'er the sea.
Its pleasant green is always seen in the springing of the year.
Like a breath of a pure April morning from under the mist of the night,
It springs anew in the morning dew to fill Irish hearts with delight.

I am dreaming of Dora, my darling, my darling, my joy and my pride.
Where'er I go, I'll always know my darling's at my side.
Her dear Irish eyes always gleaming, her heart ever tender and true,
There's none so fair that could compare with Dora whose eyes are so blue.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 21 Jul 13 - 11:45 PM

Newtown, Forkhill, Crossmaglen.


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Subject: Lyr Add: GREEN ON THE GREEN (from McNulty Family)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 23 Jul 13 - 07:50 AM

You can hear this song at The Internet Archive; or Click for an MP3:


GREEN ON THE GREEN
As recorded by the McNulty Family

1. I am a green-on-green boy; I'm here to sing for you,
And just in case you didn't know, I'm Irish through and through.
No matter where I chance to roam, on land or sea or sky,
Beneath the orange, white and green, for Ireland I would die.

CHORUS: So I'm off to Dublin on the green, on the green, our helmets gleamin' in the sun,
And the Tans they flew like lightning to the rattle of a Thompson gun.

2. I am a jolly plough-boy; I ploughed the fields all day,
Till something came across my mind: I thought I'd run away.
I tired of civilian life on the day that I was born,
So I'm off to join the I.R.A., and I'm off tomorrow morn.

3. I'll throw away my old grey coat; I'll throw away my plough.
I'll throw away the job I love, no more to milk the cow,
No more to plough the old green fields, no more to sow the corn,
For I'm off to join the I.R.A., and I'm off tomorrow morn.

4. I have a girl I left behind; her name is Nelly dear.
I know that she'll be true to me when I am not here,
And when the war is over and Ireland is free,
I'll take her to the church at home and a rebel's wife she'll be.

[This song is also known as THE MERRY PLOUGHBOY or OFF TO DUBLIN IN THE GREEN. It is usually attributed to Dominic Behan (although the title and the lyrics vary)


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Subject: Lyr Add: IN OLD BALLYMOE / OULD BALLYMORE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 24 Jul 13 - 01:13 PM

I finally located the McNulty's recording of the song that Jim Carroll posted above. At the McNulty page of The Internet Archive, it's item #28, identified as "Track 7," and the file name indicates the song title is "In Old Ballymore." The Online 78-rpm Discography Project lists a song by the McNultys called "In Ould Ballymore." In my transcription below, I use the spelling "Ballymoe" because (1) that's what it sounds like; (2) it rhymes better; (3) it makes geographical sense: although Ballymoe is in County Galway, it is just across the River Suck from County Roscommon; and (4) I found that spelling used in several online copies of the lyrics—which were unsatisfactory for other reasons, so I chose not to post them.

Click for an MP3.


IN OULD BALLYMORE / IN OLD BALLYMOE
As recorded by the McNulty Family

In the county Roscommon in hailstones and rain,
I was crossing the fields on me way to the train.
I met a cailín and says she, "Do you know
The shortest shortcut into old Ballymoe?"

Says I, "Cailín óg, who led you astray?
I think I'll go with you and show you the way."
Says she, "I'm afraid because you I don't know.
You might kiss me between here and old Ballymoe."

Says I, "Cailín óg, I've seldom been kissed."
Says she, "You poor lad, sure a lot you have missed."
Says I, "I am willing to learn, you know.
We can practice between here and old Ballymoe."

"Do you think I'd walk with you, you Mullingar rogue?
I don't like your looks or your southern(?*) brogue.
You're young and you're handsome but dear knows you're slow,
And I don't like a dead one in old Ballymoe."

Says I, "I've been noted for strength and for looks,
And me brain's no so bad, for I've mastered the books,
So if you say 'yes,' to be married we'll go,
And forever be happy in old Ballymoe."

She started to laugh till I thought she would choke.
She says, "You poor ...(?**), I'll tell you a joke.
Step out of me way, sir, for now I must go.
I've a husband and six kids in old Ballymoe."


* * *

* If the word is truly "southern," the singer seems to pronounce it as three syllables: sou-ther-in.

** I think an Irish word belongs here. Gossoon might work, but I don't think that's what she's singing.

Tom Dahill recorded this song as OLD BALLYMOE on his album "The Blackthorn Stick."

Dessie O'Halloran recorded this song as OULD BALLYMORE on his album "The Pound Road."

Micko Russell's recording appears on 2 albums: "The Very Best of the Original Legendary Irish Folk Festivals Vol. 2" and "The 2nd Irish Folk Festival on Tour, Vol. 1." On both albums, it appears in the track list as IN THE COUNTY ROSCOMMON.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Jul 13 - 02:27 PM

JIM
You're right - it's not gosoon/garsun . I'll check and get back.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: GUEST,GuestMartinRyan
Date: 24 Jul 13 - 02:29 PM

Oops! 'Tis me, yer honour!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: GUEST,MartinRyan
Date: 24 Jul 13 - 02:43 PM

Dineen , the standard Irish/English dictionary, gives "cluasan" as "a stupid person" - which figures.I've never heard the word, I reckon.

Pronounced clue-sawn, with second syllable stressed.

Regards

P.s. an accent on the a - which I can't do on this device!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: Ron Davies
Date: 25 Jul 13 - 10:22 AM

But what about "When Rafferty Brought the Rhumba", listed above? That one sounds definitely promising.


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Subject: Lyr Add: LIKEABLE LOVABLE LEITRIM LAD (McNulty Fam
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 25 Jul 13 - 08:07 PM

Click for an MP3.


LIKEABLE LOVABLE LEITRIM LAD
As sung by The McNulty Family

Tim Malone was drafted in the middle of the night.
The sergeant said: "Come, Tim, me lad; we need you in the fight."
So Timmy laid his spade right down and started with a bang.
He …(?) as he went away his buddies stood and sang:

"Oh, he's a likeable lovable Leitrim lad and he hails from old Drumkeeran.
He's wearin' the stripes his daddy had and there's no man he'll be fearin',
For he's off to join the colours of the Fightin' Sixty-Nine,
So cheer the lovable Leitrim lad as he marches up the line."

The organ played the wedding march as Michael said, "I do."
As bridie bends her pretty head, he said, "I promise you,"
But then he shouted loudly, "Sure me number has been called,"
And as he galloped down the steps the bride stood up and bawled:

"For he's a likeable lovable soldier lad and he hails from old Roscommon.
He's wearin' the stripes his daddy had and he's off to stop the bombin',
For he's going to join the colours of the Fightin' Sixty-Nine,
So cheer the lovable soldier boy as he marches up the line."

Murphy made the winning pass for good old Notre Dame.
They were in the lead with fighting speed when the army made its claim.
His made his final point and said, "I must uphold the name,
So I switched to one(?) and the fun's begun but it's Irish just the same."

For he's a rootin' tootin' shootin' lad who's never fired a rifle.
With his hustle and his muscle, sure he'll soon become an eyeful,
And as he marches past the stands on next Saint Patrick's Day,
They'll have no fear and you'll hear them cheer as they loudly shout: "Hooray!

"Oh, he's a likeable lovable Leitrim lad and he hails from old Drumkeeran.
He's wearin' the stripes his daddy had and there's no man he'll be fearin'
For he's off to join the colours of the Fightin' Sixty-Nine,
So cheer the lovable Leitrim lad as he marches up, as he marches up, as he marches up the line."


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHEN YOU LOOK IN THE HEART OF A SHAMROCK
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 25 Jul 13 - 11:00 PM

Click for an MP3.


WHEN YOU LOOK IN THE HEART OF A SHAMROCK
As sung by The McNulty Family

If you're longing for old Ireland and Killarney's lakes so blue,
Just a little bunch of shamrock can bring heaven near to you.

When you look in the heart of a shamrock,
Soon you're dreaming of Ireland and home.
Mem'ries dwell in the heart of a shamrock,
And they're with you wherever you roam.

You can see the peaceful valleys where the gentle raindrops fall.
You've a vision of Killarney and the hills of Donegal.
When you look in the heart of a shamrock,
Sure you're dreaming of Ireland and home.

REPEAT LAST VERSE.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: akenaton
Date: 26 Jul 13 - 06:24 PM

First heard them over 50 years ago on a Parlaphone??? 78.

"The Half Door" and "The Stone outside Dan Murphy's door"

Dan Murphy would take down his fiddle,
While the daughter look't after the store.
Oh the songs that were sung,
in the days we were young,
On the stone outside Dan Murphy's door!

Never forget that wonderful sound.....Ake


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Subject: Lyr Add: MY SWEETHEART (from The McNulty Family)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 26 Jul 13 - 08:51 PM

How can this be an Irish song? No references to Irish places or Irish names, no shamrocks, no drinking or fighting, no reference to emigration or leaving a lover behind, or the troubles—well, maybe my expectations have been too much influenced by the McNultys lately.

Click for an MP3 from The Internet Archive.


MY SWEETHEART
As recorded by The McNulty Family

I'm as happy as I can be.
I've a sweetheart and she loves me.
We'll be married at easter; on our honeymoon we'll go.
We'll find a cottage with roses rare,
Darling sweetheart, so wondrous fair.
Life will be cheery
For me and my dearie.
I want ev'rybody to know.

My sweetheart has such lovely eyes(?).
My sweetheart has the sweetest smile(?).
My sweetheart has the nicest hair, with ...(?).
My sweetheart is a dainty doll,
Cute and dimpled and not too tall.
None can be sweeter,
Or lovely or neater,
The sweetheart that I call my own.

REPEAT LAST VERSE


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Subject: Lyr Add: RAMBLIN' BACK TO THE OLD FOLKS (McNulty)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 27 Jul 13 - 09:44 AM

Click for an MP3 at the Internet Archive.

The title given below is taken from the file name of the MP3 file, but I am losing faith that whoever posted these songs had any idea what the correct titles were.


RAMBLIN' BACK TO THE OLD FOLKS
As recorded by the McNulty Family

1. A young man went to see a girl; the moon was big and bright.
He asked her if she'd be his bride; he thought 'twould be all right.
Said he: "We'll both go rambling as soon as we are wed."
But her husband said: "You're on your bum; you'll go right now instead."

CHORUS: So he went rambling, rambling,
Rambling right away; didn't wait a day.
Oh, he went rambling, rambling,
Back to the old folks at home.

2. To Belmont Park just for a lark I went to see a race.
My friend McGee said Fiddle-Dee-Dee was sure to set the pace,
And Fiddle-Dee-Dee went …(?) but as the race was run,
He stopped to fiddle around a bit; I hope McGee gets hung.

CHORUS: So I went rambling....

3. Now fifty men once tried to pull a mule from off his track.
At first he gave about a foot and then he pulled them back.
Then someone did a funny thing; he must have been a fool.
He went and got a piece of straw and tried to tickle the mule.

CHORUS: So he went rambling....

4. Oh, I went out to fish for trout one bright and sunny day.
I fished and fished and wished and wished but each one got away.
I got so mad I had to have a double shot of gin,
And over the side I went with the tide but I didn't know how to swim.

CHORUS: So I went rambling....

5. I stood outside a country store; I thought I'd nearly die.
I'd take a wife or give my life to have a ham on rye.
I went inside, the boss I spied, and from the waist I bowed.
He said: "You clown, get out of town; there are no bums allowed."

CHORUS: So I went rambling....


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Subject: Lyr Add: SOMEWHERE IN IRELAND (Brennan/Ball)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 27 Jul 13 - 01:14 PM

Lyrics below from the sheet music at Indiana University.

Click for an MP3 of this song sung by the McNulty Family, from the Internet Archive.


SOMEWHERE IN IRELAND
Words by J. Keirn Brennan; music by Ernest R. Ball
New York: M. Witmark & Sons, ©1917.

1. Sure me heart is sore
Many months and more
For the love I left behind;
So I'll never sleep
Till I cross the deep
And me own {colleen/spalpeen} I find.
Sure I'll spend a week
Playing hide and seek
Over ev'ry hill and dale.
I can tell {her/his} smiles
Three thousand miles
So there's no such word as fail.

CHORUS: Somewhere in Ireland,
For the divil's own while
On the Emerald Isle,
Someone has held my heart and hand,
But understand,
I'll keep on a-jogging in a jaunting car.
Never mind; I'll find {her/him} for {she/he} can't go far,
Back there, somewhere in Ireland.

2. When I leave the ship,
Sure I'll take a trip
Out of Queenstown down to Cork.
You will see me sail
Up and down each trail,
And if I can't ride, I'll walk.
When they turn me loose,
It will be no use
For to try and change my mind,
For I can't forget
My heart is set
On the {girl/boy} I left behind.


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Subject: Lyr Add: TIPPERARY (Curley/Fulton/Helf)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 28 Jul 13 - 08:08 AM

Click for an MP3 of this song being sung by The McNulty Family. They called it TIPPERARY DAISY.

Lyrics below are from the sheet music at Indiana University.


TIPPERARY
Words by Leo Curley; music by James M. Fulton and J. Fred Helf.
New York: Helf & Hager Co. Inc., ©1907.

1. I'm in love with a slip of a tip-tip-typical Tipperary miss.
She's a regular clip with a rosy lip that you'd dearly love to kiss.
From the tip of her toes to the tip-tip-top of her nose I love her so.
I'd like to just take her and squeeze her.
I know that it wouldn't displease her,
But she lives in Tipperary many miles away from here.
If I could just meet her to see her and greet her, I'm thinkin' I'd eat her, the little dear,
But she's many miles away from here, and so I'll wait I fear,
Till I take a notion and sail o'er the ocean to Ireland.

CHORUS: Faith, it's me that's nearly crazy
From me Tipperary daisy.
All the day me heart's "unaisy."
Sure the thing I find that's on my mind
Is the darlin' girl I left behind
Far off in dear old Tipperary.

2. Now I'll give ye a tip: when I board the ship with me grip to trip away,
I'll be there with a yell when they ring the bell and I'll shout, "Hip-hip-hooray!"
Then the whistle will toot and away we'll shoot with a toot-toot down the bay.
I'll wave a bye-bye when we're sailin'
From over the top of the railin',
Then across the briny ocean to the tiny Em'rald Isle.
I'd give me last penny, if I hadn't any, begorry, or many to see her smile
As she used to when she sat ferninst me down beside the stile,
But I was a rover, bedad, and came over from Ireland.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MY CHARMING NELL MCCOY (McNulty Family)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 28 Jul 13 - 11:36 AM

Click for an MP3 from the Internet Archive.


MY CHARMING NELL MCCOY
As sung by The McNulty Family

As I strolled along the river bank one evening in the spring.
I spied a maid from Erin's isle; she joyously did sing.
She was so gay and happy, sure she filled my heart with joy,
And I vowed I'd make her love me then, my charming Nell McCoy.

I danced along beside her; sure I never saw one so fair.
Her lovely Irish eyes of blue and the perfume from her hair
Completely captivated me; I never saw one so coy,
And I fell head over heels in love right then with my charming Nell McCoy.

As we sauntered home together then, her little white hand in mine,
She promised she'd be there again by the river bank at nine.
The very next night we watched the waters gliding merrily by.
She gave me her promise she'd be my bride, my charming Nell McCoy.

The years they come and glide away like the waters to the sea,
But I love my charming Irish bride and I know that she loves me.
Our lovely blue-eyed babies make our home a lasting joy
As we live and love and dance and sing with my charming Nell McCoy.


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Subject: Lyr Add: WE'LL TAKE YOU BACK TO IRELAND (McNulty)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 28 Jul 13 - 12:38 PM

Click for an MP3 from the Internet Archive.


WE'LL TAKE YOU BACK TO IRELAND
As sung by the McNulty Family

1. I'm thirty-seven hundred miles from the land across the foam
That an Irishman, where'er he roams, will always call his home.
As céad míle fáilte, there's an open door for all,
From the silver strands in Kerry to the rocks in Donegal.
No matter where you come from, be it Yankee land or Spain,
You're welcome to the castle or the cottage just the same.
Hospitality's a watchword to country, creed, or name,
But a welcome to an Irishman when on his own domain.

2. Some glorious Independence Day, we'll sail across the foam
With a gun-bore decked with shamrock from your dear old native home.
We'll nail Old Glory to the mast in honor of your name,
And we'll salute the Statue of Liberty with the battleship Sinn Féin.
Then we'll take you back to Ireland, your father's place of birth.
We'll show you why your mother called it the grandest place on earth,
Where they shake the stranger by the hand and greet you with a smile.
Those are the kind of friends you meet when you visit Erin's isle.

3. There's not a nationality in this great USA
But'll love the land that gave them birth, though it be far away.
They talk of it, they pray for it, and they tell you it's so grand,
But the nearest place to heaven, I think, is dear old Ireland.
Then we'll take you back to Ireland, your father's place of birth.
We'll show you why your mother called it the grandest place on earth.
We'll raise a tune to Patrick Pearse who faced death with a smile
When he raised the arms white and green o'er dear old Erin's isle.

[Repeat last 4 lines.]


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Subject: Lyr Add: WINGING MY WAY BACK TO IRELAND (McNulty)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 28 Jul 13 - 06:19 PM

Click for an MP3 from the Internet Archive.


WINGING MY WAY BACK TO IRELAND
As sung by the McNulty Family

My thoughts are returning to Ireland
Where soon I'll be on my way
To bring back the fairest of colleens
To our dear old USA.

When you're winging your way to old Ireland
Fondest thoughts … come back to you,
And you wonder if all of the angels
Are making the trip with you too.

For soon you'll meet the loved ones
So dear and near to your heart,
Once again to embrace dearest Kathleen,
Your sweetheart from the start.

I now hear the chapel bells ringing
As we two stand side by side
To receive the most glorious blessing
When Kathleen becomes my bride.

For soon you'll meet the loved ones
So dear and near to your heart,
Once again to embrace dearest Kathleen,
Your sweetheart from the start.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: quokka
Date: 19 Sep 13 - 08:29 AM

Wow... haven't been on here in a long while... astounded at the amount of songs people have found! Thanks :-)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: GUEST
Date: 03 Mar 14 - 10:23 AM

This isn't the McNulty Family. It's a singer called Mary Carton, who had a band with her brother Micky. They performed in the forties and fifties in the New York area.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: McNulty Family songs
From: MartinRyan
Date: 03 Mar 14 - 11:42 AM

Sorry, GUEST - WHAT isn't the McNulty Family, please? ;>)>

Regards


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