Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Lyr Req: Jambalaya

DigiTrad:
JAMBALAYA


Related threads:
Lyr Req: Jambalaya (66)
Jambalaya, Captain Stringbean (5)
Lyr Req: Jambalaya (4) (closed)


lefthanded guitar 30 May 08 - 04:13 PM
Amos 30 May 08 - 04:32 PM
Melissa 30 May 08 - 05:18 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 May 08 - 05:56 PM
Amos 30 May 08 - 08:06 PM
Amos 30 May 08 - 08:07 PM
Dead Horse 30 May 08 - 08:07 PM
Dead Horse 30 May 08 - 08:13 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 May 08 - 09:03 PM
Big Tim 31 May 08 - 02:54 AM
Joe Offer 31 May 08 - 04:13 AM
Dead Horse 31 May 08 - 07:03 AM
Big Tim 31 May 08 - 11:11 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 31 May 08 - 01:13 PM
Amos 31 May 08 - 02:41 PM
Big Tim 31 May 08 - 02:49 PM
bankley 31 May 08 - 03:08 PM
trevek 31 May 08 - 04:11 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 31 May 08 - 04:51 PM
bankley 31 May 08 - 09:58 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 31 May 08 - 10:10 PM
Jim Dixon 02 Jun 08 - 08:39 AM
PoppaGator 02 Jun 08 - 11:24 AM
lefthanded guitar 02 Jun 08 - 04:27 PM
PoppaGator 02 Jun 08 - 05:46 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 02 Jun 08 - 06:20 PM
Dead Horse 02 Jun 08 - 06:37 PM
Dead Horse 02 Jun 08 - 08:15 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 02 Jun 08 - 08:36 PM
PoppaGator 03 Jun 08 - 03:37 PM
GUEST,TJ in San Diego 03 Jun 08 - 06:09 PM
Big Tim 04 Jun 08 - 09:50 AM
Genie 03 Aug 09 - 10:09 PM
GUEST,Jim Dixon, at the Webster, WI library 04 Aug 09 - 05:39 PM
Artful Codger 06 Jul 12 - 06:52 AM
Genie 30 Jul 13 - 01:41 PM
GUEST,Eliza 30 Jul 13 - 02:31 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 Jul 13 - 07:56 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:



Subject: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: lefthanded guitar
Date: 30 May 08 - 04:13 PM

These are the words I got off the internet for this upbeat rolicking song, which I 'm hoping to share at a few song circles and one upcoming folk festival: Do these sound like the right words? And more importantly..whatever IS a piroque and MOST importantly , can anyone explain to me how to pronounce every French word in the song-
piroque, Thibodaux, Fontaineaux...sil vous plait.

muchos gracias...leftie

Good-bye Joe, me gotta go, me oh my oh
Me gotta go pole the pirogue down the bayou
My Yvonne, the sweetest one, me oh my oh
Son of a gun, we'll have big fun on the bayou

(Chorus)
Jambalaya and a crawfish pie and file' gumbo
'Cause tonight I'm gonna see my ma cher amio
Pick guitar, fill fruit jar and be gay-o
Son of a gun, we'll have big fun on the bayou

Thibodeaux, Fontainenot, the place is buzzin'
Kinfolk come to see Yvonne by the dozen
Dress in style and go hog wild, me oh my oh
Son of a gun, we'll have big fun on the bayou

(Chorus)
Jambalaya and a crawfish pie and file' gumbo
'Cause tonight I'm gonna see my ma cher amio
Pick guitar, fill fruit jar and be gay-o
Son of a gun, we'll have big fun on the bayou

Settle down, far from town, get me a pirogue
And I'll catch all the fish in the bayou
Swap my mon to buy Yvonne what she need-o
Son of a gun, we'll have big fun on the bayou

(Chorus)
Jambalaya and a crawfish pie and file' gumbo
'Cause tonight I'm gonna see my ma cher amio
Pick guitar, fill fruit jar and be gay-o
Son of a gun, we'll have big fun on the bayou


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Amos
Date: 30 May 08 - 04:32 PM

LHG:

There are earlier threads on this fine tune, and they will probably confirm these lyrics which are also available in the Digital Tradition database if you search it.

A pirogue (pi-RO-geh or pee-RO-gay) is a shallow canoe. originally dugout.

Thibodeaux, Fontainenot are French or Cajun names. TEE-ba-doh and FON-tahn-noh.

ma chere ami-oh! is French for "my darling girl-oh" and is pronounced MA share ahmee-o.

Hope this helps.

A


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Melissa
Date: 30 May 08 - 05:18 PM

I've never heard anyone sing Pirogue with three syllables when they do this song..always 'pee ro' with the first syllable stressed.

Of course, I've also heard several versions where they sing 'tippy-toe to Fontainot' so maybe I need to get out more?

I do think Hank Williams sang 'pee ro'


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 May 08 - 05:56 PM

Pirogue is two syllables only, it is Creole French, from the Spanish piragua, Carib piraua.

The words are in the DT

Also see thread 19615: Jambolaya
Some information, but also garbage in that thread. The song is mock Cajun, although Williams had some knowledge of the bayou country of Louisiana.

Words by Hank Williams, revised from music originally for the piano, by Eugenie Ricau Rocherolle, a graduate of Tulane University, and a native of New Orleans who now lives in Connecticut.

If you know nothing of Cajun music or culture, perhaps you should not try to sing it in public.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Amos
Date: 30 May 08 - 08:06 PM

Well, sorrreeee. The Parisian would have a soft "e" syllable at the end. Maybe I was thinking of keilbasa... :D



A


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Amos
Date: 30 May 08 - 08:07 PM

...I mean Polish pastrys...pronounced "pirogi".


A


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Dead Horse
Date: 30 May 08 - 08:07 PM

The cajun version of this song, with completely different words (and all in cajun-french) is called Grand Texas.
Not sure which came first, tho I suspect the Hank Williams version is the original.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Dead Horse
Date: 30 May 08 - 08:13 PM

And Q, not understanding Cajun music or culture didnt stop this song from being a big hit with many music lovers worldwide.
I would NOT include it in the genre of Cajun music, even tho it is about cajuns.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 May 08 - 09:03 PM

No, the music is mock Cajun, not really Cajun.

Pirogue will not be found in many French Dictionaries, unless they are extended to include Creole words. The form piragua is found in French dictionaries, and is the form with the most explanation and quotes in the OED.

True, everyone likes the song, finds it amusing, but unless the singer knows something of the Cajun music it imitates, its humor is not truly expressed (of course, this is a personal opinion).
Hank Williams knew and appreciated the Cajun musicians, he was a star on "Louisiana Hayride," KWKH, Shreveport, LA. I remember the Hayride on the old clear channel station from my childhood, it came in loud and clear in New Mexico.

I am not completely certain that Williams wrote the words, but his version was a hit, and he is credited by a number of other singers with the lyrics.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Big Tim
Date: 31 May 08 - 02:54 AM

According to HW's biographer Colin Escott, 'Hank cowrote the song with Moon Mullican'. 'The melody of Jambalaya came from Chuck Guillory's 1946 recording of Gran' Texas'.

Piroge is defined in Websters English Dictionary.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Joe Offer
Date: 31 May 08 - 04:13 AM

I think this song has entered into the American Canon, and I don't think any particular expertise in Cajun music or pronunciation is needed to sing it. This is one of those songs that everybody knows at least part of it, so it's fun to sing it with a group or with an audience.
Recipes, by the way, are in this thread (click). I shouldn't be writing about this when I'm hungry. Jambalaya and beer sounds really good right now.
-Joe-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Dead Horse
Date: 31 May 08 - 07:03 AM

Its a really complicated business, making a Jambalaya.
You has ta t'row 'tings in a pot, an cook 'em up wid rice.
Da best bit, apart from da ackshall eatin of it, is drinkin da beer as it cooks inbetween addin stuff.
An dats my receep for makin Jambalaya.
Ingreedience is opshunul, sa long as dare is rice, hun.
(An' of course da holy trinity + cajun seasonin)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Big Tim
Date: 31 May 08 - 11:11 AM

Again according to Colin Escott, the reason Moon Mullican, an east Texas singer, is never officially credited with co-authorship is that he was under contract to another publishing company and wasn't allowed to publish with HW's company. He was surreptitiously slipped 50% of the royalties.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 May 08 - 01:13 PM

Interesting, Big Tim. Moon Mullican composed many songs, and was one hell of a boogie pianist (Moonshine Blues, etc.). His take on Goodnight Irene is different, to say the least.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Amos
Date: 31 May 08 - 02:41 PM

Actually, although I always enjoyed this song, the first time I actually performed it was when I was invited up to join a Cajun band in a big barn dance shtick just outside of N'Orleans.   They asked if anyone int he audience could play bass, and hauled me up to spell the bass player. It was just a gimmick to make the tourists feel warm and fuzy, but my, I loved those folks, especially the loverly waitresses.


A


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Big Tim
Date: 31 May 08 - 02:49 PM

Moon was apparently one of Hank's favourite singers/musicians. He was born in 1909 and died in '67. Williams' biographers, including Escott, don't seem to be able to figure out who contributed what to the song (words, music, Cajun speak, etc). It seems that Hank was very fond of the (real or imagined) laid back Cajun lifestyle and may have contributed more of the Cajun content than previously thought. The song was released in 1952, by which time Hank was in very poor health, though abuse of alcohol and, possibly more seriously, chemicals (to alleviate the pain of his bad back). In the circumstances, I think it says a lot for Hank's ability that he could come up with such a great song in such circumstances.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: bankley
Date: 31 May 08 - 03:08 PM

D.L. Menard, who wrote many songs including 'La Porte en Arriere' has a big picture of Hank hanging on his living room wall down in Acadiana Parish... I had the pleasure of spending a few hours at DL's place just after he rec'd a Grammy nomination for an album. Jerry Douglas and Ricky Scaggs helped him with that one...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: trevek
Date: 31 May 08 - 04:11 PM

I don't know whether the question of it being 'real' Cajun is that valid from the point of view of performing it. Fats Domino, a French-speaking native of New Orelans sang the Williams version and a few years ago, on a Keith Floyd programme about Cajun cooking, the Cajuns had no problem with singing it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 May 08 - 04:51 PM

"La Porte d'en arrière" is based on the Hank Williams tune, "Honky Tonk Blues." Menard commented, "...I changed the tune some and made up words in French." (Quote in Ancelet, "The Makers of Cajun Music- Musiciens cadiens et créoles")

Re trevek comment, I was speaking of performers unfamiliar with the culture; Both Domino and Hank Williams knew it very well.
But Joe does have a point, I have heard western Canadian farm kids and even a Hutterite girl singing it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: bankley
Date: 31 May 08 - 09:58 PM

'moi et ma belle on ava z-etay au balle
on a passay par tou les honky tonks
s'en a revenu le lendemain matin
le jour etay apres-casser
j'ai passer par la porte d'en arriere

me and my gal went to the ball
we stopped by all the honky tonks
the next morning when day was breaking
I came in by the back door..

that was the 1st verse as I remember it...

the 'cadiens told me that this was the 2nd most popular cajun song after Joli Blon


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 May 08 - 10:10 PM

Full lyrics and comments on "La porte... in thread 39689: Back door


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 08:39 AM

I think "Fontainenot" should be spelled "Fontenot".

Google gives 104 hits on "Fontainenot" and most (if not all) of them are quotes from the lyrics of JAMBALAYA (and probably errors).

Likewise, 3 hits on "Fontainot"?

And 1,110,000 hits on "Fontenot." There are numerous places and people named Fontenot.

Not that it makes much difference when you're singing.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: PoppaGator
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 11:24 AM

As Mudcat's resident Louisianan, I thought I wold have to make a contribution, but it looks to me like all the right answers have already been given!

I think of "Jambalaya" as an American country song, or more precisely as a Hank Williams song ~ definitely not as "Cajun music," and not even part of any indigenous Louisiana culture. (Not that there's anything wrong with that!) I would think that anyone who learns the song by hearing it is entirely entitled to sing it.

It's OK to have learned it by a combination of oral/aural tranasmission and reference to printed lyrics and sheet music, too, of course ~ but if a peron knows the song only from printed sources, and has no other hint of how to pronounce the words except for whatever phonetic spelling another web correspondent can provide, that's really not good enough. I would strongly suggest listening to Hank, or Fats, or any other "standard" recording.

You certainly don't have to be Cajun, or an expert on Cajun culture, to sing this soing that merely refers to Cajun culture. But you really should have first-hand knowledge of how the words sound.

PS: Jamabalaya is made with regular old white rice, not "wild rice," which is an entirely different plant. It's the cayenne pepper and andouille sausage that make the dish "wild."

per Wikipedia: "Andouille is a spiced, heavily smoked pork sausage, distinguished in some varieties by its use of the entire gastrointestinal system of the pig: for example, traditional French andouillette is composed primarily of the intestines and stomach. Though somewhat similar, it is not to be confused with Andouillette."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: lefthanded guitar
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 04:27 PM

Thanks all. I agree with Joe that most everyone loves to sing along with this song, and I will now be comfortable singing it with the knowledge of what it means, and the correct pronounciation.

Of course I DID already know what the foods were: and I now leave with thanks for the info, and the recipes, and the awareness that I am now very, very hungry.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: PoppaGator
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 05:46 PM

One additional note, on "file gumbo":

Gumbo is a sort of thick soup (or thin stew) containing either assorted seafood ("Creole gumbo") or a combination of poultry, sausage and/or seafood, customarily served over white rice.

The word "gumbo" comes from the West African "gombo," the name for the vegetable we know as okra. A generous portion of okra is the original "thickening agent" in gumbo.

File (with an accent over the "e" that I don't know how to type, and pronounced "FEE-lay") is a powder made of sassafras bark that can serve as an alternate thickening agent for gumbo instead of okra. "File Gumbo" is gumbo made with file instead of okra.

Loose file is often provided at the table so that you can spoon some into your own gumbo, thickening to whatever consistency you like. Obviously, gumbo made with okra could be further thickened by the addition of file; some purists would undoubtedly object, some folks would say go for it. I'm not sure whether any restaurants serving okra gumba ever provide file for sprinkling ~ it might be considered "contamination." Of course, people can do whatever they want at home, and Cajuns (like all Louisianans) have been known to defy convention.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 06:20 PM

Fontenot is correct. It is a wide spot on 165, about 20 miles NE of Lake Charles.

Wild rice is exotic to Louisiana; it would not be used in Jambalaya or any Louisiana cooking except by one of the fusion cooks.

CAJUN JAMBALAYA
Emeril Lagasse (his TV show on Jambalaya)

12 medium shrimp, peeled, deveined and chopped
4 ounces chicken, diced
1 tablespoon Creole seasoning (recipe below)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/4 cup chopped onion
1/2 chopped green bell pepper
1/4 cup chopped celery
2 tablespoons chopped garlic
1/2 cup chopped tomatoes
3 bay leaves
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon hot sauce
3/4 cup rice
3 cups chicken stock
5 ounces Andouile sausage, sliced
Salt and pepper.

Creole Seasoning
(sold, ready-to-use, as Emeril's Essence Creole Seasoning)
2 1/2 tablespoons paprika
2 tablespoons salt
2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 tablespoon black pepper (white, if black causes upset)
1 tablespoon onion powder
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 tablespoon dried thyme

In a bowl, combine shrimp, chicken and Creole seasoning and work in seasoning well. In a large saucepan heat oil over high heat with onion, bell pepper and celery, 3 minutes. Add garlic, tomatoes, bay leaves, Worcestershire sauce and hot sauces. Stir in rice and slowly add broth. Reduce heat to medium and cook until rice absorbs liquid and becomes tender, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes. When rice is just tender add shrimp and chicken mixture and sausage. Cook until meat is done, about 10 minutes more. Season to taste with salt, pepper, and Creole seasoning.
Prep. time, 15 minutes; Cooking time, about 35 minutes.
This only serves four, so better double the recipe.

We used to make jambalaya close to this, but we used Uncle Ben's brown rice (takes a little more time). Haven't made it since we left the south. We used a good smoked sausage, not the Andouille, which we couldn't get. Since we had all of the spices on the shelf or fridge, we never used a made-up seasoning like that sold by Emeril. Also, why use garlic powder, etc. when fresh garlic and thyme is readily available? (Except most of the garlic in the stores nowadays is very weak). If canned stock is used, the salt content may be sufficient if salt is left out of the seasoning.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Dead Horse
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 06:37 PM

I cant get andouille so not being cajun I stick in a pepperami or two.
Not fond of sea food either, so I just use chicken and bacon (smoked for preference) and just about anything else I can get hold of or whatever is left in fridge or larder.
I often make a veggie concoction for visitors of that persuasion, and bung lots of nuts & fruits (cranberries, raisins, diced dried apricots etc.)
Goes down a treat, but dare not call it Jambalaya.
(But merely hint at it to uninformed locals in UK) ;-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Dead Horse
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 08:15 PM

Hanks version
+ a wee bit lagniappe of Betty Boop.
Enjoy.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 08:36 PM

Jambalaya depends in part on what is on hand. A lot of people use ham or bacon, seafood is not necessary, and I remember one made with red beans instead of rice.
I have seen a recipe for one made with duck.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: PoppaGator
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 03:37 PM

In "real" old-time Cajun culture, the protein-type ingredients in jambalaya and gumbo would vary seasonally: shrimp right around this time of year, crawfish in the spring, oysters in months with (or without?) an "R" in their names, poultry and smoked meat products (sausage) year 'round, but especially after the harvest and through the winter.

I've heard that the best substitute for andouille in places where it's unavailable is Polish sausage ~ kielbasa.

Duck is a fairly common Cajun-food ingredient; rabbit, too. Those are a couple of "wild game" meats that you'll occasionally find in restaurants. If you want squirrel or nutria in your jamabalaya, however, you'll have to find your way into someone's home kitchen.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: GUEST,TJ in San Diego
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 06:09 PM

My Dad was raised on the gulf coast, in Beaumont, Texas. He had relatives, including some of the Cajun persuasion, in Port Arthur, Sabine Pass and parts east. I remember having Jambalaya or shrimp Creole for "dinner" in the late 1940's and '50's. Dinner was the large traditional mid-day meal, as opposed to our lunch. My grandfather would come home for a two-hour dinner break, then go back to his hardware store. Supper was the evening meal and was much lighter - often soup or salad or leftovers. When you think about it, it makes more sense than eating a big meal just before going to bed.

Okra was a staple, along with rice and shrimp, which were plentiful then. A little "side meat" was common, along with black-eyed peas, butter beans (baby limas)and some type of greens. The greens could be turnip, mustard or collard.

By the way, Jo Stafford was among the popular vocalists of the timed who recorded "Jambalaya." Her version was widely played on the radio.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Big Tim
Date: 04 Jun 08 - 09:50 AM

I'm too young (!) to remember Jo Stafford's version. But according to Colin Escott 'Jambalaya went all the way to number two [in the national pop charts]. Stafford didn't make the [Cajun] connection at all; it was sung incongruously to a mambo rhythm . They were that clueless'.

I hope Moon Mullican got his 50% of the royalties from that one!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Genie
Date: 03 Aug 09 - 10:09 PM

Minor pedant note:
In French, a girlfriend/lover would be an "amie," not "ami."   Is there a reason for spelling it "ma cheri-oh" in this thread and in the DT instead of "ma cherie-oh?"

Also, I believe the DT has "file gumbo" spelled "filet" gumbo, and I believe the latter is correct for this dish.

Now, I've just been corrected on a misunderstanding I've had for years about the spelling of Fontenot. I learned the song by hearing it first, and I thought it was "Fontaineau." Wrong.

Glad to learn the more complete info about the authorship of this song.   Thanks, Big Tim.

Genie


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: GUEST,Jim Dixon, at the Webster, WI library
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 05:39 PM

I believe the correct spelling is filé, with an accent aigu over the e.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Artful Codger
Date: 06 Jul 12 - 06:52 AM

FWIW, in a recording of Hank on YouTube, I hear him clearly sing "The Thibodeaux, the Fontenots..." at the start of the first verse (i.e. with "the", and pluralizing as in English, with a "z" sound)--obviously family names are meant. It's curious to me that no one seems to follow how Hank himself sang this; not "Cajun" enough?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr correction: Jambalaya
From: Genie
Date: 30 Jul 13 - 01:41 PM

Hank also clearly sings "ma chaz ami," not "ma chèr ami(e)."

Some say it's the Cajun French way of saying "my dear friends" (mes chèrs amis).

And that makes sense, since he's singing about the ThibodeauX and the FontenotS (plural).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 30 Jul 13 - 02:31 PM

Regarding 'pirogue', any francophone West African would use this word a lot. Senegalese fishermen always use large pirogues on the Atlantic seaboard. Sung French tends to accent the final 'e' of a word, so pee-rog-uh would be the pronunciation if sung, but pee-rog if said. I've been in two or three pirogues, they're not dug-outs, but modern style wooden clinker-built boats nowadays, brightly painted and with outboard engines. Several poor Senegalese souls have been drowned in their pirogues trying to illegally enter Europe via the coast of Spain. Strangely, very few of them can actually swim.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jambalaya
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Jul 13 - 07:56 PM

Pirogues are used in the swamps and waterways of Louisiana. They are important to muskrat harvesting. More than one size is used, depending on the waterways and the size of the load that they must carry.
Here are plans for a small, simple one, not the type used for muskrat harvesting. I was in school with the son of a Cajun family who harvested muskrat. It was a profitable enterprise at the time, but I don't know the status of the muskrat fur business now.

Nutria are also harvested.

http://thecajunsecret.com/faq.html


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 22 February 8:00 PM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.